Degree Requirements

MA European and Russian AFFAIRS  (ERA)

MA ERA is a multidisciplinary program with two main objectives:

  • to provide a well-rounded competence in European, Russian, and Eurasian affairs to individuals who will pursue professional, non-academic careers in areas such as government and diplomacy, journalism, business, and teaching;
  • to enrich and broaden the base of knowledge of beginning graduate students considering eventual PhD-level study in an academic discipline with a specialization in Europe, Russia, and/or Eurasia.

Students in the program are required to complete a minimum of two years of full-time study, during which they will take six full credits (a full-year course equals one credit; a half-year course equals one-half credit). Of the six credits at least two must be taken in a discipline selected by students as their major discipline, one must be ERE 2001H taken in the first semester of the program, and one must be ERE 2000Y which begins in the second semester of the first year and continues into the second year of the program. As part of ERE 2000Y, each student must write a Master’s essay (Major Research Paper or MRP) of approximately 30-40 pages, based on original research. The remaining courses must be drawn from at least two disciplines other than the major discipline. There is no European and Russian (ERE) major as such; the courses listed under ERE (other than 2001 and 2000) count toward program requirements in the disciplines such as history and political science. Some of the work in the program is based on the study of original texts and presupposes a reading knowledge of one or more languages of the region. For the language requirement, please refer to Foreign Language Requirement.

All ERA MA students are required to spend a period of time (either the summer between the first and second years or the fall semester of the second year) in the region. This can take the form of approved language study, an approved internship, or a formal exchange with a partner university. Students are required to spend a minimum of three semesters in residence.

Combined MA (ERA) / JD Program

In 1998, the Faculty of Law and CERES inaugurated a new program of study which allows students to prepare for a legal career with special expertise in Eastern Europe and Russia, and to complete the three-year JD and the two-year CERES MA in four years instead of five years needed to complete the two programs separately. Candidates must apply to and be accepted separately by CERES and the Faculty of Law. Students who have completed a year at CERES or the first year of the JD degree are eligible for admission with advanced standing.

Year 1 of the MA ERA/JD is the mandatory first-year program of the JD. In the following years, students must meet the following requirements:

  • ten half courses in ERA (as outlined above);
  • 45 credit hours (approximately fourteen to fifteen half courses) in law;
  • two half courses where the student chooses;
  • language requirement before the beginning of the final year.

Collaborative Graduate SPECIALIZATION in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies

As of the academic year 2003/04, CERES is a member of the Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies. Students in the specialization must apply to and register with CERES and must follow a program of studies acceptable to both CERES and the Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Specialization. Upon successful completion of the requirements, students receive the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies” on their transcripts, in addition to the MA in Russian and East European Studies.

Program requirements:

  • two half-courses in ethnicity from two different disciplines;
  • the half-year coordinating seminar in ethnicity (JTH 3000H: Ethnic Relations Theory, Research, and Policy);
  • it is understood that the MRP required by CERES will be in an area of ethnic studies.
  • For more information please visit http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ethnicstudies/graduate-program/ 

Collaborative SPECIALIZATION in Jewish Studies

The Centre for Jewish Studies offers collaborative graduate degrees at the MA and PhD levels. The purpose of the collaborative degree is to institutionalize, enhance, and ensure the provision of a well-rounded training in Jewish Studies. Both in the MA and PhD collaborative specializations, an effective balance is struck between the need for disciplinary depth and the need for interdisciplinary breadth. Upon successful completion, students receive, in addition to the degree in their home department, the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Jewish Studies.”
For more information please visit http://cjs.utoronto.ca/graduate/graduate-admission

Foreign Language Requirement and Testing

Reading competence in one of the region’s languages must be demonstrated by no later than the beginning of the second year of the program. Students are urged to take the proficiency test immediately on arrival. They should contact the Graduate Coordinators in the following departments to obtain language proficiency test schedules:

  • Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures: Julia Mikhailova julia.mikhailova@utoronto.ca
  • German Department: Professor Markus Stock at markus.stock@utoronto.ca
  • Italian Department: italian.grad@utoronto.ca
  • Spanish and Portuguese Department: Professor Nestor Rodriguez at spanish.graduate@utoronto.ca
  • French Department:
    The Department of French no longer offers the French reading exam. MA students interested in taking French in the French Department should plan ahead and register in the language courses offered and available to all University of Toronto students by following the procedures in place. The decision concerning the level of proficiency students need to attain in order to fulfill their language requirement rests with their home department.
  • All other European/Eurasian languages: Please see the Graduate Coordinator for information on proficiency testing.

Tuition Fees and Registration

Registration

For complete information on registration, please visit the SGS webpage on registration and enrolment.

Tuition Fees

Please consult your application package, the School of Graduate Studies webpage on graduate fees, and the SGS Calendar carefully. While CERES and SGS endeavour to assist students financially, it is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all applicable course fees and incidental fees are paid on time.

The fee schedule for 2017-2018 may be found on the website of the School of Graduate Studies: http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/currentstudents/Pages/Graduate-Fees.aspx.

EnrolLment

Your program of courses consists of courses offered directly by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (ERE courses) and courses offered through the affiliated Departments.  You will be automatically enrolled in the two required core courses (ERE2001H and ERE2000Y).  You can register yourself in any other ERE courses two weeks before classes begin. See Course Descriptions for ERE courses offered in 2017-2018. Students should consult with the Graduate Program Advisor, Katia Malyuzhinets, before enrolling in courses.  Katia’s office is located in Room 127N at the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place.  To make an appointment with her you can call 416-946-8962 or request an appointment by email:  katia.malyuzhinets@utoronto.ca.

All non-ERE courses, with a few exceptions, are NOT available for registration before September 11, 2017.  To register for a non-ERE course, students must complete the ADD/DROP form and obtain the necessary signatures.  Please note that in some courses spaces have been reserved for CERES MA students. In other courses affiliated Departments normally wait until their own students have enrolled before enrolling ERA students.

NOTE: Students must be aware that although they may have requested, and been admitted to, classes offered in other departments, they will automatically be DROPPED from the course unless the ADD/DROP form has been properly completed, signed, and submitted.

Students may make changes to their course selection until late September. All changes must be approved by the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Course selection should be made in consideration of the student’s chosen major and minor fields. Two kinds of exceptions will be considered upon petition by the student:

  • A student may be permitted to take one course or the equivalent which is in his/her major discipline but not in the European, Russian, or Eurasian area. For example, a course on international relations or economic planning may be permitted. This course will be in addition to the two ‘major’ courses, or the equivalent, which deal with Europe, Russia, or Eurasia. This option may be of particular appeal to students intending to go on to PhD study in the given discipline.
  • Students may be allowed to take one course or the equivalent in the form of an approved undergraduate course at the advanced level, i.e., with a 300 or 400 Faculty of Arts and Sciences number. This option is reserved for students requiring basic preparation in their chosen subject.

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure there are no time conflicts between courses and consult all relevant departments directly before finalizing her/his study program.

Course Descriptions

Students in the Master of Arts program in European and Russian Affairs may, in addition to their required courses (ERE2001H and ERE2000Y), select from a wide array of courses offered through other departments at the University of Toronto.  Please see the section below, Departmental Course Offerings.

Students are advised to consult departmental listings to confirm course offerings. ADD/DROP forms are required for non-ERE courses. *An asterisk indicates courses outside CERES for which places have been reserved for CERES students—these do NOT require the ADD/DROP form, but are available on a first-come, first-served basis. For courses with a dual undergraduate/graduate code, you must enroll using the graduate code.

All course selections must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator or Graduate Program Advisor.

Courses with a “Y” suffix are full-year, full-credit courses, which run from September to April. Half-year and half-credit courses with an “F” suffix are taught in the fall term (September to December), those with an “S” suffix in spring (January to April).

For courses with a dual undergraduate/graduate code, you must enroll using the graduate code.  Failure to do so will result in loss of credit for the course.

FALL SEMESTER COURSES BEGIN THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2017.

WINTER/SPRING COURSES BEGIN THE WEEK OF JANUARY 8, 2018.

 

Courses offered through CERES

ERE1162H1S   Law and Society in Post-Communist Eurasia

Law and society research (also known as sociolegal studies) is an interdisciplinary field of scholarly inquiry involving the empirical examination of legal phenomena using social science methodologies.  Drawing on sociolegal theories and case studies from a range of countries, this course will explore selected law and society issues in post-communist Eurasia since 1989.  Topics to be considered include the evolution of street crime and organized crime; informality and corruption; judicial institutions; law enforcement, criminal justice and punishment; civil liberties; and the regulation of gender equality and family relations.

Monday 6 – 8 pm
Location: Room TBD
Instructor: Light
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1165H1(Summer or Fall) International Internship

ERE1186H1F The Past as Prologue: East Central and Southeastern Europe in the Interwar Period

Coming to grips with the multivalent instrumentalization of the “Past” is a major historical problem for the study of the successor states of the Habsburg and Ottoman Empires. The emergence of these states began for some in the nineteenth century, but was completed only with the disruption of the First World War. The turbulent decades that ended with the Second World War present a condensed moment of aspiration that welded nation-building projects to social experimentation, political innovation, economic realignment, and cultural transformations. Unpacking the meaning of this moment of experimentation therefore has resonance not only for the understanding of this period, but also informs long term historical representations of these states and societies into the present.

While this course is not a conventional survey, it will offer thematic explorations of aspects of Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Romania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and other countries that will situate their development in a broader narrative. These thematic explorations will, in turn, open possibilities for analytical and historiographic analyses that will familiarize students with notions of legacies, empires, theories of nationalism, social transformation, revolution and rupture, continuity and tradition, cultural symbolism. Finally, the course will explore the formative but also entangled relationship of these regions with Europe, and will suggest an augmentation of the standard practice of Area Studies with a subaltern move to “provincialize Europe” from within.

Monday 12-2
Location: Room 14352 (Scheybal Seminar Room), Robarts Library, 14th floor
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

ERE1195H1S      Political Violence and Civil Strife: Ukraine as a Comparative Case Study

This seminar provides a comprehensive overview of the main forms of political violence and civil strife, covering their causes, consequences, and legacies. It is a comparative politics course rooted in broad political science literature and uses Ukraine as a primary case study. Given Ukraine’s experience of political violence (ex. ethnic cleansing, state repression, civil wars, foreign invasion, genocide, mass protests), it is an ideal case for the study of violence. The course will be organized chronologically, beginning with World War I and the Russian Civil War, ending with the current situation in Eastern Ukraine. Throughout the course, the Ukraine case study will be contextualized within the broader universe of other political violence cases within and beyond Eastern Europe. Overall, the course will appeal to students interested in the comparative study of political violence and civil strife; the historiography of political violence in modern Ukraine; and more generally, the study of comparative politics.

Thursday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Fedorowycz
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1997H1Y Independent Reading Course 

ERE1198H1S Independent Reading Course

ERE1998H1S  Independent Reading Course

ERE1999H(F) Independent Reading Course

ERE2000Y1  (Required course, begins January of the first year) Core Interdisciplinary Research Seminar

Thursday 3 – 5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: CERES-affiliated faculty
Term: starts in the Spring semester, continues into second year
Credit: 1.0

ERE2001H1F  (Required course for first year) Gateway Proseminar in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday 10 am – 12 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Beltran
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 

COURSES OFFERED JOINTLY WITH CERES (limited spaces reserved for CERES STUDENts – NO aDD/dROP FORM REQUIRED)

COURSE ENROLLMENT OPEN SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

 

JRA2321H1S Topics in Comparative Politics V: The Populist/Radical/Extreme Right in Western Europe

Over the last 30 years or so, parties of the “New”, “Radical”, “Extreme”, “Populist” or “Anti-Immigration” Right have become a permanent feature of political life in most West European countries. At the same time, support for these (slightly dubious) parties is highly volatile and conditional on circumstances beyond the control of party leaders. This seminar starts with an overview of theories of contemporary right-wing extremist success. Next, we will analyse the political developments and the recent situation in several West European countries. Finally, we will look at various attempts to model right-wing extremist support in comparative perspective.

Monday  10 am – 12 pm
Location: SS2114
Instructor: Arzheimer
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JRA2337H1F Government, Law, and Politics in Russia

Law in the governance of Russia, in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, including constitutional development, courts, business disputes, crime and criminal justice, corruption, cultural obstacles to legal order, and legal transition in comparative perspective. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies)

Wednesday 12 noon-2 pm
Location: UC255
Instructor: P. Solomon
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

JRA2391H1S Topics in Comparative Politics VI: The Politics of Immigration in Europe and North America

Immigration and citizenship raise fundamental normative and empirical concerns. In the former, there are questions about how open or closed the liberal democratic state’s borders should be; about whether the state has any defensible right to control immigration at all; about who should be entitled to national citizenship and under what circumstances; and about liberal democracy’s obligations to those seeking asylum. In the latter, immigration and citizenship have been at the centre of North American and European politics for three decades. The course will examine immigration, citizenship and asylum policy in Europe and North America. It will focus on the different strands of migration (economic, family, humanitarian), how the main receiving countries use public policy to address them. Finally, it will discuss the cause of and potential solutions to the global refugee crisis. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies)

Wednesday 12-2 pm
Location: LA 213
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS (Add/drop forms required)

IMPORTANT: ALWAYS CHECK WITH THE OFFERING DEPARTMENT FOR UPDATED TIMES/LOCATIONS/ETC.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

A number of courses offered at the graduate level in Anthropology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings in Anthropology, please view the department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

 

 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

A number of courses offered at the Centre for Comparative Literature may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Centre for Comparative Literature, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

COL5012H F How Aesthetics Was Made A Science: Reading in Czech and Russian

Contemporary literary science owes much to the ideas of Russian formalists and Prague Linguistic Circle. To trace the imprint of Russian Formalism and Czech Structuralism on current scholarship this course will examine general aesthetic concepts of both schools such as aesthetic communication, functions of language, poetic devices, application of Saussure’s linguistic theory to literature, questions of literary history as well as selected topics of semiotics of drama and theater. We will discuss the theoretical treatment of poetry, prose, drama and cinema as presented by the most important scholars such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Roman Jakobson, Yuri Tynianov, Boris Eikhenbaum, Osip Brik, Vladimir Propp, Viktor Shklovsky, Petr Bogatyrev, and Jan Mukarovský.

When appropriate, text analysis of primary texts will assist in the investigation of theoretical writings. The scope of the primary texts ranges from avant-garde poetry (Xlebnikov, Mayakovsky) to fairy-tales, plays (Karel Capek, Ostrovski), novels (Sterne, Dostoevsky), films (Eisenstein, Kuleshov, Chaplin) and short stories (Doyle, Gogol, Hardy).

Tuesday 2 – 4 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Ambros
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

COL5072H S Affinities: Readings of Realism and Radicalism

This course will examine theories and representations of affinity in order to ask questions about community, collectivity, love, family, friendship, intimacy, belonging, responsibility, and social change. Forms of mediation always shape how we relate to one another, imagine ourselves as parts of groups, and constitute communities, and thus the course will investigate the different ways in which we experience the proximity of bodies, sentiments, and ideas, so as to ask questions about what it means to live politically with others. How does the community that we create in the classroom function as a template for investigating the processes and outcomes of relationality and affective associations? In the first half of the course, different forms of collectivity, whether practiced or imagined or theorized, will be investigated. The second half will analyze contemporary problematics that force us to reconsider traditional forms of affinity. What is a “normal” relationship or range of affective connections? To what extent are our intimacies segmented, remote-controlled, and apportioned, and can we redefine these distributions without lapsing into a nostalgic primitivism? What are the politics of shaping oneself in relation to others, and what does this imply for social change? Possible authors that we will read include Ursula LeGuin, Amitav Ghosh, Lauren Berlant, Mary Gaitskill, Nick Flynn, and Jodi Dean. Possible topics/treatments include Joan of Arc and Jim Jones.

Monday 1 – 3 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Jagoe
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

COL5101H F Diasporic Cities: Itinerant Narratives of Metropoles by Travellers and Expatriates

This course will look at six metropoles (Berlin, London, Paris, New York, St. Petersburg, Shanghai) from the perspectives of Japanese visitors such as Mori, Natsume, Nagai, Yokomitsu, Tanizaki, Gotô, Tawada, and Horie, and from those of natives and immigrants (e.g., Benjamin, Döblin, Nabokov, Woolf, Conrad, Rilke, Pushkin, Gogol, Shi). Those writers’ accounts of cities in the span of time between the late nineteenth century and late twentieth century are inflected by the itineraries of their movement before and after their experience of the cities and by their peripatetic as well as optical experience of urban spaces of varied historical, social, material and geopolitical conditions. They reveal cities not as cartographical spots but as sites in the traffic of bodies and sensations. The readings (all assigned are available in English, with additional materials to be introduced by the instructor) shall be arranged in such a way that participants can compare each city’s literary mediations by variably invested observers. Accompanying theoretical, critical and photographic texts (e.g., Apter, Atget, Benjamin, Brandt, Brassaï, Burgin, de Certeau, Doisneau, Gleber, Maeda, Ronis, Walker) shall define a conceptual framework for each session.

Thursday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: TBA
Instructor: Sakaki
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

COL5125H F Literature, Trauma, Modernity

In this course, we will examine literary representations of trauma from the early nineteenth century (the Industrial Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars) to the aftermath of World War One, when “shell shock” brought trauma irrevocably into the public eye. We will begin by examining the discourse of unrepresentability and doubt in nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century medical literature: if we can find no somatic source for trauma, how do we know that it exists? We will then investigate how the literature of this period—“modernism”—reacted to this discourse. Rarely focussing explicitly on traumatic events, this literature only hints at traumatic occurrences—foregrounding instead the problem of representability at the heart of the modern age. Just as the traumatized body no longer points back to a physical pathology, so too does language itself seem to be severed from the object it aims to describe, as evidenced by characters unable to give voice to the suffering at the core of their industrialized, belligerent era.

Monday 3 – 5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Zilcosky
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

SPA2304H F Latin American Cinema

This course will investigate the principal films and directors of Argentina, Mexico, and Cuba. In each case the representation of national history and identity together with the relation between cinematic production and economic and social conditions will be examined. Latin American cinema has responded to revolution, military dictatorship, the restoration of democracy, the effects of economic change on rural and urban demographics, and the marginalization of minority populations. We will also consider how a recent focus on themes of gender, identity, race, and community have contributed to an increase in the transnational and cosmopolitan reception of Latin American film.

* Please note that the course would require European content for a student to secure credit, comparative studies of European and Latin American films would need to be approved by Professor Jagoe.

Monday 3 – 5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Jagoe
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5


CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIOLEGAL STUDIES

A number of courses offered at the graduate level by the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

CRI3130H Policing

This course differs somewhat from traditional graduate-level courses on policing in that its focus will be on the role of the police as part of the broader complex of institutions that together make up the state. As part of this approach, we will explore policing in a comparative and historical context. Issues to be covered include the following: the maintenance of law and order before police forces; development of police forces in continental Europe and the English-speaking world; structure and function of national police forces around the world today; the role of political and secret police forces; and contemporary debates on the mission and regulation of the police in contemporary North America including issues such as police-community relations, changing police methods, private policing, and counter-terrorism.

Location: TBA
Instructor: Light
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5


GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

A number of courses offered at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

GER1480H S Goethe’s Faust
We will engage in a careful reading of Goethe’s major work – what he called “Das Hauptgeschäft – the monumental drama “Faust.” Faust is arguably one of the most important myths of modernity. It occupied the poet for 60 years, and is one of the most complex pieces of theatre ever written, incorporating elements of classical drama, opera, even visions of mediality bordering on the cinematic. Through the lens of this work, students will gain familiarity with the emerging trends of German modernity in the turbulent years between 1770 and 1832.

Wednesday 3 – 5 pm
Location: OH 323
Instructor: Noyes
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GER1550H S Origins: Myths of Beginning in German Literature and Thought
In this course, we will examine myths of origin in German literature and thought with a specific focus on the eighteenth and nineteenth century. The course is organized in three units: narratives about the origin of the individual (childhood and the novel of formation), narratives about the origin of man (monogenesis versus polygenesis, anthropology and race), and narratives about the origin of societies and groups (family, state, contract theory). We will read texts by Karl Philipp Moritz, Joachim Heinrich Campe, Johann Wolfgang Goethe, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Schlegel and Sigmund Freud.

Thursday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: OH  223
Instructor: Lehleiter
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GER1775H S Topics in German Film History: Women’s Film Authorship in Neoliberal Times

Maren Ade’s recently acclaimed Toni Erdmann (2016) has brought renewed attention to women’s film authorship in Germany and a growing cadre of women directors making films that are engaging, intelligent, and deeply thought-provoking without being didactic. Their work accords with counter cinematic practices sometimes loosely identified under the ‘Berlin School’ moniker, which have emerged in response to the changing social and economic landscape following unification. Rejecting the mode of production and ideology underlying German blockbusters such as Downfall or The Lives of Others, some filmmakers have instead embraced realist aesthetics to explore everyday life worlds and subjectivities against the backdrop of eroded social democratic structures and post-Fordist labour policies.

Via readings in feminist film theory, new materialism, animal studies, gender and queer theory, and cultural studies, we will place these compelling contemporary productions into conversation with those of pioneers the feminist film movement of the 1970s, such as Helke Sander and Ulrike Ottinger. Echoes of that movement are, for example, evidenced in the way Maren Ade has leveraged her success to draw public attention to imbalances within the German film industry and called for gender parity in the distribution of subsidies. With an eye towards both continuities and divergencies in aesthetics, mode of production, and culture, we will investigate to what extent recent German and Austrian directors, e.g. Barbara Albert, Angela Schanelec, Valeska Grisebach, Tanja Turanskyj, and others share among themselves and/or with an earlier generation a common focus on disparate experiences of gender, sexuality, intimacy, and precarity. How does their work accord with such labels as ‘oppositional,’ ‘subversive, or ‘resistant’, and in what ways does it enact intersectional alliances with feminist, queer, anti-heteronormative and anti-racist projects?

Monday 3 – 7 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Fenner
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JGC1855H S  Critical Theory in Context: The French-German Connection
This course examines central theoretical issues in contemporary thought with particular attention to the role that the “Frankfurt School” and its affiliates such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas and others play in the context of modern German social and cultural thought. In France, thinkers like Levinas, Foucault, and Derrida respond to this tradition and enrich it. The course explores in which way the continuing dialogue between these thinkers informs current critical approaches to rethinking issues and concerns such as theorizing modernity, culture, secularization, multiculturalism, and the vital role of cultural difference.

Wednesday 3 – 5 pm
Location: Odette Hall, Rm 323
Instructor: Goetschel
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GER6000H F Reading German for Graduate Students
In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

Tuesday 3-5
Location: TBA
Instructor: Boran
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GER6000H S Reading German for Graduate Students
In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

Tuesday 3-5
Location: TBA
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses:

A select number of MGA elective courses have a certain number of spaces open to non-departmental students if the course is not full. The enrollment period for these spaces will run from September 18-22, 2017. No enrollment will be considered before the 18th or after the 22nd. Enrollment is not guaranteed and is at the discretion of the MGA program and the course instructor. Priority for enrolment will be given to Year Two CERES students doing the Global Affairs option.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office from September 18th to 22nd. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful.

The SGS ADD/DROP course form must be completed and submitted to the MGA program office. Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions: mga@utoronto.ca

GLA2005H F Negotiating Internationally

From the US-Iran nuclear agreement to the UNFCCC climate conferences, international negotiations are shaping essential aspects of the world we live in. This course offers a practitioner’s perspective on how these negotiations take place, the effects of emergent small state and non-governmental actors within the international negotiating arena, and the types of skills required to engage in 21st Century bilateral and multilateral negotiations. The objective of this course is to enable students to analyze international negotiations from various stakeholder perspectives and to create successful negotiating strategies of their own.

Tuesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 

GLA2015H F Economic Competitiveness and Social Protection

This class explores how communities can design effective systems of social protection without sacrificing economic competitiveness. The course opens by addressing several misconceptions about the welfare state, including the connection between economic competition and social protection, the relationship between social spending and inequality, and the private provision of social protection. The second part of the course examines the politics of reform in four critical areas: Pensions, health care, unemployment, and childcare/maternity policy. The course concludes by exploring three contemporary challenges: Immigration and the welfare state, the politics of social protection in the Global South, and the challenge of designing global social safety nets. By the end of the course, students are expected to develop a politically feasible, economically competitive strategy to reform social policy in a community of interest.

Monday 12 –  2 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: Ornston
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 

GLA2090H F Topics in Global Affairs I:  Governing With and Without the State: Achieving Global Governance Progress in Agenda 2030

This course explores the making of policy at the international level. It targets global policy commitments in Agenda 2030 and asks the primary question: “How can progress be made in achieving progress in the face of the current global governance architecture?”

First, we look briefly at the global order challenges: US leadership is fading and more generally nationalism has seen dramatic resurgence in country after country. But the architectural reshaping goes far beyond this.  Power is increasingly dispersed to actors seldom seen acting at the international level. Today’s actors in global governance are not just states and intergovernmental organizations. Slowly subnational actors from provinces and states to cities and even neighborhoods have come to advance global policy making.  Moreover, a host of non-state actors (NSAs) have joined as well from NGOs, research facilities, criminal organizations, private corporations, investment coalitions. If you were called on to achieve and of the Agenda 2030 goals: “gender equality”, “zero hunger”, “climate action”, how would you do it?

You will be called on to map the question and propose a way forward to the great challenges of global governance.

Wednesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: TBA

Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GLA2090H S Topics in Global Affairs I: Global Journalism

Journalism is an increasingly vital, but underused skill in a wide range of global professions. Development professionals need to train journalists to support emerging civil society. Leaders of global businesses, NGOs and government agencies are increasingly creating proprietary news organizations to raise the profile of issues central to their work. Advocates use the tools of journalism to advance their causes. And, of course, specialists of any type need journalism skills to tell untold stories in their disciplines. Many global professionals will deploy a combination of these skills in their careers. This course will help students gain a professional edge by introducing them to journalism tools they can integrate into their careers. Students will learn frameworks for training media in emerging civil society, and for developing proprietary news organizations in business and agency settings. They will also learn essential skills for their own journalism and advocacy. The course will be highly practical and geared toward students’ own career goals.

Thursday 10 – 12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: Steiner
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

 

GLA2091H S Topics in Global Affairs II: Grand Strategy and Global Threats

Grand strategy is state policy governing the use of military force for national security interests. The contemporary threat environment is incredibly complex as a result of new technologies, economic globalization, and political economic transformation. The proliferation of nuclear weapons to new actors, the development of sophisticated conventional weapons in a number of states, ubiquitous dependence on cyberspace and satellites, and the emergence of global terrorism pose major challenges for the formulation of national security policy. This course examines the impact of sociotechnical complexity on grand strategy through historical case studies and assessments of contemporary challenges in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

Wednesday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: Lindsay
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GLA2092H F Topics in Global Affairs III: Humanitarian Practice

This course will examine the ideals of humanitarian principles and contrast them with the reality on the ground in war zones and disaster areas.  The course will cover the history of the humanitarian movement, its ethics and goals, and contrast them with the goals of development work over the course of the past three decades.  In addition to lectures and seminar discussions, this course will expose students to humanitarian practice through case studies, role plays and interactive conversations with field workers.  Current and ongoing challenges to humanitarian work will also be examined in depth, including the blurring of military and security objectives with humanitarian goals, and the practice of humanitarianism in the context of political and security challenges.

Monday 12 noon -2 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: Michalski
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GLA2092H S Topics in Global Affairs III: The Populist Radical Right in Europe

A comparative examination of the emergence and upsurge of populist radical right parties in contemporary Europe. The course will begin with historical context, definitions and typologies, before exploring topics including ideology and issues; leaders, members and voters; political parties, organizations and subcultures; transnational influences and networking; patterns of response by mainstream parties and radical right parties in public office. This course will analyze several country cases in detail, including France, Austria, the Netherlands, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, Finland and Estonia. A basic knowledge of recent European history and comparative politics is required.

*Please note this course has 15 spots for MGA students and 15 spots for CERES students.

Wednesday 10 am -12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GLA2093H F Topics in Global Affairs IV: Government Relations

As Government continues to play a key role in the global economy, firms need to engage public officials and ensure that their business interests are taken into account by policymakers. This course examines the practice of government relations in Canada and in other jurisdictions such as the US, the EU and China. Through case studies in international trade, taxation and regulatory affairs, students will learn about the process of lobbying and strategically communicating with governments. Students will also draft advocacy plans and develop the ability to make clear and robust policy recommendations to C-suite executives and members of the board of directors. An interest in politics, public policy and an aptitude for cross-cultural fluency will be helpful for this class.

Tuesday 7 – 9 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: Dupont
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 


HISTORY

A number of courses offered at the Department of History may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of History, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

HIS1031H1S Images as History

This seminar examines photography and photographs in three ways: historical, methodological, and conceptual. Historically, the seminar will cover the era of the photographic image, from its invention in the 1830s to the present. We will be especially concerned with examining the role that photography has played in shaping modern understandings of self, nation, and race. Historical monographs will be drawn from various national and transnational studies, with a primary but not exclusive focus on the Americas. The course, however, is designed for all students regardless of geographic area. In addition to examining relationships between photography, identity, and power, we will develop a set of conceptual and methodological tools for analyzing photographic images, carefully considering the status of photographs as primary sources for historical research. In terms of the conceptual, we will read and discuss foundational theoretical works, including key essays by Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Ariella Azoulay. Here, we will consider the ethics and politics of human visual experience as such. What does it mean to see and be seen? Who has “the right to look”? How has photography been used to separate, identify, and classify? How have photographs changed the kinds of claims that people could make in their respective private and public spheres?

Friday 1 – 3 pm
Location: SS1078
Instructor: Coleman
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

HIS1200H1F Readings in European Intellectual History

The course will introduce students to the methods and practices of intellectual history with a focus on the development of ideas in Europe from the Enlightenment to the present day. The books assigned in the course will be a combination of classic and exemplary works in the field, theoretical texts in related fields, and some of the best and most representative works recently published in the field. The aim is to give students a solid foundation in the methods and practices of intellectual history, an exposure to a breadth of approaches within the field and a sense of the trends in recent scholarship while also enabling them to engage with challenging theoretical works that will allow them to create their own unique approaches to intellectual history.

Tuesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: UC51
Instructor: Nelson
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1237H1F France since 1870

This graduate course explores themes and episodes in French history since the Paris Commune. Students will be introduced to the historiography of the Commune, the Dreyfus Affair, French colonialism, immigration, the two world wars, the Vichy regime, decolonization, and May 1968.  Memory, identity, citizenship, immigration and empire are some of the recurring themes in this course. Readings will include a range of cultural, political, gender, and social approaches.  In some cases we will read classics, and in others we will consider very recent studies.

Wednesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: VC115
Instructor: Jennings
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1279H1F World War II in Eastern and East Central Europe 

World War II was much more destructive and traumatic in East Central Europe than in Western Europe. The difference was caused by many reasons, among which the Nazi and Soviet plans and policies were the most important. Yet, there were also numerous East Central European phenomena that contributed to the cruelty of World War II in the East. This seminar will explore the external and internal factors that defined the war in the discussed region. Students will analyze the military, political, economic, and cultural activities of Germany, the Soviet Union, and their allies and enemies. Following sessions will concentrate on the fall of the Versailles systems, diplomatic and military activities throughout the war, on occupational policies of the invaders, economic exploration of the invaded, on collaboration, accommodation, resistance, genocide, the “liberation” and sovietization of East Central Europe after 1944. All the secondary and primary sources used in class are English.

Tuesday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: TBA
Instructor: Wrobel
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1281H1F  Experience of Real Socialism

This research seminar will examine a number of texts and films produced during and after the socialist era. Writings from the former period include memoirs, diaries, fiction, and film produced during the 1960s and 1970s in the Soviet Union and other countries of the “socialist camp,” including Yuri Trifonov’s novel, House on the Embankment (1976); Natalya Baranskaya’s novella “A Week Like Any Other” (1979) and the films The Joke, by Jaromil Jires (1969) and Man of Marble by Andrzej Wajda (1976). Works produced after 1991 include Andrzej Stasiuk’s novel On the Road to Babadag (2004), and the films Goodbye Lenin! byWolfgang Becker (2003) and 24 City by Jia Zhangke (2008).  Additional readings are critical works dealing with the concept of “real (existing) socialism,” its legacy and issues of nostalgia.

Monday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: SS1080
Instructor: Lahusen
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1286H1S Imperial Russian Social History

The first all-Russian (which was really the first all-imperial) census of 1897 categorized the population of the Russian Empire by gender, by social status, by profession, by religion, and in a way, by nationality. In this course, we will examine the ways that those categories developed over the preceding centuries. We will examine how social estates developed, and how alternate forms of social stratification did or did not develop to challenge those estates. We will look at the role religion played in categorizing Russian society, and the ways that the Russian state viewed religion synonymously with nationalism.  And we will investigate the ways that ethnic and national differences became more recognized as important sources of social division, too, related to, and yet separate from these other forms.

Tuesday 3-5 pm
Location: UC67
Instructor: Smith
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

HIS1296H1F Stalinism

A historiographical survey of the political, cultural and social history of the Soviet Union during Stalin’s years in power. Major emphasis of the course is on historiography, interpretation, and an introduction to sources. Key topics covered include collectivization, the Great Terror, the gulag, WWII, the Holocaust and postwar Stalinism. This course serves as basic preparation for a minor field in Twentieth-Century Russian history.

Tuesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: UC 63
Instructor: Viola
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1301H1F: History of Food and Drink

The field of food studies has emerged in the past few decades as a rich source of interdisciplinary research that also speaks to a broad audience beyond the academy. This class will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to the field from history and allied disciplines. Readings will cover all chronological periods from prehistory to the present and geographical areas from around the world. Because many scholars also teach classes on food, even if they research in other fields, we will also discuss teaching methods. Writing assignments will include weekly reviews and a historiographical term paper. Students should consider this class an opportunity to practice the art of writing clear, compelling prose, even if they adopt different styles in other venues. A part of each seminar will be devoted to “workshopping” student essays and practicing editing skills.

Wednesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: SS1078
Instructor: Bender
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1435H1S: Victorian Culture

Consideration of some of the major themes in Victorian social and cultural history, with emphasis on the most recent secondary literature. Among the topics considered are popular culture, gender and social class.

Wednesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: SS1080
Instructor: Loeb
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


 POLITICAL SCIENCE

A number of courses offered at the Department of Political Science may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Political Science, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

JHP2351Y1Y     The People from Nowhere

This course traces from earliest times to the present the evolution of a people called Carpatho-Rusyns and their historic homeland Carpathian Rus’, located in the heart of Europe. The historic survey will deal with political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments, all the while testing the hypothesis that nationalities are imagined communities. (Given by the Departments of Political Science and History)

Wednesday 3 – 5 pm
Location:  UC 53
Instructor: Magosci
Term: Fall and Winter/Spring
Credit: 1.0

POL2240H1F Geopolitics of Cyberspace 

New information and communication technologies, such as the Internet, are widely believed to be transforming world politics. While these transformations have brought about important challenges to state power and authority, they have not eliminated power politics and the quest for security and competitive advantage among actors on the world stage. Today, states and non-state actors alike are seeking ways to exploit information and information systems to pursue political objectives. The control of information has long been widely seen as a source of political power, and is manifest today in competition over both the media and the messages of the global communications environment. From the filtering and interception of Internet traffic to the circulation of home-made videos by militant Islamists, a new geopolitics of information and communication technologies is underway.
The Geopolitics of Cyberspace course is an intensive examination of the ways in which states and non-state actors are contesting the newly evolving terrain of global digital-electronic-telecommunications. Topics covered include Internet censorship and surveillance, information warfare, computer network attacks, hacktivism, and governance of global communications. The course is organized as a series of intensive modules. One feature of the class will be a hands-on” analysis of censorship circumvention and network interrogation techniques at the Citizen Lab (http://www.citizenlab.org/).

Tuesday 2 -4 pm
Location:  LA 213
Instructor: Diebert
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2321H1S     Topics in Comparative Politics I: Political Economy of Europe

This course surveys major theoretical and empirical contributions on the political economy of Western Europe. The course explores the political sources of how and why European societies have adopted different economic institutions and policies in the global economy. We analyze theories of the welfare state, growth models and capitalist diversity, business-labor relations, and financial markets. The course then examines the deeper processes of European integration that have shaped European economies, with a particular focus on monetary integration. Finally, we discuss contemporary issues that define economies in Western Europe today — the eurozone crisis, Brexit, and populism.

Wednesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location:  UC 148
Instructor: Reisenbichler
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2326H1S     Democracy and Dictatorship    

This course provides an in-depth introduction to theories of the origins of democracy and dictatorship. We examine a range of structural and voluntarist approaches. In the final weeks of the course, we explore the extent to which these theories help us to understand regime transitions in China, Chile, Iran, and Poland..

Monday 12 – 2 pm
Location: Larkin Buuilding Rm 214
Instructor: Way
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2391H1F     Topics in Comparative Politics III: Politics and Policy in the Nordic Region

This course on the Nordic region (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland, and other Nordic territories) looks in detail at some of the political institutions and policies presented in POL300H1F Topics in Comparative Politics (Introduction to the Politics and Society of Northern Europe). We will review first the main political parties, trade unions and social movements in the Nordic countries, including the recent surge of populism. Then we will look at the politics of the welfare state, labour markets and income equality. The last part of the course will be devoted to migration and integration aspects, foreign policy and relations with the European Union, and other important challenges to the sustainability of the Nordic political model.

Thursday 6 – 8 pm
Location: TC 22
Instructor: Beltran
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2391H1S     Topics in Comparative Politics III: Culture and Society of the Nordic Region

This course examines the relationship between what the public wants and what policies get enacted in contemporary European democracies. We will explore the roles of political parties, interest groups, local and regional governments, and the European Union. When asking how policy responds to the public, we will also ask which parts of the public are most influential. Do the wealthy have more influence than the poor? Do the opinions of ethnic majorities have a greater impact than those of minorities? How do different institutional setups shape these relationships?

Thursday 6 – 8 pm
Location: LA 213
Instructor: Beltran
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

 

POL2392H1S Topics in Comparative Politics IV: State and Society in Central Asia and Afghanistan

This course surveys key issues regarding state and society in post-Soviet Central Asia and, to a lesser extent, Afghanistan. We cover state building, social mobilization, inter-ethnic relations, and the politics of religion. Our emphasis is on the past twenty years. Some background in the history or politics of the Soviet Union and/or South Asia is helpful, though not required.

Wednesday  2 – 4 pm
Location:  Larkin Building Rm 213
Instructor: Schatz
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

A number of courses offered at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

SLA1218H1F  Pushkin

Tuesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Koznarsky
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

SLA1222Y Russian Poetry

Friday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Livak
Term: Fall and Winter/Spring
Credit: 1.0

SLA1320HF Postcommunistm – Postcolonialism – Postdependency

The swift collapse of communist regimes across Central and Eastern Europe came as a surprise to both their opponents and political clients. While in 1989 Francis Fukuyama speculated in his most famous – and most derided – essay about the “end of history,” the historian Tony Judt saw in this chain of events a final release of the region’s histories from “what once seemed permanent and somehow inevitable” but now taking on “a more transient air.” Did the Central and Eastern European nations escape history (into vaguely defined, Western-style “normalcy”), or have now properly “entered it” as independent subjects? What social and cultural mechanisms shape the relationship to the communist and pre-communist past and visions of the – still largely indeterminate – future in the globalized world for these nations? How are we to think about the years following the rapid transformation from communism to neoliberal capitalism and more or less liberal democracy in countries like Poland, Ukraine, South Slavic Republics, and Russia? How did culture mediate the experience of this political, social, and economic revolution? Finally, what is the condition of post-communism? When does it begin? When – if at all – can it be said to have ended?

In this course we will try to answer these and similar questions while examining the literature and cinema of the so called “post-communist” cultures. Our methodology will build on theoretical apparatus and concepts developed by postcolonial (and post-dependency) studies, such as imperialism, cultural hegemony, relationships of power and dependency, alterity, hybridity, liminality, and others. We will discuss and critically evaluate the applicability of this methodology to the Central and Eastern European (in the case of Russia, also Eurasian) context, focusing on various strategies of identity (re)construction adopted by the authors and filmmakers amid the chaos of competing social, historical, and cultural narratives that erupted with the collapse of the Soviet Empire and its satellites.

Wednesday 11 am – 1 pm
Location: AH404
Instructor: Wodzynski
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

SLA 1220H1S  Russian Thinkers

The course examines the major Russian social and political thinkers and movements in the nineteenth century, and the historical, philosophical and literary contexts in which they were writing. Topics studied may include: the Russian Enlightenment and the growth of rationalism; Decembrism; Chaadaev’s “Philosophical Letter”; Russian Hegelianism; the Slavophiles and Westernisers; Herzen and Russian socialism; the tradition of Russian literary criticism from Belinsky to Pisarev; nihilists, liberals and conservatives in the mid-nineteenth century; populism and anarchism; the foundations of Marxism in Russia. Taught in a combination of lectures and seminars, with weekly readings in English and, for Russian majors, in the original.

Thursday 12 noon – 3 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Siljak
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA1231H1S Russian Modernism

Russian poetry, prose, and literary criticism from the late 1880s until 1940. Topics include: Russia’s fin-de-siècle culture in its European context; the main aesthetic and philosophical trends informing the modernist field and the current theoretical problems in the study of the modernist period; the modernist renewal of Russian poetry, including a survey of the period’s representative figures and texts; experiments with narrative and genre in the prose of the 1910s-30s, in Russia and in emigration; conservative reactions to modernism, from L. Tolstoi to Socialist Realism; the modernist strategies of survival (metanarratives, children’s literature, internal and external exile, literature of the absurd). Readings may include: Chekhov, Solov’ev, Bunin, Z. Gippius, Sologub, Rozanov, Annenskii, Blok, Belyi, Kuzmin, Babel’, Esenin, Zamiatin, Pasternak, Mandel’shtam, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Tsvetaeva, Kharms, A. Tolstoi, Nabokov, Bulgakov, Khodasevich. Taught in Russian. Readings in Russian and English.

Wednesday 2 – 4 pm; Friday 3-5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Livak
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA1238H1S Chekhov

An exploration of Chekhov’s prose by means of stylistic, structural, and thematic analysis of major stories from all periods of his literacy career.  Brief attention may also be given to his non-fictional works, including his letters, to his relationships with other Russian writers and writing, and to Chekhov criticism in Russia and elsewhere.
Readings in English.

Tuesday 11 am – 1 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Holland
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA1410H1S Gogol

Fantastic and grotesque works by the most hilarious, obsessive, and delusional character in Russian literature, who teased, fascinated, and polarized readers. Gogol’s writings are examined with various theoretical approaches. Includes cinematic (Taras Bulba, Viy, Overcoat) and musical (Ribsky-Korsakov’s “Chirstmas Eve,” Shostakovich’s “Nose”) re-creations of Gogol’s works.

Wednesday 3 – 5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Koznarsky
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA 1610H1F  Havel

Václav Havel was one of the most complex figures on the European political and theatrical stage. His multifaceted oeuvre includes essays, plays, letters,  and speeches. This class explores the complexity of his oeuvre and his development as a writer, public figure, and eventually also politician in the context of recent political, literary and cultural history.

Thursday 2 – 4 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Ambros
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 


SOCIOLOGY

A number of courses offered at the Department of Sociology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Sociology, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

 

ENROLLING IN COurses in other DEPARTMENTS

Students interested in enrolling in courses offered by other departments cannot (unless the registration system allows them) enroll themselves but must seek permission of the instructor or graduate secretary of the department first and then complete an “Add/Drop” form indicating the course name and session, and the course meeting section. It must be signed in the following order by:

  • the student
  • the CERES graduate coordinator
  • the professor teaching the course
  • the graduate coordinator of the department which offers the course

The Add/Drop Forms can be found on http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/inform/stuforms.htm. Completed Add/Drop forms should be submitted to the CERES Graduate Coordinator.

Please note that some seminars, especially in History, are heavily enrolled. It is important that you contact the professor (via sponsoring department) in the course before or at the very beginning of the registration period and express your interest in taking her/his course. It is not possible for participating departments to guarantee places in their seminars for CERES students who enroll late in the registration period.

 

Financial Support

Students must familiarize themselves with the kinds of financial aid available and policies governing these awards. The Centre’s staff will recommend sources of financial support, but it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that applications are completed to meet the requirements and deadlines set by the granting organizations.

Funding Available through CERES

All students applying for admission to the MA program at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies are automatically considered for financial aid, PROVIDED THEIR APPLICATIONS ARE RECEIVED BY JANUARY 31.  Scholarship funding is provided on the basis of academic ranking by the Centre’s funding committee.  Students offered funding for their first year must maintain their academic standing to receive their second-year funding.

For special funds to handle unanticipated expenses students should apply to the bursary program of the School of Graduate Studies through the Centre’s office.

OGS and SSHRC APPLICATIONS

Students who meet the eligibility criteria are required to submit applications for funding from OGS and SSHRC. Eligibility notification will be given by mid-September. Deadlines usually fall early in the Fall semester. The Centre reserves the right to revise funding schedules based on the success of these applications.

Scholarship Opportunities Available to Non-CERES Students

Both CERES and non-CERES graduate students may be eligible to apply for funding from the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, to support study related to Germany.  Please visit the JIGES web page (http://projects.chass.utoronto.ca/jiges/funding.html) for further information about these funding competitions. Other scholarship opportunities may become available from time to time. Check back on the web site for new information.

Laszlo T. Duska Memorial Fellowship

Awarded by the Council of the Faculty of Arts and Science to academically excellent graduate students who have taken at least one course related to Hungarian studies. Eligible students will be drawn from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures or other graduate units where research is focussed on Hungarian studies. Application not required. Value: annual income.

Connaught Scholarships

When you apply for admission to a graduate program for full-time studies at the University of Toronto by February 1, you are automatically considered for a Connaught Scholarship, valued at $12,000 plus academic fees.

There is no citizenship requirement for the Connaught Scholarship. All awards are allocated on the basis of academic excellence. Nominations are made by the department to the School of Graduate Studies and formal notification of awards is sent to successful applicants starting on or about April 1. No special fellowship application is required for this award. However, your application for admission should be complete with all supporting documentation (academic records, letters of reference, etc.). Students who apply for admission after February 1 may still be considered for this award provided funds are available at the time of admission.

The following scholarships are part of the Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund (OSOTF) Award

Ivan Bodnarchuk Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

The Chair of the Ukrainian Studies Foundation has established a fund, the income of which provides an annual award to a graduate student enrolled in a program of courses in Ukrainian studies. The recipient must demonstrate financial need and academic merit. Apply to the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Awards Selection Committee by April 15 for the upcoming fall/winter session and by October 15 for the upcoming spring/summer session.

Robert Franklin Clark Graduate Fellowship in Ukrainian Language and Literature

The Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies has endowed funds for a fellowship for award to one or more students who are pursuing studies in the field of Ukrainian language and literature. Value: annual income.

Dmytro and Natalia Haluszka Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

The Chair of the Ukrainian Studies Foundation has established a fund, the income of which provides an annual award to a graduate student enrolled in a program of courses in Ukrainian studies. The recipient must demonstrate financial need and academic merit. Apply to the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Awards Selection Committee by April 15 for the upcoming fall/winter session and by October 15 for the upcoming spring/summer session.

Hungarian Helicon Foundation (Ontario) Graduate Award

Awarded to a graduate student pursuing advanced studies in any aspect of Hungarian studies. Recipient is selected on the basis of academic excellence and financial need. Application consists of a nomination from the student’s graduate unit, a letter of recommendation, transcripts, a research proposal from the applicant, and an OSOTF financial needs assessment form. Deadline: end of April. Value: annual income.

Dr. Roman Turko and Yaroslawa Turko Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

Funds from the estate of Yaroslawa Turko have been used to establish a fellowship for award to undergraduate or graduate students studying courses related to the Ukraine. The award is based on financial need; however, academic merit will also be considered. Value: annual income.

Endowments at CERES

Our generous of donors have endowed a number of fellowships and awards to provide sources of financial support in addition to University-awarded scholarships.  The endowment fellowships are available only to CERES MA students.

Marija Aukstaite Graduate Student Award

Established by A. Franks Hylands. It is awarded to graduate students whose projects relate to Lithuania in whole or in part.

George Babits Fellowship in Hungarian Studies

Established by Mr. George A. Babits and matched by GSEF. It is awarded to a graduate student(s) in the Hungarian Studies Program in the Department of Slavic Language and Literature, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES), on the basis of academic merit.

Karel and Ellen Buzek Fellowship

Established by the Karel Buzek Czech Cultural Organization and matched by OSOTF and EAF. It is awarded to graduate students studying at CERES on the basis of financial need, where academic merit will also be considered. OSOTF

Rudolf and Rosalie Cermak Graduate Fellowship

Established by Josef Cermak and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES, who are pursuing advanced study of the Czech Republic. Awards will be made on the basis of financial need and academic merit.

Daniel and Elizabeth Damov Graduate Fellowship

Established by Daniel and Elizabeth Damov and matched by EAF, It is awarded to a graduate student(s) affiliated with CERES, with a preference given to students studying Bulgaria and the Balkan region.

Ilona Diener Fund

Established by the Diener Family
It is awarded to a graduate students participating in the University of Toronto Central European University Graduate Student Exchange Program.

Veneta and James Elieff Fellowship

Established by Mrs. Veneta Elieff
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES studying for/or conducting research on Bulgaria, on the basis of academic merit.

Veneta Elieff and Danny Filipovic Fellowships in Balkan Studies

Established by Danny Filipovic
It is awarded to CERES MA students pursuing an internship, exchange, or research activities in the Balkans.

Rudolf and Viera Frastacky Graduate Fellowship

Established by the family and friends of Rudolf and Viera Frastacky and matched by OSOTF and EAF. It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES. Awards will be made on the basis of financial need, where academic merit will also be considered.

Hungarian Chamber of Commerce Graduate Exchange Fund

Established through the generous donations by Various Donors. It is awarded to graduate students participating in an exchange program between the University of Toronto and Central European University, on the basis of academic merit.

Husky Energy Graduate Student Award in Hungarian Studies

Established by Husky Energy Inc. and matched by GSEF
It is awarded to a graduate student(s) in the Hungarian Studies Program in the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES), on the basis of academic merit.

Petro Jacyk Graduate Scholarships in Ukrainian Studies

Established by Petro Jacyk. It is awarded to graduate students studying Ukrainian Studies at CERES.

Karel Kukula and Family Graduate Award

Established by Mrs. Vlasta Scheybal and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to a graduate student, Master’s or PhD, undertaking research on Czech history, society and culture. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Irma and John Papesh Graduate Award

Established by Mrs. Irma Papesh
It is awarded to graduate students whose research focus includes Slavic studies, with a preference for Czech and Slovak studies. Academic merit and financial need will be considered. OSOTF

H. Gordon Skilling Fund

Established through the generous donations of Various Donors and the Mellon Foundation and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES, who are pursuing advanced study of a country of the region covered by the Centre’s mandate. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Jan and Georgina Steinsky Sehnoutka Graduate Award in Czech Studies

Established by Jan and Georgina Steinsky and matched by OSOTF
It is awarded to a graduate student whose research focuses on the Czech Republic, where financial need will be considered.

George and Helen Vari Fund

Established by the George and Helen Vari Foundation
It is awarded to graduate students participating in the University of Toronto Central European University Graduate Student Exchange Program.

Graduate Awards Office of the School of Graduate Studies/Government Funding

Financial support is available to highly qualified graduate students from a variety of sources at the University of Toronto and through federal and provincial government programs, although support cannot be guaranteed to all graduate students who apply. Advice may be obtained from the Fellowships & Loans Officer, School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto, tel: (416) 978-2379, fax: (416) 978-2864, email: graduate.awards@utoronto.ca.

Please visit the website of the SGS Awards Office at http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money.htm.

Awards

Ontario Graduate Scholarships
Financial support is available from the provincial government through Ontario Graduate Scholarships, valued at $15,000. Deadline for submission of application to CERES is October 17. Sixty of these awards are available to visa students. Students entering the first or second year of graduate studies must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from Jana Oldfield (room 125N) and may also be downloaded from the OGS website:
http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/provincial.htm
Toll free number: 1-807-343-7247.

SSHRC Master’s Scholarships
Financial support is available from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council through Master’s Scholarships, valued at $17,500. Deadline for submission of application to CERES is November 14. You must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada. Students entering the first or second year of graduate studies must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from the SSHRC website: http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/federal/sshrc.htm.

SSHRC Doctoral Scholarships
If you are in the second year of the CERES MA program and are considering pursuing a PhD at a Canadian university, you may apply for an SSHRC Doctoral Scholarship valued at $19,000 through CERES. Deadline is October 17. You must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada. Students must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from the SSHRC website: http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/federal/sshrc.htm.

International Scholarships: Government of Canada
“Canada is committed to participation in international study and research partnerships that build understanding among peoples, develop global citizens and leaders, and contribute to the development of nations.” Please visit http://www.scholarships-bourses.gc.ca/scholarships-bourses/index.aspx/gca/nc_GCAMEX-en.html. Additional information may be obtained at the appropriate Canadian Embassy.

Undergraduate Scholarships: Hungarian Studies

The Hungarian Studies Program has a number of scholarships available to students taking courses in Hungarian Studies. Interested students should consult with the Hungarian Studies Program Coordinator about the application process.

Dr. Zoltan Mester Scholarship
• Established through the generous donations from the family and friends of Zoltan Mester.
• (For Any Year) – Student in Hungarian Studies on the basis of need and ability.

Husky Energy Hungarian Student Exchange Program
• Established through a generous donation from Husky Energy Inc.
• (For Any Year) – To support the travel and tuition costs of undergraduate and/or graduate students in the Hungarian Studies Program wishing to take advantage of exchange and/or study abroad opportunities. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Karoly Szel Undergraduate Scholarship in Hungarian Studies
• Established by Marcella Szel and supported through donations of friends.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of academic merit and financial need.

Rakoczi Prize in Hungarian
• Established by the Rakoczi Foundation.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to outstanding students in any year, either full-time or part-time, who have achieved an A average and who obtain the highest standing in the Hungarian course(s).

Szechenyi Society Inc. Undergraduate Scholarships in Hungarian Studies
• Established through a generous donation from the Széchenyi Society Inc.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of financial need and academic merit.

Funds for Undergraduate Students coming from the Czech Republic

Maria and George Hanus Scholarship
To be awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Ladislav and Maria Kroupa Scholarship
Awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Martina and Milan Plch Scholarship in Czech Studies
Awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto in the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Students interested in these scholarships must be formally nominated by either Charles University or Masaryk University to take part in an exchange at the University of Toronto.

Loan Programs

Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP)
The federal and provincial governments provide financial support to qualified students who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Ontario through Canada Student Loans and/or Ontario Student Loans. Residents of other provinces are eligible for Canada Student Loans through their home province. Application forms are available online at osap.gov.on.ca. For further information and assistance, please contact the Admissions and Awards Office, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A3; tel: (416) 978-2190; email: osap@adm.utoronto.ca.

U.S. Student Loans
Permanent residents and citizens of the United States can obtain information and applications for the USA Federal Direct Loan Program, http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/adm-awards/html/financial%20aid/government/usapp.htm. For further information and assistance, please contact e.lennox@utoronto.ca.

Internships and Exchange Programs

Internships

{This section is under construction}

Exchange Programs

{This section is under construction}

 

Ukraine: The University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv

This exchange is open to MA and PhD students in all fields who have a record of academic excellence. The successful candidate will spend one semester (September-December or January-May) studying at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. The level of financial support varies and may include the cost of travel, a living and housing stipend, and overseas health insurance.

Established in the 17th century by the Metropolitan Petro Mohyla, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy became a widely respected educational institution and a centre for the development of Ukraine’s first national political, cultural, and government elite.

The Academy was closed in 1817 by the Russian tsarist government. In 1992, after a 175-year hiatus, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy was reinstated as a secular teaching institution, becoming a symbol of the rebirth of independent Ukraine. The Academy was granted the status of “National University” in 1994.

Widely regarded as the principal school in Ukraine for the social sciences and humanities, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy is also a leading centre for social and political research. Some 3000 students from across Ukraine and abroad receive their education from leading Ukrainian and western scholars. The Academy has become a centre for the promotion of democratic values in Ukraine, and its students are actively involved in the political life of the country.

The Kyiv-Mohyla Academy is a bilingual institution: courses are taught in Ukrainian and English. Approximately 40 per cent of the library holdings are in foreign languages, primarily in English. Exchange students can also take advantage of being in the capital of Ukraine, the site of major government and legislative bodies, non-governmental organizations, and the richest state libraries and archives.

Visit Kyiv-Mohyla Academy website: http://www.ukma.edu.ua/

How to Apply

To apply for the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy exchange, please send: a Statement of Purpose (up to 750 words) which details your research interests and reasons study at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy;

2 letters of reference from individuals who are qualified to judge your academic achievements; all university transcripts. Letters of reference and transcripts should be sent directly from the referee and institution to CERES.

DEADLINE: Applications should be received in full at CERES by February 14. Applications received after this date will not be considered.

Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine
Munk School of Global Affairs
University of Toronto
1 Devonshire Place
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3K7
Canada

Nancy Park Travel Scholarship to Russia

Nancy Park was an outstanding student who graduated from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1994. She died suddenly in 1998, and her friends and family established the Park Fellowship to keep her memory alive. The fellowship will be awarded to graduate students or advanced undergraduates whose program includes at least one joint graduate/undergraduate course. The recipient must have completed or be currently enrolled in a third year Russian language course or equivalent, and be registered in one of the following disciplines: Russian language and literature, history, law, music, women’s studies, art or art history. The recipient must undertake an internship in Russia, for a minimum of eight weeks, with a total stay in Russia of at least ten weeks, with a governmental or non-governmental, not-for-profit organization whose mandate is aimed at improving the daily lives of Russian people or making Russia a more just society.

Apply to the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures by January 15. Applications should include a detailed statement of intentions, including a work plan of activities to be carried out in Russia; two letters of reference, including one from a recent Russian language professor; commitment to organize an oral presentation of the results of the trip to the University community within four months of the return to Canada; commitment to prepare a short report on the internship to be used by future interns.

Nancy Park Travel Scholarship
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
University of Toronto
Alumni Hall, 4th floor
121 St. Joseph Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J4
Canada

 

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