Upcoming Events at the Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies

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September 2015

  • Sep 22

    Courting the "Ethnic Vote": Immigration and Multiculturalism in the 2015 Federal Election

    What impact will Canada’s immigrant and ethnic minority populations have on the upcoming federal election? Will they affect the campaign? How will they vote? What are the implications for Canadian democracy? Immigrant and minority voters played a key role in 2011; will the same be true in 2015? The panel will discuss recent research, and the perspectives of media and community actors.

    Panelists:

    Chris Cochrane, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto. Chris’s research examines opinion formation, public opinion and political behaviour in Canada. His latest book is Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas

    Jane Hilderman, Samara Canada. Jane is the Executive Director of Samara Canada, a trusted, non-partisan champion of increased civic engagement through innovative research and educational programming.

    Ratna Omidvar, Global Diversity Exchange, Ryerson University. Ratna is the Executive Director of the Global Diversity Exchange, which provides analysis and leadership to strengthen the links between migration, diversity and prosperity.

    Priya Ramanujam, New Canadian Media. Priya is a journalist and editor with New Canadian Media, which covers issues relevant to Canadian immigrant and ethnic minority communities.

    Erin Tolley, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto. Erin’s research focuses on representation and diversity in Canadian politics. She is the author of Framed: Media and the Coverage of Race in Canadian Politics

    Moderated by Jeffrey Reitz, Director, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies.

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 22, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place

    Speaker(s)

    Jane Hilderman
    Panelist
    Samara Canada

    Chris Cochrane
    Panelist
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Ratna Omidvar
    Panelist
    Global Diversity Exchange, Ryerson University

    Priya Ramanujam
    Panelist
    New Canadian Media

    Erin Tolley
    Panelist
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jeffrey Reitz
    Moderator
    Director, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Sponsors

    Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

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    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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October 2015

  • Oct 8

    Beyond the Transatlantic Paradigm of Racialization: (In)visibility in Asia and Its Parallels in Europe

    The existing literature of race studies is based mostly on the transatlantic experiences such as slavery and colonization of native Americans, without actively taking into account the experiences of the groups racialized through the discourses on “blood,” as in in Japan and other parts of Asia. Such racialized groups, sometimes called “invisible races,” have no visible physical differences and have historically co-existed in the same region. They are not unique to Asia but exist in other parts of the world including in Europe and North America. When we examine the Middle Ages, I argue, significant parallels can be found in the discourses surrounding the Kawaramono (Burakumin) in Japan, the “Gypsies” in Romania, and the Jews in Spain. The primary purpose of the presentation is not to make comparisons between these groups per se. It aims to take a first step toward identifying how, and under what conditions, parallel social structures and discourses emerged surrounding groups racialized in this way, each within its own region.

    Yasuko Takezawa is professor of anthropology at the Institute for Research in Humanities of Kyoto University, Japan, and currently a visiting scholar at Harvard University. She leads an international collaborative research project, “A Japan-based Global Study of Racial Representations,” funded by the Japanese government. Her English-language publications include: Breaking the Silence: Redress and Japanese American Ethnicity (Cornell University Press); Racial Representations in Asia (Takezawa ed., Kyoto University Press/ Transpacific Press); Japanese Studies, 35:1, Special Issue: Rethinking Race/Racial Experiences (co-ed with K. Iwabuchi); Transpacific Japanese American Studies: Dialogues on Race and Racializations (co-ed. With G. Okihiro, in press).

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 8, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7

    Speaker(s)

    Yasuko Takezawa
    Professor of Anthropology, Institute for Research in Humanities of Kyoto University, Japan

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    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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