Dynamics of Global Change Program 2013 Graduate Student Workshop

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Friday, April 26th, 2013

DateTimeLocation
Friday, April 26, 201310:30AM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place
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Description

This workshop brings together doctoral students from across the university to present aspects of the their research, connected by the overarching theme of exploring the sources, structure, and pace—in short, dynamics—of change.

Professor Melissa Williams will deliver a lunchtime keynote address.

**REGISTRATION IS FOR THE LUNCH AND KEYNOTE ONLY (12-2) THOUGH WE ENCOURAGE PARTICIPATION IN THE WHOLE EVENT**

Session A (10am-12pm): Student Presentations Session B (2pm-4pm): Student Presentations


Lunch (12pm) and Keynote (12:30pm-2pm)
(Registration is required for this portion of the program)

“Glocalizing” Global Justice: Democratic Translations of Human

Prof. Melissa Williams

If there is such a thing as global justice, it demands two things of us, argues Melissa Williams (Political Science, University of
Toronto): first, that we advance the real protection of human rights; and second, that we redress unjustifiable inequalities in the global distribution of wealth and opportunities. In general, philosophic perspectives on the problem of global justice (all of which are rooted in Western philosophic traditions) enjoin us to understand human rights as universal and distributive justice as contextual; that is, mediated by our membership in bounded political communities. But we might also adopt the perspective of the “glocal” citizen-activist who is trying to advance human rights and distributive justice in theord context of a globalized capitalist economy and networked transnational public space. If we do, we find a dynamic process of democratic translation taking place in which the polarities of human rights and social justice, universalism and contextualism, are reversed. Human rights now appear as contextual, and social justice appears as
(immanently) universal. Combining these perspectives opens up new pathways for understanding multiple sites and scales of activism as complementary contributions to a global system of human rights and social justice.

Contact

Megan Ball
416-946-8917


Speakers

Professor Melissa Williams
Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



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