« December 2016 - February 2017 March 2017 - Present

March 2017

  • Wednesday, March 1st Social Changes and Public Opinion in Central Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 1, 201711:00AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Twenty-five years after independence, Central Asian societies are witnessing the emergence of new demographics, social and cultural changes that confirm the end of the “post-Soviet” period and the entry into another phase of history. In this presentation Professor Laruelle will analyze these changes and explore their possible meaning in terms of domestic and foreign policies for the region’s countries.

    Marlene Laruelle is Research Professor of International Affairs andAssociate Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES) at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University. She explores contemporary political, social and cultural changes in Russia and Central Asia through the prism of ideologies and nationalism. She is the editor in chief of Central Asian Affairs and a member of the executive editorial board of Demokratizatsiya. The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization. As director of the Central Asia Program she oversees about 30 events a year, monthly publications, and works on several programs of visiting fellows from Central Asia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marlene Laruelle
    Speaker
    Director, Central Asia Program; Co-Director, PONARS-Eurasia at George Washington University

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 2nd Aegean, The Sea of Peace, Civilization and Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 2, 20177:00PM - 8:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Street,Toronto ON
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Program

    1. Candle Dance from the Island of Lesvos
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    2. Welcome and Opening Remarks
    (Maria Xenikakis and Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    3. Short Documentary Film, 4.1 Miles
    (About the refugee crisis in Europe)

    The documentary is based on the life of a captain in the Greek Coast Guard, who is caught in the struggle of refugees fleeing the Middle East and traveling the short distance from the coast of Turkey to the island of Lesvos. Despite having limited resources, the captain and his crew attempt to save lives during the immense humanitarian crisis. The film is directed by Daphne Matziaraki and was nominated (Short Subject Documentary) for Oscars 2017.

    4. Dance Theatre Performance “The Aegean- the Sea of Humanity”
    (Melisakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    5. Lecture – Odysseas Elytis, The Poet of the Aegean
    (Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    6. Parade of Aegean Traditional Costumes
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre)
    (Costumes from the private collection of Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Mr. John Dagonas


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 3rd Pipelines, Paris, and Decarbonization: The Future of Canadian Energy and Climate Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs in partnership with the Law School at the University of Toronto are convening a discussion exploring the implications and implementation of recent national and provincial climate and energy policies and discussing the future of Canadian energy and climate policy in an uncertain global context. Our goal is to further the national and provincial conversations by bringing together multiple stakeholders and sectors. The panel include speakers with deep knowledge of the national and global policy history and context, carbon pricing, First Nations experiences and concerns, and fossil fuel industry dynamics. The event will include a moderated discussion amongst panelists as well as a question and answer session with the audience.

    Contact

    Alexa Waud


    Speakers

    John Drexhange
    Drexhage Consulting, formerly Climate Director at International Institute for Sustainable Development

    Erin Flanagan
    Director of Federal Policy at Pembina Institute

    Nancy Olewiler
    Professor Simon Fraser University

    Ben Powless
    Climate Justice and First Nations Rights Activist



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 3rd Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street, Room 318
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series; Lecture in the Arts, Histories, Literatures and Religions of Burma

    Description

    THE LEGAL HISTORY OF BURMA over the course of the second millennium CE offers a series of literary, juridical, and intellectual contributions that are unique when considered in relation to the wider Buddhist world of South, Central, and East Asia. From the 13th through 19th centuries upper Burma was a regional center for the production of a distinctive genre of Buddhist legal literature known as dhammasattha (“treatise on law”), whose laws claimed jurisdiction over all members of society, including monks and laypersons, and kings, commoners, and slaves. Prose and verse dhammasattha texts were composed in Pali and vernacular languages (Burmese, Mon, Arakanese, Shan, etc.), as well as in
    bilingual gloss versions (nissaya), and there is extensive testimony, dating from the mid-13th century onward, for their utilization by judges in contexts of dispute resolution. Aspects of the early history of this genre can be gleaned from lithic epigraphy, vernacular poetry, and bibliographic catalogues (piṭakat samuiṅḥ), although surviving dhammasattha treatises, transmitted in palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, can be dated no earlier than circa 1637, whereas the youngest examples of the tradition were written under British colonialism around 1900.

    For the past decade Christian Lammerts has been involved in the first major study of this genre—its textual histories, laws, and shifting modes of reception and jurisprudence—on the basis of extensive fieldwork in Burma and close investigation of the epigraphic corpus and manuscript archive, which preserves hundreds of discrete texts in multiple, sometimes highly variant, versions. In this presentation Lammerts will discuss the results of this project, drawn from his forthcoming book, Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE (University of Hawai’I Press).

    D. CHRISTIAN LAMMERTS is Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He is interested in the cultural and intellectual histories of Buddhism and religious law in Burma and Southeast Asia, and is currently at work on a study of
    juridical curses, oaths, and ordeals around of the Bay of Bengal from the late first
    millennium CE up to the early colonial era.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lammerts
    Assistant Professor, Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies, Rutgers University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, March 4th Return to Innocence – The Taiwanese Amis and the Work to Return, Recover and Reclaim their Heritage

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 4, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College
    Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue (at St. George, south of Bloor)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Film and Panel

    Description

    Director Hu Tai-Li’s film “Returning Souls” tells the story of the Taiwanese indigenous people, the Amis, recovering their land, restoring customs and reclaiming their ancient artifacts.

    Following the film, Professor Scott Simon of the University of Ottawa’s School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies, based on two decades of ethnographic work in Taiwan, will discuss issues of indigenous rights and cultural change among the Amis and other indigenous peoples in order to understand Hu Tai-li’s film in the wider socio-political context.

    Professor Cara Krmpotich of University of Toronto’s iSchool Museum Studies program will draw on her ethnographic research with Canadian indigenous experiences of repatriation to discuss central themes of Director Hu Tai-Li’s film of indigenous Taiwanese efforts to repatriate material and ancestral remains, with a focus on the social, cultural, spiritual, museological and political issues evoked.

    Bart Testa, of University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute, will moderate.

    PLEASE REGISTER AND ARRIVE 20 MINUTES BEFORE SCREENING TO ENSURE A SEAT

    Program:

    5:30 Doors open
    6:00 Welcome
    Remarks by Director-General Y.M. Catherine Hsu, Taipei Economic and Culture Office in Toronto
    6:05 Film screening of Returning Souls directed by Hu Tai-Li
    7:35 Presentations by Professor Scott Simon and Professor Cara Krmpotich
    8:05 Panel discussion and Q&A Moderated by Professor Bart Testa
    8:45 Post-screening Party

    Bios:

    Cara Krmpotich is Associate Professor, Museum Studies, at the iSchool. She researches and teaches in the areas of indigenous & museum relations; cultural property; critical collections management; and material culture and kinship. She leads a program that encourages hands-on artefact handling as a vehicle for collective memory work with urban Aboriginal seniors and has a long-term research partnership with the Haida Repatriation Committee.

    Scott Simon is Professor and Co-Chair in Taiwan Studies. He specializes in the anthropology of indigeneity in Taiwan, including issues of political autonomy, legal pluralism, and hunting rights. He continues to conduct ethnographic research in Hualien and Nantou, more recently by collaborating with hunters to study human-animal relations. His most recent book was published by Presses de l’Université Laval.

    Bart Testa is Associate Professor (teaching) at the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto. His teaching includes courses on Chinese Cinemas, European, Asian and European auteurs, narrative theory and cinema, urbanism and film, experimental cinema, Science Fiction movies and other popular genres.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Scott Simon
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Ottawa

    Bart Testa
    Moderator
    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cara Krmpotich
    Speaker
    Faculty of Information (i-School), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    imagineNATIVE

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU)

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Sunday, March 5th Birth of a Notion: The Vimy Idea, 1917-2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, March 5, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, Trinity College
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Vimy is more than a battle from the First World War. It is common to hear that Vimy marks the “birth of a nation,” a claim repeated in school textbooks, by politicians, and in the news. Yet what is meant by this phrase? Do Canadians actually believe that Canada was born at Vimy, 50 years after Confederation? How did the four-day battle of Vimy in April 1917 transform into an origin story? This was no militarist plot. While not all Canadians believed in Vimy’s importance, enough did, and the idea of Vimy was invigorated with the building of Walter Allward’s monument on the ridge. The monument’s unveiling in 1936 by King Edward VIII was attended by more than 6,000 Canadian veterans who crossed the Atlantic. Since then, Vimy has been incorporated into Canadian history, although its meaning has changed with each generation. In this year, the 100th anniversary of the battle, Dr. Tim Cook will explore the emergence of the Vimy idea, its changing meaning, and its endurance as a symbol of Canadian service and sacrifice.

    Dr. Tim Cook is a historian at the Canadian War Museum. He was the curator for the museum’s First World War permanent gallery, and he has curated numerous temporary, travelling and digital exhibitions. He has also authored tens books, most of which have been longlisted, shortlisted or awarded prizes, including the C.P. Stacey Prize for Military History (twice), the Ottawa Book Award (twice), the RBC Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, the BC National Book Award, the J.W. Dafoe Book Prize, the Canadian Authors Association Literary Award and the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. His newest book is Vimy: Battle and Legend (2017).
    In 2012, Dr. Cook was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contributions to Canadian history and in 2013 he received the Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media: The Pierre Berton Award. Dr. Cook is a Member of the Order of Canada.


    Speakers

    Dr. Tim Cook, C.M.
    Historian at the Canadian War Museum



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Cities, Immigrant Diversity and Complex Problem Solving

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Cities play host to residents hailing from a wide range of countries. Theory suggests such immigrant diversity can influence worker productivity, both positively and negatively. Benefits flow from the idea that people born in different countries complement each other in problem solving and innovation, by enabling the combination of different skills, ideas and perspectives. But heterogeneity can also inhibit productivity by raising the costs of co-operation and spurring rent-seeking behavior. This project makes several contributions to a growing body of empirical work exploring these claims. First, it leverages a rich matched employer-employee dataset for the U.S. that enables us to better account for bias from non-random worker selection, while distinguishing between impacts flowing from diversity manifested at city- and workplace-scales. Second, we ‘stress-test’ motivating theory, examining the extent to which any benefits from diversity are concentrated among workers engaged in complex problem solving and innovation. Results suggest that the benefits of immigrant diversity outweigh the costs. Consistent with theory, the association is concentrated among workers engaged in industries where complex problem solving is particularly important. In light of continued controversy about the economic implications of immigration, this project suggests an additional channel by which immigration improves overall economic well-being.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Thomas Kemeny
    Department of Geography and Environment University of Southampton



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Possible But Not Inevitable: Emergence of Violent Contentious Repertoire in Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The events of winter 2013-2014 in Ukraine were special in many respects. Not only Euromaidan took many by surprise – neither the government nor the experts saw it coming. These also were the largest protests by far in the Independent Ukraine, bringing together a broad coalition of collective actors and spreading to all Ukrainian regions. But the eventual victory of the Revolution of Dignity came at a price. In two months of protest the camp in capital Kyiv abandoned its non-violent philosophy for Molotov cocktails. In few more weeks it ended with special police forces opening fire on protesters leaving more than a hundred dead. Unprecedented violence led to high level defections and dissolution of Viktor Yanukovych’s regime. Why did Ukrainian contentious repertoire, proudly non-violent starting from 1960-ies dissidents adopted the violent tactics? The presentation explores the gradual emergence of radical repertoire among Ukrainian protesters and the dynamics of violence taking up the central stage in Kyiv in January 2014. I use available data to illustrate these processes in the invert order – starting with the ‘Moment of Madness’ on Maidan on February 20th 2014 and going back in time, tracing some conditions which made it possible, but not inevitable.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Olga Zelinska
    Speaker
    PhD student in Sociology at the Graduate School for Social Research, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences; Petro Jacyk Visiting Graduate Student

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Prosecuting Sexual Violence in Conflict: Lessons from International Criminal Tribunals

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Over the past two decades, international criminal tribunals have adopted groundbreaking judgments convicting individuals for rape, sexual slavery and forced marriage committed during armed conflict and genocide in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and elsewhere. At the same time, these tribunals have had some very public setbacks, with sexual violence cases dismissed, charges acquitted, and investigations failed. What lessons can be learned from these experiences that can inform future cases at the International Criminal Court and other tribunals?

    This session will feature a keynote address by Michelle Jarvis, Deputy to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), on her new book, “Prosecuting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence at the ICTY”. Responses will be provided by Linda Bianchi (formerly of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, now Department of Justice) and Valerie Oosterveld (Western Law) on whether the ICTY’s lessons can be applied on a global scale.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Western University

    Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada Partnership Grant


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 8th HIV Prevention, American Homonationalism in LGBT Rights Talk, and the Making-Up of the Medicalized MSM Malagasy Subject

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    CPHS Administrator
    416-946-0104


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 8th Understanding International Mining

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    How does the mining industry impact global issues of development, human rights, and the environment, and what role can the industry, government, academia, and civil society play in addressing these impacts?
    The second annual student-led conference on Understanding International Mining will bring together leading actors to discuss how we understand this important issue. The conference will consist of two panels which will each focus on a different aspect of the overarching theme: the global mining industry.

    Panel 1: Human Rights & Development (10:00 – 11:30AM)

    Bonne Lyn de Bartok – CEO and Founder of MacCormick IMC
    Shin Imai – Faculty of Law Professor at Osgoode Hall
    Jeffrey Davidson – Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor
    James Yap – Business and Human Rights Lawyer
    Louis Guay – Social Responsibility Consultant
    Moderator: Paul Cadario – Distinguished Fellow at Munk School of Global Affairs

    LUNCH (60 MINS)

    Panel 2: Economic & Environmental Sustainability (12:30 – 2:00PM)

    Nolan Watson – President and CEO of Sandstorm Gold
    Chris Adachi – Manager, Sustainability Implementation & Carbon Strategy at Teck Resources Limited
    Tamara Brown – Engineer and VP Corporate Relations at Primero
    Alec Crawford – Senior Researcher at International Institute for Sustainable Development
    Jane Church – Co-Founder and Director of Collaboration for NetPositive
    Moderator: Joaquin Bardallo Bandera – PhD in Political Science at University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 9th Bulgarian Politics in the Post-Accession Era: The First Decade.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 9, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Distinguished Leaders in Bulgaria Lecture Series

    Description

    Venelin I. Ganev (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2000) is a Professor in Political Science and a faculty associate of the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies at Miami University of Ohio. His main fields of interest are postcommunist politics, democratization studies, constitutionalism, and modern social theory. His publications have appeared in East European Constitutional Review, American Journal of Comparative Law, Journal of Democracy, East European Politics and Societies, Communist and Postcommunist Studies, Slavic Review, Europe-Asia Studies and Comparative Studies in Society and History. He has also contributed chapters to several volumes that explore various aspects of institution-building in contemporary Europe. His first book, Preying on the State: The Transformation of Postcommunist Bulgaria was published in 2007 by Cornell University Press.

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Venelin Ganev
    Miami University, Oxford, Ohio


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Mr. and Mrs Daniel and Elizabeth Damov


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th INDePth Conference 2017: Worlding South Asia Beyond Borders

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 201710:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Interrogating Notions of Development and Progress (INDePth) is an annual undergraduate conference hosted by the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Founded by Contemporary Asian Studies major students, the series has held conferences on Indonesia, China, Korea and Japan. Our aim is to foster dialogue on Asia through interdisciplinary analysis. INDePth utilizes research methodologies offered by courses from the Asian Institute to unpack the prism of ‘Asia’ through notions of ‘development’ and ‘progress’.

    The theme for this year’s conference is South Asian Worlds. Dominant discourse within mainstream agencies such as the World Bank and IMF, domestic national programs and academic discourse imagine South Asia as an active site of intervention. Discourse that is embedded into the imagining and practice of institutions characterize ‘developing’ space as ‘backward’, ‘lacking’ or otherwise a systematic ‘standard’. Participants will engage with how such South Asian Worlds are simultaneously constructed through the human imagination and physically materialized through uneven processes of development practice. We aim to emphasize South Asia as a conceptual site of research that extends beyond national borders and traditional ‘area studies’.

    By doing so, we look at the ways in which the concept of Worlding challenges notions of ‘third world’ development discourse and helps to understand the region.

    Join us on March 10th for the 2017 Conference to debate and take part in workshops with fellow delegates, the executive members of the INDePth team, and academic speakers from leading universities in Canada and the United States.

    Keynote Address:

    Professor Chandrima Chakraborty, Department of English & Cultural Studies, McMaster University

    Moderators:

    Professor Rachel Silvey, Interim Director of the Asian Institute, Geography & Planning, University of Toronto
    Dr. Antonela Arhin, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto
    Professor Francis Cody, Department of Anthropology

    Schedule:

    10:30 AM – 11:00 AM Registration and Informal Lunch

    11:00 AM – 11:15 AM Conference Introduction

    11:15 AM – 12:00 AM Keynote Speech

    12:00 AM – 1:00 PM Panel 1: Remapping Boundaries

    1:00 PM – 1:45 PM Breakout Workshops

    1:45 PM – 2:10 PM Coffee Break

    2:10 PM – 2:30 PM Dance Performance

    2:30 PM – 4:00 PM Panel 2: Worlding Beyond Borders

    4:00 PM – 4:15 PM Conclusion

    4:15 PM – 6:00 PM Reception

    Contact

    Jae Park

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Woodsworth College Student Association

    Hart House Good Ideas Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th Green Japan: Combining Technological Innovation, Economic Growth and Environmental Sustainability

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    National governments the world over face the formidable challenge of figuring out how to sustain or enhance economic prosperity while contributing to the global effort to ensure environmental sustainability. The Government of Japan, together with the business community and civil society, have been wrestling with this issue for several decades. Japan has promoted the development and implementation of new products and services, urged commercial exports of environmental technologies and implemented stringent environmental protection measures. While far from the only nation seeking to produce “Green Growth,” the Government of Japan has encouraged a wide range of technological innovations, from electric and fuel cell vehicles and smart grid implementations to futuristic technologies designed to convert energy from outer space into electricity on earth. The Green Growth strategy remains largely untested, in part because of the inherent contradictions of seeking to expand economic activity while conserving energy, reducing pollution, and constraining the environmental impact of human beings. This presentation examines Japan’s commercial developments service innovations and explores the lessons to be learned from the Japanese approach to the promotion of Green Growth.

    Speaker Bio:

    Dr. Carin Holroyd is President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan. She has published extensively on aspects of Japan’s international trade, commercial relations with Canada, and national innovation policies in Japan. Her books include Government, International Trade and Laissez Faire Capitalism: Canada, Australia and New Zealand’s Relations with Japan (McGill-Queen’s) and co-authored with Ken Coates, Japan and the Internet Revolution (Palgrave-Macmillan), Innovation Nation: Japanese Science and Technology in the 21st Century (Palgrave¬ Macmillan), Digital Media in East Asia: National Innovation and the Transformation of a Region. (Cambria Press) and The Global Digital Economy (Cambria). Her most recent book, Green Japan, Environmental Technologies and Economic Growth, will be released by the University of Toronto Press in 2017.

    * * *
    Save the Dates: October 12-15, 2017
    For an important conference on GREEN JAPAN organized by the Japan Studies Association of Canada (JSAC) and hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Carin Holroyd
    Speaker
    President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan

    Kimberley Strong
    Chair
    Director, School of the Environment and Professor of Physics, University of Toronto

    Louis Pauly
    Discussant
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    School of the Environment


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th Irregular Settlements (Kampung) in the Context Of Capitalist Modernization, Urban Governance, and the Politics of the City: Discursive Notes from Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The talk will cover the subject of kampung, its recent fate and fortune, and whether its change is desirable? And how might the current change of kampung be understood in the context of capitalist modernization, urban governance, and politics of the city. The materials for the talk will be drawn from an on-going collaborative research with a university and notes taken from recent visits to Jakarta.

    Abidin Kusno is a professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. His recent publications include The Appearances of Memory: Mnemonic Practices of Architecture and Urban Form in  Indonesia (2010); After the New Order: Space, Politics, and Jakarta (2013); Visual Cultures of the Ethnic Chinese in Indonesia (2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 14th How Guestworker Programs are Made: The U.S.-Ontario Tobacco Worker Movement, 1920s-1960s

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 14, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the late 1920s to the 1960s, almost 2,000 migrants from the Southern United States travelled annually to Ontario to work on tobacco farms. In its early years, this migration system was primarily organized by elite brokers and by previous migrants operating within kinship networks. Over time, and especially during the Great Depression and World War II, governments on both sides of the border struggled to gain control over the movement, an effort that was challenged by employers and migrants alike. This talk explores the character and evolution of this migration system, using it as a case study to gain a better understanding of how guestworker programs are made and change over time. Race, state policy, and political economy in both sending and receiving regions all played key roles in this history. This little-known labour movement complicates our understanding of U.S. migration, demonstrating that the U.S. was at once a migrant-receiving and migrant-sending country. Its also provides an example of some of the complex linkages between the U.S. and Canada in the realms of migration and political economy.

    Ed Dunsworth is a third-year PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is a transnational history of tobacco farm labour in Ontario, 1925-1985.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ed Dunsworth
    PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Return to China or Taiwan?: The Korean War Hijacked by Prisoners

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    The Korean War was in fact two wars: the first was fought over territory from June 1950 to June 1951; the second was over prisoners, especially the Chinese prisoners wishing to “return to Taiwan,” from late 1951 to July 1953. While the first war restored territorial status quo ante, the second war’s only visible outcome was the “defection” of 14,220 Chinese prisoners to Taiwan and 7,574 North Korean prisoners to South Korea—at the cost of doubling the length of the war and numerous casualties on all sides. Contrary to the Communist allegation of an American conspiracy, this outcome was unplanned. Two separately conceived U.S. policies—prisoner reindoctrination and voluntary repatriation—became intertwined and resulted in the rise of anti-Communist prisoners, who soon hijacked the war agenda. The U.S. government became hostage to its own moralistic but ultimately hypocritical policy and to prisoners—a reality so embarrassing that it has remained largely unknown to the American people. Using archival documents and oral histories, this talk will examine the interplay between policies and prisoners’ actions. It will also chart the extraordinary experiences of several prisoner leaders.

    Speaker Bio:

    David Cheng Chang (常成) is an Assistant Professor of History at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in modern Chinese history from the University of California, San Diego in 2011. He studies the Korean War, the Cold War, U.S.-China relations, and the history of war photography.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    David Cheng Chang (常成)
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Asian Institite and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Hong Kong Stories -- A Historical Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Leo K. Shin
    Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies, Convenor of the Hong Kong Studies Initiative at the University of British Columbia
    Author of The Making of the Chinese State: Ethnicity and Expansion on the Ming Borderlands (Cambridge, 2006)
    Presentation Topic: The Story of the Story of Pre-colonial Hong Kong

    Clement Tong
    Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies at the Carey Theological College, Vancouver
    Lecturer of Hebrew and Koine Greek at the Vancouver School of Theology
    Presentation Topic: The Riots and The Festival – The Emergence of Hong Kong Identity in 1967

    Light Refreshment will be provided.

    Please register by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca.

    Speakers

    Leo K. Shin
    Associate Professor, University of British Columbia

    Clement Tong
    Assistant Professor, Carey Theological College


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Resettlement of North Korean Migrants in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Cat's Eye Student Pub & Lounge
    150 Charles Street W
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Synergy Lecture: South Korea has long promoted a sense of ethnic and cultural homogeneity, but the macro economic and political changes and a substantial increase in the numbers of immigrants, both non-ethnic Koreans and ethnic Koreans from abroad, has irreversibly altered the cultural and demographic makeup of the country. These structural changes have precipitated a new discourse on Korean national belonging and “Koreaness.” But how, exactly, has the increase in immigrants – co-ethnics and non-ethnically Korean peoples alike – changed what it means to be Korean? What can the re-socialization experiences of new comers tell us about changes and variations in contemporary South Korean ethnic and national identity?

    Given their unique status as Korean nationals who bear the right to citizenship in the Republic of Korea, there is much to learn from the resettlement experiences of South Korea’s 30,000+ North Korean migrants. Do the national identities of Korean migrants change upon resettlement? How much do their prior experiences matter, if they matter at all? Do migrants learn from their new environment in South Korea, or do they resist change? What can the resettlement of North Korean migrants elsewhere tell us? This conference seeks to provide answers – some concrete, others preliminary – to these questions.

    Speakers:

    Austin BuHeung Hyeon is a senior at Columbia University. He is originally from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, more commonly known as North Korea. Humbled and honored to be the first student of North Korean descent to attend Columbia, Austin carries a sense of responsibility in making known the resilient narrative of his fellow North Koreans. After graduating, Austin looks forward to playing a role in shaping policies related to NK affairs.

    Christopher Green is the former Manager of Intl’ Affairs for Daily NK and a PhD candidate at Leiden University. His research interests span the socio-political economy, ideology and mediascape of the two Koreas. He has written for The Guardian and Al Jazeera, and interviewed by the BBC, Reuters, and CNN.

    Steven Denny is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on the variations in South Korean political attitudes and social identities with a focus on intergenerational changes and the rise of a ‘new’ nationalism among young South Koreans. He is also a columnist for The Diplomat.

    Jack Kim is the founder of HanVoice, Canada’s largest organisation advocating for improved human rights in North Korea. He holds a MSc in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a LLB from Osgoode Hall Law School.

    Associate Professor Yoonkyung Lee is a political sociologist studying labor politics, social movements, and political representation at the University of Toronto. Her research probes how socially marginalized actors such as labor mobilize to gain a social and political voice and how they interact with civil society and political institutions.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christopher Green
    Former Manager of Intl’ Affairs for Daily NK; PhD candidate, Leiden University

    Steven Denny
    PhD candidate, University of Toronto

    Jack Kim
    Founder, HanVoice

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Austin BuHeung Hyeon
    Undergraduate Student, Columbia University


    Sponsors

    Synergy: The Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 16th Thinking about China's Past and Future in the Globally Unsettling Present

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM170 St. George Street, Room JHB100, 1st floor, Jackman Humanities Building
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    What does Xi Jinping’s China mean for the West? How will Trump’s attitude towards Taiwan affect cross-strait relations? What are the implications of China’s recent shift from majority rural to majority urban population?

    Such questions may form a starting point for this roundtable conversation, in which speakers will discuss China’s past and future in light of current global events.

    Event Poster

    Event poster (repeats information listed in description above, and presents 2 images from China. In first image, a group of people stand in a square in Beijing, holding up their cell phones as cameras. In the second, a Chinese street artist paints pictures of Donald Trump.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    Speaker
    Editor, Journal of Asian Studies, Chancellor's Professor of History, University of California, Irvine

    Tong Lam
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Maura Elizapeth Cunningham
    Speaker
    Historian and Writer

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Critical China Studies Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 16th Music of Survival: The Story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, John P. Robarts Research Library, 130 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is one of courage and true grit – a vivid chronicle that celebrates the human spirit. This is the triumphant story of the original 17 members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus who survived World War II as a musical ensemble. The film brings out the deepest roots of a fragile tradition, celebrating the resiliency of a music culture that has survived centuries. Set against the backdrop of the war itself, the story reveals the ways that music and musicians are used and abused by political regimes.

    It provides an educational, informative and compelling perspective – the personal stories of the last two survivors inter cut with the collective history of the bandura throughout the ages. Interwoven with contemporary musical performances, the film illustrates the bandurist as bard, as seer, as spiritual emissary for the soul of the Ukrainian people, then and now, in Ukraine and beyond.

    Orest Sushko is a member of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, following in the footsteps of his father Makar Sushko, the first Canadian member of the Chorus in 1949 – and grandfather Paul Stepowy, a bandura craftsman and honorary patron of the Chorus. As an Emmy award-winning Re-recording mixer in both film and television, Orest has worked with a broad range of directors from David Cronenberg to Barry Sonnenfeld to Guillermo del Toro – television series including Orphan Black and documentaries from David Suzuki, to The North Face, The Patagonia and Alan Doyle of Great Big Sea.

    See http://musicofsurvival.com/ for more information about the film (includes the trailer)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Orest Sushko
    producer/director



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th The New Nature of Democracy - Munk School Graduate Student Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 201710:00AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    FREE Students with Student Card
    $10 General Admission CASH payable at the door

    The 2017 Munk Graduate Student Conference
    The New Nature of Democracy, is focused on the ever-changing landscape of global democracy and the rise of populist movements. The conference brings together a wide variety of perspectives from academia to practitioners, to explore the challenges that are facing the liberal institutions we so often associate with democracy.
    Lunch will be provided for those in attendance and the day will end with a keynote address followed by a reception and networking event.
    Populism at the Ballot Box will focus on how elections function in the 21st century. What strategies have made recent populist style campaigns successful? What implications might this have in Canada, and around the globe? This panel will consist of members of the media, democratic strategists, and public opinion researchers who can provide practical insights into how and why populism translates into success at the polls.
    Government for the People? will be a round table discussion focusing on the development of populism outside of North America and Western Europe. Is the rise of populism a new phenomenon around the globe, or are these Western movements merely reflections of trends that already exist elsewhere?
    The Democratic-Generational Divide will be a panel discussion consisting of graduate students from the Munk School and associated faculties which try to identify where to situate youth within the context of this rise in populism. From identity politics to economic opportunity, there is clearly an ideological divide between the generations. This panel will explore what elements of this divide are unique, what areas are intransigent, and where there may be opportunities to bridge the gap.

    Schedule
    10:00 – 11:30 am: Government For the People?
    12:00 – 1:30 pm: The Democratic-Generational Divide
    1:30 – 2:30 pm: Networking Lunch
    2:30 – 4:00 pm: Populism at the Ballot Box

    Keynote 4:30 – 6:00 pm
    Symone D. Sanders is a democratic strategist and CNN Political Commentator who rose to prominence during her tenure as the National Press Secretary for U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. At 25, Symone served as the youngest presidential press secretary on record. Ms. Sanders will be discussing her experiences on the 2016 Presidential campaign, engaging with youth on political issues, and offer some insight into the changing nature of the American electorate.
    Symone is the immediate past chair of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice’s Emerging Leaders Committee and former member of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice. Through her involvement with CJJ and the FACJJ, Symone worked to raise the profile of young voices in the fight for juvenile justice reform and bring millennial perspectives to policy conversations.
    In 2013, Symone Sanders was honored as the youngest recipient to ever receive the Midlands Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Award. Most recently, she was honored by Fusion as one of 30 women under 30 who will influence the 2016 elections, named one of 16 young Americans shaping the 2016 election by Rolling Stone and one of the most influential African-Americans of 2016 by The Root

    Reception 6:00-7:30pm
    Following the keynote address, there will be a networking meeting session with food and drinks provided. The reception will offer an opportunity for students, staff, and faculty to interact with speakers from the day’s events. Confirmation of attendance is required to attend the reception.

    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Master of Global Affairs Program

    Abacus Data

    Master of Global Affairs Student Association


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th Geopolitical Risks: China, Russia and the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bio: Thomas Gomart founded and was director of the Russia/NIS Centre of Ifri (Institut francais des relations internationals) from 2004 to 2013. He was Vice-President for Strategic Development of Ifri from September 2010 to March 2015, and was appointed Director of Ifri in April 2015. His academic and professional background has been closely related to post-Soviet space, as Lavoisier Fellow at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations (2001), Visiting Fellow at the EU Institute for Security Studies (2003) and Marie Curie Fellow at Department of War Studies at King’s College (2003-2004). He holds a PHD in History (Paris I – Panthéon La Sorbonne) and an EMBA from HEC Paris.

    Description: The year 2014 was defined by the conflict in Ukraine, the emergence of Daesh, and tensions between China and Japan. The next year witnessed the spread of Daesh, the conflict in Yemen, the Greek crisis, revelations about the activity of the National Security Agency (NSA), the migrant crisis, and a ramping-up of terrorist attacks. This proliferation of crises has contributed to a “return” of geopolitics, or, in other words, to power rivalries that may sound the death-knell for the kind of globalization that ignores territorial boundaries.
    The presentation focuses on China, Russia and the United States, which together form a strategic triangle of systemic importance for the global world order.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th The Age of Three Emperors: The Direction of US Foreign Policy and the Future of US-Japan Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    First Floor Conference Room
    170 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Abstract:

    America’s 45th president, Donald J. Trump, was inaugurated in January of this year. His unexpected victory was a surprise to many and it became the second major global shock in 2016 after Brexit. As an individual who has never held public office, he came to power by adroitly harnessing the anger of the American voter. Despite comparisons to past US presidents such as Jackson, TR, Nixon, and Reagan, in many ways he is a new type of leader that America has not witnessed since the beginning of the Republic. Although it will require many more months to be able to fully assess the new president’s policies, one can assume that his policies will be quite different than those of his predecessor.

    In a world which an undercurrent toward a power transition can be witnessed, in which direction will President Trump lead the US? Moreover, as a leader devoid of any strong ideology besides “Making America Great Again,” his policies will surely be much vaguer and harder to pin down. However, he has surrounded himself with advisors and senior administration officials who do not necessarily toe the same foreign policy position toward such countries as China and Russia. Considering that he also does not have full support of a few senior GOP leaders on matters of foreign policy, how will this multilevel tug-o-war play out? And amid an era of ever increasing uncertainties, what can we expect the future course of US foreign policy be, particularly toward Asia? Will the previous Asia Pivot policy become an Asia Pullback policy similar to Nixon’s Guam doctrine of the 1970s? Furthermore, how should Japan and other nations deal with an increasingly inward America that will be much less predictable and perhaps even more reckless? Through this presentation, I would like to present a possible geopolitical scenario of the future that incorporates the major powers of US, Japan, China, Russia, and the EU.

    Speaker:

    Tosh Minohara is Professor of Diplomacy at the Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University where he holds a joint appointment with the Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies. He received his B.A. in International Relations from University of California, Davis, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science and Diplomatic History from Kobe University. In the past, he has had various visiting appointments with such universities as Harvard University, University of California at Irvine, University of Iowa (Noguchi Distinguished Fellow), University of Oxford, Leiden University, Stockholm University, Kuwait University, Seoul National University, and most recently, Inha University, ROK. His main research themes are, from a historical perspective, the diplomatic, political, and security dimension of US-Japan relations. He is currently interested in applied history. He has published widely and his first monograph, The Japanese Exclusion Act and US-Japan Relations [in Japanese], was awarded the Shimizu Hiroshi Prize in 2002. He is also the editor of Tumultuous Decade: Empire, Society, and Diplomacy in 1930s Japan (University of Toronto Press, 2016) and Decade of the Great War: Japan and the Wider World during the 1910s (Brill, 2014). He is also the English translation editor of the forthcoming,The History of US-Japan Relations: From Perry to Present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). He has several op-ed columns and comments frequently for major new outlets throughout the world. In addition to NHK in Japan, he regularly appears as a navigator in several National Geographic programs.

    Discussants:

    Aleksandra Babovic is currently a PhD student at Kobe University Graduate School of Law with a specialization in Diplomatic History. She earned her MA degree from Paris School of International Affairs. She is a Lecturer at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies and Osaka University. Her research interests include Japanese post-war history, international criminal law and justice, and more specifically the Tokyo Tribunal.

    Ms Babovic will speak on International Relations under Trump Administration, from perspective of Europe.

    David A. Welch is CIGI Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, and Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, where he has recently been working on Asia-Pacific Security.

    Professor Welch will speak on International Relations under Trump Administration, from perspective of Canada.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Tosh Minohara
    Speaker
    Professor of U.S.-Japan Relations, International History and Security Studies, Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University

    David Welch
    Discussant
    Munk School Fellow; CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo

    Aleksandra Babovic
    Discussant
    Lecturer, Department of Global Affairs, Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Japan

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Pluralism and Islam: Muslim Citizenship in Western Liberal Democracies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20179:00AM - 1:00PMMassey College
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
    Toronto ON M5S 2E1
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Presented by Massey College, Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation & Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Islam is one of the fastest growing religions in Canada with its adherents projected to triple in numbers within 20 years. Those on the far-right have argued that Islam is not compatible with Western civilizations and perpetuate the rhetoric that Daesh /ISIS represents all Muslims. Despite Canada priding itself on values of pluralism, diversity and inclusion, on January 29th 2017, six Muslim worshippers were killed at the Centre Culturel Islamique de Québec in Quebec City. A recent Motion, (Motion 103) proposed by MP Iqra Khalid requesting that the Commons committee study the issue of Islamophobia have resulted in thousands of hate mails and death threats against her for supposedly “threatening freedom of speech”. Are Muslim identities in conflict with Canada’s values of pluralism, free speech and democracy? This program will explore the future of peace and pluralism in Canada amidst growing Islamophobia and global conflict. The first panel will showcase diverse Muslim voices (e.g. Sunni, Shi’a (both Twelver and Ismaili), Ahmadi) to counter the idea that Muslims are one monolithic block and to challenge sectarian ideologies that have affected other countries. The second panel will feature female Muslim scholars and authors whose work have shattered common misconceptions about women’s roles in Islam and are challenging policies in Canada (e.g niqab ban) that fetishize the surveillance of women’s bodies.

    Light lunch served at 1:00pm

    Speakers

    Dr. Shafique Virani
    Keynote
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Aisha Ahmad
    Panelist
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Melissa Finn
    Panelist
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Saima Hussain
    Panelist

    Dr. Liyakat Takim
    Panelist

    Dr. Aman Haji
    Panelist

    Ustadh Amjad Tarsin
    Panelist

    Imam Farhan Iqbal
    Panelist


    Sponsors

    Massey College

    Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico 1880-1994

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Chino is a history of comparative race relations that considers the function of anti-Chinese politics in shaping Mexican mestizo national identity during and after the 1910 revolution. Evidence from U.S. and Mexican archives shows how anti-Chinese politics created a nationalistic public sphere. Building on the hemispheric turn in Asian American Studies, this talk argues that Mexican anti-Chinese politics differed from U.S. racial politics because Mexican Orientalism was expressed, as mob violence, social campaigns, and government policy to aid the post-revolutionary enlistment of an indigenous citizenry. These developments became the basis of new social bonds across the country and enabled a diverse Mexican polity to claim and occupy a state-endorsed mixed-race, mestizo identity (inclusive of indigeneity). Chino critiques a monolithic notion of racism by marking out a comparative methodology for transnational racial analysis in the Americas.

    Jason Oliver Chang is Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies and History at the University of Connecticut. He also serves as Associate Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Association. He earned his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Comparative Ethnic Studies.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason Oliver Chang
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Latin American Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th EU Trade Policy in a More Protectionist World

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20172:00PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström will set out the trade agenda of the EU, the world’s biggest trader, in the wake of an uncertain future for trade deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the proposed EU-US agreement known as TTIP. Pursuing an ambitious programme of trade deals, the EU will seek to work with major partners such as Canada to “shape globalisation”, with trade policy that is effective, transparent and based on values. The Commissioner will also highlight the benefits of the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) due to take effect soon, which she cites as the most progressive and ambitious ever concluded.

    As EU Commissioner for Trade since 1 November 2014, Dr. Malmström is responsible for EU trade policy. She is representing the EU in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and other international trade for a. She is negotiating bilateral trade agreements with key countries around the globe.

    As EU Commissioner for Home Affairs 2010-2014, she was responsible for the European Commission’s work within the fields of asylum and migration, police cooperation, border control and the fight against organised crime and human trafficking. Formerly a Member of the European Parliament and Minister for European Affairs of Sweden. As Minister for European Affairs, Malmström was responsible for issues such as the Lisbon Treaty, the EU strategy for growth and employment and the review of the EU budget and for the preparation and co-ordination of the Swedish EU Presidency.

    Cecilia Malmström has a Ph.D. in political science and was a researcher at Göteborg University in Sweden for several years, teaching in European politics.

    On Twitter: @MalmstromEU. Website: ec.europa.eu/malmstrom

    Contact

    J. Hawker


    Speakers

    Cecilia Malmström
    EU Trade Commissioner



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th HUMANITARIAN AUTHORITARIANISM: WHY “CAPACITY BUILDING” CAN BACKFIRE

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    HUMANITARIAN AUTHORITARIANISM: WHY “CAPACITY BUILDING” CAN BACKFIRE

    Professor Elizabeth Dunn, Anthropology, Indiana University

    Over the last decade, many humanitarian agencies have moved away from the direct provision of services to needy population, and towards what they call “capacity building” for host governments. “Capacity building” involves not only installing bureaucratic routines and dictating policy changes, but also routing millions or even billions of dollars through host governments so that they, not the humanitarian
    agencies, can provide services. But where, exactly, does that money
    end up? In this paper, I look at what happened in the Republic of Georgia in 2008, when nearly a billion dollars was routed through the government of Mikheil Saakashvili, and trace the link between humanitarian funding and the rise of authoritarianism in the
    Saakashvili administration. I compare this to other cases, including
    the increasing authoritarianism of the Erdogan government in Turkey.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Weapons of Mass Instruction: Prospects for Human Security In & Out of North Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMRoom J130, Jackman Law Building
    78 Queens Park
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    “Weapons of Mass Instruction” presents a soft power approach to North Korea security as an alternative to the dominant security focus on weapons of mass destruction and hard power solutions. Considering values and data of human security and intelligence, this talk aims to highlight the past, current, and future work of Canadian and international NGOs, governmental representatives, and passionate academics about information smuggling and cultural soft power as a means to effect peaceful change and resistance within North Korea.

    According to HanVoice, a Toronto-based human rights NGO for North Koreans, 74% of North Koreans have access to TV and 46% to DVD players. The growing numbers of communications-savvy North Koreans are playing an increasingly important role in changing perspectives of power through their consumerist practices and will to learn more. This is a narrative we do not hear enough in foreign security media.
    To approach the North Korean security case differently, this event will acknowledge and highlight growing research on marketization and information breaches in North Korea, as well as refugee and resettlement studies. We will also link USB keys to defense policies and technology as another way to widen traditional views on security strategies.

    his discussion panel will question whether a USB key can bring change in a totalitarian regime, followed by a Q&A session with our three tremendous guest speakers: Mr. Jang Jin-Sung, former North Korean official and founder of NewFocus International (via Skype); Mr. Christopher Kim, executive director of HanVoice; and Ms. Sharon Stratton, US Program Officer at the North Korean Strategy Centre. Our discussion will be moderated by Mr. Steven Denney, PhD candidate at the University of Toronto and managing editor of Sino-NK.
    Special interpretation by: Daniel Jung

    RSVP Here: info@atlantic-council.ca

    Tickets:
    Student members – free
    Students – $7 online, $10 at the door
    Adults – $12 online, $15 at the door
    Adult members – $10 online, $12 at the door

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jang Jin-Sung
    Speaker
    Former North Korean official and founder of NewFocus International

    Christopher Kim
    Speaker
    Executive directorr, HanVoice

    Sharon Stratton
    Speaker
    US Program Officer, North Korea Strategy Centre

    Steven Denney
    Moderator
    PhD candidate, University of Toronto; managing editor, Sino-NK


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute

    Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 21st Innovation Policy in International Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Professor Taylor, drawing on his acclaimed book The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology? will open the panel with a keynote address setting the international stage for innovation policy. He will be followed by Dr. Munro, responding to his arguments and positioning Canada within the global league of innovative nations. Concluding the panel will be Sagi Dagan, reflecting on these arguments from a practitioner’s perspective by sharing the experience of what is arguably the most successful innovation agency in the world since the 1970s. Professor Breznitz will moderate the panel, which will conclude with lessons for Canada as the federal government launches its new Innovation Agenda.

    Contact

    Jennifer Colvin
    416-9465670


    Speakers

    Mark Zachary Taylor
    Speaker
    Professor & Author of The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology?

    Dr. Daniel Munro
    Speaker
    Director of Public Policy at the Conference Board of Canada

    Sagi Dagan
    Speaker
    Head of Growth Financing in Israel’s Innovation Authority

    Dan Breznitz
    Moderator
    Professor, Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 21st The Crisis of “Society” and the Explosion of “The Social”: Social Construction Projects in South Korea and China

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This paper, which I wrote with Seung-Cheol Lee, gives attention to the coexistence between increasing concerns about the “crisis” of society and increasing “social construction” projects exercised in the name of “the social.” Under circumstances where neoliberal doctrines penetrate deep into a realm of subjectification, how can we understand the reality that “society” is central to state governance and, furthermore, reconstructed as an ethical field? With an eye to recent projects of social construction in South Korea and China, this study aims to answer the following inquiries. How can social construction projects be analyzed and contextualized in countries where the state did not go through the so-called stage of “social government” found in the Western welfare state? How does the state accomplish a double mission to disperse its functions to social realms and re-articulate managerial power when it intervenes in social construction projects? How do various participants in social construction projects in the two countries experience and react to the tensions between “society” as the assemblage of social rights, solidarities, and socialities, and “society” as the target of state governance and engineered projects?

    Mun Young Cho is an associate professor of the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Yonsei University, South Korea. Her research focuses on poverty, labor, development, and youth in China and South Korea. She is the author of the book The Specter of “The People”: Urban Poverty in Northeast China (Cornell University Press, 2013).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for the Study of Diaspora and Transnationalism, University of Toronto

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Mun Young Cho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, South Korea)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Diaspora and Transnationalism Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 22nd Conceptualizing and Measuring Social Inequalities in Distributions of Birth Outcomes in Canada and its Peer Nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 22nd Writing the Commune: The Lived and the Conceived

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this talk, Kristin Ross examines some of the methodological and theoretical problems she confronted while writing Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune in her attempt to construct the seventy-two-day insurrection as a laboratory of political invention.

    Kristin Ross is Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. Her first book, The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune (1988; reissued, Verso, 2008) examined cultural movement during the 1871 insurrection. Her cultural history of the French 1950s, Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture (1995), won the Laurence Wylie award for French cultural studies and a Critic’s Choice award; it has been published in France under the title Rouler plus vite, laver plus blanc (Flammarion, 2006). May ’68 and Its Afterlives (Chicago, 2002), a study of French memory of the political upheavals of the 1960s, was published in France as Mai 68 et ses vies antérieures (2005; re-issued, Agones, 2010). Her most recent book, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune (2015) appeared in France from La Fabrique as L’Imaginaire de la Commune.


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd The Double: Dubbing Western Films in the Soviet Union

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    This presentation discusses the incorporation of Western films into Soviet cities and visual culture during the 1950s and 60s. In this talk, I will compare Soviet dubbing with various translation theories debated in the 1950s; describe how the process altered Western films to create what I call sensory forgery – the amalgam of foreign materiality and Russian language; and explore the implications of the incongruity between speech and image for audience reception.

    I am a historian of Russia and the Soviet Union. The enduring concern of my research is how texts, images, objects, and people move across geopolitical and ideological borders. This interest has led me to focus on translation practices and cultural diplomacy in my first book, Western Culture in the Soviet Union, a history of the Soviet opening to the West during the 1950s and 1960s. I am beginning research for a second book, Weary Sun, a history of tango in Russia and the Soviet Union. I teach at the University of Chicago.


    Speakers

    Eleonor Gilburd
    Department of History, University of Chicago



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd From Belleville to Notre-Dame-des-Landes: Today's Communal Imaginary

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20173:00PM - 4:30PMSenior Common Room, Room 317
    Glendon College, York University
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this talk, Kristin Ross will examine some of the continuities and discontinuities between the Paris Commune of 1871 and the commune-in-the-making on the zad in Notre-Dame-des-Landes. The anti-airport struggle in western France, the longest ongoing battle in the country, has become more than a major environmental opposition to an imposed infrastructural project: it is in the process of becoming an autonomous zone in secession from the state.

    Kristin Ross is Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. Her first book, The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune (1988; reissued, Verso, 2008) examined cultural movement during the 1871 insurrection. Her cultural history of the French 1950s, Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture (1995), won the Laurence Wylie award for French cultural studies and a Critic’s Choice award; it has been published in France under the title Rouler plus vite, laver plus blanc (Flammarion, 2006). May ’68 and Its Afterlives (Chicago, 2002), a study of French memory of the political upheavals of the 1960s, was published in France as Mai 68 et ses vies antérieures (2005; re-issued, Agones, 2010). Her most recent book, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune (2015) appeared in France from La Fabrique as L’Imaginaire de la Commune.


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd Reading Revolution: Then and Now

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Borrowing the name of the recent Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library exhibit, , I will consider the visual imagery of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) over a longer period than the “Ten Years of Chaos.” I will look back at some of the earlier, non-revolutionary sources, at the dissemination of those images during the Cultural Revolution, and show some of them in a more recent context. In particular, I will look at some of the most ubiquitous items of the time – for example, the red, bright and shiny Mao badges and the more restrained designs on coins and banknotes. These items were some of the smallest in everyday use, and the imagery on these items can be understood immediately – if you know the visual and political vocabulary.

    Helen Wang is Curator of East Asian Money at the British Museum. She is the author of The Chairman Mao Badges: Symbols and Slogans of the Cultural Revolution (based on the British Museum collection of Mao badges). She is also the translator of Cao Wenxuan’s Bronze and Sunflower, a children’s novel set in a rural area during the Cultural Revolution.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jenny Purtle
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art

    Helen Wang
    Speaker
    Curator, East Asian Money, British Museum


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd The West in search of its identity in three simultaneous states of mind: Pre-modern, modern and post-modern

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20175:30PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Thanos Veremis is Professor Emeritus of Political history at the University of Athens, Department of European and International Studies and Founding Member of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP).

    He has been Research Associate, at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London 1978-79; Visiting Scholar, Center for European Studies, Harvard Univ. 1983; Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton Univ. 1987; Visiting Fellow, St. Antony’s College, Oxford 1993-94; Constantine Karamanlis Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford Massachusetts (2000-2003); and more recently President of the National Council of Education, 2004-2010 .


    Speakers

    Professor Thanos Veremis
    ELIAMEP Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, Athens, Greece


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - DAY 1

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20179:30AM - 3:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Conference Program (Day I):

    Panel 1: What Was the Revolution in Ukraine?
    9:45–11:45 a.m.

    “Ukrainians in 1917. Not so Rural and not so Russified”
    Stephen Velychenko. Research Fellow, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    “‘The Most Unconquerable Stronghold of Our Rightlessness will be Captured:’ Jews between Emancipation, Ukrainization, and Pogroms in 1917”
    Mihaly Kalman. Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies, Central European University

    “‘Kievlianin’: Cultural Life in Kyiv between the February and October Revolutions of 1917”
    Roman Tashlitskyy, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

    Panel 2: Building the Soviet Ukrainian State in the 1920s and 1930s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Reconciling the Irreconcilable? Left-Wing Ukrainian Nationalism and the Soviet Regime”
    Christopher Gilley, independent scholar, Durham, U.K., and author of The “Change of Signposts” in the Ukrainian Emigration: A Contribution to the History of Sovietophilism in the 1920s

    “Chronicling the Jewish Attitude Toward Ukrainian Statehood: Writing and Rewriting Bolshevik History in the 1920s”
    Myroslav Shkandrij, Professor, Department of German and Slavic Studies, University of Manitob

    THE CONFERENCE CONTINUES ON MARCH 25. PLEASE REGISTER FOR DAY 2 SEPARATELY IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON BOTH DAYS

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge: Winners Report Back

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In April 2016, nine teams pitched their ideas to a panel of judges to compete for funding in the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC, formerly Big Ideas Competition). In this presentation, the winning teams will present the results of their projects to show how they applied their academic studies to make a difference in addressing real-world issues in Asia and what they learned from the process.

    Winners of this year’s Insights through Asia Challenge, who will carry out their projects in summer 2017, will also be presented with their awards.

    Presenters Include:

    Evaporative Cooling Vests – Preventing Deadly Heat Stress
    Presentation by Adam Sheikh

    Thousands of migrant construction workers in the Gulf have died as a result of heat induced heart complications. Local governments have done little to address serious workplace safety problems giving construction companies little incentive to ensure the safety of cheap, easily replaceable, labour. Through use of low cost cooling vests we have found a means of changing this dynamic and ensure protecting workers’ is less costly then leaving them exposed.

    Upward
    Presentation by David Tobiasz and Melody Liang

    Upward is a small-scale educational development project founded by three University of Toronto graduate students that provides dynamic classroom experiences to migrant children in China.

    Cleanopy Air4Kids
    Presentation by Natalia Mykhaylova and Julie Huber

    Our overall goal is to reduce the health risk factors of air pollution for children by providing affordable devices for monitoring and purifying the air and an awareness campaign that together will result in reduced disease incidence and improved health. We have conducted a detailed survey of parents, clinicians and NGOs and used the findings to improve the design of our solution.

    Red Pocket

    Our goal was to disrupt stereotypes of Chinese people as silent and conservative by elevating lived experiences and voices of youth. Through our media production company, we have aimed to encourage discussion about racial stereotyping and to share real stories from real people.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Forget Chineseness: On the Geopolitics of Cultural Identification

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    Forget Chineseness provides a critical interpretation not only of discourses of Chinese identity—Chineseness—but also of how they have reflected differences between “Chinese” societies, such as in Hong Kong, Taiwan, PRC, Singapore and communities “overseas”. It asserts that identity has meaning not only in cultural, representational terms but is moreover a product of its embeddedness in specific entanglements of modernity, colonialism, nation-state formation, and globalization. By articulating these processes underlying institutional practices vis-à-vis public mindsets, it is thus possible to elucidate various epistemic moments that lay the basis for their socio-political transformation.
    From a broader perspective, this should have salient ramifications for prevailing discussions of identity politics. Not only has the concept of identity been predicated on flawed notions of ethnicity and culture in the social “sciences”, but it has been acutely exacerbated by polarizing assumptions that drive our understanding of identity “politics”.

    Speaker Bio:

    Allen Chun is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. His research interests include socio-cultural theory, (trans)national identity, and (post)colonial formations. Most of his work has dealt with Chinese-speaking societies, contemporary and late traditional. In addition to a monograph, Unstructuring Chinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of “Land” in the New Territories of Hong Kong (2000), he edited a special double issue of Cultural Studies (vol. 14, nos. 3–4), “(Post)Colonialism and Its Discontents”; a special issue of Social Analysis (vol. 46, no. 2), “Global Dissonances”; and co-edited a book, Refashioning Pop Music in Asia: Cosmopolitan Flows, Political Tempos and Aesthetic Industries (2004). His major articles have appeared in diverse journals, including Toung Pao, Late Imperial China, History and Anthropology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Historical Sociology, Current Anthropology, Theory Culture & Society, boundary 2, Communal/Plural, Cultural Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Critique of Anthropology, Anthropological Theory, and positions.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Allen Chun
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Indian Visual Culture and Contemporary Art, Department of Visual Studes

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, March 25th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - Day 2

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 25, 20179:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Conference Program (Day II):

    Panel 3: Soviet State-Building and Ukrainian Culture
    10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

    “What was Soviet and Ukrainian about Soviet Ukrainian Culture?”
    Mayhill C. Fowler, Assistant Professor of History, Stetson University

    “In Search of Own “Self”: Anticolonial Discourse of Soviet Ukrainian Cinema in the 1920s”
    Yana Prymachenko, Researcher, Institute of the History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences

    “Rehabilitating a Mythology: The Ukrainian SSR’s Foundational Myth after Stalin”
    Markian Dobczansky, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Panel 4: Toward a Consolidated Statehood? The Ukrainian SSR in the 1960s–1980s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Corruption and Ideological Subversion: Soviet Ukrainian Political Elites in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the 1970s–80s”
    Olga Bertelsen, Research Fellow, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

    “Making Soviet Ukraine Ukrainian: Ideas of Ukrainian Statehood in the Ukrainian Diaspora of Canada and the USA (1960–80s)”
    Simone Attilio Bellezza, Research Fellow, Department of Humanities, University of Trento, and Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    “Building Socialism, Being a Professional: Everyday Life and Professional Identity in Late Soviet Ukraine”
    Oleksandra Gaidai, Senior Research Fellow, Museum of History of Kyiv

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS DAY II OF A 2-DAY CONFERENCE. IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON DAY I (MARCH 24) AS WELL, PLEASE REGISTER FOR IT SEPARATELY.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 27th Symposium: Learning to Steer: Reflections and Progress on Reducing Urban GHG Emissions

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 27, 20178:30AM - 1:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Registration is required.
    Register here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/learning-to-steer-reflections-and-progress-on-reducing-urban-ghg-emissions-tickets-32669304770

    Schedule:

    8:30-9:00 am Breakfast and Registration
    9:00-9:15 am Welcome (City of Toronto)
    9:15-9:30 am Opening Remarks: Sara Hughes (University of Toronto)
    9:30-10:15 am Rohit Aggarwala: Climate Change Mitigation Experiences in New York City
    10:15-11:00 am Jonathan Parfrey: Climate Change Mitigation Experiences in Los Angeles
    11:00-11:30 am Coffee Break
    11:30 am-12:15 pm Mary Pickering: Climate Change Mitigation Experiences in Toronto
    12:15-1:00 pm Open Discussion with Audience and Speakers

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    (416) 946-8972


    Speakers

    Sara Hughes
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto; CSUS Bissell Heyd Fellow

    Rohit Aggrawala
    Speaker
    Adjunct Professor; Adjunct Research Scholar, Faculty of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

    Jonathan Parfrey
    Speaker
    Executive Director and Founder, Climate Resolve, Los Angeles

    Mary Pickering
    Speaker
    Vice-President, Programs and Partnerships, Toronto Atmospheric Fund


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Office of the Dean, Faculty of Arts and Sciences

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Global Cities Institute

    School of the Environment

    Decarbonization Project, Environmental Governance Lab

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Department of Political Science, UTM


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 27th Putin's War Against Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 27, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Dr. Taras Kuzio will give a presentation based on his book that will be published in February 2017. The West has woken up to the uncomfortable fact that Russia has long believed it is at war with them the most egregious example of which is Vladimir Putin’s hacking of the US elections. For Western governments, used to believing in the post-Cold War peace dividend, it came as a shock to find the liberal international order is under threat from an aggressive Russia. The ‘End of History – loudly proclaimed in 1991 – has been replaced by the ‘Return of History.’ Putin’s war against Ukraine came three years earlier when he launched an unprovoked war in the Donbas and annexed the Crimea. Putin’s war against Ukraine has killed 20,000 civilians, Ukrainian and Russian soldiers and combatants, forced a third of the population of the Donbas to flee, illegally nationalised Ukrainian state and private entities in the Crimea, destroyed huge areas of the infrastructure and economy of the Donbas, and created a black hole of crime and soft security threats to Europe. Putin’s war against Ukraine is the first book length study of how Russian nationalism, chauvinism, anti-Semitism and crime are driving Putin’s belief that Russians and Ukrainians are ‘one people’ forever united in the Russian World. Written by Taras Kuzio, a leading authority on contemporary Ukraine, Putin’s War Against Ukraine is a product of his long-term expertise in Ukrainian politics, fieldwork in the Russian-speaking eastern and southern Ukraine and his visits to the front lines of the Donbas combat zone. The book debunks the myths surrounding Europe’s biggest crisis since World War II and provides an incisive analysis for policy makers, journalists and scholars as to why Putin is at war with the West and Ukraine.

    Taras Kuzio has analysed crime, corruption, politics, and nationalism in the USSR, Ukraine, Russia and Eurasia for over three decades as a journalist, consultant and academic. Educated in the UK, he received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, MA in Soviet and Eastern European Studies from the University of London, and Phd in political science from University of Birmingham, UK. He was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University. Currently a Senior Research Associate at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. Previously he has held positions as a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Senior Fellow at the School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, Visiting Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University and Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. Taras Kuzio has been a consultant to different branches of the US government, including team leader on a USAID spring 2015 assessment of democracy, governance and human rights in Ukraine. He has prepared expert testimony in political asylum cases and consultancy on oligarchs, corporate raiding and due diligence for legal and business clients. As a public intellectual he has been a frequent guest on television, radio and print media, including during the Euromaidan, Russian invasion of the Crimea and the Donbas conflict. Over a 3-decade journalistic career he has authored 1, 400 articles on post-communist, Ukrainian and Russian politics and international affairs for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Al Jazeera, Financial Times, UPI (United Press International), New Eastern Europe, and specialist publications by Jane’s Information Group and Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty. His most recent book Ukraine: Democratization, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (June 2015) surveys modern Ukrainian political history from 1953 to the present. In 2013-2016, he undertook 15 visits to eastern Ukraine and the Donbas conflict zone to research the book Putin’s War Against Ukraine: Revolution, Nationalism, and Crime (2017). He is the author and editor of an additional 15 books, including Open Ukraine. Changing Course towards a European Future Democratic Revolution in Ukraine (2011), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007) and Ukraine-Crimea-Russia: Triangle of Conflict (2007). Dr. Kuzio has guest edited 12 special issues of academic journals Problems of Post-Communism, East European Politics and Society, Nationalities Papers, Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics and Communist and Post-Communist Studies and authored over 100 think tank monographs, book chapters, and scholarly articles.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Taras Kuzio
    Speaker
    University of Alberta

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 27th Zoom to Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 27, 20176:00PM - 8:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Zoom to Canada is a film screening event which presents short movies that are made by canadian children and youth alongside with youth from other parts of the world (brought to us by our partner organization: Zoom to Europe and Asian Express). Some of the films were awarded at Berlinale or at the New York film festival

    Sponsors

    Hungarian Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 28th Turmoil in Turkey: The Aftermath of the Failed Coup

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    On July 15, 2016, a group of Turkish soldiers, apparently initiating a coup attempt, flew attack helicopters; F16s fighter jets, bombed the parliament building, and drove tanks down the streets of Istanbul and the capital city of Ankara. The subsequent violence caused almost 300 people to lose their lives, and at least two thousand more to suffer physical harm. The upheaval, quickly crushed by governmental forces, granted Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoǧan an opportunity to squelch his critics, effectively bolstering his authority. He promptly accused Islamic cleric Fethullah Gülen (b. 1941) and his followers of masterminding the plot, and launched a series of oppressive measures against those affiliated with the Gülen Movement, also known as Hizmet (Turkish for “service”). Individuals from a wide range of political allegiances perceived to be in opposition of the government were arrested. Most of those arrested or fired, however, were involved, or affiliated in some way, with Hizmet. In the aftermath, participants found themselves under siege, vulnerable to human rights abuses, in light of Erdoǧan’s three-month suspension of the European Convention of Human Rights. Termed “the purge,” or temizlik(Turkish for cleansing), his AKP government detained 94,889 people, arrested over 47,120, and closed or took over 149 media outlets, and over 2,000 educational institutions were shut down.[1] Erdoǧan also labeled Gülen a traitor, and the movement a terrorist organization, creating the conditions for ordinary participants to experience acute ostracism from those around them, creating rifts between friends and family members. Refugees of the purge spoke of loss of family, friends, occupations, and property, and also of their very identity as Turks or citizens of Turkey. These series of events reflect seismic fault lines in Turkey between sectarian, ethnic, and ideological groups, and ultimately a brutal struggle over the soul of Turkey. The resulting geopolitical outcomes will transform Turkey and the larger region, already destabilized by the war in Syria, PKK militancy, and Russian aggression.
    ________________________________________
    [1] Turkey Purge, as of March 16, 2017,http://turkeypurge.com/.

    Dr. Sophia Pandya specializes in women, religion, and globalization. She received her BA from UC Berkeley in Near Eastern Studies/Arabic, and her MA and PhD from UCSB in Religious Studies, with a focus on women and Islam. An Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California at Long Beach, she co-edited the book entitled The Gulen Hizmet Movement and its Transnational Activities: Case Studies of Altruistic Activism in Contemporary Islam.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Sophia Pandya
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California at Long Beach



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 28th Stakeholder Capitalism in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Special Symposium

    Description

    It is now widely recognized that globalized shareholder capitalism, while generating substantial wealth over recent decades, has failed to distribute the benefits of such wealth equitably. The financial crisis of 2008 has brought to fore growing social and economic inequality, negative social and human costs of unregulated business practices, and short and long-term impacts of wasteful resource extraction and consumption on social and natural environment. The search is now on to identify more sustainable ways of organizing capitalism. In 2014 world business, government and civil society leaders and academics at World Economic Forum in Davos began discussing the idea of ethical capitalism. What is ethical capitalism? A group of scholars from Europe, North America and Asia has returned to history to answer this question. In the second half of the 19th century, Shibusawa Eiichi, a major business leader and entrepreneur, and widely considered the father of modern Japanese economy, expressed the view that business enterprise could and should simultaneously achieve profits and social goals through enhanced public welfare. His solutions are still relevant today. In this symposium we: 1) elaborate on the Asian and Western origins of ethical capitalism; 2) map out arguments for corporate responsibilities and the changing corporate practices; and 3) debate the relations between ethics and economy for a sustainable global economies and societies.

    Featuring:

    Ken Shibusawa, Chairman, Commons Asset Management, Inc.
    Geoffrey Jones, Professor of Business History, Harvard Business School
    The Hon. Kevin G. Lynch, Vice-Chair, BMO Financial Group

    with an introduction to the “Ethical Capitalism” project by:

    Patrick Fridenson, Professor Emeritus in International Business History, Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris
    Takeo Kikkawa, Professor of Business History, Graduate School of Innovation Studies, Tokyo University of Science
    Janet Hunter, Saji Professor of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Program:

    MC: Ito Peng, Professor, Department of Sociology, and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto.
    • 14:00 – 14:02 Welcome by Professor David Cameron, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto
    • 14:02 – 14:05 Opening remarks by Peter Loewen, Director, School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto.
    • 14:05 – 14:10 Remarks by Mr. Yasunori Nakayama, Consul General of Japan in Toronto.
    • 14:10 – 14:30 Introduction to the “Ethical Capitalism” project, Patrick Fridenson (Professor Emeritus in International Business History, Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris) & Takeo Kikkawa (Professor of Business History, Graduate School of Innovation Studies, Tokyo University of Science).

    Moderator: Janet Hunter, Saji Professor of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science.
    • 14:30 – 15:00 Keynote speaker: The Hon. Kevin G. Lynch, Vice-Chair, BMO Financial Group.
    • 15:00 – 15:20 Keynote speaker: Ken Shibusawa, Chairman, Commons Asset Management, Inc.
    • 15:20 – 15:35 Discussant: Geoffrey Jones, Professor of Business History, Harvard Business School.
    • 15:35 – 15:55 Panel Discussion and Q & A
    • 15:55 – 16:00 Closing Remarks by Masahide Shibusawa, President, Shibusawa Eiichi Memorial Foundation.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918

    Sponsors

    Shibusawa Eiichi Memorial Foundation

    University of Toronto Press

    School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Japan Foundation

    Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Toronto Japanese Association of Commerce & Industry


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 28th The Pale King and the “Cowboys of Information”

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In 1997-98, David Foster Wallace took three accounting classes at Illinois State University as part of the research for what became The Pale King, his posthumously published, unfinished novel about IRS accountants. His notes for these classes include, in block capitals, the statement “ACCOUNTANTS ARE COWBOYS OF INFORMATION.” This talk draws on archival research at the Harry Ransom Center (at the University of Texas at Austin), arguing that The Pale King is not only a book about “cowboys of information” at the Peoria IRS Regional Center; it is also a book that required its author and its editor—as well as its readers—to act as cowboys of information, corralling a large and increasingly unwieldy body of data into something meaningful.

    Philip Sayers is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto, and a Junior Fellow at Massey College. He holds a BA in English from Cambridge and an MA in Comparative Literature from University College London, and specializes in twentieth century and contemporary Anglophone prose, psychoanalysis, and continental philosophy.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Philip Sayers
    PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto; Junior Fellow at Massey College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 29th Promoting the Relationship between the G20 and the United Nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 29, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Shuyong Guo is dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Shanghai International Studies University, where he is also director of the Centre for G20 Studies. He is the deputy general secretary of the Society of Studies on International Politics in Universities in China, Vice President of Association of the Study of Basic Theories of Behavioural Law in China, Vice President of Shanghai Association of International Strategic Studies, foreign affairs consultant for the Shanghai municipal government, and an editorial board member of International Organization Research Journal.

    Jiyong Jin is an associate professor of political science and the deputy dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Shanghai International Studies University. His research focuses on Sino-American relations, global health governance, health diplomacy and America’s global health strategy. He was awarded a Fox International Fellowship by Yale University and studied at Yale from 2008 to 2009. He completed his postdoctoral program at University of Oxford and Princeton University respectively as Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow from 2011 to 2013.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Shuyong Guo
    School for International Relations and Public Affairs, Shanghai International Studies University

    Jiyong Jin
    School for International Relations and Public Affairs, Shanghai International Studies University


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 29th 2017 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 29, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was founded in 1989 by Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber. The prize is a literary award for the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs that seeks to deepen public debate on significant international issues. Presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Foreign Policy magazine, the winning author receives $15,000.

    A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, From Tahrir Square to ISIS

    A Rage for Order tracks the tormented legacy of what was once called the Arab Spring. Combining dramatic storytelling with an original analysis of the Arab world today, Worth captures the psychic and actual civil wars raging throughout the Middle East and explains how the dream of an Arab renaissance gave way to a new age of discord.

    Robert F. Worth spent 14 years as a foreign correspondent for The New York Times and was the paper’s Beirut bureau chief from 2007 until 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine and The New York Review of Books. He has twice been a finalist for a National Magazine Award. Born and raised in Manhattan, he now lives in Washington, D.C.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 30th Meeting - Prof. Kessler

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Marilyn Laville
    416-946-8950


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 30th I and I Survive: Film Blackness and Contemporary Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The talk will consider some of the major arguments and themes of Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Film with attention to issues of visual historiography, death, resistance, and film form. By mapping out ways of addressing the idea of black film through the lens of black visual and expressive culture, the talk will focus on Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits (2015), Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight (2016), the work of Kevin Jerome Everson, and other recent and consequential enactments of film blackness.

    Michaeal Boyce Gillespie’s work focuses on black visual and expressive culture, film theory, genre, visual historiography, global cinema, adaptation theory, popular music studies, and contemporary art. His recently released book, Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film (Duke University Press, 2016) frames black film alongside literature, music, art, photography, and new media, treating it as an interdisciplinary form that enacts black visual and expressive culture. The book shifts the ways scholars think about black film, treating it not as a category, genre, or strictly a representation of the black experience, but as a visual negotiation between film as art and the discursivity of race. Gillespie has published numerous essays and book chapters including “Grace and Grind: Notes on the Work of Kevin Jerome Everson” in How to Remain Human (Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, 2015), and “Reckless Eyeballing: Coonskin, Film Blackness, and the Racial Grotesque,” in Contemporary Black American Cinema: Race, Gender and Sexuality at the Movies, edited by Mia Mask (Routledge, 2012). His most recent research project is entitled Music of My Mind: Blackness and Sonic Visuality. Gillespie is currently associate professor of film at The City College of New York, holding a joint appointment in the Department of Media and Communication Arts and the Black Studies Program. He holds a masters and doctoral degrees from New York University’s Department of Cinema Studies.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Michael Boyce Gillespie
    Associate Professor of Film, Department of Media and Communication Arts, and the Black Studies Program, The City College of New York


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 30th The Looming Illiberal World Order, Israel and World Jewry

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Professor Yossi Shain is the Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University where he also serves as Head of TAU’s School of Political Science, Government and International Affairs, head of the Abba Eban Graduate Studies Program in Diplomacy and Director of the Frances Brody Institute for Applied Diplomacy. He is also a Full Professor of Comparative Government and Diaspora Politics at Georgetown University, and the Founding Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization (PJC) at Georgetown. In 2007, he served (pro-bono) as President of Western Galilee College. Shain earned his B.A. (Philosophy-1981 cum laude) and M.A. (Political Science-1983) degrees from Tel Aviv University and received his Ph.D. in Political Science (with distinction) from Yale University in 1988. Shain is the author and editor of 8 books which won wide acclaim, and published numerous articles in academic journals. He also writes newspaper columns including a regular Op-Eds to Yediot Achronot, Israel’s leading daily, and serves as commentator on Israeli and international media. In 2016 Shain was appointed as a member of Israel’s Council for Higher Educational, and he is now heading Israel’s National committee on rejuvenating the liberal arts and the humanities.

    Chemi Shalev is a senior columnist and U.S. analyst for the widely respected Haaretz news organization. He has recently returned to Israel after five years in New York, where he served as U.S. editor and correspondent, writing about U.S. politics, U.S.-Israeli relations and the American Jewish community. He will continue to cover these issues and to report and comment on Israeli politics and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process from his home near Tel Aviv. Mr. Shalev writes and lectures in both Hebrew and English. He is published in Haaretz’s print editions as well as on its website in Hebrew, Haaretz.co.il, and English, Haaretz.com. He has been covering Arab-Israeli conflict, US-Israeli relations, Israel’s internal politics and American Jewry for over thirty years. Previously he served as diplomatic correspondent and commentator for several major Israeli dailies, including Maariv, Davar, Yisrael Hayom and Jerusalem Post. Mr Shalev’s columns on American and Israeli affairs are frequently cited in major newspapers throughout the world. He has been a guest-commentator on CNN, BBC, Sky, CBS and other television networks during times of Middle East crisis and has served as CNN’s resident analyst during several Israeli election campaigns. For many years, Shalev was the Jerusalem correspondent for the New York-based Jewish weekly The Forward and has also served as associate editor of the Australian Jewish News. He is married, has three daughters and lives in Givatayim, Israel.


    Speakers

    YOSSI SHAIN
    Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University

    CHEMI SHALEV
    Haaretz news organization


    Sponsors

    Political Science, University of Toronto

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 30th Godin (2013; dir. Simon Beaulieu)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20177:30PM - 10:30PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In collaboration with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty

    All film screenings / talks take place at
    Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road


    Speakers

    Sean Mills
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 31st Decoding the Digital Debate

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20179:00AM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor St. West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For further event information, please visit http://www.digitaldebate.ca/

    The digital realm is wired into our everyday lives. While the internet has offered information liberation, economic opportunity and increased global connection, our reliance on it exposes us to threats from state and non-state adversaries. Opinions on these threats are widely debated: some believe a Cyber Pearl Harbour is imminent, others argue there is current cyber threat inflation. On the civilian side, there exists a tug-of-war between the right to privacy and domestic surveillance.
    The Digital Debate is a highly contested arena, untangling the conflicting theoretical and practical debates requires thoughtful input from all sectors across each discipline.
    As states work to navigate various legal and normative frameworks in cyberspace, comprehension on the various challenges is necessary. This one-day event will bring together actors from academia, think tanks, government, private sector and civil society to engage on topics from cyber war and state censorship of information to international law.

    TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
    9:00am – 9:25am Breakfast
    9:30am – 11:00am PANEL 1
    11:05am – 11:15am Break
    11:20am – 12:50am PANEL 2
    12:55am – 1:40pm Lunch
    1:45pm – 3:15pm PANEL 3
    3:20pm – 3:30pm Break
    3:35pm – 5:05pm PANEL 4
    5:10pm – 5:20pm Concluding Remarks
    5:30pm – End of Event

    PANEL 1: UNTANGLING THE NARRATIVE
    The digital debate is a crowded space with contributors from each sector and discipline shaping emerging narratives. In evaluating the potential for cyber war, opinions vary greatly between imminent threat and unlikely skepticism. Media coverage can, at times, be sensationalist. The high technicality of cyberspace and computer networks leaves little room for general public expertise. Yet, productive policymaking regarding all areas – from education and business to security – requires cooperation. This panel will comb through the myriad of voices contributing to the field and attempt to identify points of intersection, which may be capitalized for greater collaboration.

    PANEL 2: UNDERSTANDING TECHNICAL CAPABILITIES IN CYBERSPACE
    Computer networks and infrastructure are vulnerable to attacks and intrusions by people and organizations across entirely different jurisdictions. Some claim that attributing these cyber attacks are difficult due to the technical nature of cyberspace, others argue that a lack of political will is the true obstacle. The military and intelligence communities are constantly concerned that adversaries can penetrate nuclear command, control, and communication systems, and policy-makers worry that hackers can shut down entire city grids. Many argue that cyber offense dominates cyber defense due to the numerous vulnerabilities in computer networks and critical infrastructure. This panel will attempt to address these technical complexities and seek to find ways in which computer networks and infrastructure can be more resilient to attacks and intrusions.

    PANEL 3: SURVEILLANCE, CENSORSHIP & HUMAN RIGHTS ONLINE
    There are significant challenges facing the balance between government surveillance and use of data analytics and a citizen’s privacy and civil liberties. Digital whistleblowers have provided a platform for increased public knowledge on government intelligence operations. At the same time, not all governments use the Internet or information technology for good. Non-state actors, like ISIL, continue to use online networks for recuritment and information campaigns. This panel will hear from a variety of voices on the balance between national security and civil liberties.

    PANEL 4: A FRAMEWORK FOR INTERSTATE RELATIONS
    Concerns over how states interact with and exploit each other’s software and cyber infrastructure have been around since at least the 1960s. From deterrence to cooperation, disagreements in international relations theory and practice about cyber security grow stronger, as progress in understanding the best path forward becomes weaker. On the legal side, understanding how domestic laws apply to cyber security is a difficult task for any state internally, understanding how a state’s cyber actions are governed by international law is even more challenging. This panel will explore the current theoretical and practical gaps in the cyber debate within international relations and evaluate the international legal frameworks applicable to cyberspace.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 31st A Remittance Forest in Java; Turning Migrant Labour into Agrarian Capital

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    How does labor migration affect Southeast Asian forests? Political forests and agroforests in Indonesia have been declining rapidly as millions of hectares are given over to industrial plantations and mines, aggravating rural labor surpluses and increasing rates of domestic and transnational migration. In the mountains of Java, where such plantations and political forests date back to government land grabs in the nineteenth century, forests are being reconstituted and reconfigured by unexpected constituents: the daughters and wives of contracted forest workers and other forest villagers. Working as transnational domestic laborers in Hong Kong and other prosperous Asian cities, many invest their accumulated wages in rural resources, remaking forest lands to suit new investments. This talk will examine some of these dynamics as they are playing out in a montane forest in East Java, Indonesia. The question posed initially turns on its head the usual perspectives on forest transitions and agrarian change, demanding greater scholarly attention to the specific ways that mobilities affect both the material and symbolic constructions of place—in this case, political forests of Indonesia.

    lunch will be served in the Faculty Lounge at 12:00pm; talk begins at 12:30pm

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nancy Peluso
    UC Berkeley



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 31st The Place of the Baltic in the French Atlantic Empire

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This talk explores ways in which the Baltic region enabled the rise and consolidation of the French colonial empire in the Americas. The Baltic, a supplier of masts, tar, hemp, iron, planks, and other naval stores, has long been viewed as central to early modern European expansion overseas. Nevertheless, its particular association with French empire building remains little studied. Drawing on data from the Danish Sound Toll Registers and French consular records, the talk delineates how French colonization began as an attempt to secure commercial independence from the Baltic, only to produce the opposite effect of binding the French colonial enterprise and the Baltic ever closer together.

    Pernille Røge is Assistant Professor of French and French Colonial History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarly interests focus on interconnections between eighteenth-century political economic theory and colonial policy and practice. Her publications on the French, British, and Danish colonial empires have appeared in edited volumes and peer reviewed journals, including Dix-huitième Siècle, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, and History of European Ideas. She is co-editor of a collection of essays entitled The Political Economy of Empire in the Early Modern World (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Her book manuscript Reinventing the Empire: Political Economy, France, and the African and Caribbean Colonies, c. 1750-1800 is currently under review with Cambridge University Press.


    Speakers

    Pernille Røge
    University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 31st Isaac Julien: Artist's Talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Ave.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This lecture was rescheduled from Jan. 23rd to March 31, 4-6 pm. Registration is not required for this event. Seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Isaac Julien is a Turner prize nominated artist and filmmaker. Earlier works include Young Soul Rebels (1991), which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), and Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996). Julien has pioneered a form of multi-screen installations with works such as Western Union: Small Boats (2007), Ten Thousand Waves (2010), andPlaytime: Kapital (2014).

    Julien was a participant in the 56th Biennale di Venezia, curated by Okwui Enwezor (2015). He has exhibited his work in major museums and institutions across the world including the nine screen of Ten Thousand Waves at Museum of Modern Art, New York, at Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and more recently Playtime and Kapital at El Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City. Julien’s work is included in the collections of institutions around the globe. In 2013, a monographic survey of his career to date, Riot, was published by MoMA, NY.

    Julien is currently producing a new work that is a poetic meditation on aspects of the life and architecture of Lina Bo Bardi, entitled 7 Songs for Lina Bo Bardi. The first chapter of this work, Stones Against Diamonds was shown during 2015’s La Biennale di Venezia, Art Basel, and Art Basel Miami Beach. Julien was Chair of Global Art at University of Arts London (2014-2016), and is the recent recipient of the 83rd James Robert Brudner Memorial Prize and Lecture at Yale University (2016).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Isaac Julien
    artist and filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Department of Art

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Master of Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

April 2017

  • Saturday, April 1st Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream Against Our Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 1, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMBloor St. United Church
    300 Bloor St. West
    Toronto
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca. Registration is not required for this event, but seating is limited.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelly
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Lee Maracle
    Author, Instructor, and Traditional teacher

    Faith Nolan
    Social Justice Activist and Musician


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Women and Gender Studies

    African Studies

    Department of Geography and Planning

    Caribbean Studies

    Hart House

    Academic Initiatives Fund, New College

    Diaspora and Transnational Studies

    Equity Studies

    Department of History

    MVS Proseminar

    Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto

    A Different Booklist


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, April 3rd Robin D.G. Kelley & Fred Moten: In Conversation

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 3, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMGreat Hall
    Hart House
    University of Toronto
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In Conversation is a TICKETED EVENT. Tickets are free but required and available at:
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/robin-dg-kelley-fred-moten-in-conversation-tickets-32116721980

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca.

    All talks are wheelchair accessible with ASL provided.

    SPONSORS: A Different Booklist; Caribbean Studies; Academic Initiatives Fund, New College; Women and Gender Studies; African Studies; Geography and Planning; Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs; Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Equity Studies; Hart House; History; MVS Proseminar; and the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelley
    Speaker
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Fred Moten
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of English, UC Riverside; Northrop Frye Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    Rinaldo Walcott
    Moderator
    Director, Women & Gender Studies Institute

    Afua Cooper
    Moderator
    James Robinson Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Dalhousie University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, April 4th The Making of a President and the Unmaking of Political Parties: France 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 4, 20174:30PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This year’s French presidential election will have a decisive influence on the future of France and Europe. The outcome could determine whether France remains in the European Union, which is celebrating its sixtieth anniversary. The political parties that have dominated French politics during that period may not make it into the runoff, leaving the final contest between a 39-year-old political newcomer and a right-wing populist. The repercussions of this election for Europe and the world are likely to be far more significant than the Brexit vote last June. The talk will explain how France reached this point, examine the positions of the five leading candidates, and consider the possible outcomes and consequences.

    Arthur Goldhammer is a Senior Affiliate at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University. He writes widely on French culture and politics for publications such as The Nation, The American Prospect, Democracy Journal, Foreign Policy, and The Chronicle of Higher Education and serves on the editorial boards of French Politics, Culture and Society, and The Tocqueville Review. He is the author of a novel, Shooting War, and the translator of 125 books from the French, for which he has won numerous awards. He is an Officer of the French Order of Arts and Letters and holds a BS and Ph.D. in mathematics from MIT.


    Speakers

    Arthur Goldhammer
    Senior Fellow, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, April 6th Performing Revolution: Violence and Dissent in China's Red Guard Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMFirst Floor Conference Room (JHB100), Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    From 1966 to 1968, students and workers in urban China were embroiled in deadly factional battles in what many of them believed to be a revolution of a lifetime – the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the middle of factional violence, they also expressed radical ideas of political dissent. Based on the recently published book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that both violence and dissent were the results of the dramatic enactment of a revolutionary culture. The mechanism of this enactment was revolutionary competition. This conclusion has direct implications for understanding the role of political culture in collective violence in today’s world.

    Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols. 2003). He is the editor of Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Victor Pickard, forthcoming), China’s Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Guobin Yang
    Speaker
    Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, April 6th Modern authoritarian regimes in the 21st century. A shadow over Central Europe?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMUniversity College 152
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Michal Mochťak, Ph.D. is a Research Fellow at the International Institute of Political Science, Masaryk University and a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at the Department of Political Science, Yale University. His research focuses on the challenges to democracy in Central and Eastern Europe with special emphasis on the conflict potential of elections, modern forms of authoritarian rule and deconsolidation processes. Results of his research on electoral violence and democratization have been published in a variety of international peer-reviewed political science journals (e.g. Terrorism and Political Violence, Democracy and Security, Journal of Southeast European and Black Sea Studies or World Political Science). He has co-authored the publications ‚Challenges to Democracies in East Central Europe‘ and ‚Demokratizace a lidská práva. Středoevropské pohledy‘ (Democratization and Human Rights. The Central European Perspectives). His book ‘Electoral Violence in the Western Balkans. From Voting to Fighting and Back‘ is scheduled to be published in September 2017 by Routledge Press.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 7th The representation of 'Zainichi-Chosenjin'(Korean residents in Japan) in South Korea in the 1970s: Mass-media and representation of home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this speech I would like to tell you how the ‘home-visiting project’ in 1975 has represented in the mass media in South Korea, and that this particular method of representation has been targeted. I want to talk about the representation of the Zainichi- Chosenjin(在日朝鮮人) in the 1970s reflect today’s South Korea rather than the realistic reconstruction of the surrounding home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan. The Zainichi-Chosenjin refer to ancestry of chosen(Korea) peninsula and their descendants who defected to Japan from colonial rule, regardless of nationality, belong to the Japanese colonial rule. In the 1970s, however, Zainichi-Chosenjin was understood as the image of ‘Pro-North Korea’ and ‘Converted chongnyeon (在日朝鮮人總聯合會)’ in South Korea. In 1975, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan began in the South Korean government’s intention to gain dominance over the North Korean regime. At the same time, it was an active national anti-communistic tourism project, which is distinguished from the “North Korea Repatriation Project”(歸國事業) in 1959.

    On the surface, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan appeared to be based on humanitarianism. By December 29, 1975, the number of visitors to South Korea was about 1,600. If the North Korea Repatriation Project was exodus for the settlement of paradise of socialism, home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan was the anti-communistic tourism for the purpose of denying the dark past as pro-North Korea by showing the rapid development of South Korea. In the 1970s, the mass media in South Korea represented Zainichi-Chosenjin as the converted to South Korea(“Total System converted collectively, 總轉向體制). However, the anti-communistic project planned by Yushin government, the National Intelligence Service, were not intended for Zainichi-Chosenjin. In Conclusion, the issue of dispersed family between North and South Korea, legal status concerning Zainichi-Chosenjin was not discussed. Instead converting of Zainichi-Chosenjin to South Korea was represented as victory of South Korea in competition of Cold War.

    Kim Won is an associate professor of political science at the Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies. Now he reserches at Hiroshima University in Japan for investigating memories of Zainichichosejin in era of cold war. Recently he presented “Stow away, border and nationality : Atomic notebook tial by Sohn Jin-doo victim of Korean atomic bomb”(2016). His interests include reemberinig of East Asia, labor history, and oral history. He is the author of several books including Factory Girl: Antihistory of Her (2006), Ghost of Park-Jung Hee Era(2011), Uprising June in 1987 (2009), The Disappearing Place of Politics (2008), Memories about the 1980s: Subculture and Mass Politics of Korean Students in the 1980s (1999).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Won
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 7th Bookish Transactions in the Countryside: Missionary Print in nineteenth-century rural India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Coinciding with the rise of Protestant missionary activity, the spread of print technology in nineteenth-century South Asia introduced the cheap, mass-produced book in Indian languages and led to a boom in religious print. Despite the considerable body of work on Christian missionaries’ pioneering role in vernacular printing and their use of print for proselytizing, little attention has been paid to the impact of Christian tracts in the low-literacy environment of rural India. This talk examines how missionaries used the printed tract as both an object of transaction and a tool of conversion in their encounters with prospective converts in the Indian countryside. It also explores the understudied role of Indian colporteurs and catechists in disseminating Christian tracts. In tracing the shifting status of the tract as gift and saleable object, I outline the challenges of the missionary print enterprise, while drawing attention to the material dimensions of the book.

    Ulrike Stark is Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history. She is the author of An Empire of Books: The Naval Kishore Press and the Diffusion of the Printed Word in Colonial India (2007) and is currently completing a biography of Raja Sivaprasad ‘Sitara-e Hind.’

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ulrike Stark
    Speaker
    Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Co-Sponsors

    the Centre for Comparative Literature

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 7th Transcendence in a Secular World: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

    I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions—particularly of China and India– that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic: separating God or the human subject from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOS, quasi-governmental and inter-governmental agencies committed to to the inviolability or sacrality of the ‘commons’ will need to find common cause with these communities struggling to survive.

    Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. Born and educated in India, he received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was Professor of History and East Asian Studies at University of Chicago (1991-2008) and Raffles Professor and Director of Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

    His books include Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) winner of Fairbank Prize of the AHA and Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA, Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014; discussion of the book can be found in http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/world/asia/china-religion-prasenjit-duara.html?ref=world

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 7th Rebel, Ruler, Renegade – The Life of Enver Pasha (1881-1922)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Described by the Washington Herald in 1915 as “the most fascinating figure” of World War I, Enver Pasha has long been regarded as one of the most controversial figures of that war and indeed Middle Eastern history. This talk will trace the arc of Enver’s life from his emergence as the hero rebel of the Young Turk Revolution of 1908 through his time as Ottoman Minister of War and triumvir in World War I to his battlefield death as an anti-imperialist renegade in Central Asia. It will argue that understanding Enver’s life is essential to understanding the emergence of the modern Middle East.


    Speakers

    Michael Reynolds
    Princeton University


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, April 8th The 2017 Toronto Conference on Germany: Populism, Immigration, and Elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 8, 20179:00AM - 4:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    An annual event, this conference examines the state of the union in Germany—Europe’s most consequential country—as well as the relationship between Germany and Canada.

    The conference features expert panels that this year will examine the 2017 German federal elections, immigration in Germany and Canada, and populism in Europe and North America.

    This event will be streamed live beginning at 9 a.m. at https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/Live/403.aspx

    Chair: Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    09:00 – 09:15
    Welcome – Stephen J. Toope, Munk School of Global Affairs; Eugen Wollfarth, Minister of the Embassy of Germany, Ottawa; Michael Meier, Friedrich Ebert Foundation

    09:15 – 10:00 Keynote Speech and Q&A
    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag

    10:00 – 11:30 Panel and Q&A: The 2017 German Federal Elections

    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag
    Prof. Eric Langenbacher, Georgetown University
    Dr. Michael Petrou, Montreal Institute for Genocide & Human Rights Studies
    Moderator: Veit Medick, Der Spiegel, Washington office

    11:30 – 11:45 Coffee break

    11:45 – 13:15 Panel and Q&A: Immigration in Canada and Germany

    Nele Allenberg, Head of the Welcome Center for Immigrants Berlin
    Birte Steller, Hamburg Agency for Labour, Social Issues, Family, and Integration
    Prof. Jeffrey Reitz, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Moderator: Marina Jimenez, Toronto Star

    13:15 – 14:00 Lunch

    14:00 – 15:30 Panel and Q&A: Populism in Europe and North America

    Bob Rae, former Premier of Ontario and Interim Leader, Liberal Party
    Prof. Dr. Frank Decker, University of Bonn
    Ryan Lenz, Southern Poverty Law Center
    Moderator: Joanna Slater, The Globe and Mail

    15:30 – 15:45 Closing remarks – Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    This event is co-sponsored by the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the Munk School for Global Affairs; the Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada; and the German Academic Exchange Service

    Use #germanTO on Twitter to follow this event

    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung @FES_DC

    Munk School @CERESMunk @munkschool

    German Embassy @GermanyInCanada

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Washington Office

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, April 10th Photo Essay of a Failed Reform: Beida, Tiananmen Square and the Defeat of Deng Xiaoping, 1975-76

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In mid-1975, Deng Xiaoping, with Mao’s blessing, initiated reforms that targeted the negative consequences of the Cultural Revolution. To bolster Deng’s effort, Mao endowed him with penultimate authority over the party, government and military. However, in late October, Mao turned on Deng, and within five months, Mao and the radicals toppled Deng from power.
    Chinese society supported Deng’s changes. In January 1976, Beijingers used Zhou’s death to express fears that his moderate policies and persona would be swept aside by the radicals. In early-April, several million Beijingers took over Tiananmen Square and denounced the radicals and challenged Mao’s vision for China’s future.
    As a foreign student at Peking University, I observed and photographed four key points in this historic struggle: (1) the initial establishment of a “big character poster” compound at Peking U; (2) emotional mourning for Zhou Enlai in Tiananmen Square following his death: (3) the intensified assault on Deng in February 1976 at Peking U; and (4) the massive demonstration of support in Tiananmen Square on April 3rd and 4th for the end of Maoist politics

    David Zweig is Chair Professor, Division of Social Science, and Director, Center on China’s Transnational Relations (www.cctr.ust.hk), HKUST. He is an Adjunct Professor, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, and Vice-President of the Center on China’s Globalization (Beijing). He lived in China for 4 years (1974-76, 1980-81, 1986 and 1991-92), and in Hong Kong since 1996. In 1984-85, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University. His Ph.D. is from The University of Michigan (Political Science, 1983).

    He is the author of four books, including Internationalizing China: domestic interests and global linkages (Cornell Univ. Press, 2002) and a new edited book, Sino-U.S. Energy Triangles: Resource Diplomacy under Hegemony, with Hao Yufan (Routledge: 2015). In 2013, he received The Humanities and Social Sciences Prestigious Fellowship, Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, and in 2015 received grant from the RGC for a project entitled, “Coming Home: Reverse Migration of Entrepreneurs and Academics in India and Turkey in Light of the Chinese Experience.”

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. David Zweig
    Speaker
    Chair Professor, Division of Social Science; Director, Center on China's Transnational Relations Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 12th Seeing as Touch: Gao Jianfu's Revolutionary Design in Modern Canton

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the early years of the Republic the revolutionary Cantonese brush-and-ink painter Gao Jianfu (1879-1951) presented Sun Yatsen, father of the Republic, with an essay in which he argued that porcelain manufacture would save the new nation. Important among Gao’s own porcelain designs was a dish painted with mantises devouring pupa, encircled by a rim ornamented with patterns of stylized fishes, flowers, and birds on a ground much like Japanese shibori tie-dyed textiles. The striking contrast of the decorative rim with the specimen-like insect depiction at the dish’s centre raises questions. How did the rim’s artificial lines mediate the naturalism of the insects to embody Gao’s radical conception of modern design – a design that was more than formal, but social and political as well? And what did it mean for the nation to see and touch insects on their patriotic porcelains? How, in short, was the dish designed and designing?

    Lisa Claypool publishes widely on late imperial and Republican-era visual culture and design in China, and has curated and published a series of essays and interviews about contemporary art. She is currently at work on two projects: a book about the mediation of science through the ink brush in early 20th century China, and; an article about curatorial practices of contemporary artists in China.

    本人在阿尔伯塔大学主要教授中国艺术方面的课程,并负责大学美术馆的中国古代绘画和艺术藏品的管理和展览. 主要研究方向包括十八世纪之后的中国艺术和现当代视觉文化。目前已有多篇关于博物馆、近现代艺术、展览学以及审美学的文章在重要学术刊物和会议出版物中发表。

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Lisa Claypool
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Depertment of the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Alberta; Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery 2016-17

    Jennifer Purtle
    Chair
    Interim Dr. David Chu Director in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, April 13th Provisional Authority: Police, Order, and Security in India Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 13, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.

    Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.

    Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.
    Beatrice Jauregui is assistant professor at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Global Policing and Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

    Frank Cody
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; and Department Of Anthropology, UTM

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, UTM

    Kevin O’Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, April 18th Breaking the Ice Book Launch with Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 18, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Buttery
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C8
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us on April 18th to celebrate the book launch of Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon’s ‘Breaking the Ice: Canada, Sovereignty, and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf’ (Dundurn Press). There will be a presentation by the author and the opportunity to purchase copies of the book and have them signed by the author.

    In Breaking the Ice: Canada, Sovereignty and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf, Arctic policy expert Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon examines the political, legal, and scientific aspects of Canada’s efforts to delineate its Arctic extended continental shelf. The quality and quantity of the data collected and analyzed by the scientists and legal experts preparing Canada’s Arctic Submission for the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, and the extensive collaboration with Canada’s Arctic neighbours is a good news story in Canadian foreign policy. As Arctic sovereignty continues to be a key concern for Canada and as the international legal regime is being observed by all five Arctic coastal states, it is crucial to continue to advance our understanding of the complex issues around this expanding area of national interest.

    Stick around after the book launch for a discussion on Canadian foreign policy with Roland Paris and Kim Nossal in the George Ignatieff Theatre. For full details click HERE

    Speaker’s Biography
    Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon has spent three decades researching and writing about law of the sea policy. She is a Distinguished Senior Fellow with the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto, and Professor Emerita in the Department of Political Science at Western University.

    This is a free event. There will be food, refreshments and a cash bar.

    Sponsors

    Canadian International Council

    The Gordon Foundation

    Dundurn Press

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, April 18th Canadian Foreign Policy Discussion with Roland Paris and Kim Nossal

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 18, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    Larkin Building, University of Toronto, St. George Campus
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C8
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us on Tuesday April 18th for a discussion on Canadian Foreign Policy between two of the most respected authorities on the subject, Roland Paris and Kim Nossal. Prior to the discussion we will be hosting a book launch in the Buttery for Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon’s Breaking Ice: Canada, Sovereignty, and the Arctic Extended Continental Shelf. Click HERE for more details of that event.

    Speakers’ Biographies

    Kim Richard Nossal is the director of the School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University. He received his B.A., (1972), M.A. (1974), and Ph.D. (1977) in Political Economy from the University of Toronto. In 1976, he joined the Department of Political Science at McMaster University in Hamilton, serving as chair of the department from 1992 to 1996. In 2001, he was appointed head of the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s, a position he held until 2009. From 2008 to 2013, he served as the Sir Edward Peacock Professor of International Relations. From 2010 to 2013 he was the director of the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen’s.

    Nossal has served as editor of International Journal, the quarterly journal of the Canadian International Council, Canada’s institute of international affairs, and sits on the editorial boards of several journals. He has served as president of both the Australian and New Zealand Studies Association of North America (1999-2001) and the Canadian Political Science Association (2005-2006).

    Nossal has authored or edited a number of books, including The Politics of Canadian Foreign Policy (1985, 1989, 1997); Relocating Middle Powers: Australia and Canada in a Changing World Order (with Andrew F. Cooper and Richard A. Higgott, 1993); Rain Dancing: Sanctions in Canadian and Australian Foreign Policy (1994); Diplomatic Departures: The Conservative Era in Canadian Foreign Policy (ed. with Nelson Michaud, 2001); Politique internationale et défense au Canada et au Québec (with Stéphane Roussel and Stéphane Paquin, 2007); Architects and Engineers: Building the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, 1909-2009 (ed. with Greg Donaghy, 2009). His latest book, with Roussel and Paquin, is International Policy and Politics in Canada, published in 2011. At present he and Jean-Christophe Boucher are working on a book on the domestic politics of Canada’s Afghanistan mission.

    Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa, where he teaches in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He has expertise in the fields of international security and peacebuilding, global governance and foreign policy. He has won several prizes and citations for his research, including the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, and six awards for teaching and public service.

    In addition to his scholarly work, Paris has held several positions in government, most recently as Senior Advisor to the Prime Minister of Canada. Previously he worked in the Privy Council Office, the Department of Foreign Affairs, and the Federal-Provincial Relations Office. He has also been Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country’s largest think tank, and he served on a group of ten international experts advising the Secretary-General of NATO.

    At the University of Ottawa, Paris founded the Centre for International Policy Studies (CIPS), which he directed from 2008 until 2015. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, he was Assistant Professor the University of Colorado-Boulder, and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC. He has also been a Visiting Fellow at Sciences Po in Paris.

    He sits on the editorial board of seven scholarly journals and has served the board of directors of several organizations, including the World University Service of Canada and the Academic Council on the United Nations System. He also provides regular analysis and commentary on international affairs for national and international media.

    Paris holds a Ph.D. from Yale University, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge, and a B.A. from the University of Toronto. He lives in Ottawa with his spouse and three children.

    Contact

    Jennifer Chylinski

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Canadian International Council


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 19th (In)securitization

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20172:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This event is reserved for University of Toronto students and faculty.
    To register please visit: https://insecuritization.eventbrite.ca

    Munk School faculty map themes and interventions for understanding our new world of insecurity

    Has global governance been configured as a project of security, as distinct from earlier concepts of “freedom” or “peace”? What value-systems (economic, political, ethical and ecological) inform contemporary global security and insecurities? And what media—what channels, conduits, technologies—enable new networks of global governing?

    Moderated by Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Panel 1: Global Insecurity/Global Values
    Ritu Birla, Director, Initiative in Global Governance, Economy and Society, Munk School; Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies; Department of History

    Harriet Friedmann, Senior Fellow, Munk School and Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology

    Jon Lindsay, Faculty, Digital Media and Global Affairs, Munk School

    Lynette Ong, Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Louis Pauly, Chair, Department of Political Science; Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Joseph Wong, Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School;
    Department Political Science

    Panel 2: Media of Global Access, Improvement and Control
    Randall Hansen, Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Tong Lam, Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of History

    Darius Ornston, Faculty and Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Katharine Rankin, Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Rachel Silvey, Interim Director of the Asian Institute, and Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Lecture: 2:00PM-4:00PM
    Reception: 4:00PM-5:00PM


    Speakers

    Ritu Birla
    Panelist
    Director, Initiative in Global Governance, Economy and Society, Munk School; Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies; Department of History

    Harriet Friedmann
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Munk School and Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology

    Jon Lindsay
    Moderator
    Faculty, Digital Media and Global Affairs, Munk School

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Louis Pauly
    Panelist
    Chair, Department of Political Science; Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School; Department Political Science

    Randall Hansen
    Panelist
    Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School; Department of Political Science

    Tong Lam
    Panelist
    Former Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Department of History

    Darius Ornston
    Panelist
    Faculty and Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School

    Katharine Rankin
    Panelist
    Asian Institute and Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Rachel Silvey
    Panelist
    Interim Director of the Asian Institute, and Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Munk School; Department of Geography

    Stephen Toope
    Moderator
    Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 19th The Holodomor - Genocide Against the Ukrainian Nation in the Context of World Genocides

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Although comparative genocide as the second generation of genocide studies has developed over the past two decades, the Holodomor as a crime of genocide committed by Stalin’s regime has not been examined in comparative perspective. In her presentation, Dr. Myroslava Antonovych will trace the reasons for this situation and will offer a comparative analysis of the Holodomor with examples of genocide in the first half of the XX century–namely, the Armenian genocide of the Ottoman Empire and the Holocaust of Nazi Germany. The speaker will compare the three genocides as crimes under international law in terms of the mental (mens rea) and material (actus reus) elements of genocide that characterize each of them, noting the dissimilarities and similarities in intent, the perspectives of the victims and perpetrators, and the acts perpetrated. The key common element in the genocides perpetrated in the Ottoman Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Third Reich is that state organization was substituted by hegemony of a ruling party: the Ittihadists, the Communists, and the Nazis. The importance of comparing cases of genocide is evident – if lessons from the past are not heeded and genocide is not punished, history will repeat itself as can be seen in the east and south (Crimea) of Ukraine, where the successor state to the Soviet Union – the Russian Federation – continues an attack on the Ukrainian nation.

    Dr. Myroslava Antonovych is the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”, Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2010-2014 she was a Judge ad Hoc at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She graduated from the Faculty of Law, Lviv National University (1995) and from the English Department, Dnipropetrovsk National University in Ukraine (1981) with honors. She has LL.M. degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada (1999). Her Doctor of Law degree is from the Ukrainian Free University in Munich, Germany (2008) and Candidate of Philology degree is from Kyiv Linguistic University in Ukraine (1988). As a Fulbright scholar she conducted research on International Human Rights at the Urban and Morgan Institute for Human Rights, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (1996). She is the author of about 100 books and articles in Ukraine and abroad. Her research focuses on International Human Rights and Genocide Studies. In April-May 2017, Dr. Antonovych will be the visiting professor at the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Andrij Makuch
    Chair
    HREC Associate Director of Research and Publication, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Myroslava Antonovych
    Speaker
    The Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy"


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 21st The Neverending Age of Coal: Energy Extraction amidst Dreams of Post-Industrialism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 21, 20174:00PM - 5:30PMJackman Humanities Building
    Room 100, 170 St. George St.
    This event is free and open to all. Registration is not required.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Coal seems the antithesis of the economy of post-industrialism, part of the “maggoty corpse,” in Lewis Mumford’s words, of an industrial age far from present day economies focused on information technology and service work. Scholars have argued as such since at least the 1930s. Indeed, writers as diverse as Mumford, Daniel Bell, Richard Florida, and Timothy Mitchell have all portrayed a transition away from coal as a central element of a broader shift to a political economy defined by “flowing energy,” “a creative class,” and the geography of office parks, research labs, and university campuses that compose the landscapes of post-industrial society. No longer was economic life “a game against nature,” Daniel Bell contended in 1973. Instead, it was “a game between persons.” “What counts,” he wrote, “is not raw muscle power, or energy, but information.”

    In the years since Bell published The Coming of Post-Industrial Society, the global economy has indeed been transformed. Information technology has altered the nature of work, culture, and social life. Those same years have seen a transformation of urban space, fueled largely by highly educated workers in the technology and finance, insurance, and real estate (FIRE) sectors. Cities have become greener, and increasingly economically stratified. At the same time, American coal production has boomed, rising from 573 million tons annually in 1973 to 1.2 billion tons in 2008. Even the celebrated decline in coal use and bankruptcy of coal producers over the past eight years has lowered coal production only to 900 million tons. Indeed, post-industrial society has been, to a large extent, coal fired.

    This talk tries to make sense of this paradox. Why has a transition away from coal been imagined as central to the rise of post-industrialism? Why did the political economy of energy rely increasingly on coal? How was its use obscured, both in scholarly work, and in political culture more generally? And finally, what are the political and intellectual consequences of the new spatial dynamics of coal-fired, post-industrial society?

    This event is free and open to all. Registration is not required. If you require an accommodation for disability, please contact the Jackman Humanities Institute at 416-946-0313, or email jhi.associate@utoronto.ca, to make appropriate arrangements.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Andrew Needham
    Department of History, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    JHI Working Group: Imagining & Inhabiting Resource Landscapes, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 21st Federation and Confederation in Central Europe: Constitutions and Society in the 1860s and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 21, 20175:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Registration not required.

    Volker Berghahn is a historian of German and modern European history at Columbia University, where he holds the Seth Low Chair in History. His research interests have included the fin de siècle period in Europe, the origins of World War One, and German-American Relations. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis.

    Prof. Berghahn’s talk is the opening lecture of a series of events held by the University of Toronto Department of History to reflect on the meanings and memorializations of Confederation. A public conference on The Other 60s: A Decade that Shaped Canada and the World will be held on April 22nd (for further information go to history.utoronto.ca/events/other-60s-decade-shaped-canada-and-world ), followed by Elsbeth Heaman’s 2017 Donald Creighton Lecture on “The Civilization of the Canadas in the 1860s”.


    Speakers

    Volker Berghahn
    Seth Low Chair in History, Columbia University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 26th IMFG Graduate Fellowship Seminar: Local Governance and Public Finance Challenges of the Fracking Boom: Lessons for the US and Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 26, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    IMFG

    Description

    Every year, IMFG awards two fellowships to graduate students at the University of Toronto who are undertaking doctoral or master’s level work in areas related to municipal finance and governance. Come learn more about the research of this year’s fellowship winners.

    Hydraulic fracturing drilling – commonly known as fracking – makes up the majority of US oil output. Canada may soon follow. This presentation will focus on the impacts of boom-bust resource extraction cycles on local revenues and expenditures and intergovernmental relations. During the boom, local governments must provide new infrastructure for an expanding industry and maintain social service levels for a rapidly growing population. During the bust, municipal governments may find themselves over-extended with declining revenues while facing a new set of service challenges.

    About the speaker:

    Austin Zwick, originally from Texas, is a PhD Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto and an IMFG Graduate Fellow. He previously obtained a BSc in Industrial Relations and an MPA in Public Finance from Cornell University. Austin’s research interests focus on the intersection between energy and economic development, and the local governance challenges that arise because of it.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Austin Zwick
    PhD Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto and an IMFG Graduate Fellow.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 28th Ukraine Today Between War and Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 28, 20173:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bios of the panelists:

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    As the 3rd president of Georgia, Mikheil Saakashvili was applauded in the West for his reforms, which transformed the country from an almost failed state to a model in the fight against corruption. But he was defeated in parliamentary elections in 2012. Now he’s back – not in his native Georgia but as Ukrainian politician. In 2015 he was appointed by President Petro Poroshenko as his top foreign policy adviser and head of Ukraine’s Advisory International Council on Reforms. Then a Governor of Odessa Region. But when all of his attempts to transform the system in at least one region failed, Mikheil created an opposition party “Movement of New Forces” which has now officially been registered in Ukraine.

    Yuriy Butusov
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website, Yuriy Butusov has worked for the newspapers Kijevskije Vedomosti and Zerkalo nedeli (Weekly Mirror). In 2004 Butusov started the website Censor.net and is its editor. This online project is one of the most popular news portals in Ukraine. He wrote the screenplay for the film Orange Sky and produced the film Illusion of Fear. Yuriy Butusov is a journalist who reports on incisive social topics and conducts journalistic research. He has exposed many corruption cases and other crimes committed by the power elite. Censor.net, which was created by Butusov is among the most popular Ukrainian news portal. The main topic covered by Butusov currently is the situation in Ukraine – Russia’s aggression and the military activities in Donbas.

    Lyuba Shipovich
    In January 2016 Lyuba Shipovich, President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine, was named one of top 50 developers of New York City.
    She has developed a software called “OKO”: a media monitoring project, which automatically gathers all mentions on Ukraine in foreign media, grades by social rating (likes, shares, comments), and manually (by team of editors) prepares daily and weekly reports for the UN representatives, diplomats, politicians, media etc. In her effort to help reform Ukraine, she led the implementation of electronic record keeping and e-service systems in Odesa region of Ukraine. Brought the region to the 1st place in the investment efficiency rating, implementation of the Google program “Digital transformation of Odesa”.


    Speakers

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    Speaker
    Former President of Georgia, current leader of the opposition party "Movement of New Forces" in Ukraine

    Yuriy Butusov
    Speaker
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website

    Lyuba Shipovich
    Speaker
    President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program's co-director

    Victor Ostapchuk
    Co-Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canada-Ukraine International Assistance Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

May 2017

  • Thursday, May 4th Symposium on the Comparative Program on Health and Society's Contributions to the Social Determinants of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 4, 20178:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join the Comparative Program on Health and Society as we commemorate seventeen years of the Program and celebrate its achievements in advancing research on the social determinants of health. Presentations by distinguished alumni will include discussions of their current research, with topics ranging from the health impacts of fracking in British Columbia to the Trade in Human Liver Lobes.

    Schedule:

    8:00 Registration and Breakfast

    8:45 Opening Remarks by Stephen Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, Peter Warrian, Co-Founder and Chair, Lupina Foundation, Lisa Forman, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    9:00 The History of CPHS
    Peter Warrian, Co-Founder and Chair, The Lupina Foundation, Senior Research Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Margret Hovanec, Co-Founder and Director, The Lupina Foundation
    Lisa Forman, Assistant Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto
    Joshua Goldstein, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Calgary
    Bianca Seaton, Qualitative Researcher, St. Michael’s Hospital

    10:30 Break

    11:00 Socio-Economic Status and Health Outcomes

    Social Determinants of Health in Rural Anhui
    Weizhen Dong, Associate Professor, Sociology and Legal Studies, The University of Waterloo

    When personal healing leads to reconciliation: a longitudinal study
    Regine King, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Work, University of Manitoba

    Gender and health inequalities: Implications of the extended working lives agenda
    Laurie Corna, Lecturer, Faculty of Social Science and Public Policy, King’s College London

    Beyond the Ideology of Heterosexuality: Researching Structural Inequalities in Health Services
    Andrea Daley, Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Work, York University; Director, School of Social Work, York University

    12:30 Lunch

    13:30 Socio-Economic Status and Access to Healthcare

    Where are the social determinants of health in this fracking conversation? Exploring the cumulative (health) impacts of resource development in northern British Columbia
    Chris Buse, Project Lead, Cumulative Impacts Research Consortium, University of Northern British Columbia

    Reflections on CPHS and Global HIV Social Science Research
    Rusty Souleymanov, PhD Candidate, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

    A program of work to advance the pan-Canadian measurement of equity in health care
    Sara Allin, Assistant Professor, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

    Riding the wave. Understanding episodic disability and its impact on labour market participation in young adulthood and across the life course
    Arif Jetha, Associate Scientist, Institute for Work and Health

    15:00 Break

    14:00 Human Rights, Globalization, and Ethics

    Ethical issues related to the development and implementation of new technologies to fight tuberculosis
    Diego Silva, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University

    HIV and the Limits of Securitization
    Suzanne Hindmarch, Assistant Professor, University of New Brunswick

    Trade in Human Liver Lobes: Violence, Exploitation, Suffering
    Monir Moniruzzaman, Assistant Professor, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, Department of Anthropology Michigan State University

    Public Health as Social Justice
    Maxwell Smith, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, McGill University Institute for Health and Social Policy

    17:00 Closing Remarks from Lisa Forman

    ***Reception to Follow***

    Contact

    Pragya Kaul
    (416) 946-0104


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, May 5th Political Economy of Independent Ukraine: Late Starts, False Starts-and Last Chance?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 5, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Ukraine continues to be in the news since Independence with its early economic disappointments, its two people – revolutions, and of course the military aggression by Russia. This book has two main objectives. First, it describes the process of economic reforms and performance since independence. Second, it proposes several hypotheses as to why market reforms have been so slow and incomplete, and economic performance has lagged far behind that of the Central European countries. In doing so it puts forth a number of revisionist theories. The main economic difficulties were not, as many leaders argued, Ukraine’s unique impedimenta, but the decision at the very beginning to delay reforms. Oligarch development resulted from this late start, and is therefore not attributable to the Kuchma period alone as many analysts write, but started with the Kravchuk regime. One piece of evidence for that is that most of todays’ oligarchs started their business before 1994. Furthemore, delayed reforms allowed Russia to use it leverage over energy supplies to Ukraine’s detriment-but not coincidentally for the benefit of many early oligarchs. Finally, despite the incomplete reforms, standards of living of Ukrainians is not lower than they were in the Soviet period –that is simply a myth due to improper use of standard GDP statistics.

    Oleh Havrylyshyn is an economist with a diverse career including academia, Government as Deputy Minister of Finance of Ukraine, a senior official at the Board of Directors and management of the IMF. His numerous writings on transition have been widely cited. In 2014-2016, he was an advisor to senior officials of the Ukrainian Government.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program's Co-Director

    Oleh Havrylyshyn
    Speaker
    Adjunct Professor of Economics, George Washington University; member of the Economic Advisory Council to Ukraine’s Minister of Economics and the Presidential Administration


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, May 11th Symposium: Gun Violence in Black America

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 11, 20179:00AM - 1:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Thursday, May 11th, 8:45 am to 1:00 pm. Registration starts at 8:45 am.

    The United States is currently experiencing a rise in firearm related deaths and injuries. In 2015, the CDC reported that there were 15,809 homicides in the US. 10,945 of these homicides (roughly 70%) were committed with firearms. These numbers represent a rise from previous years, and also conceal the thousands of non-fatally injured each year. In fact, similar data from the CDC estimates that only about 1 in 5 shootings are fatal. This means that approximately 80% of all gunshot victims are non-fatal. Additionally, we know that these patterns of violence are not evenly distributed across the U.S. population. A robust field of gun violence research shows that the burden of gun violence is felt within urban poor, Black communities across the United States. Homicide is the leading cause of death for young Black men between the age of 15-24; and Black men comprise roughly 50% of the total number of gun deaths, even though they only make up 6% of the U.S. population. The purpose of this one-day symposium will be to investigate key questions around the gun violence epidemic and its impacts on urban Black communities in the U.S.

    Panel 1: New Mechanisms – Gun Violence and Social Media
    Desmond Patton, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Columbia University
    “Innovating Gang Violence Prevention with Qualitative Analysis and Natural Language Processing Tools”

    Panel 2: New Responses – Evolving Emergency and Trauma Care for Gunshot Victims
    Joseph Richardson, Jr., Associate Professor, African American Studies, University of Maryland
    “Invisible Wounds: Violence, Trauma and Healing Young Black Men”

    Moderator: Jooyoung Lee, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.


    Speakers

    Desmond Patton
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Columbia University

    Joseph Richardson, Jr.
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, African American Studies, University of Maryland

    Jooyoung Lee
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, May 11th Populism and its Influence in the United States: How does the working class vote? And who votes for the working class?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 11, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The event will feature a discussion on Justin Gest’s new book, The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality, as well as Nick Carnes’ book, White Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making. These experts will weigh in on the role of populism in the United States and its influence on the rise of Donald Trump. Details are below.

    Seats are limited, please register here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/populism-and-its-influence-in-the-united-states-tickets-33991307917

    More on the speakers and discussant:

    Justin Gest is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government. His teaching and research interests include comparative politics, minority political behavior, and immigration policy. In the field of minority political behavior, his earlier research focused on Muslim political behavior in Western democracies. This work was collected in Apart: Alienated and Engaged Muslims in the West (Oxford University Press/Hurst, 2010). He recently published a follow-up study that applies his conclusions to white working class people. This work is entitled The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016).

    Nick Carnes is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University, and the Co-Director of the Research Triangle chapter of the Scholars Strategy Network. His research focuses on U.S. politics, legislative decision making, representation, social class, economic inequality, and state and local politics. His book White-Collar Government: The Hidden Role of Class in Economic Policy Making examines how the shortage of people from the working class in American legislatures skews the policymaking process towards outcomes that are more in line with the upper class’s economic interests. He is also completing a large-scale study of the factors that discourage working-class Americans from holding public office and the programs that could help to address the shortage of working-class Americans in our political institutions.

    Chris Cochrane is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas (MQUP, 2015) and co-author, with Rand Dyck, of Canadian Politics: Critical Approaches (Nelson, 2014). He is also a co-investigator of Digging Into Linked Parliamentary Data, an international and interdisciplinary collaboration investigating the written records of parliamentary speech in Canada, the UK, and the Netherlands. He is interested in ideology and political disagreement in Canada and other democratic countries.


    Speakers

    Justin Gest
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University

    Nick Carnes
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University

    Chris Cochrane
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, May 12th A Celebration of Emanuel Adler’s Scholarship and Career

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 12, 20179:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    On the occasion of Professor Emanuel Adler’s 70th birthday and 35th anniversary of graduating Berkeley, his colleagues and former PhD students gather to recognize their intellectual and personal debts and to celebrate Adler’s many scholarly achievements in the time-honored academic fashion of a Fest conference hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    The different papers presented at the conference will engage intellectually and critically Adler’s extensive contributions in the theory of international relations, especially but not limited to issues such as progress, communities, practices, constructivism, the Middle East, complexity theory, and the European order. Special attention will be given to Adler’s ongoing book project: A Social Theory of Cognitive Evolution: Change, Stability, and International Social Orders, which brings to fruition the different strands that interested him throughout his incredibly fruitful career.

    Emanuel Adler is the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the European Academy of Sciences, an Honorary Professor at the University of Copenhagen, and former editor of International Organization. Previously, he was Professor of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently based out of the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.

    His publications include books such as The Power of Ideology; Security Communities (with Michael Barnett); Communitarian International Relations; Convergence of Civilizations (with Federica Bicchi Beverly Crawford, and Raffaella Del Sarto); International Practices (with Vincent Pouliot); and Israel in the World. He has also published articles such as “Seizing the Middle Ground: Constructivism in World Politics” and “The Emergence of Cooperation: National Epistemic Communities and the International Evolution of the Idea of Nuclear Arms Control.”

    Professor Adler’s interests include international practices and communities of practice, the evolution of international order, a constructivist reconsideration of strategic logic, including deterrence, European security institutions, international relations theory — in particular, constructivism, epistemic communities, security communities, and communities of practice — and Israel’s relations with the world.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Department of Political Science, Mr. Charles Bronfman and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies University of Toronto

    9:00 Welcome
    Louis Pauly, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science
    Stephen J. Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Karen Weisman, Professor and Acting Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    9:30 Becoming Emanuel Adler
    Piki Ish-Shalom, the A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Markus Kornprobst, Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies
    Vincent Pouliot, Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    10:15 Coffee break

    10:30 Pragmatism, Meaning, and Suffering: Evolutionary Callings and Exhaustions
    Michael Barnett, University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University
    Janice Stein, Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    11:15 Two Tales of Imperial Power: Mongols on Land — Anglo-America on Water
    Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    12:00 Lunch break

    13:00 Holding the Middle Ground: Cognitive Evolution and Progress
    Christian Reus-Smit, Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    13:45 In consideration of evolving matters
    Alena Drieschova, Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    14:30 Coffee break

    15:00 Governing Environmental Complexity through Cognitive Evolution
    Peter M. Haas, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    15:45 Power in evolution
    Stefano Guzzini, Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    16:30 Closing remarks
    Emanuel Adler, Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    *** Reception to Follow ***


    Speakers

    Peter J. Katzenstein
    Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    Christian Reus-Smit
    Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    Alena Drieschova
    Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    Peter M. Haas
    Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Stefano Guzzini
    Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    Emanuel Adler
    Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    Stephen J. Toope
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Piki Ish-Shalom
    A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Markus Kornprobst
    Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies

    Vincent Pouliot
    Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    Michael Barnett
    University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University

    Janice Stein
    Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    Louis Pauly
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, May 15th – Tuesday, May 16th Policing: IDEAS CBC RADIO ONE & Munk School of Global Affairs (May 15th & May 16th)

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 15, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, May 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and CBC IDEAS

    Description

    Relations between the public and the police are strained today: from charges of police violence, abuse and racial bias to calls for transparency and greater police accountability. At the same time, we expect the cops to take on new missions: counter-terrorism, cybercrime, and the policing of highly diverse societies. In this new two-part series, IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, considers what it means to police and be policed in these complex and anxious times.

    Monday May 15, 2017, Part 1: To Serve or Protect

    Do the police serve the public by doing what communities say they want and need? Or, do cops think they know what’s best for public safety and must protect us? Inspector Shawna Coxon, Toronto Police Service, and member of the TPS Transformational Task Force; Todd Foglesong, Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School; Donald Worme, Q.C. , I.P.C., Cree lawyer and founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, based in Saskatoon; and moderator Ron Levi, Director of the Munk School’s Global Justice Lab, debate the dynamics of policing, trust and public consent.

    Tuesday May 16, 2017, Part 2: Old Cops, New Expectations

    Counter-terrorism, fighting cybercrime, policing highly diverse societies: Can the police do it all? Should the police do it all? Do the police want
    to do it all? Cal Corley, CEO of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance, and former Assistant Commissioner with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Inspector Shawna Coxon, Toronto Police Service, and member of the TPS Transformational Task Force; Micheal Vonn, Policy Director, B.C. Civil Liberties Association; and moderator Ron Levi, Director of the Munk School’s Global Justice Lab, weigh the implications, the challenges and the trade-offs for the police, for justice and for all of us.

    ABOUT THE PANELLISTS

    Inspector Shawna Coxon

    Serving for more than two decades with the Toronto Police Service, Inspector Shawna Coxon has had a diverse career in uniform, community, intelligence, and investigative policing. Having just released ‘The Way Forward’ as a member of the Transformational Task Force, she has started an Organizational Change Management Team (a novel endeavour in Canadian policing). Prior to that, she was the second in charge of Intelligence Services where she implemented the inaugural Computer Cyber Crime Section.

    Inspector Coxon has a PhD in Criminal Law and her areas of research include criminal law and technology. She is a published academic who has lectured internationally. She has won numerous awards; however she is most proud of the letters of appreciation from victims she has worked diligently for.

    Todd Foglesong

    Todd Foglesong joined the Munk School of Global Affairs as a Professor of Global Practice in 2014. He writes and teaches about the role of indicators as instruments of governance in policing and prosecution around the world, competing strategies for measuring and managing the response to violence against women and pretrial detention, and the role of surveys in assessments of safety and justice.

    Between 2007 and 2014, Todd was a senior research fellow and adjunct lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), where wrote about policing in Los Angeles under a consent decree, the challenges of “making policing more affordable” in the United States, and the role of indicators of justice in the governments of Jamaica, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

    Donald Worme, Q.C., I.P.C.

    DONALD E. WORME, Q.C., I.P.C., is a Cree lawyer from Kawacatoose First Nation, Treaty Four, Saskatchewan. For more than thirty years, he’s practiced extensively in criminal law and Aboriginal rights litigation. He also has considerable experience in public law, including Judicial Inquiries and Commissions of Inquiry. Among his high profile cases: Donald Worme served as Commission Counsel to the Ipperwash Judicial Inquiry into the death of unarmed Aboriginal protester, Dudley George, at the hands of an OPP sniper; he was Lead Counsel to the family of Neil Stonechild in the public inquiry into the freezing death of the Aboriginal teenager in Saskatoon; and he represented the family of 18-year-old Mathew Dumas in the Coroners Inquest into his shooting death by the Winnipeg Police. Donald Worme is a founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association and recipient of the Aboriginal Achievement Award for outstanding efforts in the field of Law and Justice.

    Cal Corley

    Cal Corley is the CEO of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance (CKSA), a non-profit research and knowledge development centre that supports governments and the community safety sector in their drive for improved community safety and wellbeing. Cal is a former Assistant Commissioner with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. During his career, he gained extensive experience in both operations and management, serving in such areas as national security, criminal intelligence, drug enforcement, human resources, and leading reform initiatives. He also served at the Privy Council Office and at Public Safety Canada. From 2008 – 2014, he was head of the Canadian Police College, during which time he also served as the RCMP Senior Envoy to Mexico and the Americas.

    Micheal Vonn

    Micheal Vonn is a lawyer and has been the Policy Director of the BCCLA since 2004. She has been an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia in the Faculty of Law and in the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies where she has taught civil liberties and information ethics. She’s also a regular guest instructor for UBC’s College of Health Disciplines Interdisciplinary Elective in HIV/AIDS Care. Ms Vonn’s been honoured for her work in HIV/AIDS with both an AccolAIDS Award and a Red Ribbon Award, and she is the recipient of the 2015 Keith Sacré Library Champion Award. She’s currently a collaborator on Big Data Surveillance, a multi-year research projected lead by Queens University. She’s an Advisory Board Member of Ryerson University’s Centre for Free Expression and an Advisory Board Member of Privacy International.

    MODERATOR:

    Professor Ron Levi holds the George Ignatieff Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Toronto, where he serves as Deputy Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs, and is an Associate Professor of Global Affairs and Sociology. He is a sociologist and legal scholar, whose research focuses on the legal and political dimensions of justice system responses to violence, crime, and human rights violations. Prof. Levi is a past Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He launched a Global Justice Lab at the Munk School, and was awarded the University of Toronto’s Ludwik and Estelle Jus Memorial Human Rights Prize. He holds an appointment as Permanent Visiting Professor in the University of Copenhagen’s Centre of Excellence for International Courts.

    POLICING READERS: PART ONE

    Sharry Flett

    Sharry Flett has acted in theatres across Canada and played leading roles at the Stratford Festival (4 seasons) and the Shaw Festival (28 seasons). She will appear in “Me And My Girl” and “1837 A Farmer’s Revolt” for the 2017 Shaw season. She was twice nominated for Gemini Awards as Best Actress (CBC TV Drama). She’s also taught acting at the Shaw Festival, George Brown Theatre School, University of Toronto, Queen’s University, and the National Theatre School in Montreal.

    RH Thomson

    Acclaimed Canadian stage and screen actor RH Thomson, was awarded in 2015 the prestigious Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, was the recipient of the 2014 ACTRA Toronto Award of Excellence. He was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 2010 and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Toronto, Trinity College. Recently, Mr. Thomson directed The Crucible at Theatre Calgary and performed in You Will Remember Me at the Tarragon Theatre. He is currently playing Matthew Cuthbert in the CBC/NETFLIX series ANNE and producing the Canadian and international WWI Commemoration project The World Remembers- Le Monde se souvient.

    EVENT HOST:

    Greg Kelly is the Executive Producer of the CBC Radio One program IDEAS. After completing his doctorate in literature at Oxford University, Greg Kelly left the academy to begin working at the CBC Radio — in fact, his first foray into broadcasting was at IDEAS. His work in both radio and television has won international awards. In 2006, Greg left the CBC to create and oversee a daily NPR current affairs program, The Story, which was carried by over 100 affiliates. He then went to Radio Netherlands Worldwide, where he became Editor of the internationally-acclaimed program The State We’re In, which won numerous awards and was carried nationally in the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland as well as select markets in India and Africa. He returned to Canada in the autumn of 2013, and is now an Associate Senior Fellow of Massey College.

    Disclaimer: Please note that this is a public event – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, May 17th Israel - Palestine: Is the Two-State Solution Dead?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 17, 20176:30PM - 8:30PMUniversity of Toronto Trinity College
    Combination Room
    6 Hoskin Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1H8
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Jon Allen (LL.B., University of Western Ontario; LL.M., International Law, University of London School of Economics) joined the then Department of External Affairs in 1981. In addition to postings abroad in Mexico City, New Delhi and Washington, Mr. Allen spent his early career in the Legal Bureau where he represented Canada in disputes under the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement and worked in the areas of human rights, humanitarian and environmental law. Mr. Allen also held the positions of Director General, North America Bureau, Minister (Political Affairs) at the Embassy of Canada in Washington and Assistant Deputy Minister for the Americas. From 2006-2010, he was Ambassador of Canada to Israel. From 2012 to 2016 he was Canada’s Ambassador to Spain and Andorra. He was Charge d’affaires a.i. to the Holy See from December 2012 to July 2014.

    Mr. Allen is currently a Diplomat in Residence at Fulbright Canada and a Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Registration
    CIC Members: $20
    Non-members: $30
    CIC Students: $5
    Non-member Students: $10

    Space is limited so please register as soon as possible.

    If you have any questions, please contact us at toronto@thecic.org

    Looking forward to seeing you!
    Henry Lotin
    Member of the Executive Committee and Event Organizer
    Canadian International Council – Toronto Branch


    Speakers

    Jon Allen
    Former Canadian Ambassador to Israel


    Sponsors

    CIC Canadian International Council Toronto Branch


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
« December 2016 - February 2017 March 2017 - Present

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.