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April 2017

  • Saturday, April 1st Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream Against Our Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 1, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMBloor St. United Church
    300 Bloor St. West
    Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca. Registration is not required for this event, but seating is limited.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelly
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Lee Maracle
    Author, Instructor, and Traditional teacher

    Faith Nolan
    Social Justice Activist and Musician


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Women and Gender Studies

    African Studies

    Department of Geography and Planning

    Caribbean Studies

    Hart House

    Academic Initiatives Fund, New College

    Diaspora and Transnational Studies

    Equity Studies

    Department of History

    MVS Proseminar

    Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto

    A Different Booklist


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 3rd Robin D.G. Kelley & Fred Moten: In Conversation

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 3, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMGreat Hall
    Hart House
    University of Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In Conversation is a TICKETED EVENT. Tickets are free but required and available at:
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/robin-dg-kelley-fred-moten-in-conversation-tickets-32116721980

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca.

    All talks are wheelchair accessible with ASL provided.

    SPONSORS: A Different Booklist; Caribbean Studies; Academic Initiatives Fund, New College; Women and Gender Studies; African Studies; Geography and Planning; Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs; Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Equity Studies; Hart House; History; MVS Proseminar; and the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelley
    Speaker
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Fred Moten
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of English, UC Riverside; Northrop Frye Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    Rinaldo Walcott
    Moderator
    Director, Women & Gender Studies Institute

    Afua Cooper
    Moderator
    James Robinson Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Dalhousie University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 4th The Making of a President and the Unmaking of Political Parties: France 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 4, 20174:30PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This year’s French presidential election will have a decisive influence on the future of France and Europe. The outcome could determine whether France remains in the European Union, which is celebrating its sixtieth anniversary. The political parties that have dominated French politics during that period may not make it into the runoff, leaving the final contest between a 39-year-old political newcomer and a right-wing populist. The repercussions of this election for Europe and the world are likely to be far more significant than the Brexit vote last June. The talk will explain how France reached this point, examine the positions of the five leading candidates, and consider the possible outcomes and consequences.

    Arthur Goldhammer is a Senior Affiliate at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University. He writes widely on French culture and politics for publications such as The Nation, The American Prospect, Democracy Journal, Foreign Policy, and The Chronicle of Higher Education and serves on the editorial boards of French Politics, Culture and Society, and The Tocqueville Review. He is the author of a novel, Shooting War, and the translator of 125 books from the French, for which he has won numerous awards. He is an Officer of the French Order of Arts and Letters and holds a BS and Ph.D. in mathematics from MIT.


    Speakers

    Arthur Goldhammer
    Senior Fellow, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 6th Performing Revolution: Violence and Dissent in China's Red Guard Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMFirst Floor Conference Room (JHB100), Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    From 1966 to 1968, students and workers in urban China were embroiled in deadly factional battles in what many of them believed to be a revolution of a lifetime – the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the middle of factional violence, they also expressed radical ideas of political dissent. Based on the recently published book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that both violence and dissent were the results of the dramatic enactment of a revolutionary culture. The mechanism of this enactment was revolutionary competition. This conclusion has direct implications for understanding the role of political culture in collective violence in today’s world.

    Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols. 2003). He is the editor of Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Victor Pickard, forthcoming), China’s Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Guobin Yang
    Speaker
    Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 6th Modern authoritarian regimes in the 21st century. A shadow over Central Europe?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMUniversity College 152
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    Description

    Michal Mochťak, Ph.D. is a Research Fellow at the International Institute of Political Science, Masaryk University and a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at the Department of Political Science, Yale University. His research focuses on the challenges to democracy in Central and Eastern Europe with special emphasis on the conflict potential of elections, modern forms of authoritarian rule and deconsolidation processes. Results of his research on electoral violence and democratization have been published in a variety of international peer-reviewed political science journals (e.g. Terrorism and Political Violence, Democracy and Security, Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies or World Political Science). He has co-authored the publications ‚Challenges to Democracies in East Central Europe‘ and ‚Demokratizace a lidská práva. Středoevropské pohledy‘ (Democratization and Human Rights. The Central European Perspectives). His book ‘Electoral Violence in the Western Balkans. From Voting to Fighting and Back‘ is scheduled to be published in September 2017 by Routledge Press.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th The representation of 'Zainichi-Chosenjin'(Korean residents in Japan) in South Korea in the 1970s: Mass-media and representation of home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In this speech I would like to tell you how the ‘home-visiting project’ in 1975 has represented in the mass media in South Korea, and that this particular method of representation has been targeted. I want to talk about the representation of the Zainichi- Chosenjin(在日朝鮮人) in the 1970s reflect today’s South Korea rather than the realistic reconstruction of the surrounding home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan. The Zainichi-Chosenjin refer to ancestry of chosen(Korea) peninsula and their descendants who defected to Japan from colonial rule, regardless of nationality, belong to the Japanese colonial rule. In the 1970s, however, Zainichi-Chosenjin was understood as the image of ‘Pro-North Korea’ and ‘Converted chongnyeon (在日朝鮮人總聯合會)’ in South Korea. In 1975, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan began in the South Korean government’s intention to gain dominance over the North Korean regime. At the same time, it was an active national anti-communistic tourism project, which is distinguished from the “North Korea Repatriation Project”(歸國事業) in 1959.

    On the surface, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan appeared to be based on humanitarianism. By December 29, 1975, the number of visitors to South Korea was about 1,600. If the North Korea Repatriation Project was exodus for the settlement of paradise of socialism, home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan was the anti-communistic tourism for the purpose of denying the dark past as pro-North Korea by showing the rapid development of South Korea. In the 1970s, the mass media in South Korea represented Zainichi-Chosenjin as the converted to South Korea(“Total System converted collectively, 總轉向體制). However, the anti-communistic project planned by Yushin government, the National Intelligence Service, were not intended for Zainichi-Chosenjin. In Conclusion, the issue of dispersed family between North and South Korea, legal status concerning Zainichi-Chosenjin was not discussed. Instead converting of Zainichi-Chosenjin to South Korea was represented as victory of South Korea in competition of Cold War.

    Kim Won is an associate professor of political science at the Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies. Now he reserches at Hiroshima University in Japan for investigating memories of Zainichichosejin in era of cold war. Recently he presented “Stow away, border and nationality : Atomic notebook tial by Sohn Jin-doo victim of Korean atomic bomb”(2016). His interests include reemberinig of East Asia, labor history, and oral history. He is the author of several books including Factory Girl: Antihistory of Her (2006), Ghost of Park-Jung Hee Era(2011), Uprising June in 1987 (2009), The Disappearing Place of Politics (2008), Memories about the 1980s: Subculture and Mass Politics of Korean Students in the 1980s (1999).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Won
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Bookish Transactions in the Countryside: Missionary Print in nineteenth-century rural India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle
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    Description

    Coinciding with the rise of Protestant missionary activity, the spread of print technology in nineteenth-century South Asia introduced the cheap, mass-produced book in Indian languages and led to a boom in religious print. Despite the considerable body of work on Christian missionaries’ pioneering role in vernacular printing and their use of print for proselytizing, little attention has been paid to the impact of Christian tracts in the low-literacy environment of rural India. This talk examines how missionaries used the printed tract as both an object of transaction and a tool of conversion in their encounters with prospective converts in the Indian countryside. It also explores the understudied role of Indian colporteurs and catechists in disseminating Christian tracts. In tracing the shifting status of the tract as gift and saleable object, I outline the challenges of the missionary print enterprise, while drawing attention to the material dimensions of the book.

    Ulrike Stark is Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history. She is the author of An Empire of Books: The Naval Kishore Press and the Diffusion of the Printed Word in Colonial India (2007) and is currently completing a biography of Raja Sivaprasad ‘Sitara-e Hind.’

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ulrike Stark
    Speaker
    Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Co-Sponsors

    the Centre for Comparative Literature

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Transcendence in a Secular World: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall
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    Description

    The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

    I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions—particularly of China and India– that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic: separating God or the human subject from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOS, quasi-governmental and inter-governmental agencies committed to to the inviolability or sacrality of the ‘commons’ will need to find common cause with these communities struggling to survive.

    Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. Born and educated in India, he received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was Professor of History and East Asian Studies at University of Chicago (1991-2008) and Raffles Professor and Director of Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

    His books include Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) winner of Fairbank Prize of the AHA and Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA, Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014; discussion of the book can be found in http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/world/asia/china-religion-prasenjit-duara.html?ref=world

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Rebel, Ruler, Renegade – The Life of Enver Pasha (1881-1922)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM2098 Sidney Smith Hall
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Described by the Washington Herald in 1915 as “the most fascinating figure” of World War I, Enver Pasha has long been regarded as one of the most controversial figures of that war and indeed Middle Eastern history. This talk will trace the arc of Enver’s life from his emergence as the hero rebel of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 through his time as Ottoman Minister of War and triumvir in World War I to his battlefield death as an anti-imperialist renegade in Central Asia. It will argue that understanding Enver’s life is essential to understanding the emergence of the modern Middle East.


    Speakers

    Michael Reynolds
    Princeton University


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, April 8th The 2017 Toronto Conference on Germany: Populism, Immigration, and Elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 8, 20179:00AM - 4:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    An annual event, this conference examines the state of the union in Germany—Europe’s most consequential country—as well as the relationship between Germany and Canada.

    The conference features expert panels that this year will examine the 2017 German federal elections, immigration in Germany and Canada, and populism in Europe and North America.

    This event will be streamed live beginning at 9 a.m. at https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/Live/403.aspx

    Chair: Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    09:00 – 09:15
    Welcome – Stephen J. Toope, Munk School of Global Affairs; Eugen Wollfarth, Minister of the Embassy of Germany, Ottawa; Michael Meier, Friedrich Ebert Foundation

    09:15 – 10:00 Keynote Speech and Q&A
    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag

    10:00 – 11:30 Panel and Q&A: The 2017 German Federal Elections

    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag
    Prof. Eric Langenbacher, Georgetown University
    Dr. Michael Petrou, Montreal Institute for Genocide & Human Rights Studies
    Moderator: Veit Medick, Der Spiegel, Washington office

    11:30 – 11:45 Coffee break

    11:45 – 13:15 Panel and Q&A: Immigration in Canada and Germany

    Nele Allenberg, Head of the Welcome Center for Immigrants Berlin
    Birte Steller, Hamburg Agency for Labour, Social Issues, Family, and Integration
    Prof. Jeffrey Reitz, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Moderator: Marina Jimenez, Toronto Star

    13:15 – 14:00 Lunch

    14:00 – 15:30 Panel and Q&A: Populism in Europe and North America

    Bob Rae, former Premier of Ontario and Interim Leader, Liberal Party
    Prof. Dr. Frank Decker, University of Bonn
    Ryan Lenz, Southern Poverty Law Center
    Moderator: Joanna Slater, The Globe and Mail

    15:30 – 15:45 Closing remarks – Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    This event is co-sponsored by the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the Munk School for Global Affairs; the Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada; and the German Academic Exchange Service

    Use #germanTO on Twitter to follow this event

    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung @FES_DC

    Munk School @CERESMunk @munkschool

    German Embassy @GermanyInCanada

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Washington Office

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 10th Photo Essay of a Failed Reform: Beida, Tiananmen Square and the Defeat of Deng Xiaoping, 1975-76

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In mid-1975, Deng Xiaoping, with Mao’s blessing, initiated reforms that targeted the negative consequences of the Cultural Revolution. To bolster Deng’s effort, Mao endowed him with penultimate authority over the party, government and military. However, in late October, Mao turned on Deng, and within five months, Mao and the radicals toppled Deng from power.
    Chinese society supported Deng’s changes. In January 1976, Beijingers used Zhou’s death to express fears that his moderate policies and persona would be swept aside by the radicals. In early-April, several million Beijingers took over Tiananmen Square and denounced the radicals and challenged Mao’s vision for China’s future.
    As a foreign student at Peking University, I observed and photographed four key points in this historic struggle: (1) the initial establishment of a “big character poster” compound at Peking U; (2) emotional mourning for Zhou Enlai in Tiananmen Square following his death: (3) the intensified assault on Deng in February 1976 at Peking U; and (4) the massive demonstration of support in Tiananmen Square on April 3rd and 4th for the end of Maoist politics

    David Zweig is Chair Professor, Division of Social Science, and Director, Center on China’s Transnational Relations (www.cctr.ust.hk), HKUST. He is an Adjunct Professor, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, and Vice-President of the Center on China’s Globalization (Beijing). He lived in China for 4 years (1974-76, 1980-81, 1986 and 1991-92), and in Hong Kong since 1996. In 1984-85, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University. His Ph.D. is from The University of Michigan (Political Science, 1983).

    He is the author of four books, including Internationalizing China: domestic interests and global linkages (Cornell Univ. Press, 2002) and a new edited book, Sino-U.S. Energy Triangles: Resource Diplomacy under Hegemony, with Hao Yufan (Routledge: 2015). In 2013, he received The Humanities and Social Sciences Prestigious Fellowship, Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, and in 2015 received grant from the RGC for a project entitled, “Coming Home: Reverse Migration of Entrepreneurs and Academics in India and Turkey in Light of the Chinese Experience.”

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. David Zweig
    Speaker
    Chair Professor, Division of Social Science; Director, Center on China's Transnational Relations Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Seeing as Touch: Gao Jianfu's Revolutionary Design in Modern Canton

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the early years of the Republic the revolutionary Cantonese brush-and-ink painter Gao Jianfu (1879-1951) presented Sun Yatsen, father of the Republic, with an essay in which he argued that porcelain manufacture would save the new nation. Important among Gao’s own porcelain designs was a dish painted with mantises devouring pupa, encircled by a rim ornamented with patterns of stylized fishes, flowers, and birds on a ground much like Japanese shibori tie-dyed textiles. The striking contrast of the decorative rim with the specimen-like insect depiction at the dish’s centre raises questions. How did the rim’s artificial lines mediate the naturalism of the insects to embody Gao’s radical conception of modern design – a design that was more than formal, but social and political as well? And what did it mean for the nation to see and touch insects on their patriotic porcelains? How, in short, was the dish designed and designing?

    Lisa Claypool publishes widely on late imperial and Republican-era visual culture and design in China, and has curated and published a series of essays and interviews about contemporary art. She is currently at work on two projects: a book about the mediation of science through the ink brush in early 20th century China, and; an article about curatorial practices of contemporary artists in China.

    本人在阿尔伯塔大学主要教授中国艺术方面的课程,并负责大学美术馆的中国古代绘画和艺术藏品的管理和展览. 主要研究方向包括十八世纪之后的中国艺术和现当代视觉文化。目前已有多篇关于博物馆、近现代艺术、展览学以及审美学的文章在重要学术刊物和会议出版物中发表。

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Lisa Claypool
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Depertment of the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Alberta; Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery 2016-17

    Jennifer Purtle
    Chair
    Interim Dr. David Chu Director in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 13th Provisional Authority: Police, Order, and Security in India Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 13, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.

    Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.

    Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.
    Beatrice Jauregui is assistant professor at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Global Policing and Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

    Frank Cody
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; and Department Of Anthropology, UTM

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, UTM

    Kevin O’Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 18th Breaking the Ice Book Launch with Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 18, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Buttery
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C8
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    Description

    Join us on April 18th to celebrate the book launch of Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon’s ‘Breaking the Ice: Canada, Sovereignty, and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf’ (Dundurn Press). There will be a presentation by the author and the opportunity to purchase copies of the book and have them signed by the author.

    In Breaking the Ice: Canada, Sovereignty and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf, Arctic policy expert Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon examines the political, legal, and scientific aspects of Canada’s efforts to delineate its Arctic extended continental shelf. The quality and quantity of the data collected and analyzed by the scientists and legal experts preparing Canada’s Arctic Submission for the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, and the extensive collaboration with Canada’s Arctic neighbours is a good news story in Canadian foreign policy. As Arctic sovereignty continues to be a key concern for Canada and as the international legal regime is being observed by all five Arctic coastal states, it is crucial to continue to advance our understanding of the complex issues around this expanding area of national interest.

    Stick around after the book launch for a discussion on Canadian foreign policy with Roland Paris and Kim Nossal in the George Ignatieff Theatre. For full details click HERE

    Speaker’s Biography
    Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon has spent three decades researching and writing about law of the sea policy. She is a Distinguished Senior Fellow with the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto, and Professor Emerita in the Department of Political Science at Western University.

    This is a free event. There will be food, refreshments and a cash bar.

    Sponsors

    Canadian International Council

    The Gordon Foundation

    Dundurn Press

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 18th Canadian Foreign Policy Discussion with Roland Paris and Kim Nossal

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 18, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    Larkin Building, University of Toronto, St. George Campus
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C8
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us on Tuesday April 18th for a discussion on Canadian Foreign Policy between two of the most respected authorities on the subject, Roland Paris and Kim Nossal. Prior to the discussion we will be hosting a book launch in the Buttery for Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon’s Breaking Ice: Canada, Sovereignty, and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf. Click HERE for more details of that event.

    Speakers’ Biographies

    Kim Richard Nossal is the director of the School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University. He received his B.A., (1972), M.A. (1974), and Ph.D. (1977) in Political Economy from the University of Toronto. In 1976, he joined the Department of Political Science at McMaster University in Hamilton, serving as chair of the department from 1992 to 1996. In 2001, he was appointed head of the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s, a position he held until 2009. From 2008 to 2013, he served as the Sir Edward Peacock Professor of International Relations. From 2010 to 2013 he was the director of the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen’s.

    Nossal has served as editor of International Journal, the quarterly journal of the Canadian International Council, Canada’s institute of international affairs, and sits on the editorial boards of several journals. He has served as president of both the Australian and New Zealand Studies Association of North America (1999-2001) and the Canadian Political Science Association (2005-2006).

    Nossal has authored or edited a number of books, including The Politics of Canadian Foreign Policy (1985, 1989, 1997); Relocating Middle Powers: Australia and Canada in a Changing World Order (with Andrew F. Cooper and Richard A. Higgott, 1993); Rain Dancing: Sanctions in Canadian and Australian Foreign Policy (1994); Diplomatic Departures: The Conservative Era in Canadian Foreign Policy (ed. with Nelson Michaud, 2001); Politique internationale et défense au Canada et au Québec (with Stéphane Roussel and Stéphane Paquin, 2007); Architects and Engineers: Building the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, 1909-2009 (ed. with Greg Donaghy, 2009). His latest book, with Roussel and Paquin, is International Policy and Politics in Canada, published in 2011. At present he and Jean-Christophe Boucher are working on a book on the domestic politics of Canada’s Afghanistan mission.

    Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, where he teaches in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He has expertise in the fields of international security and peacebuilding, global governance and foreign policy. He has won several prizes and citations for his research, including the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, and six awards for teaching and public service.

    In addition to his scholarly work, Paris has held several positions in government, most recently as Senior Advisor to the Prime Minister of Canada. Previously he worked in the Privy Council Office, the Department of Foreign Affairs, and the Federal-Provincial Relations Office. He has also been Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country’s largest think tank, and he served on a group of ten international experts advising the Secretary-General of NATO.

    At the University of Ottawa, Paris founded the Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS), which he directed from 2008 until 2015. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, he was Assistant Professor the University of Colorado-Boulder, and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at Sciences Po in Paris.

    He sits on the editorial board of seven scholarly journals and has served the board of directors of several organizations, including the World University Service of Canada and the Academic Council on the United Nations System. He also provides regular analysis and commentary on international affairs for national and international media.

    Paris holds a Ph.D. from Yale University, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, and a B.A. from the University of Toronto. He lives in Ottawa with his spouse and three children.

    Contact

    Jennifer Chylinski

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Canadian International Council


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 19th (In)securitization

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20172:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This event is reserved for University of Toronto students and faculty.
    To register please visit: https://insecuritization.eventbrite.ca

    Munk School faculty map themes and interventions for understanding our new world of insecurity

    Has global governance been configured as a project of security, as distinct from earlier concepts of “freedom” or “peace”? What value-systems (economic, political, ethical and ecological) inform contemporary global security and insecurities? And what media—what channels, conduits, technologies—enable new networks of global governing?

    Moderated by Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Panel 1: Global Insecurity/Global Values
    Ritu Birla, Director, Initiative in Global Governance, Economy and Society, Munk School; Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies; Department of History

    Harriet Friedmann, Senior Fellow, Munk School and Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology

    Jon Lindsay, Faculty, Digital Media and Global Affairs, Munk School

    Lynette Ong, Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Louis Pauly, Chair, Department of Political Science; Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Joseph Wong, Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School;
    Department Political Science

    Panel 2: Media of Global Access, Improvement and Control
    Randall Hansen, Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Tong Lam, Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of History

    Darius Ornston, Faculty and Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Katharine Rankin, Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Rachel Silvey, Interim Director of the Asian Institute, and Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Lecture: 2:00PM-4:00PM
    Reception: 4:00PM-5:00PM


    Speakers

    Ritu Birla
    Panelist
    Director, Initiative in Global Governance, Economy and Society, Munk School; Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies; Department of History

    Harriet Friedmann
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Munk School and Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology

    Jon Lindsay
    Moderator
    Faculty, Digital Media and Global Affairs, Munk School

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Louis Pauly
    Panelist
    Chair, Department of Political Science; Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School; Department Political Science

    Randall Hansen
    Panelist
    Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Tong Lam
    Panelist
    Former Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of History

    Darius Ornston
    Panelist
    Faculty and Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Katharine Rankin
    Panelist
    Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Rachel Silvey
    Panelist
    Interim Director of the Asian Institute, and Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Stephen Toope
    Moderator
    Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 19th The Holodomor - Genocide Against the Ukrainian Nation in the Context of World Genocides

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Although comparative genocide as the second generation of genocide studies has developed over the past two decades, the Holodomor as a crime of genocide committed by Stalin’s regime has not been examined in comparative perspective. In her presentation, Dr. Myroslava Antonovych will trace the reasons for this situation and will offer a comparative analysis of the Holodomor with examples of genocide in the first half of the XX century–namely, the Armenian genocide of the Ottoman Empire and the Holocaust of Nazi Germany. The speaker will compare the three genocides as crimes under international law in terms of the mental (mens rea) and material (actus reus) elements of genocide that characterize each of them, noting the dissimilarities and similarities in intent, the perspectives of the victims and perpetrators, and the acts perpetrated. The key common element in the genocides perpetrated in the Ottoman Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Third Reich is that state organization was substituted by hegemony of a ruling party: the Ittihadists, the Communists, and the Nazis. The importance of comparing cases of genocide is evident – if lessons from the past are not heeded and genocide is not punished, history will repeat itself as can be seen in the east and south (Crimea) of Ukraine, where the successor state to the Soviet Union – the Russian Federation – continues an attack on the Ukrainian nation.

    Dr. Myroslava Antonovych is the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”, Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2010-2014 she was a Judge ad Hoc at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She graduated from the Faculty of Law, Lviv National University (1995) and from the English Department, Dnipropetrovsk National University in Ukraine (1981) with honors. She has LL.M. degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada (1999). Her Doctor of Law degree is from the Ukrainian Free University in Munich, Germany (2008) and Candidate of Philology degree is from Kyiv Linguistic University in Ukraine (1988). As a Fulbright scholar she conducted research on International Human Rights at the Urban and Morgan Institute for Human Rights, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (1996). She is the author of about 100 books and articles in Ukraine and abroad. Her research focuses on International Human Rights and Genocide Studies. In April-May 2017, Dr. Antonovych will be the visiting professor at the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Myroslava Antonovych
    Speaker
    The Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy"

    Andrij Makuch
    Chair
    HREC Associate Director of Research and Publication, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 21st The Neverending Age of Coal: Energy Extraction amidst Dreams of Post-Industrialism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 21, 20174:00PM - 5:30PMJackman Humanities Building
    Room 100, 170 St. George St.
    This event is free and open to all. Registration is not required.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Coal seems the antithesis of the economy of post-industrialism, part of the “maggoty corpse,” in Lewis Mumford’s words, of an industrial age far from present day economies focused on information technology and service work. Scholars have argued as such since at least the 1930s. Indeed, writers as diverse as Mumford, Daniel Bell, Richard Florida, and Timothy Mitchell have all portrayed a transition away from coal as a central element of a broader shift to a political economy defined by “flowing energy,” “a creative class,” and the geography of office parks, research labs, and university campuses that compose the landscapes of post-industrial society. No longer was economic life “a game against nature,” Daniel Bell contended in 1973. Instead, it was “a game between persons.” “What counts,” he wrote, “is not raw muscle power, or energy, but information.”

    In the years since Bell published The Coming of Post-Industrial Society, the global economy has indeed been transformed. Information technology has altered the nature of work, culture, and social life. Those same years have seen a transformation of urban space, fueled largely by highly educated workers in the technology and finance, insurance, and real estate (FIRE) sectors. Cities have become greener, and increasingly economically stratified. At the same time, American coal production has boomed, rising from 573 million tons annually in 1973 to 1.2 billion tons in 2008. Even the celebrated decline in coal use and bankruptcy of coal producers over the past eight years has lowered coal production only to 900 million tons. Indeed, post-industrial society has been, to a large extent, coal fired.

    This talk tries to make sense of this paradox. Why has a transition away from coal been imagined as central to the rise of post-industrialism? Why did the political economy of energy rely increasingly on coal? How was its use obscured, both in scholarly work, and in political culture more generally? And finally, what are the political and intellectual consequences of the new spatial dynamics of coal-fired, post-industrial society?

    This event is free and open to all. Registration is not required. If you require an accommodation for disability, please contact the Jackman Humanities Institute at 416-946-0313, or email jhi.associate@utoronto.ca, to make appropriate arrangements.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Andrew Needham
    Department of History, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    JHI Working Group: Imagining & Inhabiting Resource Landscapes, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 21st Federation and Confederation in Central Europe: Constitutions and Society in the 1860s and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 21, 20175:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Registration not required.

    Volker Berghahn is a historian of German and modern European history at Columbia University, where he holds the Seth Low Chair in History. His research interests have included the fin de siècle period in Europe, the origins of World War One, and German-American Relations. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Prof. Berghahn’s talk is the opening lecture of a series of events held by the University of Toronto Department of History to reflect on the meanings and memorializations of Confederation. A public conference on The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World will be held on April 22nd (for further information go to history.utoronto.ca/events/other-60s-decade-shaped-canada-and-world ), followed by Elsbeth Heaman’s 2017 Donald Creighton Lecture on “The Civilization of the Canadas in the 1860s”.


    Speakers

    Volker Berghahn
    Seth Low Chair in History, Columbia University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 26th IMFG Graduate Fellowship Seminar: Local Governance and Public Finance Challenges of the Fracking Boom: Lessons for the US and Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 26, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IMFG

    Description

    Every year, IMFG awards two fellowships to graduate students at the University of Toronto who are undertaking doctoral or master’s level work in areas related to municipal finance and governance. Come learn more about the research of this year’s fellowship winners.

    Hydraulic fracturing drilling – commonly known as fracking – makes up the majority of US oil output. Canada may soon follow. This presentation will focus on the impacts of boom-bust resource extraction cycles on local revenues and expenditures and intergovernmental relations. During the boom, local governments must provide new infrastructure for an expanding industry and maintain social service levels for a rapidly growing population. During the bust, municipal governments may find themselves over-extended with declining revenues while facing a new set of service challenges.

    About the speaker:

    Austin Zwick, originally from Texas, is a PhD Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto and an IMFG Graduate Fellow. He previously obtained a BSc in Industrial Relations and an MPA in Public Finance from Cornell University. Austin’s research interests focus on the intersection between energy and economic development, and the local governance challenges that arise because of it.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Austin Zwick
    PhD Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto and an IMFG Graduate Fellow.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 28th Ukraine Today Between War and Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 28, 20173:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bios of the panelists:

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    As the 3rd president of Georgia, Mikheil Saakashvili was applauded in the West for his reforms, which transformed the country from an almost failed state to a model in the fight against corruption. But he was defeated in parliamentary elections in 2012. Now he’s back – not in his native Georgia but as Ukrainian politician. In 2015 he was appointed by President Petro Poroshenko as his top foreign policy adviser and head of Ukraine’s Advisory International Council on Reforms. Then a Governor of Odessa Region. But when all of his attempts to transform the system in at least one region failed, Mikheil created an opposition party “Movement of New Forces” which has now officially been registered in Ukraine.

    Yuriy Butusov
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website, Yuriy Butusov has worked for the newspapers Kijevskije Vedomosti and Zerkalo nedeli (Weekly Mirror). In 2004 Butusov started the website Censor.net and is its editor. This online project is one of the most popular news portals in Ukraine. He wrote the screenplay for the film Orange Sky and produced the film Illusion of Fear. Yuriy Butusov is a journalist who reports on incisive social topics and conducts journalistic research. He has exposed many corruption cases and other crimes committed by the power elite. Censor.net, which was created by Butusov is among the most popular Ukrainian news portal. The main topic covered by Butusov currently is the situation in Ukraine – Russia’s aggression and the military activities in Donbas.

    Lyuba Shipovich
    In January 2016 Lyuba Shipovich, President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine, was named one of top 50 developers of New York City.
    She has developed a software called “OKO”: a media monitoring project, which automatically gathers all mentions on Ukraine in foreign media, grades by social rating (likes, shares, comments), and manually (by team of editors) prepares daily and weekly reports for the UN representatives, diplomats, politicians, media etc. In her effort to help reform Ukraine, she led the implementation of electronic record keeping and e-service systems in Odesa region of Ukraine. Brought the region to the 1st place in the investment efficiency rating, implementation of the Google program “Digital transformation of Odesa”.


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program's co-director

    Victor Ostapchuk
    Co-Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    Speaker
    Former President of Georgia, current leader of the opposition party "Movement of New Forces" in Ukraine

    Yuriy Butusov
    Speaker
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website

    Lyuba Shipovich
    Speaker
    President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canada-Ukraine International Assistance Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2017

  • Thursday, May 4th Symposium on the Comparative Program on Health and Society's Contributions to the Social Determinants of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 4, 20178:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Comparative Program on Health and Society as we commemorate seventeen years of the Program and celebrate its achievements in advancing research on the social determinants of health. Presentations by distinguished alumni will include discussions of their current research, with topics ranging from the health impacts of fracking in British Columbia to the Trade in Human Liver Lobes.

    Schedule:

    8:00 Registration and Breakfast

    8:45 Opening Remarks by Stephen Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, Peter Warrian, Co-Founder and Chair, Lupina Foundation, Lisa Forman, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    9:00 The History of CPHS
    Peter Warrian, Co-Founder and Chair, The Lupina Foundation, Senior Research Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Margret Hovanec, Co-Founder and Director, The Lupina Foundation
    Lisa Forman, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
    Joshua Goldstein, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Calgary
    Bianca Seaton, Qualitative Researcher, St. Michael’s Hospital

    10:30 Break

    11:00 Socio-Economic Status and Health Outcomes

    Social Determinants of Health in Rural Anhui
    Weizhen Dong, Associate Professor, Sociology and Legal Studies, The University of Waterloo

    When personal healing leads to reconciliation: a longitudinal study
    Regine King, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba

    Gender and health inequalities: Implications of the extended working lives agenda
    Laurie Corna, Lecturer, Faculty of Social Science and Public Policy, King’s College London

    Beyond the Ideology of Heterosexuality: Researching Structural Inequalities in Health Services
    Andrea Daley, Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Work, York University; Director, School of Social Work, York University

    12:30 Lunch

    13:30 Socio-Economic Status and Access to Healthcare

    Where are the social determinants of health in this fracking conversation? Exploring the cumulative (health) impacts of resource development in northern British Columbia
    Chris Buse, Project Lead, Cumulative Impacts Research Consortium, University of Northern British Columbia

    Reflections on CPHS and Global HIV Social Science Research
    Rusty Souleymanov, PhD Candidate, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

    A program of work to advance the pan-Canadian measurement of equity in health care
    Sara Allin, Assistant Professor, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

    Riding the wave. Understanding episodic disability and its impact on labour market participation in young adulthood and across the life course
    Arif Jetha, Associate Scientist, Institute for Work and Health

    15:00 Break

    14:00 Human Rights, Globalization, and Ethics

    Ethical issues related to the development and implementation of new technologies to fight tuberculosis
    Diego Silva, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University

    HIV and the Limits of Securitization
    Suzanne Hindmarch, Assistant Professor, University of New Brunswick

    Trade in Human Liver Lobes: Violence, Exploitation, Suffering
    Monir Moniruzzaman, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Anthropology Michigan State University

    Public Health as Social Justice
    Maxwell Smith, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, McGill University Institute for Health and Social Policy

    17:00 Closing Remarks from Lisa Forman

    ***Reception to Follow***

    Contact

    Pragya Kaul
    (416) 946-0104


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 5th Political Economy of Independent Ukraine: Late Starts, False Starts-and Last Chance?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 5, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Ukraine continues to be in the news since Independence with its early economic disappointments, its two people – revolutions, and of course the military aggression by Russia. This book has two main objectives. First, it describes the process of economic reforms and performance since independence. Second, it proposes several hypotheses as to why market reforms have been so slow and incomplete, and economic performance has lagged far behind that of the Central European countries. In doing so it puts forth a number of revisionist theories. The main economic difficulties were not, as many leaders argued, Ukraine’s unique impedimenta, but the decision at the very beginning to delay reforms. Oligarch development resulted from this late start, and is therefore not attributable to the Kuchma period alone as many analysts write, but started with the Kravchuk regime. One piece of evidence for that is that most of todays’ oligarchs started their business before 1994. Furthemore, delayed reforms allowed Russia to use it leverage over energy supplies to Ukraine’s detriment-but not coincidentally for the benefit of many early oligarchs. Finally, despite the incomplete reforms, standards of living of Ukrainians is not lower than they were in the Soviet period –that is simply a myth due to improper use of standard GDP statistics.

    Oleh Havrylyshyn is an economist with a diverse career including academia, Government as Deputy Minister of Finance of Ukraine, a senior official at the Board of Directors and management of the IMF. His numerous writings on transition have been widely cited. In 2014-2016, he was an advisor to senior officials of the Ukrainian Government.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oleh Havrylyshyn
    Speaker
    Adjunct Professor of Economics, George Washington University; member of the Economic Advisory Council to Ukraine’s Minister of Economics and the Presidential Administration

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program's Co-Director


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 11th Symposium: Gun Violence in Black America

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 11, 20179:00AM - 1:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Thursday, May 11th, 8:45 am to 1:00 pm. Registration starts at 8:45 am.

    The United States is currently experiencing a rise in firearm related deaths and injuries. In 2015, the CDC reported that there were 15,809 homicides in the US. 10,945 of these homicides (roughly 70%) were committed with firearms. These numbers represent a rise from previous years, and also conceal the thousands of non-fatally injured each year. In fact, similar data from the CDC estimates that only about 1 in 5 shootings are fatal. This means that approximately 80% of all gunshot victims are non-fatal. Additionally, we know that these patterns of violence are not evenly distributed across the U.S. population. A robust field of gun violence research shows that the burden of gun violence is felt within urban poor, Black communities across the United States. Homicide is the leading cause of death for young Black men between the age of 15-24; and Black men comprise roughly 50% of the total number of gun deaths, even though they only make up 6% of the U.S. population. The purpose of this one-day symposium will be to investigate key questions around the gun violence epidemic and its impacts on urban Black communities in the U.S.

    Panel 1: New Mechanisms – Gun Violence and Social Media
    Desmond Patton, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Columbia University
    “Innovating Gang Violence Prevention with Qualitative Analysis and Natural Language Processing Tools”

    Panel 2: New Responses – Evolving Emergency and Trauma Care for Gunshot Victims
    Joseph Richardson, Jr., Associate Professor, African American Studies, University of Maryland
    “Invisible Wounds: Violence, Trauma and Healing Young Black Men”

    Moderator: Jooyoung Lee, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.


    Speakers

    Desmond Patton
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Columbia University

    Joseph Richardson, Jr.
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, African American Studies, University of Maryland

    Jooyoung Lee
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 11th Populism and its Influence in the United States: How does the working class vote? And who votes for the working class?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 11, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The event will feature a discussion on Justin Gest’s new book, The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality, as well as Nick Carnes’ book, White Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making. These experts will weigh in on the role of populism in the United States and its influence on the rise of Donald Trump. Details are below.

    Seats are limited, please register here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/populism-and-its-influence-in-the-united-states-tickets-33991307917

    More on the speakers and discussant:

    Justin Gest is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government. His teaching and research interests include comparative politics, minority political behavior, and immigration policy. In the field of minority political behavior, his earlier research focused on Muslim political behavior in Western democracies. This work was collected in Apart: Alienated and Engaged Muslims in the West (Oxford University Press/Hurst, 2010). He recently published a follow-up study that applies his conclusions to white working class people. This work is entitled The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016).

    Nick Carnes is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, and the Co-Director of the Research Triangle chapter of the Scholars Strategy Network. His research focuses on U.S. politics, legislative decision making, representation, social class, economic inequality, and state and local politics. His book White-Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making examines how the shortage of people from the working class in American legislatures skews the policymaking process towards outcomes that are more in line with the upper class’s economic interests. He is also completing a large-scale study of the factors that discourage working-class Americans from holding public office and the programs that could help to address the shortage of working-class Americans in our political institutions.

    Chris Cochrane is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas (MQUP, 2015) and co-author, with Rand Dyck, of Canadian Politics: Critical Approaches (Nelson, 2014). He is also a co-investigator of Digging Into Linked Parliamentary Data, an international and interdisciplinary collaboration investigating the written records of parliamentary speech in Canada, the UK, and the Netherlands. He is interested in ideology and political disagreement in Canada and other democratic countries.


    Speakers

    Justin Gest
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University

    Nick Carnes
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

    Chris Cochrane
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 12th A Celebration of Emanuel Adler’s Scholarship and Career

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 12, 20179:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    On the occasion of Professor Emanuel Adler’s 70th birthday and 35th anniversary of graduating Berkeley, his colleagues and former PhD students gather to recognize their intellectual and personal debts and to celebrate Adler’s many scholarly achievements in the time-honored academic fashion of a Fest conference hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    The different papers presented at the conference will engage intellectually and critically Adler’s extensive contributions in the theory of international relations, especially but not limited to issues such as progress, communities, practices, constructivism, the Middle East, complexity theory, and the European order. Special attention will be given to Adler’s ongoing book project: A Social Theory of Cognitive Evolution: Change, Stability, and International Social Orders, which brings to fruition the different strands that interested him throughout his incredibly fruitful career.

    Emanuel Adler is the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the European Academy of Sciences, an Honorary Professor at the University of Copenhagen, and former editor of International Organization. Previously, he was Professor of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently based out of the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.

    His publications include books such as The Power of Ideology; Security Communities (with Michael Barnett); Communitarian International Relations; Convergence of Civilizations (with Federica Bicchi Beverly Crawford, and Raffaella Del Sarto); International Practices (with Vincent Pouliot); and Israel in the World. He has also published articles such as “Seizing the Middle Ground: Constructivism in World Politics” and “The Emergence of Cooperation: National Epistemic Communities and the International Evolution of the Idea of Nuclear Arms Control.”

    Professor Adler’s interests include international practices and communities of practice, the evolution of international order, a constructivist reconsideration of strategic logic, including deterrence, European security institutions, international relations theory — in particular, constructivism, epistemic communities, security communities, and communities of practice — and Israel’s relations with the world.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Department of Political Science, Mr. Charles Bronfman and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies University of Toronto

    9:00 Welcome
    Louis Pauly, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science
    Stephen J. Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Karen Weisman, Professor and Acting Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    9:30 Becoming Emanuel Adler
    Piki Ish-Shalom, the A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Markus Kornprobst, Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies
    Vincent Pouliot, Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    10:15 Coffee break

    10:30 Pragmatism, Meaning, and Suffering: Evolutionary Callings and Exhaustions
    Michael Barnett, University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University
    Janice Stein, Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    11:15 Two Tales of Imperial Power: Mongols on Land — Anglo-America on Water
    Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    12:00 Lunch break

    13:00 Holding the Middle Ground: Cognitive Evolution and Progress
    Christian Reus-Smit, Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    13:45 In consideration of evolving matters
    Alena Drieschova, Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    14:30 Coffee break

    15:00 Governing Environmental Complexity through Cognitive Evolution
    Peter M. Haas, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    15:45 Power in evolution
    Stefano Guzzini, Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    16:30 Closing remarks
    Emanuel Adler, Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    *** Reception to Follow ***


    Speakers

    Louis Pauly
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science

    Stephen J. Toope
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Piki Ish-Shalom
    A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Markus Kornprobst
    Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies

    Vincent Pouliot
    Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    Michael Barnett
    University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University

    Janice Stein
    Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    Peter J. Katzenstein
    Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    Christian Reus-Smit
    Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    Alena Drieschova
    Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    Peter M. Haas
    Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Stefano Guzzini
    Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    Emanuel Adler
    Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 15th – Tuesday, May 16th Policing: IDEAS CBC RADIO ONE & Munk School of Global Affairs (May 15th & May 16th)

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 15, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, May 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and CBC IDEAS

    Description

    Relations between the public and the police are strained today: from charges of police violence, abuse and racial bias to calls for transparency and greater police accountability. At the same time, we expect the cops to take on new missions: counter-terrorism, cybercrime, and the policing of highly diverse societies. In this new two-part series, IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, considers what it means to police and be policed in these complex and anxious times.

    Monday May 15, 2017, Part 1: To Serve or Protect

    Do the police serve the public by doing what communities say they want and need? Or, do cops think they know what’s best for public safety and must protect us? Inspector Shawna Coxon, Toronto Police Service, and member of the TPS Transformational Task Force; Todd Foglesong, Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School; Donald Worme, Q.C. , I.P.C., Cree lawyer and founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, based in Saskatoon; and moderator Ron Levi, Director of the Munk School’s Global Justice Lab, debate the dynamics of policing, trust and public consent.

    Tuesday May 16, 2017, Part 2: Old Cops, New Expectations

    Counter-terrorism, fighting cybercrime, policing highly diverse societies: Can the police do it all? Should the police do it all? Do the police want
    to do it all? Cal Corley, CEO of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance, and former Assistant Commissioner with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Inspector Shawna Coxon, Toronto Police Service, and member of the TPS Transformational Task Force; Micheal Vonn, Policy Director, B.C. Civil Liberties Association; and moderator Ron Levi, Director of the Munk School’s Global Justice Lab, weigh the implications, the challenges and the trade-offs for the police, for justice and for all of us.

    ABOUT THE PANELLISTS

    Inspector Shawna Coxon

    Serving for more than two decades with the Toronto Police Service, Inspector Shawna Coxon has had a diverse career in uniform, community, intelligence, and investigative policing. Having just released ‘The Way Forward’ as a member of the Transformational Task Force, she has started an Organizational Change Management Team (a novel endeavour in Canadian policing). Prior to that, she was the second in charge of Intelligence Services where she implemented the inaugural Computer Cyber Crime Section.

    Inspector Coxon has a PhD in Criminal Law and her areas of research include criminal law and technology. She is a published academic who has lectured internationally. She has won numerous awards; however she is most proud of the letters of appreciation from victims she has worked diligently for.

    Todd Foglesong

    Todd Foglesong joined the Munk School of Global Affairs as a Professor of Global Practice in 2014. He writes and teaches about the role of indicators as instruments of governance in policing and prosecution around the world, competing strategies for measuring and managing the response to violence against women and pretrial detention, and the role of surveys in assessments of safety and justice.

    Between 2007 and 2014, Todd was a senior research fellow and adjunct lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), where wrote about policing in Los Angeles under a consent decree, the challenges of “making policing more affordable” in the United States, and the role of indicators of justice in the governments of Jamaica, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

    Donald Worme, Q.C., I.P.C.

    DONALD E. WORME, Q.C., I.P.C., is a Cree lawyer from Kawacatoose First Nation, Treaty Four, Saskatchewan. For more than thirty years, he’s practiced extensively in criminal law and Aboriginal rights litigation. He also has considerable experience in public law, including Judicial Inquiries and Commissions of Inquiry. Among his high profile cases: Donald Worme served as Commission Counsel to the Ipperwash Judicial Inquiry into the death of unarmed Aboriginal protester, Dudley George, at the hands of an OPP sniper; he was Lead Counsel to the family of Neil Stonechild in the public inquiry into the freezing death of the Aboriginal teenager in Saskatoon; and he represented the family of 18-year-old Mathew Dumas in the Coroners Inquest into his shooting death by the Winnipeg Police. Donald Worme is a founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association and recipient of the Aboriginal Achievement Award for outstanding efforts in the field of Law and Justice.

    Cal Corley

    Cal Corley is the CEO of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance (CKSA), a non-profit research and knowledge development centre that supports governments and the community safety sector in their drive for improved community safety and wellbeing. Cal is a former Assistant Commissioner with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. During his career, he gained extensive experience in both operations and management, serving in such areas as national security, criminal intelligence, drug enforcement, human resources, and leading reform initiatives. He also served at the Privy Council Office and at Public Safety Canada. From 2008 – 2014, he was head of the Canadian Police College, during which time he also served as the RCMP Senior Envoy to Mexico and the Americas.

    Micheal Vonn

    Micheal Vonn is a lawyer and has been the Policy Director of the BCCLA since 2004. She has been an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia in the Faculty of Law and in the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies where she has taught civil liberties and information ethics. She’s also a regular guest instructor for UBC’s College of Health Disciplines Interdisciplinary Elective in HIV/AIDS Care. Ms Vonn’s been honoured for her work in HIV/AIDS with both an AccolAIDS Award and a Red Ribbon Award, and she is the recipient of the 2015 Keith Sacré Library Champion Award. She’s currently a collaborator on Big Data Surveillance, a multi-year research projected lead by Queens University. She’s an Advisory Board Member of Ryerson University’s Centre for Free Expression and an Advisory Board Member of Privacy International.

    MODERATOR:

    Professor Ron Levi holds the George Ignatieff Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Toronto, where he serves as Deputy Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs, and is an Associate Professor of Global Affairs and Sociology. He is a sociologist and legal scholar, whose research focuses on the legal and political dimensions of justice system responses to violence, crime, and human rights violations. Prof. Levi is a past Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He launched a Global Justice Lab at the Munk School, and was awarded the University of Toronto’s Ludwik and Estelle Jus Memorial Human Rights Prize. He holds an appointment as Permanent Visiting Professor in the University of Copenhagen’s Centre of Excellence for International Courts.

    POLICING READERS: PART ONE

    Sharry Flett

    Sharry Flett has acted in theatres across Canada and played leading roles at the Stratford Festival (4 seasons) and the Shaw Festival (28 seasons). She will appear in “Me And My Girl” and “1837 A Farmer’s Revolt” for the 2017 Shaw season. She was twice nominated for Gemini Awards as Best Actress (CBC TV Drama). She’s also taught acting at the Shaw Festival, George Brown Theatre School, University of Toronto, Queen’s University, and the National Theatre School in Montreal.

    RH Thomson

    Acclaimed Canadian stage and screen actor RH Thomson, was awarded in 2015 the prestigious Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, was the recipient of the 2014 ACTRA Toronto Award of Excellence. He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2010 and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Toronto, Trinity College. Recently, Mr. Thomson directed The Crucible at Theatre Calgary and performed in You Will Remember Me at the Tarragon Theatre. He is currently playing Matthew Cuthbert in the CBC/NETFLIX series ANNE and producing the Canadian and international WWI Commemoration project The World Remembers- Le Monde se souvient.

    EVENT HOST:

    Greg Kelly is the Executive Producer of the CBC Radio One program IDEAS. After completing his doctorate in literature at Oxford University, Greg Kelly left the academy to begin working at the CBC Radio — in fact, his first foray into broadcasting was at IDEAS. His work in both radio and television has won international awards. In 2006, Greg left the CBC to create and oversee a daily NPR current affairs program, The Story, which was carried by over 100 affiliates. He then went to Radio Netherlands Worldwide, where he became Editor of the internationally-acclaimed program The State We’re In, which won numerous awards and was carried nationally in the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland as well as select markets in India and Africa. He returned to Canada in the autumn of 2013, and is now an Associate Senior Fellow of Massey College.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this is a public event – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 17th Israel - Palestine: Is the Two-State Solution Dead?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 17, 20176:30PM - 8:30PMUniversity of Toronto Trinity College
    Combination Room
    6 Hoskin Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1H8
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Jon Allen (LL.B., University of Western Ontario; LL.M., International Law, University of London School of Economics) joined the then Department of External Affairs in 1981. In addition to postings abroad in Mexico City, New Delhi and Washington, Mr. Allen spent his early career in the Legal Bureau where he represented Canada in disputes under the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement and worked in the areas of human rights, humanitarian and environmental law. Mr. Allen also held the positions of Director General, North America Bureau, Minister (Political Affairs) at the Embassy of Canada in Washington and Assistant Deputy Minister for the Americas. From 2006-2010, he was Ambassador of Canada to Israel. From 2012 to 2016 he was Canada’s Ambassador to Spain and Andorra. He was Charge d’affaires a.i. to the Holy See from December 2012 to July 2014.

    Mr. Allen is currently a Diplomat in Residence at Fulbright Canada and a Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Registration
    CIC Members: $20
    Non-members: $30
    CIC Students: $5
    Non-member Students: $10

    Space is limited so please register as soon as possible.

    If you have any questions, please contact us at toronto@thecic.org

    Looking forward to seeing you!
    Henry Lotin
    Member of the Executive Committee and Event Organizer
    Canadian International Council – Toronto Branch


    Speakers

    Jon Allen
    Former Canadian Ambassador to Israel


    Sponsors

    CIC Canadian International Council Toronto Branch


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 23rd Should Canada develop a list of essential medicines?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 23, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The World Health Organization recommends that each state define its own list of essential medicines. Essential medicines lists generally contain hundreds of medicines including treatments for acute conditions (e.g. pneumonia, anaphylaxis, sprained ankles) and chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes, HIV-AIDS, hypertension). Lists of essential medicines can help governments ensure adequate healthcare services are delivered by identifying the medications that are needed by people.

    More than 100 countries have developed essential medicine lists. Canada is not one of them.

    Should Canada develop a list of essential medicines? We will learn from two international experts about the benefits and challenges of creating an essential medicines list: Dr Nicola Magrini from the World Health Organization’s Essential medicines group and Professor Lars Gustaffson from the Swedish “Wise List”. Then we will hear the reactions of Canadian decision makers before we open up the discussion to involve all participants.

    This event is supported by the WHO Collaborating Center for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector.


    Speakers

    Nicola Magrini
    Secretary of the Expert Committee on the Selection and Use of Essential Medicines Policy, Access and Use Team Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products (EMP/PAU) World Health Organization

    Lars Gustaffson
    Professor, senior consultant Division of Clinical Pharmacology Department of Laboratory Medicine Karolinska Institutet Karolinska University Hospital


    Sponsors

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 23rd RELIGION, ETHNO-NATIONALISM, AND VIOLENCE: PROBING THE INTERSECTIONS

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 23, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Co-organized by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and the University of Toronto’s Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies, this event explores the intersections of religion, ethno-nationalism, fascism, antisemitism, and violence in the era of the world wars. By analyzing the ways in which religious groups, institutions, and networks engaged political and social upheaval in and beyond Europe, we hope to identify broader patterns that can deepen our understanding of the dynamics shaping the roles of religious actors before and during the Holocaust.

    By bringing together scholars, teachers, students, and community members, the Mandel Center’s outreach symposia seek to enrich campus dialogue and forge connections with diverse audiences that will ensure the vitality of Holocaust studies in an increasingly interdisciplinary and multicultural academic landscape. The Mandel Center’s Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust focus on the history of the churches’ response to the Holocaust, the roles of different religious communities during that period, and the ways in which religious institutions, leaders, and theologians have addressed this history and its legacy since 1945.

    The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies is located within the Department of History and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. Its goals are to produce and promote world-class scholarship on the Holocaust, to train undergraduate and especially graduate students in Holocaust Studies, and to connect researchers in Canada with their international counterparts. In keeping with its commitment to making high-quality research widely accessible, the Wolfe Chair welcomes the public at many of its events.


    Speakers

    Susannah Heschel
    Speaker
    Dartmouth College

    Victoria Barnett
    Speaker
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Doris Bergen
    Moderator
    University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    Hoffberger Family Foundation

    Department of History

    Konstanty Reynert Chair in Polish History

    John Yaremko Chair in Ukrainian Studies

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 25th Soccer as an Agent of Integration: Sport in Expellee and Refugee Camps in Germany after World War II

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 25, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In September 1945, a few months after the end of World War II, a group of young soccer enthusiasts founded a soccer association in the largest refugee and expellee camp in southwestern Germany. Through the meandering history of this remarkable soccer association, special attention is paid to the reciprocal effects of two mass phenomena: sports and migrant camps. The paper highlights the relevance of sports in the long-term process of integration of 12.5 million refugees and expellees into postwar German society.


    Speakers

    Prof. Dr. Mathias Beer
    University of Tübingen


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 29th Finding Common Ground: Inter-Local Cooperation in Canada in Theory and Practice

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 29, 201710:00AM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Municipal governments across Canada are increasingly looking to inter-municipal agreements as a way to share the costs and delivery of some local services. As this practice increases, it is important to have a better understanding of the benefits and consequences of service sharing in Canadian communities. How well are these agreements working? What challenges do municipalities face? What are the pitfalls of entering into these arrangements? This half-day conference brings together academics and practitioners to examine inter-municipal agreements and service sharing in Canadian municipalities and Indigenous communities.

    Seating is limited and registration is required.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Zachary Spicer
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Brock University

    Christopher Alcantara
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Western Ontario

    Jen Nelles
    Visiting Assistant Professor, Urban Policy and Planning, Hunter College, City University of New York

    Dave Cash
    President and CEO, Cash and Associates Inc.

    Emily Harris
    Principal, Acclimatize Fiscal Consulting



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 30th Symposium: Reforming Criminal Justice and National Security

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 30, 201710:00AM - 5:00PMUniversity of Toronto Faculty of Law
    84 Queens Park, Solarium
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    Description

    Hosted by U of T Faculty of Law and Supported by the Trudeau Foundation. Co-sponsored by the Criminal Law Quarterly and the Counter-Terrorism Law and Policy Group, Global Justice Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    This symposium is designed to produce a special double issue of the Criminal Law Quarterly that will reflect on the processes and challenges of reforming criminal justice and national security.

    The aim is to examine specific contexts of pressing concerns that may be the subject of anticipated legislation including expected amendments to Ontario’s Police Services Act, expected amendments to the Criminal Code and expected amendments to the Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015 and related national security legislation.

    The symposium is designed to bring academics, policy-makers and practitioners together for frank and open discussion of matters of common concern and pressing importance.

    The symposium will end with a panel on general reflections about the process of criminal justice and national security reform.

    The Symposium is free but registration is required. To register, or for more information, please visit:
    https://www.law.utoronto.ca/events/criminal-justice-and-national-security-reform-symposium

    Co-Sponsors

    Faculty of Law

    Trudeau Foundation

    Criminal Law Quarterly

    Global Justice Lab


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2017

  • Thursday, June 8th Muslim Integration in France and Canada Compared

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 8, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this special panel discussion, experts from France and Canada will present and discuss recent survey research assessing the integration of Muslim minorities in France, Quebec and Canada.

    Program

    3:50-4:00 Registration
    4:00-4:05 Welcome address: Professor Randall Hansen, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    4:05-4:10 Opening remarks: Mr. Marc Trouyet, Consul General of France in Toronto
    4:10-4:40 Dr Patrick Simon, Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques (INED): “Muslims in France: Religion and the Experience of Exclusion”
    4:40-5:10 Professor Jeffrey Reitz, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto: “Muslims in France, Canada and Quebec: Inclusion and Exclusion across Settings”
    5:10-5:20 Professor Abdie Kazemipur, Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge
    5:20-5:30 Professor Valérie Amiraux, Department of Sociology, Université de Montréal
    5:30-6:00 Q&A
    6:00-7:00 Reception

    PATRICK SIMON is Director of Research at the Institut national d’études démographiques (National Institute for Demographic Studies; INED). He was a Visiting Scholar at the Advanced Research Collaborative program at CUNY (2015-2016) and at the Russell Sage Foundation in 2010-11. Trained as a sociodemographer at L’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences; EHESS), where he earned a doctoral degree in 1994, he has studied social and ethnic segregation in French cities, antidiscrimination policies, and the integration of ethnic minorities in European countries. He is one of the principal investigators of a large survey, Trajectories and Origins: The Diversity of Population in France, conducted by INED and the Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies).

    JEFFREY G. REITZ is a Professor of Sociology and Director of the R.F. Harney Program of Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Professor and former Chair in the University’s Department of Sociology. Professor Reitz has published extensively on immigration and inter-group relations; his work had emphasized the case of Canada in comparative perspective, and he also has written on policies for immigration, immigrant employment, and multiculturalism. Recent articles have appeared in the International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Social Science Research, and Patterns of Prejudice. He is a member of the Centre d’analyse et d’intervention sociologiques, L’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales; in 2017 he will be Visiting Fellow at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

    ABDIE KAZEMIPUR is the University Scholar research chair in social sciences at the Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge; and as of next month, the Chair of Ethnic Studies at University of Calgary. Previously, he served as Stephen Jarislowsky Chair in Culture Change and Immigration at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He has also been the founding director of two research data centres at the University of Lethbridge and Memorial University. He conducts research on the socio-economic experiences of immigrants in Canada and the socio-cultural developments in the Middle East, on which he has published seven books. His most recent book, The Muslim Question in Canada: A Story of Segmented Integration (UBC Press, 2014), received the 2015 John Porter Excellence Award from the Canadian Sociological Association. He is currently working on a new book titled Sacred as Secular: Secularization under Theocracy in Iran. Commentaries and interviews about his works have appeared in The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, National Post, la Presse, Winnipeg Free Press, Vancouver Sun, Lethbridge Herald, Global TV, TVO, and Russia Today TV, among others.

    VALĒRIE AMIRAUX (valerieamiraux.com) is a full Professor of Sociology at the University of Montreal (on leave from her Senior Research Fellow position at the CNRS), where she holds the Canada Research Chair for the Study of Religious Pluralism. Her main fields are religious pluralism, the relationships between Muslim minorities and European and Quebecer societies, Islamophobia and discrimination. Her current research interests centre on an ethnographic analysis of the articulation between pluralism and radicalisation, with a special emphasis on the interaction between majority societies and Jews and Muslims as minorities in specific cities of Europe and Canada. Her most recent publications include: 2017 AMIRAUX V., “From the Empire to the Republic: ‘French Islam’”, in N. Bancel et al. (ed.), The Colonial Legacy in France, Indiana University Press (forthcoming), 2016, AMIRAUX, V., “Visibility, Transparency and Gossip: How did the religion of some (Muslims) become the public concern of other? ”, Critical religious Studies (special issue: The Muslim Question), vol. 4(1), pp. 37-56, AMIRAUX V., “Parler des autres pour dire qui nous sommes : Débat(s) européen(s) sur le port du voile intégral”, in D. Koussens, M.-P. Robert, C. Gélinas et al., La religion hors-la-loi : L’État libéral à l’épreuve des religions minoritaires, à paraître, AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS (dir.), “Droit et religion en contexte de pluralisme : alliance objective ou mariage de raison ? //Law and Religion in Plural Societies : Objective Alliance or Marriage of Convenience ? ”, Studies in Religion-Religious Studies, 45 (2), numéro spécial, 2015 AMIRAUX, V. ET F. DESHARNAIS, Salomé et les hommes en noir, Bayard Canada., 2014 AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS, Trajectoires de la neutralité, Presses de l’université de Montréal.

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of France in Toronto

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies, DAAD


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 12th Mennonites and the Holocaust - and Gerhard Rempel's Unfinished Book

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 12, 20175:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Panel discussion with:

    Rebecca Carter-Chand, Clark University
    Diana Dumitru, Ion Creanga State Pedagogical University, Moldova
    Aileen Friesen, University of Waterloo
    Mark Jantzen, Bethel College, Kansas
    Robert Nelson, University of Windsor
    Robert Teigrob, Ryerson University

    moderated by
    Doris Bergen, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs, room 108N
    1 Devonshire Place

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 13th How Does China Respond to the Threat of Terrorism? Information and Political Mechanisms

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 13, 20171:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The world is faced with the necessary, if unasked for, task of effectively countering globally coordinated and financed extremist-based terrorism. This lecture presents Professor Fang’s comprehensive structural approach that China is utilizing to counter that threat. Under the title of “The Law of Triangle Motion,” the synergistic interactions between a) government leadership, b) psychologically informed, legislative, educational, economic and defensive countermeasures to extremist ideology, and c) involvement of the people and society, will be described in detail. Complimentary political mechanisms will be discussed.
    Note this lecture will be translated live by translator

    Qiang Fang is a Professor at Northwest University of Political Science and Law in Xi’an, and one of China’s pioneers in the field of legal (forensic) psychology and a pioneer and leading contributor to Chinese research on extremism and terrorism. He was awarded the titles of “Outstanding Expert” and “Prominent Jurist” along with an “Expert Prize” and an “Allowance for Life” from the State Department of China. He was also a writer for the Chinese Encyclopedia, the Comprehensive Dictionary of Psychology, and the Chinese Contemporary Psychology Textbook. Professor Fang’s works have received various awards including: An Introduction to Legal Psychology, The Shanxi Provincial First Prize for Outstanding achievement in the Philosophical and Social Sciences, and the Shanxi Provincial Education Committee’s Humanity Social Science Outstanding Achievement Award.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Qiang Fang
    Speaker
    Professor, Northwest University of Political Science and Law

    David Nussbaum
    Chair
    Professor (Retired), Psychology, University of Toronto Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, June 16th Gold Mining and Agrarian Transformation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 16, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMYork University Room 208N York Lanes
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us for this free public lecture(no registration required) by Nancy Lee Peluso (UC-Berkeley).

    Nancy is a longtime contributor to political ecology, the critical approach to the study of socio-ecological transformations and their politics across scales. Her work has influenced studies of the relationships between violence and environmental change, including how violence shapes resource access and agrarian change, how nature conservation legitimizes violent dispossessions, and how violence is integral to the constitution of political forests.

    Her work examines the social processes that affect the management of land-based resources, using ethnographic, historical, and other broadly sociological research methods. Her work explores various dimensions of resource access, use, and control, while comparing and contrasting local, national, and international influences on management structures and processes. She grounds her analysis of contemporary resource management policy and practice in local and regional histories.

    She is particularly interested in how social difference – ethnic identity, class, gender – affects resource access and control. How do government and non-government institutions and actors define, make claims upon, contest, and attempt to manage natural resources?

    Nancy is the Henry J. Vaux Distinguised Professor of Forest Policy, and Professor of Society and Environment (University of California, Berkeley).

    Event page on Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/1875504296058110
    Event info on our website: http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/event/gold-mining-agrarian-transformation/

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Nancy Peluso
    Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy Professor of Society and Environment, University of California, Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    York University Geography Department

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, June 21st Climate Finance in Ontario: Can Debt Financing be "Green"?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, June 21, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Municipalities are crucial stakeholders in climate change. They are a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and, due to their higher building and population densities, will also bear the brunt of the economic and social costs imposed by extreme weather events. Can Ontario municipalities rely on debt financing mechanisms to pay for critical mitigation and adaptation projects? Can debt financing be “green”? On June 21, IMFG post-doctoral fellow Gustavo Carvalho will talk about climate financing in Ontario cities, looking at financial instruments and strategies that have been successfully implemented elsewhere, with a focus on green bonds, environmental impact bonds, and green banks.

    Space is limited and registration is required.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Gustavo Carvalho
    Gustavo Carvalho is IMFG’s Post-Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2017. He has a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto, an M.A. in International Relations from the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and a law degree from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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