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June 2017

  • Thursday, June 8th Muslim Integration in France and Canada Compared

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 8, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In this special panel discussion, experts from France and Canada will present and discuss recent survey research assessing the integration of Muslim minorities in France, Quebec and Canada.

    Program

    3:50-4:00 Registration
    4:00-4:05 Welcome address: Professor Randall Hansen, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    4:05-4:10 Opening remarks: Mr. Marc Trouyet, Consul General of France in Toronto
    4:10-4:40 Dr Patrick Simon, Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques (INED): “Muslims in France: Religion and the Experience of Exclusion”
    4:40-5:10 Professor Jeffrey Reitz, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto: “Muslims in France, Canada and Quebec: Inclusion and Exclusion across Settings”
    5:10-5:20 Professor Abdie Kazemipur, Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge
    5:20-5:30 Professor Valérie Amiraux, Department of Sociology, Université de Montréal
    5:30-6:00 Q&A
    6:00-7:00 Reception

    PATRICK SIMON is Director of Research at the Institut national d’études démographiques (National Institute for Demographic Studies; INED). He was a Visiting Scholar at the Advanced Research Collaborative program at CUNY (2015-2016) and at the Russell Sage Foundation in 2010-11. Trained as a sociodemographer at L’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences; EHESS), where he earned a doctoral degree in 1994, he has studied social and ethnic segregation in French cities, antidiscrimination policies, and the integration of ethnic minorities in European countries. He is one of the principal investigators of a large survey, Trajectories and Origins: The Diversity of Population in France, conducted by INED and the Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies).

    JEFFREY G. REITZ is a Professor of Sociology and Director of the R.F. Harney Program of Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Professor and former Chair in the University’s Department of Sociology. Professor Reitz has published extensively on immigration and inter-group relations; his work had emphasized the case of Canada in comparative perspective, and he also has written on policies for immigration, immigrant employment, and multiculturalism. Recent articles have appeared in the International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Social Science Research, and Patterns of Prejudice. He is a member of the Centre d’analyse et d’intervention sociologiques, L’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales; in 2017 he will be Visiting Fellow at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

    ABDIE KAZEMIPUR is the University Scholar research chair in social sciences at the Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge; and as of next month, the Chair of Ethnic Studies at University of Calgary. Previously, he served as Stephen Jarislowsky Chair in Culture Change and Immigration at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He has also been the founding director of two research data centres at the University of Lethbridge and Memorial University. He conducts research on the socio-economic experiences of immigrants in Canada and the socio-cultural developments in the Middle East, on which he has published seven books. His most recent book, The Muslim Question in Canada: A Story of Segmented Integration (UBC Press, 2014), received the 2015 John Porter Excellence Award from the Canadian Sociological Association. He is currently working on a new book titled Sacred as Secular: Secularization under Theocracy in Iran. Commentaries and interviews about his works have appeared in The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, National Post, la Presse, Winnipeg Free Press, Vancouver Sun, Lethbridge Herald, Global TV, TVO, and Russia Today TV, among others.

    VALĒRIE AMIRAUX (valerieamiraux.com) is a full Professor of Sociology at the University of Montreal (on leave from her Senior Research Fellow position at the CNRS), where she holds the Canada Research Chair for the Study of Religious Pluralism. Her main fields are religious pluralism, the relationships between Muslim minorities and European and Quebecer societies, Islamophobia and discrimination. Her current research interests centre on an ethnographic analysis of the articulation between pluralism and radicalisation, with a special emphasis on the interaction between majority societies and Jews and Muslims as minorities in specific cities of Europe and Canada. Her most recent publications include: 2017 AMIRAUX V., “From the Empire to the Republic: ‘French Islam’”, in N. Bancel et al. (ed.), The Colonial Legacy in France, Indiana University Press (forthcoming), 2016, AMIRAUX, V., “Visibility, Transparency and Gossip: How did the religion of some (Muslims) become the public concern of other? ”, Critical religious Studies (special issue: The Muslim Question), vol. 4(1), pp. 37-56, AMIRAUX V., “Parler des autres pour dire qui nous sommes : Débat(s) européen(s) sur le port du voile intégral”, in D. Koussens, M.-P. Robert, C. Gélinas et al., La religion hors-la-loi : L’État libéral à l’épreuve des religions minoritaires, à paraître, AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS (dir.), “Droit et religion en contexte de pluralisme : alliance objective ou mariage de raison ? //Law and Religion in Plural Societies : Objective Alliance or Marriage of Convenience ? ”, Studies in Religion-Religious Studies, 45 (2), numéro spécial, 2015 AMIRAUX, V. ET F. DESHARNAIS, Salomé et les hommes en noir, Bayard Canada., 2014 AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS, Trajectoires de la neutralité, Presses de l’université de Montréal.

    Co-Sponsors

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies, DAAD

    Consulate General of France in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 12th Mennonites and the Holocaust - and Gerhard Rempel's Unfinished Book

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 12, 20175:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Panel discussion with:

    Rebecca Carter-Chand, Clark University
    Diana Dumitru, Ion Creanga State Pedagogical University, Moldova
    Aileen Friesen, University of Waterloo
    Mark Jantzen, Bethel College, Kansas
    Robert Nelson, University of Windsor
    Robert Teigrob, Ryerson University

    moderated by
    Doris Bergen, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs, room 108N
    1 Devonshire Place

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 13th How Does China Respond to the Threat of Terrorism? Information and Political Mechanisms

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 13, 20171:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The world is faced with the necessary, if unasked for, task of effectively countering globally coordinated and financed extremist-based terrorism. This lecture presents Professor Fang’s comprehensive structural approach that China is utilizing to counter that threat. Under the title of “The Law of Triangle Motion,” the synergistic interactions between a) government leadership, b) psychologically informed, legislative, educational, economic and defensive countermeasures to extremist ideology, and c) involvement of the people and society, will be described in detail. Complimentary political mechanisms will be discussed.
    Note this lecture will be translated live by translator

    Qiang Fang is a Professor at Northwest University of Political Science and Law in Xi’an, and one of China’s pioneers in the field of legal (forensic) psychology and a pioneer and leading contributor to Chinese research on extremism and terrorism. He was awarded the titles of “Outstanding Expert” and “Prominent Jurist” along with an “Expert Prize” and an “Allowance for Life” from the State Department of China. He was also a writer for the Chinese Encyclopedia, the Comprehensive Dictionary of Psychology, and the Chinese Contemporary Psychology Textbook. Professor Fang’s works have received various awards including: An Introduction to Legal Psychology, The Shanxi Provincial First Prize for Outstanding achievement in the Philosophical and Social Sciences, and the Shanxi Provincial Education Committee’s Humanity Social Science Outstanding Achievement Award.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Qiang Fang
    Speaker
    Professor, Northwest University of Political Science and Law

    David Nussbaum
    Chair
    Professor (Retired), Psychology, University of Toronto Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, June 16th Gold Mining and Agrarian Transformation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 16, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMYork University Room 208N York Lanes
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    Description

    Join us for this free public lecture(no registration required) by Nancy Lee Peluso (UC-Berkeley).

    Nancy is a longtime contributor to political ecology, the critical approach to the study of socio-ecological transformations and their politics across scales. Her work has influenced studies of the relationships between violence and environmental change, including how violence shapes resource access and agrarian change, how nature conservation legitimizes violent dispossessions, and how violence is integral to the constitution of political forests.

    Her work examines the social processes that affect the management of land-based resources, using ethnographic, historical, and other broadly sociological research methods. Her work explores various dimensions of resource access, use, and control, while comparing and contrasting local, national, and international influences on management structures and processes. She grounds her analysis of contemporary resource management policy and practice in local and regional histories.

    She is particularly interested in how social difference – ethnic identity, class, gender – affects resource access and control. How do government and non-government institutions and actors define, make claims upon, contest, and attempt to manage natural resources?

    Nancy is the Henry J. Vaux Distinguised Professor of Forest Policy, and Professor of Society and Environment (University of California, Berkeley).

    Event page on Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/1875504296058110
    Event info on our website: http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/event/gold-mining-agrarian-transformation/

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Nancy Peluso
    Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy Professor of Society and Environment, University of California, Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    York University Geography Department

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, June 21st Climate Finance in Ontario: Can Debt Financing be "Green"?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, June 21, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Municipalities are crucial stakeholders in climate change. They are a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and, due to their higher building and population densities, will also bear the brunt of the economic and social costs imposed by extreme weather events. Can Ontario municipalities rely on debt financing mechanisms to pay for critical mitigation and adaptation projects? Can debt financing be “green”? On June 21, IMFG post-doctoral fellow Gustavo Carvalho will talk about climate financing in Ontario cities, looking at financial instruments and strategies that have been successfully implemented elsewhere, with a focus on green bonds, environmental impact bonds, and green banks.

    Space is limited and registration is required.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Gustavo Carvalho
    Gustavo Carvalho is IMFG’s Post-Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2017. He has a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto, an M.A. in International Relations from the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and a law degree from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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