Upcoming Events at the Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies

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January 2015

  • Jan 30

    8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference has grown into a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work. We attract a great number of proposals from various universities, not just in Canada but also the United States, Europe and even Asia.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    Every year we are very fortunate to have a dedicated group of graduate faculty members who serve as discussants, and prepare thorough and insightful comments for each paper submitted. Our conference thus provides valuable feedback to those seeking publication of their research.

    The conference is organized with the help of a committee of students from the Collaborative Program in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies. These students are often themselves presenters at the conference, and also serve as session chairs and timekeepers.

    CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

    Thursday January 29, 2015 (8:30-16:30)

    Session 1: Immigration (Discussant: Prof. Vappu Tyska, Sociology, Ryerson University)
    Session 2: Multiculturalism (Discussant: Prof. Russell Kazal, History, University of Toronto)

    Keynote Lecture 12:00-14:00 Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs:
    John Borrows “Living Legal Traditions: Indigenous Law in Practice” (see event poster above)
    Registration required for the keynote lecture. Please click here to register.

    Session 3: Law and Policy (Discussant: Prof. Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University)
    Session 4: Identity (Discussant: Prof. Sarah Hillewaert, Anthropology, University of Toronto)

    Friday January 30, 2015 (9:00-16:00)

    Session 5: Health (Discussant: Prof. Morton Beiser, Professor in Distinction, Psychology, Ryerson University)
    Session 6: Race (Discussant: Prof. Rinaldo Walcott, Director of Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto)
    Session 7: Religion (Discussant: Prof. Joseph Bryant, Sociology/Religion, University of Toronto)
    Session 8: Gender (Discussant: Prof. Rania Salem, Sociology, University of Toronto)

    Registration not required except for the keynote lecture.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 20158:30AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783

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    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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March 2015

  • Mar 2

    Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    This talk introduces Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong; Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers; and Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography, and “Mail-Order’ Marriages.

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Speaker(s)

    Nicole Constable
    Director, University Center for International Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh

    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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