Friday, May 16th, 2014 – Sunday, May 18th, 2014 In Many Worlds: Kudi/Kudiyurimai, Belonging, and Citizenship in the Tamil Imaginary

DateTimeLocation
Friday, May 16, 20149:00AM - 6:00PMMay 16: University of Toronto Scarborough,
1265 Military Trail (Morningside & Ellesmere)
May 17-18: University of Toronto St. George: New College,
45 Willcocks Street
Saturday, May 17, 20149:00AM - 6:00PMMay 16: University of Toronto Scarborough,
1265 Military Trail (Morningside & Ellesmere)
May 17-18: University of Toronto St. George: New College,
45 Willcocks Street
Sunday, May 18, 20149:00AM - 6:00PMMay 16: University of Toronto Scarborough,
1265 Military Trail (Morningside & Ellesmere)
May 17-18: University of Toronto St. George: New College,
45 Willcocks Street

Series

8th Tamil Studies Conference

Description

In Many Worlds: Kudi/Kudiyurimai, Belonging, and Citizenship in the Tamil Imaginary

The objective of the conference is to explore how the notion of belonging (together with entitlement, empowerment, dispossession) has functioned in the past and the present. While papers that deal specifically with the etymology of “Kudi/Kudiyurimai” are welcome, the larger concern is with how belonging has been defined, upheld, or questioned. From the relatively circumscribed spatial units of the Sangam Period, to the reframing of Kudi/Kudiyurimai as republican citizenship, and on to more porous classifications of the diasporic and global present, Kudi/Kudiyurimai and belonging have contained shifting and multiple meanings. Whereas citizenship is often contrasted to the state of slavery, the genealogies of Kudimai in Tamil offer a perspective from which to think beyond these binaries.

We invite papers from diverse disciplines about the many ways in which belonging has been conceptualized, practiced, or reconfigured. What does it mean to belong to a country, a community, a region, or the world? What does it mean to inhabit, dwell, or reside in a place? How has the tension between an existential belonging measured as restraint or duty to kin and claims to citizenship constituted practices of democracy? How can alternative concepts of belonging be used to challenge dominant definitions of the citizen? Potential submissions might chart the connections between citizenship and belonging, activism, community, family, sexuality and intimacy, feminism, ethnicity, migration and labour, literary and cultural texts, religion, caste, memory, nationalist movements, movements for social reform and change, the law, and military power.

We welcome individual or panel proposals from all disciplines and from scholars, students, artists, writers, and activists. Papers can range beyond the theme of the conference, though preference will be given to those that do engage the theme more directly.

Submission Deadline: August 31, 2013

More information about the conference can be found here: www.tamilstudiesconference.ca/index.html

Sponsors

University of Toronto Scarborough

Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Co-Sponsors

Asian Institute

Centre for South Asian Studies

New College, University of Toronto

French Institute of Pondicherry

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