« October 2016 - December 2016 January 2017 - Present

January 2017

  • Tuesday, January 10th Victor by Default? The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership and the Demise of Mega-FTAs

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 10, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    “Mega-FTAs” dominated the global trade agenda in the first half of the second decade of the 21st Century. Even before the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency, it seemed that the era of Mega-FTAs would be short-lived—with both the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) encountering significant opposition. The Chinese and ASEAN-backed alternative to the TPP, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), is the last of the Mega-FTAs standing. Until the demise of the TPP was confirmed, RCEP had received relatively little attention in the press or in the academic world. This presentation will focus on the factors shaping RCEP. In particular, through a comparison with the other Mega-FTAs, it examines how the structure of regional economic interdependence determines the content of mega trade agreements.

    John Ravenhill is Director of the Balsillie School of International Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo. He was previously Head of the School of Politics and International Relations, Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University. He is an editor of the Review of International Political Economy.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    John Ravenhill
    Speaker
    Director, Balsillie School of International Affairs; Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, January 11th The 2016 U.S. Election: Polarization, Partisanship, and Populism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 11, 20176:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Doors open at 5:30 pm
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT. PLEASE REGISTER AT: http://engage.samaracanada.com/2016_us_election_event

    This event will also be available via live webcast and can be viewed at the following link on January 11, 2017 at 6:00pm EST:
    https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/live/393.aspx

    Samara Canada and the School of Public Policy and Governance present:

    The 2016 U.S. Election: Polarization, Partisanship, and Populism

    You’re invited to an evening event with two leading American experts, in conversation with Andrew Coyne, who will discuss the results of the recent U.S. election and the prospects for democracy. Here you’ll hear get answers to these pressing questions:
    • What deep and long-term trends were at play in the election, including polarization of public opinion and role of identities like class, race and gender?
    • What do Americans expect from the Trump presidency? What should they expect?
    • What does this election tell us about deeper problems with American democracy?

    Speakers:

    Jocelyn Kiley, Associate Director of Research, Pew Research Center
    Chris Achen, Professor at Princeton, and co-author of Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Governments.
    In conversation with Andrew Coyne

    This event is generously supported by the Centre for the Study of the United States, and the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    Speakers:

    JOCELYN KILEY is associate director of research at Pew Research Center, where she primarily works on U.S. public opinion about politics. She is involved in all stages of the research process at the Center, and is a principal investigator on the Center’s work on political polarization in the American public, as well as its regular election polling. Prior to joining Pew Research Center in 2008, Kiley worked in research and evaluation for several media and governmental organizations. She has a master’s degree in political science from the University of California, Berkeley. Her graduate work primarily concerned issues of racial and ethnic political identity in the U.S., as well as the role of the media in shaping public opinion. She received her bachelor’s degree in sociology and anthropology from Harvard University. Kiley discusses the Center’s findings with the news media and regularly presents to outside audiences and at the American Association for Public Opinion Research’s annual conference.

    CHRIS ACHEN’s research interest is Political Methodology, particularly in its application to empirical democratic theory, American Politics, and International Relations. He is the author Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Governments. Professor Achen was the first president of the Political Methodology Section of the American Political Science Association, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the National Science Foundation, and Princeton’s Center for the Study of Democratic Politics. He received the first career achievement award from The Political Methodology Section of The American Political Science Association in 2007. He is also the recipient of an award from the University of Michigan for lifetime achievement in training graduate students. Recent academic placements of graduate students for whom he was the principal dissertation advisor include Stanford, Duke, and the London School of Economics.

    Our moderator

    A columnist at the National Post, and the former National Editor ofMaclean’s, ANDREW COYNE is thoughtful, intrepid, and never afraid to speak his mind. Coyne is highly sought after by audiences looking for unvarnished insights on Canada’s increasingly interconnected political and economic future. Coyne has been an editorial writer, columnist and contributor for The Globe and Mail, The Financial Post, Saturday Night, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Time magazine. Coyne is no stranger to national accolades: he is the winner of two National Newspaper Awards and the Hyman Solomon Award for Excellence in Public Policy Journalism. He is also a member of the “At Issue” Panel on CBC’s The National, appears on TVO’s The Agenda, and once co-hosted Face-Off on CBC. He is a Fellow of the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto, and holds a Master’s in Economics from the London School of Economics.

    About the Partners

    SAMARA CANADA is dedicated to reconnecting citizens to politics. Established as a charity in 2009, we have become Canada’s most trusted, non-partisan champion of increased civic engagement and a more positive public life. Samara Canada’s research and educational programming shines new light on Canada’s democratic system and encourages greater political participation across the country to build better politics, and a better Canada, for everyone.

    A samara is the winged “helicopter” seed that falls from the maple tree. A symbol of Canada, it is also a reminder that from small seeds, big ideas can grow.

    The SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY AND GOVERNANCE is a vibrant centre for scholarly investigation and an important hub for cross-community collaboration and creative problem solving within the broader policy community. Our School understands and responds to the need in Canada for an innovative form of education to build the professional and academic capacity necessary to address the public policy challenges of the 21st century. The School is a hub for policy discourse, bringing researchers, practitioners, and community members together in order to contribute to policy debates, development, and discussion across many areas of expertise, both nationally and internationally. It offers a rigorous two-year Master of Public Policy (MPP) program, an undergraduate major, and executive education.


    Speakers

    Jocelyn Kiley
    Speaker
    Associate Director of Research, Pew Research Center

    Chris Achen
    Speaker
    Professor at Princeton, and co-author of Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Governments

    Andrew Coyne
    Discussant
    Columnist at the National Post, and former National Editor, Maclean’s


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Samara Canada

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 12th Japan’s Global Reach: Development Cooperation and Foreign Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:
    Japan has been engaged in development cooperation throughout the world since the 1950s. The initial efforts of development cooperation were made to augment and reinforce the postwar settlements with the countries invaded by Japan. Japan’s development cooperation expanded quantitatively and geographically in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the projects conducted in this period illustrate Japan’s approach to international development cooperation, an approach that emphasizes both human capacity development and infrastructure building. Reviewing the history of Japan’s activities globally, I would like to discuss challenges Japan faces in the 21st century as a civilian power.

    Speaker Biography:
    Akihiko Tanaka is Professor of International Politics at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, The University Tokyo. He served as President of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) from April, 2012 to September, 2015. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in International Relations at the University of Tokyo and Ph.D. in Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has numerous books and articles on world politics and security issues in Japanese and English including The New Middle Ages: The World System in the 21st Century (Tokyo: The International House of Japan, 2002). He received the Medal with Purple Ribbon in 2012 for his academic achievements.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    Akihiko Tanaka
    Speaker
    Professor of International Politics, Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo

    Stephen Toope
    Chair
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 12th Book Launch: Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism, and Memory in a Balkan Community

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 12, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    During two terrifying days and nights in early September 1941, the lives of nearly two thousand men, women, and children were taken savagely by their neighbors in Kulen Vakuf, a small rural community straddling today’s border between northwest Bosnia and Croatia. This frenzy—in which victims were butchered with farm tools, drowned in rivers, and thrown into deep vertical caves—was the culmination of a chain of local massacres that began earlier in the summer. In Violence as a Generative Force, Max Bergholz tells the story of the sudden and perplexing descent of this once peaceful multiethnic community into extreme violence. This deeply researched microhistory provides provocative insights to questions of global significance: What causes intercommunal violence? How does such violence between neighbors affect their identities and relations?

    Max Bergholz is Associate Professor of History at Concordia University in Montreal. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in the Balkans since 2003 on the dynamics of intercommunal violence, nationalism, and memory. His research has won support from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies, and his articles have been published in journals such as American Historical Review. In November 2016, Cornell University Press published his first book, Violence as a Generative Force.

    Copies of Prof. Bergholz’s book will be available for purchase at the event.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Max Bergholz
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Concordia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    University Professor Research Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, January 17th The U.S. Presidential Election and the Trump Presidency: How Did We Get Here? What Comes Next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place, south house
    Doors Open at 1:45 pm
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    A live, video-conference roundtable discussion among experts from the University of Toronto and Sciences Po/Paris – sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States.

    The 2016 contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump may have been one of the most unusual elections in U.S. history. How else to describe the first woman nominated by a major political party running against a businessman/reality television star with no office-holding experience, for instance – or another conclusion which saw the contender who lost the popular vote winning in the Electoral College? There have already been many attempts to decipher the election results, but surveying the terrain during the week of Trump’s inauguration seems appropriate. Experts based in Paris and Toronto will also share thoughts about what can be expected from the new U.S. president.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    (416) 946-8972


    Speakers

    Ron Pruessen
    Speaker
    Professor of History, University of Toronto

    Rob Vipond
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science; Interim Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Mario Del Pero
    Speaker
    Professor of International History at the Institut d’études politiques (Sciences Po), Paris (via video conference)

    Clifford Orwin
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science, Classics, and Jewish Studies; Fellow of St. Michael’s College; Senior Fellow of Massey College, University of Toronto

    Bart Gordon
    Speaker
    Lawyer and former U.S. Representative for Tennessee's 6th congressional district; former Chairman of the House Committee on Science and Technology

    James Kent Syler
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Political Science, Middle Tennessee State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Sciences Po, Paris


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, January 17th Innovation by the People, for the People

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Amos Zehavi
    Senior lecturer, Department of Political Science Department of Public Policy, Tel Aviv University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, January 18th Zero Waste: Fictional or Achievable Goal?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    All countries, large or small, rich or poor, suffer waste problems to various degrees. If not properly dealt with, waste issues could impose heavy environmental burdens which not only hinder economic growth but also lead to social discomfort. A sound strategic approach for effective waste management therefore is critical to finding an economically viable and environmentally sound solution.

    Recently, a zero-waste concept has emerged worldwide as a new initiative to curtail the worsening waste problem. Realization of such a concept, however, necessitates the prevention and/or making the best use of the waste via workable mechanisms. Plausible measures include: waste minimization, waste reduction, reuse, recycle and recovery, cleaner production, eco-industrial networking, sustainable consumption and production, etc. The application of these measures, on the other hand, is case and location specific, requiring a careful consideration of many inter-related technical, regulatory, economic and social factors.

    This presentation will review the background and challenges of the waste problem, ways and means of planning and implementing a zero-waste society, paradigm shift from waste to resource management, innovation and partnership, and key elements of success or failure with discussion on the exemplary case of Taiwan.

    Zero waste: is it a fictional or achievable goal? This is an open question that we must address, to help build a sound foundation for pursuance of sustainability.

    Professor Chih C. Chao is a former Vice President of Tunghai University, Taiwan and received his PhD from the University of Montreal. Trained as a chemical and environmental engineer, Dr. Chao has a grave concern over the social and environmental impacts that are caused by un-thoughtful economic activities. Recently, he has worked extensively with natural and social scientists to search for and implement feasible approaches that will lead to establishment of sustainable low-carbon circular economic systems. Dr. Chao has over 40 years’ experience in North America, EU and Asia, covering a wide spectrum of sustainability driven issues. His most recent focal interest is in facilitating the development of value-added zero-waste systems, with a goal of maximizing material and energy use efficiency and minimizing the natural resource exploitation, towards a low-carbon society.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Chih C. Chao
    Speaker
    Honorary Professor, Tunghai University, Taiwan

    John Robinson
    Chair
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and School of the Environment; Adjunct Professor, Copenhagen Business School


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of the Environment

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, January 18th BOOK LAUNCH THE HARPER ERA IN CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    To both critics and defenders, Canadian foreign policy under Stephen Harper was seen as representing a sharp break with what had gone before. Was this true, and why or why not? The Harper Era in Canadian Foreign Policy, edited by Adam Chapnick and Christopher J. Kukucha, brings together an outstanding roster of analysts to assess the conduct of Canadian foreign policy under Stephen Harper in a variety of its aspects. The Graham Centre is pleased to sponsor a launch of this provocative volume, at which coeditor Adam Chapnick and contributors John English, Kim Richard Nossal, and Hugh Segal will speak.
    Books will be available for purchase.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 19th New Possibilities and the Remaking of American Politics: The Policy Implications of a Trump Presidency

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMRoom 3130, Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event, but seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Speakers: Ryan Hurl, Carolyn Tuohy, Louis Pauly, Randall Hansen, Sara Hughes
    Chair: Robert Vipond

    Organized by the Graduate Association of Political Science Students.
    Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 19th War of Decolonization? The Russian Empire and the Great War, 1914-1918

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Joshua Sanborn is Professor and Head of the Department of History at Lafayette College (Pennsylvania, USA). He is a historian of violence, society, and politics in modern Russia. His most recent monograph is Imperial Apocalypse: The Great War and the Destruction of the Russian Empire (Oxford UP, 2014), which argues that the process of state failure, social collapse, violent transformation, and imperial disintegration experienced by Russia between 1914 and 1918 is analogous to processes of decolonization in Africa and Asia in the period after World War II. His most recent co-authored work is Gender, Sex, and the Shaping of Modern Europe: A History from the French Revolution to the Present Day (with co-author Annette Timm) which just came out in a revised and expanded second edition from Bloomsbury in 2016 (the first edition was published in 2007). He is also one of the charter contributing members of the Russian History Blog, which just celebrated its fifth anniversary of existence.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Joshua Sanborn
    Lafayette College



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 19th The Crisis of Postnationalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For years, the mainstream liberal opinion, shared by many social scientists, was that nationalism is a transient phenomenon that will either disappear or become marginal in the course of general development. However, what we see everywhere, including the most developed parts of the world, is the rise of nationalism. This often causes shock and bewilderment. But what we need is to analyze what were the theoretical premises on which the expectations of the coming decline of nationalism were based, and what was wrong about them.

    Ghia Nodia is professor of politics and director of the International School of Caucasus Studies in Ilia Chavchavadze State University in Tbilisi, Georgia. He is also a founder of the Caucasus Institute for Peace, Democracy and Development (CIPDD), an independent public policy think tank in Tbilisi, Georgia and member of the Forum’s NDRI think tank network, which he has led since August 2009 and in 1992-2008. In February–December 2008, he served as the minister for education and science of Georgia.
    Prof. Nodia has published extensively on democratization; state-building, security, and conflicts in Georgia and the Caucasus; theories of nationalism; and democratic transition in the post-cold-War context. He has been involved in pro-democracy advocacy efforts in Georgia and internationally and has been a frequent participant of international congresses and conferences on related topics.


    Speakers

    Ghia Nodia


    Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 19th Film screening and talk: Les liaisons dangereuses

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20177:30PM - 10:30PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Les liaisons dangeureuses (1988; dir. Stephen Frears)
    Speaker: Paul Cohen (Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto)

    In collaboration with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Prof. Paul Cohen
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Alliance Française Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, January 25th Unpacking the ‘Core Content’ of Essential Medicines under the Right to Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 25, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Access to essential medicines is part of the right to health and a cornerstone of an equitable health system. Enshrined in the ICESCR, the right to health offers a set of standards, principles and duties to guide its realisation. Global health and development initiatives increasingly embrace a right to health approach, particularly for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health.

    Authoritative entities such as the WHO and the former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health maintain that national governments should give legal recognition in domestic law to essential medicines as part of the right to health. Legal recognition offers a framework for national policy makers and health workers to implement these rights while providing a foothold for their enforcement. In particular, universal health coverage (UHC) enshrined in domestic law can advance health rights by making essential medicines affordable and available to all.

    Currently, it is unclear to what degree domestic legal rules providing for essential medicines mirror right to health principles and how such legal approaches are framed. This research maps the domestic legal terrain governing access to essential medicines in middle income countries. Through comparative legal analysis, this multidisciplinary study determines how domestic legal texts articulate the public health dimensions of access to medicines (i.e. Who are the beneficiaries? Which medicines are provided? What are the direct costs to patients?) through a human rights lens that considers provisions for non-discrimination and vulnerable groups. This research reflects on how national policy makers have made explicit use of the norms and standards in the right to health when forming pharmaceutical benefits in national UHC schemes. It will outline potential ‘best practice’ legal approaches to express rights- sensitive provisions for universal access, offering tools for prospective domestic policy learning to advance the SDG for health.

    Katrina Perehudoff M.Sc. LL.M. is a PhD candidate at the University of Groningen where she studies model domestic law for universal access to medicines through a human rights lens under the supervision of prof. Hans V. Hogerzeil (Faculty of Medical Sciences) and prof. Brigit Toebes (Faculty of Law). As a Research Fellow at the Global Health Law Groningen Research Centre, Katrina coordinates the Essential Laws for Medicines Access project and the Centre’s 2016 Summer School. Katrina has 5 years of experience advocating for access to medicines and their rational use at the NGOs Health Action International and The European Consumer Organization. She will join the CPHS as a Temporary Health & Human Rights Fellow in 2017.


    Speakers

    Katrina Perehudoff
    Visiting Health and Human Rights Fellow (University of Groningen)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 26th – Friday, January 27th R.F. Harney Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (Special 10th Anniversary Event)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 26, 20179:00AM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    Friday, January 27, 20179:00AM - 3:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    10th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies will be held on January 26 and 27, 2017 at the Munk School of Global Affairs (Observatory Site, 315 Bloor Street West).

    All sessions as well as the keynote lecture will take place in the boardroom (first floor). Open to the public.

    Conference website:
    http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ethnicstudies/graduate-conference/

    Thursday January 26, 2017 (Registration starts at 8:45)
    9:00-9:05am Opening remarks
    9:05-10:35am Session 1 “Nationalism and Representation”
    10:40am-12:00pm Session 2 “Religion and Integration”
    1:00-3:00pm Keynote lecture by Senator Ratna Omidvar (see below)
    3:10-4:40pm Session 3 “Temporary Workers and Precarious Labor”

    Friday January 27, 2017
    9:00-10:45 am Session 4 “Human Capital and Economic Integration”
    10:50am-12:10pm Session 5 “Multiculturalism and Social Support”
    1:00-2:00pm Session 6 “Counter-radicalization and Policy”
    2:05-3:35pm Session 7 “International Crisis and Response”
    3:40-5:00pm Special session “The Fire Next Door: The 1967 Detroit Uprising in the Canadian Imagination”

    5:00-6:30pm Reception (Library)

    Keynote speaker: The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, C.M., O. Ont. (Senator, The Senate of Canada, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Global Diversity Exchange (GDX) at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University)

    Keynote Lecture Title: “Reflections on Belonging and Inclusion”

    Ratna Omidvar is an internationally recognized expert on migration, diversity and inclusion. In April 2016, Prime Minister Trudeau appointed Ratna to the Senate of Canada as an independent Senator representing Ontario.

    Ratna is the founding Executive Director and currently a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Global Diversity Exchange (GDX), Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. GDX is a think-and-do tank on diversity, migration and inclusion that connects local experience and ideas with global networks.

    Ratna is a director at the Environics Institute, and Samara. She is the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council’s Chair Emerita and was formerly the Chair of Lifeline Syria.

    Ratna is co-author of Flight and Freedom: Stories of Escape to Canada (2015), an Open Book Toronto best book of 2015 and one of the Toronto Star’s top five good reads from Word on the Street.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, January 26th The Crimean Tatar-Ukrainian Cossack Alliance versus the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1648-1654): Warfare and Diplomacy in the Istanbul-Warsaw-Moscow Triangle

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 26, 20174:30PM - 6:30PMDepartment of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
    Conference Room (BF200B)
    4 Bancroft Avenue
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    The 1648 Ukrainian Cossack rebellion led by hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky and ensuing war against the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth sparked the beginning of a new era in the history of Eastern Europe. The successes of the rebels were largely due to cooperation between the Orthodox Ukrainian Cossacks and the Muslim Crimean Tatars: from 1648 until 1654 the Crimean Khanate led by Khan Islam Giray III played a crucial role in the success of the Ukrainian Cossacks against forces of the Commonwealth. Throughout most of this tumultuous period the Ottoman Empire and Muscovy avoided being drawn into the Ukrainian-Polish conflict, though by 1654 Moscow was forced to abandon its reluctance to become involved in Ukraine. Mean-while the Ottomans maintained non-involvement in north until the late 1660s. As to the powers that sought to alter the international order in Eastern Europe, Islam Giray and Bohdan Khmelnytsky had different and even conflicting goals and expectations which meant that the Crimean Tatar-Ukrainian Cossack cooperation was doomed to fail. This presentation will analyze the conditions that prompted the Tatar khan and Cossack hetman to cooperate for six years and the factors that contributed to the break-up of their alliance.


    Speakers

    Sait Ocakli
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, January 27th ‘Le petit oeil de cristal, lui, ne cillait pas’: Jean Rouch and the camera eyewitness

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 27, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In a 1951 article series for Franc-Tireur, Jean Rouch described his fears as an ethnographic filmmaker. One must, he wrote, navigate between the detached observation of the ‘dry-eyed savant’ and the myopic immersion of a new ‘Robinson Crusoe’ bereft of his perspective-glass. If Rouch’s anxiety touched on a familiar cliché of both ethnographic fieldwork and documentary filmmaking, it would nonetheless operate idiosyncratically in Rouch’s work as a recurrent preoccupation with the possibilities of visual witnessing and the cooperation of human and camera eyes. In this talk, I explore the genealogies of Jean Rouch’s vision of témoignage, his experiments with the camera-as-witness, and the contribution of his filmmaking to a culture of visual witnessing prior to what Annette Wieviorka has called the ‘era of the witness’ in the 1960s.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Will Fysh
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, January 27th EPS Graduate Research Conference Special Session "The Fire Next Door: The 1967 Detroit Uprising in the Canadian Imagination"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 27, 20173:30PM - 6:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This talk will take place in a special session during the R.F. Harney 10th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (January 26-27, 2017), featuring Harney Program alumni Wendell Adjetey. The presentation aims to illuminate Canadians’ perceptions and fears of U.S. racial violence.

    Speaker’s bio:
    Wendell Nii Laryea Adjetey is a doctoral candidate in the Departments of History and African American Studies at Yale University, where he holds numerous awards and prizes, including the Falk Foundation, Felix G. Evangelist, and Douglass R. Bomeisler Fellowships. He is writing a dissertation on twentieth-century black activism and freedom linkages between Canada and the United States. Wendell is a Trudeau Scholar and a SSHRC Doctoral Fellow. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Toronto.

    Reception to follow in the Library.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Wendell Adjetey
    Speaker
    Doctoral Candidate, History and African American Studies, Yale University

    Prof. Akwasi Owusu-Bempah
    Discussant
    Sociology, University of Toronto

    Prof. Ian Radforth
    Discussant
    History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, January 28th International Relations Society Annual Conference "Climate Change and High Politics"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 28, 201710:00AM - 4:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The International Relations Society is proud to announce its annual conference, this year on “Climate Change and High Politics.” This conference will focus on unpacking the multidimensional issue of climate change, bringing together some of the nation’s premier scholars to provide insight into this complex issue. Dividing the conference into three panels, our speakers will be asked to address the following topics:

    1. The Global Governance of Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future
    What is the plausibility of COP21 actually being implemented?
    What should Canada’s role be in the next 10 years?
    Are democracies at a major disadvantage when enacting policy change, whereby an election can change environment policy every 4 or 8 years?

    2. Economic Growth and Sustainable Environmental Policy: Compatible or Not?
    Will ecosystem services become more integrated in economic calculations?
    Is sustainability achievable within an economic framework where environmental externalities remain unaccounted for?
    How will climate change affect the availability and pricing of products of agriculture amidst increasing global demand?

    3. Climate Change’s Threat to Human Security
    What are some of the consequences for human societies in the face of climate change?
    Can current international standards of aid and legal systems adequately support massive displacements of persons expected due to climate change?
    How will fundamental human rights potentially be affected by climate change and the destruction of the environment?

    Sponsors

    International Relations Society

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Arts and Science Student Union


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Sunday, January 29th International Holocaust Remembrance Day Program

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, January 29, 201711:00AM - 12:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Doors open at 10:00am.

    The Evidence Room
    Robert Jan van Pelt (and co-authors tbc)

    Join the Neuberger for the annual IHRD lecture and a book launch of this companion piece to the critically-acclaimed exhibition at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Prof. Robert Jan van Pelt, a pivotal witness at the libel trial against Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, incorporates some of the compelling visuals and testimony he used at the 2000 trial. Using a multi-layered approach, he demonstrates through forensic science the reality that Auschwitz-Birkenau was purposely designed as a factory of death.

    The book will be available for purchase ($30) and author signing.

    Generously supported by the Esther Bem Memorial Fund and presented in partnership with the New Jewish Press and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto.

    Open to the public; no registration required.

    About International Holocaust Remembrance Day
    January 27 marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp. In 2005, the United Nations General Assembly designated this day as International Holocaust Remembrance Day (IHRD), an annual day of commemoration to honour the victims of the Nazi era.

    Sponsors

    SARAH AND CHAIM NEUBERGER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE UJA FEDERATION OF GREATER TORONTO


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, January 30th "The More We Did, the More We Were Able To Do: A New Look at the Legacy of Charter 77 and Václav Havel"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 30, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    “The More We Did, the More We Were Able To Do”: A New Look at the Legacy of Charter 77 and Václav Havel.”
    The occasion is the 40th anniversary of the release of Charter 77, the manifesto of the Czechoslovak human rights initiative that blossomed into a broad-based movement that helped to undermine the totalitarian regime in that country. Two of the participants, Martin Palouš and Martin Šimsa, were signatories of the manifesto and activists in the movement. David Dušek is the grandson of one of the main instigators of Charter 77, and the event will also celebrate the publication, by the Václav Havel library in Prague, of a facsimile edition of a diary Havel kept when he was arrested and imprisoned in January 1977, just after the release of Charter 77. Dušek has also discovered a lengthy essay Havel wrote shortly after his release. Both these documents shed new light on how the regime tried to suppress the Charter movement, and indeed, all opposition.
    We’re hoping the event will be more than just a look back at an important turning point in Central European history, but that it might also provide a look at Havel’s legacy in the light of what we are facing now. The title of the event comes from Havel’s characterization of another era of great change and uncertainty: “The more we did, the more we were able to do, and the more we were able to do, the more we did.

    Chair: Robert C Austin, CERES

    Discussant: Veronika Ambros, Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Panelists

    David Dusek

    David Dusek is founding partner and managing director of a consultancy firm specializing in legislative process. At the same time, due to his family heritage, he became amateur archivist and publisher. He is also the grandson of one of Vaclav Havel’s closest friends, the Czech translator and writer Zdenek Urbanek. Two years ago, David discovered a lost notebook kept by Havel when he was imprisoned in 1977 for his leadership in Charter 77. He helped to organize its publication in Prague last year. In January David published the first chapter of the “lost” report on first days of Charter 77 written by Vaclav Havel and then lost.

    Martin Palous
    Martin Palouš studied Natural Science, Philosophy and International Law. In 1974 he received Doctorate of Natural Sciences (RNDr). In 2001 he earned Higher Doctorate in Political Science/Philosophy (Associate Professorship) at Charles University. In 2007 he got PhD in Public International Law.
    Since January of 2011, Martin Palous is Senior Fellow and Director of Vaclav Havel Program for Human Rights and Diplomacy at School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University. He is also President of Vaclav Havel Library Foundation and President of International Platform for Human Rights in Cuba.
    He belonged to the original signatories of Charter 77, served as its spokesperson in 1986 and participated at the creation of Civic Forum during the Velvet Revolution (November 1989). After the fall of Communism he was a member of Parlament (1990), Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs (1990-1992, 1998-2001), Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the United States (2001-2005) and Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to the United Nations (2006-2011).

    Martin Simsa
    Martin Šimsa teaches philosophy at Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Jan Evangelista Purkyně in Ústí and Labem, Czech Republic. The main topics of his research and teaching is political philosophy, deliberative theory of democracy, philosophical hermeneutics and Czech philosophy. He cooperated with conscientious objectors of compulsory military service and he signed the human rights document Charter 77 in 1978. He took part in protest activities in Brno along with other signatories of Charter 77, was active in the underground and among young Christians. He participated in seminars of professor Božena Komárková and philosopher Ladislav Hejdánek. He printed and distributed an illegal newsletter titled Information about Charter 77 (INFOCH) and as well as samizdat literature. He presented human rights topics at synods of the Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren as a representative of youth in 1985, 1987 and 1989, which took place during the time of the Velvet revolution 1989. On November 18 at 0:30 hours The Church Synod condemned the brutal police attack against students and young people on Národní třída and challenged the government to lead a dialogue with the human rights activists groups. He studied philosophy after Velvet Revolution (1990-1995) at Charles University and in 2001 he received a Ph.D. in philosophy there.

    Paul Wilson
    Paul Wilson lived and worked in Czechoslovakia for ten years, from 1967-1977, when he was expelled during the regime’s campaign against Charter 77. Since then, he has translated the work of many Czech writers, including Josef Škvorecký, Bohumil Hrabal, Ivan Klíma, and Václav Havel. He co-authored Fifty-seven Hours, about the Moscow theatre siege in 2002. A collection of his essays on Czech subjects, Bohemian Rhapsodies, was published in Prague in 2011. His most recent translation is a collection of short stories by Bohumil Hrabal, Mr. Kafka and Other Takes from the Time of the Cult. (New Directions, 2015)

    Sponsors

    Rudolf and Rosalie Cermak Fund
    CERES


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, January 31st Fracking: the Future of American Energy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 31, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The technological innovation of hydraulic fracturing drilling, commonly known as ‘fracking’, has revolutionized global energy markets overnight, but it quickly became a victim of its own success as global oil prices plunged in late 2014. This industry went from boom to bust in only a few short years. Despite this, it is still the future of American energy and soon to spread throughout the entire world. This presentation serves as an introduction to fracking, answering the following questions: What is it? How it did it come about? Why is it so important? And what are the implications—economic, social, and environmental—for the local communities where it occurs?

    Austin Zwick is a Ph.D. Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto. He previously obtained a BSc in Industrial Relations and an MPA in Public Finance from Cornell University. Austin’s research interests focus on the intersection between energy and economic development, quantifying job growth generated by upstream and downstream business linkages. His dissertation research concentrates on how the natural resource boom of fracking has affected patterns of urban decline and revitalization in the American Rust Belt. His research uses quantitative methods, statistics, and measures of public finance. Zwick also works with Evergreen CityWorks in measuring the fiscal health of Ontario’s cities over time.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Austin Zwick
    Ph.D. Candidate in Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

February 2017

  • Thursday, February 2nd One Belt One Road Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20171:30PM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the fall of 2013, China’s President Xi Jinping proposed a global effort known as “One-Belt-One-Road” (OBOR). Unlike many other Chinese proposals currently on the table such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) which has multi-national economic development as underpinning, the implication and potential impact of OBOR appears to be deeper and broader. Roughly speaking, the upstream of OBOR is what President Xi refers to as CULTURAL COMMUNICATION (文化相通). It is an initiative to culturally (and economically as a spin-off) revitalize the Ancient Silk Routes (ASR), be they land-based or maritime-based. However, unlike ASR, OBOR’s success places unprecedented demand on China to profoundly understand other cultures and civilizations. For the maritime OBOR, India, being next door to China, geographically situated in South Asia, and with 1.2 billion people, is an unavoidable challenge. If OBOR is successful, measured not by years but decades and maybe centuries, it could initiate a neo-Renaissance to allow humanity to meet unprecedented challenges.

    Da Hsuan Feng received his physics BA from Drew University (1968) and his PhD the University of Minnesota (1972). He joined Drexel University in 1976, where in 1990 he became M. Russell Wehr Chair Professor. In 1996, Feng became a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has been named an honorary professor at fifteen Chinese universities. He was a consultant for three National Laboratories in the United States: Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Brookhaven, and has served on a number of academic advisory boards and university Boards of Trustees throughout Asia. In 2000, Feng became Vice President for Research and Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas. From 2007 to 2014, he brought significant change to Taiwan as Senior Executive Vice President of National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) and National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). Since 2007, Feng has lectured widely throughout Asia on challenges of higher education. In 2014, he assumed his current position at the University of Macau. In the past year has lectured extensively on One-Belt-One-Road in Singapore, Malaysia, Mainland China, and Taiwan.

    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of Asian Politics.  Her research examines the relationship between popular contention, state power, and civil society, with an emphasis on contemporary China.  Her book manuscript, “Mobilizing Without the Masses in China” examines state control and civil society contention under authoritarian rule.  Based on two years of ethnographic research that tracks the development of informal labor organizations, the book explores counterintuitive dynamics of organized contention in post-1989 China. Articles that are part of this broader project have appeared in Governance (Forthcoming), Comparative Political Studies (2016) and Modern China (2009) among others.  Her research has been supported by the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Chiang Ching Kuo Foundation, and the Rhodes Trust, Prior to joining the department, she was a Walter H. Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University and a Predoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Political Science.   She holds a D.Phil. In Politics and an M.Phil. In Development Studies with distinction from Oxford University, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. 

    Yong Wang is Professor at School of International Studies, and the Director of the Center for International Political Economy, Peking University. He is also Professor at Party School of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China, and Former Visiting Chevalier Chair Professor at Institute of Asian Research(IAR), University of British Columbia(UBC). Member of the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Agenda Council on Global Trade and FDI, Asia Society Regional Trade Architecture Commission and Economic Diplomacy Expert Working Group of China Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM). He has published numerous books and articles focusing on the topics of Chinese political economy, foreign policy, China-US relations, regional cooperation, international political economy, World Trade Organization (WTO) and global governance. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Global Asia, the Journal of Global Governance, the journal of Contemporary Politics and the Journal of Human Security. His recent article on political economy of One Belt One Road is published by UK-based journal of Pacific Review.


    Speakers

    Da Hsuan Feng
    Keynote
    Special Assistant to the Rector and Director of Global Affairs, University of Macau; Former Senior Vice President, National Tsing Hua University

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Yong Wang
    Discussant
    Professor, School of International Studies; Director, Center for International Political Economy, Peking University, Beijing


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 2nd Making Postindustrial Cities in North America

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Contemporary narratives of the decline of basic industry make the postindustrial transformation of old manufacturing centers seem inevitable, the product of natural business cycles and neutral market forces. Using Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Hamilton, Ontario, as case studies, this talk offers a different interpretation, one in which local political and business elites collaborated to create postindustrial places well in advance of the economic malaise of the 1970s. As public resources dwindled, city officials made harsh calculations about whose needs they would no longer meet, rather than seeking to better meet the needs of all residents. They faced difficult choices and, seeing no other way forward, made decisions about how to allocate resources in a way that exacerbated inequality and sacrificed the well-being of large portions of urban populations in order to “save” cities. Mayors, planners, and business and civic leaders fostered a shift from cities as pluralistic places where skilled, high-wage manufacturing took place alongside commercial and financial enterprises to urban centers that served as entertainment zones, where white and middle-class suburbanites went for a convention or for dinner and a baseball game.

    Tracy Neumann is an Assistant Professor of History at Wayne State University. She specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century U.S. history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, and she is the author of Remaking the Rust Belt: The Postindustrial Transformation of North America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tracy Neumann
    Assistant Professor of History, Wayne State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography & Planning


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 2nd Grab, Dump, Capture: Screenshot Genealogies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMFaculty of Information
    University of Toronto
    140 St. George Street, Room 728
    *Registration is NOT required for this event.*
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The screenshot is today a ubiquitous object for the preservation of information, a digital snapshot that documents the visual output of a computer and its operations both extraordinary and mundane.

    Screenshots are an important tool for the archiving of digital environments, and remain central to the visual methods of both film studies and art history. The nature of the screenshot as a method for capture has transformed radically over the past forty years. What began as an analog process of photographing a screen or display has become an entirely digital operation, produced by software and stored as files to be transferred, uploaded, shared, and archived. Yet the screenshot itself as photo-object has gone largely unremarked, its complex genealogy collapsed into a single button: PrtScn. This talk will examine the history of the screenshot from its origins in computer graphics labs in the 1960s to contemporary methods for digital archiving and preservation, asking what this history tells us about the materiality of the digital, the history of the computer screen, and the ways in which visual artifacts efface the complexity of complex systems.

    Jacob Gaboury is Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Visual Culture at Stony Brook University.

    *Registration is NOT required for this event.* For additional information, please contact Prof. Patrick Kielty at: p.keilty@utoronto.ca.

    This talk is generously supported by the Knowledge Media Design Institute, JHI Digital Humanities Network, Comparative Literature, Art History, Sexual Diversity Studies, Cinema Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States.


    Speakers

    Jacob Gaboury
    Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Visual Culture at Stony Brook University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Faculty of Information, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 2nd JALANAN, a Film by Daniel Ziv

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, Robarts Library, 3rd Floor, 130 St George St
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Film Screening

    Description

    Documentary Screening............... 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
    Commentary and Discussion....... 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

    JALANAN (“Streetside”) is an award-winning documentary that tells the captivating story of Boni, Ho, and Titi, three street musicians in Jakarta. Directed by Canadian Daniel Ziv, the film follows these musicians as they seek to secure their livelihoods by busking on Jakarta’s streets and navigate the city’s complex social and legal landscape. Jalanan is not only an intimate portrait of Jakarta, it is a glimpse into the lives of marginalized urban communities facing the pressures of globalization.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Joshua Barker
    Associate Professor of Anthropology, St. George Campus; Vice-Dean, Graduate Education & Program Reviews; and expert on urban Indonesia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, February 3rd What Does China’s Industrial Relocation Mean for China’s Workers?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 3, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    For the last decade, a large contingent of manufacturing firms in developmental zones on China’s coast has moved to inland provinces. What are the implications of this move inland for Chinese workers? Research on labor conditions in the current period of economic globalization and mobile capital debates the existence of a “race to the bottom” in labor standards through the pressures of international capital mobility. These theories predict that as inland China develops and attracts a larger amount of foreign and domestic capital, inland governments will compete by offering cheap labor and lower or unenforced standards.

    Our argument in this paper is contrarian in that we propose the possibility of a positive relationship between the movement inland and labor conditions. We argue that the movement of manufacturing to inland China is not primarily about cheaper workers, but instead signals the beginning of a fundamental shift in the development model through the employment of a localized workforce.

    Using audit data from Apple Corporation suppliers (2007-2013), supplementary survey data, and in-depth interviews, we conduct a structured case study of two cities that have attracted significant investment from Apple suppliers—Chengdu and Shenzhen—to draw some of the main hypotheses and to discuss possible causal mechanisms for this relationship between localized production and better labor conditions. We also provide initial empirical evidence that firm relocation toward inland does not necessarily lead to degradation of labor conditions.

    Mary Gallagher is a professor of political science at the University of Michigan where she is also the director of the Kenneth G. Lieberthal and Richard H. Rogel Center for Chinese Studies. Professor Gallagher received her Ph.D in politics in 2001 from Princeton University and her B.A. from Smith College in 1991. She was a foreign student in China in 1989 at Nanjing University. She also taught at the Foreign Affairs College in Beijing from 1996-1997. She was a Fulbright Research Scholar from 2003 to 2004 at East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, China. In 2012-2013, she was a visiting professor at the Koguan School of Law at Shanghai Jiaotong University.

    Her forthcoming book, Authoritarian Legality: Law, Workers, and the State in China, will be published by Cambridge University Press this year. She is also the author or editor of several other books, including Contagious Capitalism: Globalization and the Politics of Labor in China (Princeton 2005), Chinese Justice: Civil Dispute Resolution in Contemporary China (Cambridge 2011), From Iron Rice Bowl to Informalization: Markets, Workers, and the State in a Changing China (Cornell 2011), and Contemporary Chinese Politics: New Sources, Methods, and Field Strategies (Cambridge 2010).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mary E. Gallagher
    Speaker
    Director, Kenneth G. Lieberthal and Richard H. Rogel Center for Chinese Studies; Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, February 3rd – Saturday, February 4th Behind Closed Doors: Trafficking Labour, Sex, Art

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 3, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Saturday, February 4, 201710:00AM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    11th Annual Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies Conference

    Description

    Behind Closed Doors will shed light on modern day slavery and the trafficking of cultural legacies — two issues whose human and economic impact cannot fully be quantified due to its clandestine nature. The forum will set the tone for the day through an overview of the current actions undertaken by national and international actors to deal with sex and labour trafficking. The workshop will provide the audience with the opportunity to engage in informal activities through the guidance of local experts, practitioners, and scholars. Lastly, the debate will ask both participants and audience members alike to confront the ethical dilemma that surrounds trafficked art.

    DAY 1 – Friday, February 3, 2017
    6-7pm – Opening remarks & keynote address
    7-9pm – Networking Reception

    DAY 2 – Saturday, February 4, 2017
    10-10:30am – Breakfast
    10:30am-12:30pm – Forum
    12:30-2 pm – Networking lunch
    2 – 4 pm – Workshop
    4-4:30pm – High tea
    4:30 – 6 pm – Debate
    6 – 6:30 pm – Closing remarks

    Contact

    Tea Cimini


    Speakers

    Michele Clark
    Executive Director of Artworks for Freedom and adjunct faculty at the George Washington University

    Bonnie Czegledi
    Czegledi Art Law

    Jacqui Linder
    Associate professor at City University

    Antonela Arhin
    Executive officer and sessional lecturer, University of Toronto

    Shelley Gilbert
    Legal Assistance of Windsor


    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Master of Global Affairs Program, Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto

    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    University of Toronto Department of Political Science

    Arts and Science Students' Union

    University College

    Woodsworth College

    Department of Philosophy

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 8th Re-Conceptualizing Mental Health Services for Women Who Have Experienced IPV: Responding to Intersecting Experiences of Trauma

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Despite the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its devastating effects on Canadian women, there is a gap in empirically-supported mental health interventions for IPV. Specifically, despite wide acknowledgment of the links between IPV and trauma, there is a research gap in understanding how IPV interventions address trauma. Also problematic is that Canadian IPV interventions have mainly been informed by the 1980s experiences of white, cis-gendered, middle-class, heterosexual women from Duluth, Minnesota, rather than representing women’s diverse experiences of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, socioeconomic status, religion, and immigration experiences. Interventions for IPV need to shift from a view of gender-based oppression as the root cause of IPV, to a view that encompasses the multiple ways in which identity-based oppressions and traumatic experiences can impact IPV. Informed by critical feminist intersectional and trauma-informed approaches, this qualitative study aims to build theory to address these gaps, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Theoretical sampling and semi-structured interviews with women in Ontario who have accessed mental health services for IPV will be employed to: 1) understand how trauma is conceptualized and addressed within IPV services; and 2) compare differences in women’s service experiences based on intersecting identities and oppression. Through comparative analysis, this study aims to identify service inequities based on women’s complex identities, and to understand how trauma on multiple levels (childhood adversities, racism, classism, homophobia, etc.) impacts IPV-related trauma. Findings will provide knowledge necessary to reduce inequities in the future design of mental health care for IPV survivors.

    Stephanie Baird is a PhD candidate at Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at University of Toronto. Her research interest in trauma and intimate partner violence builds on her community and clinical social work practice with people who have been impacted by experiences of trauma and violence. Her dissertation, which is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship, will explore the intersectional experiences of trauma of women who have been abused by a partner.


    Speakers

    Stephanie Baird
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 8th Minority Report: A Sociological Account of Muslim Immigrants in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201711:00AM - 1:00PMHart House, North Dining Room
    7 Hart House Circle, 2nd floor
    University of Toronto
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies and the SD Clark Chair of Sociology are pleased to invite you to attend a seminar on Muslim immigrants in Canada led by Professor Abdie Kazemipur, University Scholar Research Chair in Social Sciences at the University of Lethbridge and winner of the Canadian Sociological Association’s John Porter Prize for the outstanding book in Canadian sociology, 2015.

    Debates about Canadian Muslims have focussed on theology or culture; treated Muslims as a monolithic population; and paid little attention to the specificities of local contexts. As a result, they have oversimplified complex social realities and offered poor guides to policy. Professor Kazemipur overcomes these problems by employing a wide range of socio-economic data to argue for a sociologically grounded account of Muslims in Canada.

    Professor Kazemipur’s The Muslim Question in Canada: A Story of Segmented Integration (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2014) won the John Porter Prize of the Canadian Sociological Association for the outstanding book in Canadian sociology, 2015.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Professor Abdolmohammad Kazemipur
    University of Lethbridge



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 8th Curative Violence: How to Inhabit the Time Machine with Disability

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This presentation explores “folded time” in which the present disappears through the imperative of cure in South Korea. By folding time, cure demands temporal crossings to a past through “rehabilitation” and “recovery” and to a future without disabilities and illnesses. By thinking about the imperative of cure as a time machine, Kim explores the possibility of inhabiting in the present with disability and illness. Cure appears as an attempt at category-crossing from otherness to normality, which reveals the multiplicity of the boundaries that divide “human” and “inhuman” as well as “life” and “nonlife.” Kim also discusses the temporal trap into which discussions of non-Western societies in Western academic contexts might fall, one that denies coevalness or universalizes disability experiences across different cultural and historical contexts. In this analysis, cure is reframed, not as unequivocally beneficial nor politically harmful, but as a set of political, moral, economic, emotional, and ambivalent negotiations.

    Eunjung Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program at Syracuse University. Her research and teaching involve transnational feminist disability studies, visual cultures, Korean cultural history of disability and activism, humanitarian communications, asexuality theories, and queer inhumanism.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eunjung Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program, Syracuse University

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 9th Political Economies and Political Rationalities of Road Building in Nepal: Notes from the Archives

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 9, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Asian Insitute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    Infrastructure in general, and road in particular, has become one of the priority sectors in Nepal’s development efforts and it has become a major concern for many Nepali people. Road building projects have always been a major focus of government and donor programming, from the beginning of planned development initiatives in the 1950s. Road projects were highly centralized and the central state and donors were major dominating agencies during the 1960s and 70s. Now, multiple actors have engaged and road building can broadly be explained as tripartite coordination among the state (both central and local), donors, and local communities. The state, donors, and community practices through which roads have been constructed in Nepal vary across time and place. Considering those practices and the wider scale of political interests, roads have become a key site of governance contestation.

    In this paper, I sketch out the emergence of governmental landscapes (policy, institutions and actors) from the readings of archives; policies, plans, and other historical documents produced by the government of Nepal, World Bank, and other organizations or individuals, and information collected from multiple research sites. Considering the dynamics of political history, I analyze the political economies and political rationalities of road building in Nepal and relate this history to some international scholarship on infrastructure.

    Tulasi Sharan Sigdel is a PhD scholar at the School of Arts, Kathmandu University, and Research Fellow in Infrastructure of Democracy: State Building as Everyday Practices in Nepal’s Agrarian Districts. He examines what kind of democratic practices and governance regimes have emerged from the grassroots in post-conflict politics in Nepal.

    Mr. Sigdel graduated in Rural Development studies from Tribhuvan University, and examined local planning processes in rural Nepal for his graduate thesis. After his graduation, he served at the Rural Development Department, TU, for five years in the capacity of Assistant Lecturer. Then he joined Nepal Administrative Staff College, a national level training institution which trains government officers and carries out policy research. As a senior faculty (Director of Studies) in the college, he trains bureaucrats in the areas of governance, development planning, democracy, and state-building and he has engaged in different research projects. He brings a mix of experiences working closely with Nepali bureaucrats and researching democracy and governance practices from the grassroots.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Katharine Rankin
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Geography and Planningl Centre for South Asian Studies

    Tulasi Sharan Sigdel
    Speaker
    PhD scholar at School of Arts, Kathmandu University; Visiting Doctoral Student, Centre for South Asian Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 9th The Plot to Save American Democracy: Project Narrative, Story Science and the Plan to Hack Hollywood

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 9, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This talk will explore how Project Narrative’s new empirical methods for studying democracy and storytelling have generated a half-dozen new film and TV projects at various Hollywood studios.

    Angus Fletcher is a Full Professor of English and Film at Ohio State and Core Faculty at Project Narrative, where he teaches in both the MFA and PhD programs. He’s also a Blacklist and Nicholl award-winning screenwriter who has sold or optioned six pilots and feature screenplays in the past three years to Disney, Universal, and other studios, for directors such as Michael Apted, James Strong, and four-time Oscar-nominee Gary Ross. His work on narrative and democracy has appeared in Critical Inquiry, and two-dozen other academic journals. His most recent book was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2016.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Angus Fletcher
    Professor of English and Film at Ohio State, and Core Faculty at Project Narrative


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

    Department of English, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 9th When Warriors Turn: Nationalism and the Meaning of the Great War in Ernst Jünger, Käthe Kollwitz, and Otto Dix

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 9, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis History Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall, room 2098
    100 St. George Street
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Helmut Walser Smith is a historian of modern Germany with particular interests in the history of nation-building and nationalism, religious history, and the history of antisemitism. He is the author of German Nationalism and Religious Conflict, 1870-1914 (Princeton 1995) and a number of edited collections, including The Oxford Handbook of Modern German History (Oxford 2011), Protestants, Catholics and Jews in Germany, 1800-1914 (Oxford 2001), and The Holocaust and Other Genocides (Nashville 2002).

    His book, The Butcher’s Tale: Murder and Anti-Semitism in a German Town (New York 2002), received the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History and was an L.A. Times Non-Fiction Book of the Year. It has also been translated into French, Dutch, Polish, and German, where it received an accolade as one of the three most innovative works of history published in 2002. Smith has also authored The Continuities of German History: Nation, Religion, and Race across the Long Nineteenth Century (Cambridge 2008) and is currently working on a book on German conceptions of nation before, during, and after nationalism.


    Speakers

    Helmut Walser Smith
    Martha Rivers Ingram Chair of History, Vanderbilt University


    Sponsors

    Department of History Intellectual Community Committee

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 9th A Historical Perspective on the Ukraine Crisis: States, Stability, and the Soviet Legacy - CERES Graduate Student Conference Keynote Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 9, 20175:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Update: The keynote lecture will be given by Dr. Markian Dobczansky, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society.

    About the lecture:

    Frozen and unfrozen conflicts have been a persistent feature of the Eurasian political landscape since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Breakaway regions and civil wars have affected no fewer than seven former Soviet republics, calling into question the stability and durability of these independent states. Yet each of the conflicts has a particular historical background that can help illuminate the challenges faced by these states. The Ukraine crisis is no exception. This talk will focus on the history of Soviet state and nation building in Ukraine, arguing that the peculiarities of the Soviet legacy have contributed to the Ukrainian state’s strengths and weaknesses.

    About Dr. Dobczansky:

    Markian Dobczansky is a historian of the Soviet Union. His specializations include Russian-Ukrainian relations, Soviet nationalities policy, and the politics of culture. He is currently the Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society at the University of Toronto, where he teaches a course on comparative nationalisms in Russia and Ukraine. He has conducted archival research in Moscow, Kyiv, Kharkiv, Washington, D.C., and at the Hoover Institution in California. Dr. Dobczansky is working on a book manuscript about the intersection between Soviet, Ukrainian, and local identity in Kharkiv in the twentieth century. He has presented his research at academic conferences in the United States, Ukraine, Russia, and Lithuania.

    Dr. Dobczansky received a Ph.D. in history from Stanford University, where he focused on the Soviet Union, Russian Empire, and Eastern Europe. His dissertation, “From Soviet Heartland to Ukrainian Borderland: Searching for Identity in Kharkiv, 1943—2004,” utilized Soviet archival sources, published materials, and interviews to examine local identity in Ukraine’s second largest city over the second half of the twentieth century. While writing his dissertation, he received a Mellon pre-doctoral fellowship at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He received a B.A. in European History and German Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. He was born in Silver Spring, Maryland.

    Contact

    J. Hawker


    Speakers

    Dr. Markian Dobczansky
    Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow in Ukrainian Politics, Culture, and Society


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Ethnic and Pluralism Studies

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Department of Political Science

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, February 10th Home Ownership among Local Born and Migrant Young Adults in Hong Kong

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 10, 20171:30PM - 3:30PMRichard Charles Lee
    Canada-Hong Kong Library
    Robarts Library 8th Floor
    130 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Hong Kong Seminar Series

    Description

    Home ownership is particularly important for young adults as it is one of the highly-valued life goals to achieve in Chinese culture. Yet, the
    affordability of housing is a very serious issue in Hong Kong where population density is high and housing supply is limited. Those who cannot afford to buy their own houses usually live with their parents or stay in rental units.

    Based on data from the 2011 Hong Kong census, this study explores home ownership of youth in Hong Kong. We are particularly interested in people aged between 20 and 35 as they just start establishing their career and having a family of their own. In our study, we pay particular attention to the difference between local-born and migrant young adults. Our findings suggest that the home-ownership rate of migrant young adults from the Mainland, who arrived in Hong Kong at age 17 or later, is substantially higher than that of either local-born young adults or their counterparts from the Mainland who arrived in Hong Kong at younger ages. Factors contributing to such a pattern and implications of the findings will be discussed.

    Eric Fong is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Director of the Center on Migration and Mobility. Fong also serves as a Chiangjiang Chair Professor at the Xi’an Jiaotong University. He was Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto until July 2016. His latest book Immigration and the City, co-written with Brent Berry, will be published by Polity Press later this year.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca or calling 416-946-8978


    Speakers

    Eric Fong
    Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology; Director, Center on Migration and Mobility; The Chinese University of Hong Kong


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Hong Kong Canada Crosscurrents

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, February 13th From Modernity to Postmodernity: Malaysian Art in a Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This paper examines the key narratives in the development of Malaysian modern art in the last 100 years. It will start with a discussion on Low Kway Song’s “Portrait of Man in Three Piece Suit with Orchid on Lapel” produced in 1917 and the art scene in Malaya prior to its Independence. Post Independence saw an exposure of Western Abstract Expressionism, albeit in a localized manner, on Malaysian art pioneered by newly returned Malaysian artists from their studies abroad. Such influence could be observed in the works of Syed Ahmad Jamal and Latiff Mohidin. However, the period of late 1970s and throughout 1980s has changed the previous trend, which marked a new turning point in Malaysian art, due to the implementation of the National Cultural Policy and Islamization Policy. Tis was followed by the decade of the 1990s that witnessed a growing Malaysian art scene that led to the produce of artworks that were indirectly conditioned by the ‘postmodern situation’. This paper will conclude with the works of selected Malaysian artists in the current Singapore Biennale: An Atlas of Mirrors (2016).

    Sarena Abdullah is a Senior Lecturer at the School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), where she teaches Art History subjects for both undergraduate and graduate class. She has an MA in Art History from the State University of New York, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A., and a PhD in Art History (2010) from the University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. Her research interests are contemporary Malaysian and Southeast Asian Art. She has numerous papers published both locally and abroad, and has presented at conferences in Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, the United States and China. She is one of the Field Leader for “Ambitious Alignments: New Histories of Southeast Asian Art,” a research project led by the Power Institute, The University of Sydney and funded by the Getty Foundation in 2015. She was the recipient of the 2016 CAA-Getty Travel Grant as part of the CAA-Getty International Program and will be part of the 2017 CAA-Getty International Reunion Program in February as well.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sarena Abdullah
    Senior Lecturer, School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 15th The ‘Transnationalization’ of Ukrainian Dissent: Human Rights and Ukrainian Diasporas in the 1960s-1980s

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This talk will be an account of my ongoing research project on the relationship between Ukrainian diaspora communities and their original homeland during and after the Cold War. It will focus on the reception of the Ukrainian dissent by the younger generations of the Ukrainian diaspora (especially in the US) and on the ways these younger Ukrainian-Americans tried to change the relationship with Soviet Ukraine. The analysis will address the question of the multiculturalism of these second-generation Ukrainian Americans aiming at a working definition of otherwise ambigous concepts such as “transnationalism” and “diaspora.”

    Simone Attilio Bellezza completed two PhDs: the first one at the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, where he defended a dissertation on the German civil administration of Dnipropetrovs’k region during World War II, and the second at the University of the Republic of San Marino, where he wrote a dissertation on the Ukrainian dissent during the 1950s and 1960s. He specialized in Soviet and particularly Ukrainian history, and the fil rouge of his work is the study of national identity and its relationship with other kinds of loyalty (social, political, cultural, and religious). He is now working on a new research project, whose aim is to verify to what extent the human rights activism of the 1970s and 1980s constituted the basis for the new-born foreign policy of post-Soviet Ukraine, by creating numerous networks of international relationships. His first objective will be to investigate the relationship between Ukrainian diaspora communities and their original homeland in the emergence of the human rights movement.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Simone Bellezza
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Research Award Recipient

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 15th The Muslim Ban: Trump's First Legal, Political, and Security Crisis of 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 15, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    A video of this event is now available as a webcast. Please see ‘Watch Munk School Webcasts & Live Events’ on the home page.

    In a recent Executive Order targeting migrants from seven Muslim-majority countries, President Trump has banned all Syrian refugees from entering the United States of America indefinitely, and suspended entry for all refugees, immigrants, dual nationals, and US permanent residents from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days, or longer. After campaigning on a promise to ban all Muslims entering the United States, this Executive Order is the first formal act by the new administration that takes aim at the Muslim community. The legal, political, humanitarian, and security consequences of this “Muslim ban” are far-reaching. What are the short- and long-term implications of the ban? At this exclusive Munk School event, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative brings together a team of legal and security experts to unpack this urgent question.

    Speakers:
    Aisha Ahmad, Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto, Co-director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative, Senior Researcher, Global Justice Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Stephen J. Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mohammad Fadel, Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, at the University of Toronto. He specializes in Islamic law, International human rights law, and the compatibility of Islam and liberal democracy

    Doug Saunders, Distinguished author and journalist, with a regular column with The Globe and Mail. He is the author of the acclaimed 2012 book “The Myth of the Muslim Tide”.

    Moderator:
    Ed Schatz, Professor; Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Associate Professor, Political Science

    Contact

    Jennifer Colvin
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Aisha Ahmad
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Co-director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative
    Senior Researcher, Global Justice Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Stephen J. Toope
    Speaker
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mohammad Fadel
    Speaker
    Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, at the University of Toronto

    Doug Saunders
    Speaker
    Distinguished Author and Journalist

    Ed Schatz
    Moderator
    Professor; Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies Associate Professor, Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 16th The Immigrant Experience in Canada in the Context of Growing Inequality and Austerity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Canada has an impressive historical track record of successful immigrant incorporation, and continues to serve as a global model in a time of growing anti-immigrant sentiment in other countries. Yet growing inequality and austerity have contributed to a changing context of settlement in Canada, and raises potential concerns. This talk will discuss these trends and present some case study evidence from research in Toronto and Vancouver as well as policy recommendations to address emerging challenges and improve outcomes.

    Dr. Daniyal Zuberi is RBC Chair and Associate Professor of Social Policy at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto.
    Prior to his appointment at the University of Toronto, he was the William Lyon Mackenzie King Research Fellow at Harvard University and a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. In 2015, he was elected as a member of the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. He is author of three books, Differences that Matter (Cornell University Press, 2006), Cleaning Up (Cornell University Press, 2013) and Schooling the Next Generation (University of Toronto Press, 2015) He is currently completing research projects on social policy and urban poverty, health policy, education, immigrant access to services and settlement experiences, and hospital employment.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Daniyal Zuberi
    RBC Chair and Associate Professor of Social Policy at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 16th Lumumba (2000; dir. Raoul Peck)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20177:30PM - 10:30PM Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Julie MacArthur
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, February 17th Munk One Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 17, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Will you be beginning your first year at the University of Toronto in September 2017? Join us for an opportunity to talk with Munk One professors, students, and staff to find out about the program and if it’s right for you. And it’s happening on a PA day for the TDSB, TCDSB, and many private schools!

    To make the most of your time with us, we kindly ask that you arrive promptly at 10:00am. During the first hour, Professor Teresa Kramarz, Director of Munk One will present a brief overview of the program, and you will have the opportunity to meet with Munk One professors, students, and staff who will be happy to answer any questions. Following that, from 11:00am, Munk One students will take you on a short campus tour.

    If you want to find out more about the program, please visit our website: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/one/

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, February 21st The Rise of the Hybrid Domain: Collaborative Governance for Social Innovation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 21, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    By conceptualizing the rise of the hybrid domain as an emerging institutional form that overlaps public and private interests, this book explores how corporations, states, and civil society organizations develop common agendas, despite the differences in their primary objectives. Using evidence from India, it examines various cases of social innovation in education, energy, health, and finance, which offer solutions for some of the most pressing social challenges of the twenty-first century.

    Yuko Aoyama and Balaji Parthasarathy position social innovation at the intersection of changing state–market relations, institutional design, and technological innovation. By demonstrating how corporations, social entrepreneurs, and social finance increasingly cross borders to devise local solutions with global technologies, this book illustrates how collaborative governance can serve as a useful alternative to blend economic and social objectives by overriding organizational boundaries which were previously considered ideologically incompatible and, therefore, unbridgeable.

    Engaging with the question of collective capacity building, this book will be of interest to a broad and multi-disciplinary audience, from those studying innovation, science and technology policy, and entrepreneurship, to those working in international governance and development.

    Contact

    Sole Fernbandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Yoku Aoyama, PhD
    Professor Henry J. Leir Faculty Fellow of Geography Graduate School of Geography Clark University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, February 22nd “We’re Here”: Health Care as a Site of Subjugation and Resistance for Older HIV-Positive Gay Men in Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 22, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In recent years, a growing body of literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging has highlighted the systemic exposure of older sexual and gender minorities to complex expressions of stigma and discrimination across a variety of social contexts, the confluence of which tends to adversely affect the social conditions and health outcomes of these groups. Older gay men have specifically been recognized as a population of concern, given this group’s exposure to the unique social history of HIV, and therefore the unique features of stigma and discrimination that are likely to typify the realities of these older adults as they access health care and social services (Addis et al., 2009). Informed by this literature, my research seeks to examine how older gay men experience the production of subjugation at the intersection of older age, gay sexuality, and HIV stigma, specifically when they access health care systems, and how they resist these systemic issues in their interactions with health services. In this qualitative study, I aim to interview 30 gay men who are 50 years of age or older with recent experience accessing health care services, 15 of whom will be HIV-positive. In these interviews, I will ask participants to discuss their overall experiences of accessing health care services as older gay men, and how they believe they navigate potential barriers to access in these contexts. Drawing on these accounts, I will infer how intersectional subjugation is produced and resisted as older gay men, including those living with HIV, enter and interact with systems of care. The results of this study will be used not only to further insight in the growing field of LGBT aging, but also to develop health care policy and practice implications that seek to address access to care in a key subpopulation of aging and sexual minorities.

    Hannah Kia is a third year PhD Candidate in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences Division of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She is also a member of the Re:searching for LGBTQ Health Team, led by Dr. Lori Ross. Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Hannah was a clinical social worker in British Columbia, where she gained practice experience in palliative care and other health care specialty areas. During her time as a social worker, she conducted research on the experiences of care-giving partners of gay men, and assisted with a Metropolis BC-funded study that examined the experiences and service needs of sexual minority newcomers. Hannah holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work from the University of British Columbia. At this time, Hannah’s research interests centre on examining health care access among older LGBTQ adults. In pursuing her doctoral studies, she hopes to gain a better understanding of how older LGBTQ adults, particularly those living with HIV and other chronic illnesses, experience stigma and discrimination as barriers to accessing care. In April 2015, Hannah was awarded a Doctoral Research Award by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to support her work in this area.


    Speakers

    Hannah Kia
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, February 23rd Book launch: The WAY OF THE STRANGERS, Encounters with the Islamic State by Graeme Wood

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 23, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Tens of thousands of men and women have left comfortable, privileged lives to join the Islamic State and kill for it. To them, its violence is beautiful and holy, and the caliphate a fulfillment of prophecy and the only place on earth where they can live and die as Muslims.

    The Way of the Strangers is an intimate journey into the minds of the Islamic State’s true believers. From the streets of Cairo to the mosques of London, Graeme Wood interviews supporters, recruiters, and sympathizers of the group. We meet an Egyptian tailor who once made bespoke suits for Paul Newman and now wants to live, finally, under Shariah; a Japanese convert who believes that the eradication of borders—one of the Islamic State’s proudest achievements—is a religious imperative; and a charming, garrulous Australian preacher who translates the group’s sermons and threats into English and is accused of recruiting for the organization. We also learn about a prodigy of Islamic rhetoric, now stripped of the citizenship of the nation of his birth and determined to see it drenched in blood. Wood speaks with non–Islamic State Muslim scholars and jihadists, and explores the group’s idiosyncratic, coherent approach to Islam.

    The Islamic State is bent on murder and apocalypse, but its followers find meaning and fellowship in its utopian dream. Its first caliph, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, has declared that he is the sole legitimate authority for Muslims worldwide. The theology, law, and emotional appeal of the Islamic State are key to understanding it—and predicting what its followers will do next.

    Through character study and analysis, Wood provides a clear-eyed look at a movement that has inspired so many people to abandon or uproot their families. Many seek death—and they will be the terror threat of the next decade, as they strike back against the countries fighting their caliphate. Just as Lawrence Wright’s The Looming Tower informed our understanding of Al Qaida, Graeme Wood’s The Way of the Strangers will shape how we see a new generation of terrorists.

    Graeme Wood is Canadian journalist and a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He has written for The New Republic, The New Yorker, Bloomberg Businessweek, The American Scholar, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and many other publications. He was the 2014–2015 Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and he teaches in the political science department at Yale University.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Graeme Wood
    Canadian journalist and a national correspondent for The Atlantic



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, February 24th Civil Wars: A History in Ideas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 24, 20174:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Munk Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the Balkans to Rwanda, Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan and most recently Syria, civil conflict has exploded across the globe. In the West, politics itself looks ever more like civil war by other means. At such a charged time, David Armitage’s unique perspective on the origins and dynamics of this phenomenon is indispensable. His highly original history traces this least understood and most intractable form of organized human aggression from ancient Rome through the centuries to the present day.

    Please join David Armitage, Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, in discussion about his new book Civil Wars: A History in Ideas

    Speaker

    DAVID ARMITAGE is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, where he teaches intellectual history and international history, and former chair of Harvard’s History Department. His many publications include The Ideological Origins of the British Empire (2000) and The Declaration of Independence: A Global History (2007). Twitter: @davidrarmitage

    Contact

    Jen Colvin
    (416) 946-5670


    Speakers

    David Armitage
    Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, February 27th Aspirations to Live: the Politics of Transnational Welfare Citizenship among Older Sakhalin Koreans

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 27, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Since 1990, when the Soviet Union and South Korea established diplomatic ties, over 4,000 Koreans from Sakhalin Island (Russia) have “returned” to their so-called ethnic homeland, now in South Korea. This return migration program has been supported by the Japanese and South Korean governments, named a humanitarian aid, with older Sakhalin Koreans being granted citizenship in South Korea. Based on ethnographic fieldwork on Sakhalin in South Korea (2010-2011, 2016), I present everyday experiences of citizenship among older Sakhalin Koreans in a transnational setting. This return project, offering a range of material and social assistance, has provoked new aspirations to live; at the same time it entails a new sense of unfairness, moral discourses around dependency, contested claim-making practice, and reflections of self through Others. These experiences show the ways older Sakhalin Koreans negotiate moral and political personhood as they reconfigure historically shaped relations to key nation-states including Japan, Russia, and South Korea. Situating the practices and imaginaries of citizenship of older Sakhalin Koreans within the shifting geopolitics of Northeast Asia, this study offers an analysis and understanding of subjectivities in the times of post-colonial and post-cold war transformations.

    Sungsook Lim completed her Master’s degree in Anthropology at Hanyang University in Korea in 2004, and continued to study anthropology in the Ph.D. program at the University of British Columbia. Her PhD research project considered return mobility among older Sakhalin Koreans, specially focusing on their kinship and citizenship practices. Sungsook completed her PhD degree in 2016, and is currently a post-doctoral fellow of the Korea Foundation.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sungsook Lim
    Post-doctoral fellow, Korea Foundation

    Jesook Song
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Korea


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

March 2017

  • Wednesday, March 1st Social Changes and Public Opinion in Central Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 1, 201711:00AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Twenty-five years after independence, Central Asian societies are witnessing the emergence of new demographics, social and cultural changes that confirm the end of the “post-Soviet” period and the entry into another phase of history. In this presentation Professor Laruelle will analyze these changes and explore their possible meaning in terms of domestic and foreign policies for the region’s countries.

    Marlene Laruelle is Research Professor of International Affairs andAssociate Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES) at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University. She explores contemporary political, social and cultural changes in Russia and Central Asia through the prism of ideologies and nationalism. She is the editor in chief of Central Asian Affairs and a member of the executive editorial board of Demokratizatsiya. The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization. As director of the Central Asia Program she oversees about 30 events a year, monthly publications, and works on several programs of visiting fellows from Central Asia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marlene Laruelle
    Speaker
    Director, Central Asia Program; Co-Director, PONARS-Eurasia at George Washington University

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 2nd Aegean, The Sea of Peace, Civilization and Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 2, 20177:00PM - 8:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Street,Toronto ON
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Program

    1. Candle Dance from the Island of Lesvos
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    2. Welcome and Opening Remarks
    (Maria Xenikakis and Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    3. Short Documentary Film, 4.1 Miles
    (About the refugee crisis in Europe)

    The documentary is based on the life of a captain in the Greek Coast Guard, who is caught in the struggle of refugees fleeing the Middle East and traveling the short distance from the coast of Turkey to the island of Lesvos. Despite having limited resources, the captain and his crew attempt to save lives during the immense humanitarian crisis. The film is directed by Daphne Matziaraki and was nominated (Short Subject Documentary) for Oscars 2017.

    4. Dance Theatre Performance “The Aegean- the Sea of Humanity”
    (Melisakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    5. Lecture – Odysseas Elytis, The Poet of the Aegean
    (Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    6. Parade of Aegean Traditional Costumes
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre)
    (Costumes from the private collection of Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Mr. John Dagonas


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 3rd Pipelines, Paris, and Decarbonization: The Future of Canadian Energy and Climate Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs in partnership with the Law School at the University of Toronto are convening a discussion exploring the implications and implementation of recent national and provincial climate and energy policies and discussing the future of Canadian energy and climate policy in an uncertain global context. Our goal is to further the national and provincial conversations by bringing together multiple stakeholders and sectors. The panel include speakers with deep knowledge of the national and global policy history and context, carbon pricing, First Nations experiences and concerns, and fossil fuel industry dynamics. The event will include a moderated discussion amongst panelists as well as a question and answer session with the audience.

    Contact

    Alexa Waud


    Speakers

    John Drexhange
    Drexhage Consulting, formerly Climate Director at International Institute for Sustainable Development

    Erin Flanagan
    Director of Federal Policy at Pembina Institute

    Nancy Olewiler
    Professor Simon Fraser University

    Ben Powless
    Climate Justice and First Nations Rights Activist



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 3rd Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street, Room 318
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series; Lecture in the Arts, Histories, Literatures and Religions of Burma

    Description

    THE LEGAL HISTORY OF BURMA over the course of the second millennium CE offers a series of literary, juridical, and intellectual contributions that are unique when considered in relation to the wider Buddhist world of South, Central, and East Asia. From the 13th through 19th centuries upper Burma was a regional center for the production of a distinctive genre of Buddhist legal literature known as dhammasattha (“treatise on law”), whose laws claimed jurisdiction over all members of society, including monks and laypersons, and kings, commoners, and slaves. Prose and verse dhammasattha texts were composed in Pali and vernacular languages (Burmese, Mon, Arakanese, Shan, etc.), as well as in
    bilingual gloss versions (nissaya), and there is extensive testimony, dating from the mid-13th century onward, for their utilization by judges in contexts of dispute resolution. Aspects of the early history of this genre can be gleaned from lithic epigraphy, vernacular poetry, and bibliographic catalogues (piṭakat samuiṅḥ), although surviving dhammasattha treatises, transmitted in palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, can be dated no earlier than circa 1637, whereas the youngest examples of the tradition were written under British colonialism around 1900.

    For the past decade Christian Lammerts has been involved in the first major study of this genre—its textual histories, laws, and shifting modes of reception and jurisprudence—on the basis of extensive fieldwork in Burma and close investigation of the epigraphic corpus and manuscript archive, which preserves hundreds of discrete texts in multiple, sometimes highly variant, versions. In this presentation Lammerts will discuss the results of this project, drawn from his forthcoming book, Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE (University of Hawai’I Press).

    D. CHRISTIAN LAMMERTS is Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He is interested in the cultural and intellectual histories of Buddhism and religious law in Burma and Southeast Asia, and is currently at work on a study of
    juridical curses, oaths, and ordeals around of the Bay of Bengal from the late first
    millennium CE up to the early colonial era.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lammerts
    Assistant Professor, Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies, Rutgers University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, March 4th Return to Innocence – The Taiwanese Amis and the Work to Return, Recover and Reclaim their Heritage

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 4, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College
    Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue (at St. George, south of Bloor)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Film and Panel

    Description

    Director Hu Tai-Li’s film “Returning Souls” tells the story of the Taiwanese indigenous people, the Amis, recovering their land, restoring customs and reclaiming their ancient artifacts.

    Following the film, Professor Scott Simon of the University of Ottawa’s School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies, based on two decades of ethnographic work in Taiwan, will discuss issues of indigenous rights and cultural change among the Amis and other indigenous peoples in order to understand Hu Tai-li’s film in the wider socio-political context.

    Professor Cara Krmpotich of University of Toronto’s iSchool Museum Studies program will draw on her ethnographic research with Canadian indigenous experiences of repatriation to discuss central themes of Director Hu Tai-Li’s film of indigenous Taiwanese efforts to repatriate material and ancestral remains, with a focus on the social, cultural, spiritual, museological and political issues evoked.

    Bart Testa, of University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute, will moderate.

    PLEASE REGISTER AND ARRIVE 20 MINUTES BEFORE SCREENING TO ENSURE A SEAT

    Program:

    5:30 Doors open
    6:00 Welcome
    Remarks by Director-General Y.M. Catherine Hsu, Taipei Economic and Culture Office in Toronto
    6:05 Film screening of Returning Souls directed by Hu Tai-Li
    7:35 Presentations by Professor Scott Simon and Professor Cara Krmpotich
    8:05 Panel discussion and Q&A Moderated by Professor Bart Testa
    8:45 Post-screening Party

    Bios:

    Cara Krmpotich is Associate Professor, Museum Studies, at the iSchool. She researches and teaches in the areas of indigenous & museum relations; cultural property; critical collections management; and material culture and kinship. She leads a program that encourages hands-on artefact handling as a vehicle for collective memory work with urban Aboriginal seniors and has a long-term research partnership with the Haida Repatriation Committee.

    Scott Simon is Professor and Co-Chair in Taiwan Studies. He specializes in the anthropology of indigeneity in Taiwan, including issues of political autonomy, legal pluralism, and hunting rights. He continues to conduct ethnographic research in Hualien and Nantou, more recently by collaborating with hunters to study human-animal relations. His most recent book was published by Presses de l’Université Laval.

    Bart Testa is Associate Professor (teaching) at the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto. His teaching includes courses on Chinese Cinemas, European, Asian and European auteurs, narrative theory and cinema, urbanism and film, experimental cinema, Science Fiction movies and other popular genres.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Scott Simon
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Ottawa

    Bart Testa
    Moderator
    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cara Krmpotich
    Speaker
    Faculty of Information (i-School), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    imagineNATIVE

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU)

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Sunday, March 5th Birth of a Notion: The Vimy Idea, 1917-2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, March 5, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, Trinity College
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Vimy is more than a battle from the First World War. It is common to hear that Vimy marks the “birth of a nation,” a claim repeated in school textbooks, by politicians, and in the news. Yet what is meant by this phrase? Do Canadians actually believe that Canada was born at Vimy, 50 years after Confederation? How did the four-day battle of Vimy in April 1917 transform into an origin story? This was no militarist plot. While not all Canadians believed in Vimy’s importance, enough did, and the idea of Vimy was invigorated with the building of Walter Allward’s monument on the ridge. The monument’s unveiling in 1936 by King Edward VIII was attended by more than 6,000 Canadian veterans who crossed the Atlantic. Since then, Vimy has been incorporated into Canadian history, although its meaning has changed with each generation. In this year, the 100th anniversary of the battle, Dr. Tim Cook will explore the emergence of the Vimy idea, its changing meaning, and its endurance as a symbol of Canadian service and sacrifice.

    Dr. Tim Cook is a historian at the Canadian War Museum. He was the curator for the museum’s First World War permanent gallery, and he has curated numerous temporary, travelling and digital exhibitions. He has also authored tens books, most of which have been longlisted, shortlisted or awarded prizes, including the C.P. Stacey Prize for Military History (twice), the Ottawa Book Award (twice), the RBC Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, the BC National Book Award, the J.W. Dafoe Book Prize, the Canadian Authors Association Literary Award and the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. His newest book is Vimy: Battle and Legend (2017).
    In 2012, Dr. Cook was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contributions to Canadian history and in 2013 he received the Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media: The Pierre Berton Award. Dr. Cook is a Member of the Order of Canada.


    Speakers

    Dr. Tim Cook, C.M.
    Historian at the Canadian War Museum



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Cities, Immigrant Diversity and Complex Problem Solving

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Cities play host to residents hailing from a wide range of countries. Theory suggests such immigrant diversity can influence worker productivity, both positively and negatively. Benefits flow from the idea that people born in different countries complement each other in problem solving and innovation, by enabling the combination of different skills, ideas and perspectives. But heterogeneity can also inhibit productivity by raising the costs of co-operation and spurring rent-seeking behavior. This project makes several contributions to a growing body of empirical work exploring these claims. First, it leverages a rich matched employer-employee dataset for the U.S. that enables us to better account for bias from non-random worker selection, while distinguishing between impacts flowing from diversity manifested at city- and workplace-scales. Second, we ‘stress-test’ motivating theory, examining the extent to which any benefits from diversity are concentrated among workers engaged in complex problem solving and innovation. Results suggest that the benefits of immigrant diversity outweigh the costs. Consistent with theory, the association is concentrated among workers engaged in industries where complex problem solving is particularly important. In light of continued controversy about the economic implications of immigration, this project suggests an additional channel by which immigration improves overall economic well-being.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Thomas Kemeny
    Department of Geography and Environment University of Southampton



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Possible But Not Inevitable: Emergence of Violent Contentious Repertoire in Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The events of winter 2013-2014 in Ukraine were special in many respects. Not only Euromaidan took many by surprise – neither the government nor the experts saw it coming. These also were the largest protests by far in the Independent Ukraine, bringing together a broad coalition of collective actors and spreading to all Ukrainian regions. But the eventual victory of the Revolution of Dignity came at a price. In two months of protest the camp in capital Kyiv abandoned its non-violent philosophy for Molotov cocktails. In few more weeks it ended with special police forces opening fire on protesters leaving more than a hundred dead. Unprecedented violence led to high level defections and dissolution of Viktor Yanukovych’s regime. Why did Ukrainian contentious repertoire, proudly non-violent starting from 1960-ies dissidents adopted the violent tactics? The presentation explores the gradual emergence of radical repertoire among Ukrainian protesters and the dynamics of violence taking up the central stage in Kyiv in January 2014. I use available data to illustrate these processes in the invert order – starting with the ‘Moment of Madness’ on Maidan on February 20th 2014 and going back in time, tracing some conditions which made it possible, but not inevitable.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Olga Zelinska
    Speaker
    PhD student in Sociology at the Graduate School for Social Research, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences; Petro Jacyk Visiting Graduate Student

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 7th Prosecuting Sexual Violence in Conflict: Lessons from International Criminal Tribunals

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Over the past two decades, international criminal tribunals have adopted groundbreaking judgments convicting individuals for rape, sexual slavery and forced marriage committed during armed conflict and genocide in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and elsewhere. At the same time, these tribunals have had some very public setbacks, with sexual violence cases dismissed, charges acquitted, and investigations failed. What lessons can be learned from these experiences that can inform future cases at the International Criminal Court and other tribunals?

    This session will feature a keynote address by Michelle Jarvis, Deputy to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), on her new book, “Prosecuting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence at the ICTY”. Responses will be provided by Linda Bianchi (formerly of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, now Department of Justice) and Valerie Oosterveld (Western Law) on whether the ICTY’s lessons can be applied on a global scale.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Western University

    Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada Partnership Grant


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 8th HIV Prevention, American Homonationalism in LGBT Rights Talk, and the Making-Up of the Medicalized MSM Malagasy Subject

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    CPHS Administrator
    416-946-0104


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 8th Understanding International Mining

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    How does the mining industry impact global issues of development, human rights, and the environment, and what role can the industry, government, academia, and civil society play in addressing these impacts?
    The second annual student-led conference on Understanding International Mining will bring together leading actors to discuss how we understand this important issue. The conference will consist of two panels which will each focus on a different aspect of the overarching theme: the global mining industry.

    Panel 1: Human Rights & Development (10:00 – 11:30AM)

    Bonne Lyn de Bartok – CEO and Founder of MacCormick IMC
    Shin Imai – Faculty of Law Professor at Osgoode Hall
    Jeffrey Davidson – Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor
    James Yap – Business and Human Rights Lawyer
    Louis Guay – Social Responsibility Consultant
    Moderator: Paul Cadario – Distinguished Fellow at Munk School of Global Affairs

    LUNCH (60 MINS)

    Panel 2: Economic & Environmental Sustainability (12:30 – 2:00PM)

    Nolan Watson – President and CEO of Sandstorm Gold
    Chris Adachi – Manager, Sustainability Implementation & Carbon Strategy at Teck Resources Limited
    Tamara Brown – Engineer and VP Corporate Relations at Primero
    Alec Crawford – Senior Researcher at International Institute for Sustainable Development
    Jane Church – Co-Founder and Director of Collaboration for NetPositive
    Moderator: Joaquin Bardallo Bandera – PhD in Political Science at University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 9th Bulgarian Politics in the Post-Accession Era: The First Decade.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 9, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Distinguished Leaders in Bulgaria Lecture Series

    Description

    Venelin I. Ganev (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2000) is a Professor in Political Science and a faculty associate of the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies at Miami University of Ohio. His main fields of interest are postcommunist politics, democratization studies, constitutionalism, and modern social theory. His publications have appeared in East European Constitutional Review, American Journal of Comparative Law, Journal of Democracy, East European Politics and Societies, Communist and Postcommunist Studies, Slavic Review, Europe-Asia Studies and Comparative Studies in Society and History. He has also contributed chapters to several volumes that explore various aspects of institution-building in contemporary Europe. His first book, Preying on the State: The Transformation of Postcommunist Bulgaria was published in 2007 by Cornell University Press.

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Venelin Ganev
    Miami University, Oxford, Ohio


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Mr. and Mrs Daniel and Elizabeth Damov


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th INDePth Conference 2017: Worlding South Asia Beyond Borders

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 201710:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Interrogating Notions of Development and Progress (INDePth) is an annual undergraduate conference hosted by the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Founded by Contemporary Asian Studies major students, the series has held conferences on Indonesia, China, Korea and Japan. Our aim is to foster dialogue on Asia through interdisciplinary analysis. INDePth utilizes research methodologies offered by courses from the Asian Institute to unpack the prism of ‘Asia’ through notions of ‘development’ and ‘progress’.

    The theme for this year’s conference is South Asian Worlds. Dominant discourse within mainstream agencies such as the World Bank and IMF, domestic national programs and academic discourse imagine South Asia as an active site of intervention. Discourse that is embedded into the imagining and practice of institutions characterize ‘developing’ space as ‘backward’, ‘lacking’ or otherwise a systematic ‘standard’. Participants will engage with how such South Asian Worlds are simultaneously constructed through the human imagination and physically materialized through uneven processes of development practice. We aim to emphasize South Asia as a conceptual site of research that extends beyond national borders and traditional ‘area studies’.

    By doing so, we look at the ways in which the concept of Worlding challenges notions of ‘third world’ development discourse and helps to understand the region.

    Join us on March 10th for the 2017 Conference to debate and take part in workshops with fellow delegates, the executive members of the INDePth team, and academic speakers from leading universities in Canada and the United States.

    Keynote Address:

    Professor Chandrima Chakraborty, Department of English & Cultural Studies, McMaster University

    Moderators:

    Professor Rachel Silvey, Interim Director of the Asian Institute, Geography & Planning, University of Toronto
    Dr. Antonela Arhin, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto
    Professor Francis Cody, Department of Anthropology

    Schedule:

    10:30 AM – 11:00 AM Registration and Informal Lunch

    11:00 AM – 11:15 AM Conference Introduction

    11:15 AM – 12:00 AM Keynote Speech

    12:00 AM – 1:00 PM Panel 1: Remapping Boundaries

    1:00 PM – 1:45 PM Breakout Workshops

    1:45 PM – 2:10 PM Coffee Break

    2:10 PM – 2:30 PM Dance Performance

    2:30 PM – 4:00 PM Panel 2: Worlding Beyond Borders

    4:00 PM – 4:15 PM Conclusion

    4:15 PM – 6:00 PM Reception

    Contact

    Jae Park

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Woodsworth College Student Association

    Hart House Good Ideas Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th Green Japan: Combining Technological Innovation, Economic Growth and Environmental Sustainability

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    National governments the world over face the formidable challenge of figuring out how to sustain or enhance economic prosperity while contributing to the global effort to ensure environmental sustainability. The Government of Japan, together with the business community and civil society, have been wrestling with this issue for several decades. Japan has promoted the development and implementation of new products and services, urged commercial exports of environmental technologies and implemented stringent environmental protection measures. While far from the only nation seeking to produce “Green Growth,” the Government of Japan has encouraged a wide range of technological innovations, from electric and fuel cell vehicles and smart grid implementations to futuristic technologies designed to convert energy from outer space into electricity on earth. The Green Growth strategy remains largely untested, in part because of the inherent contradictions of seeking to expand economic activity while conserving energy, reducing pollution, and constraining the environmental impact of human beings. This presentation examines Japan’s commercial developments service innovations and explores the lessons to be learned from the Japanese approach to the promotion of Green Growth.

    Speaker Bio:

    Dr. Carin Holroyd is President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan. She has published extensively on aspects of Japan’s international trade, commercial relations with Canada, and national innovation policies in Japan. Her books include Government, International Trade and Laissez Faire Capitalism: Canada, Australia and New Zealand’s Relations with Japan (McGill-Queen’s) and co-authored with Ken Coates, Japan and the Internet Revolution (Palgrave-Macmillan), Innovation Nation: Japanese Science and Technology in the 21st Century (Palgrave¬ Macmillan), Digital Media in East Asia: National Innovation and the Transformation of a Region. (Cambria Press) and The Global Digital Economy (Cambria). Her most recent book, Green Japan, Environmental Technologies and Economic Growth, will be released by the University of Toronto Press in 2017.

    * * *
    Save the Dates: October 12-15, 2017
    For an important conference on GREEN JAPAN organized by the Japan Studies Association of Canada (JSAC) and hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Carin Holroyd
    Speaker
    President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan

    Kimberley Strong
    Chair
    Director, School of the Environment and Professor of Physics, University of Toronto

    Louis Pauly
    Discussant
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    School of the Environment


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 10th Irregular Settlements (Kampung) in the Context Of Capitalist Modernization, Urban Governance, and the Politics of the City: Discursive Notes from Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The talk will cover the subject of kampung, its recent fate and fortune, and whether its change is desirable? And how might the current change of kampung be understood in the context of capitalist modernization, urban governance, and politics of the city. The materials for the talk will be drawn from an on-going collaborative research with a university and notes taken from recent visits to Jakarta.

    Abidin Kusno is a professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. His recent publications include The Appearances of Memory: Mnemonic Practices of Architecture and Urban Form in  Indonesia (2010); After the New Order: Space, Politics, and Jakarta (2013); Visual Cultures of the Ethnic Chinese in Indonesia (2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 14th How Guestworker Programs are Made: The U.S.-Ontario Tobacco Worker Movement, 1920s-1960s

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 14, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the late 1920s to the 1960s, almost 2,000 migrants from the Southern United States travelled annually to Ontario to work on tobacco farms. In its early years, this migration system was primarily organized by elite brokers and by previous migrants operating within kinship networks. Over time, and especially during the Great Depression and World War II, governments on both sides of the border struggled to gain control over the movement, an effort that was challenged by employers and migrants alike. This talk explores the character and evolution of this migration system, using it as a case study to gain a better understanding of how guestworker programs are made and change over time. Race, state policy, and political economy in both sending and receiving regions all played key roles in this history. This little-known labour movement complicates our understanding of U.S. migration, demonstrating that the U.S. was at once a migrant-receiving and migrant-sending country. Its also provides an example of some of the complex linkages between the U.S. and Canada in the realms of migration and political economy.

    Ed Dunsworth is a third-year PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is a transnational history of tobacco farm labour in Ontario, 1925-1985.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ed Dunsworth
    PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Return to China or Taiwan?: The Korean War Hijacked by Prisoners

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    The Korean War was in fact two wars: the first was fought over territory from June 1950 to June 1951; the second was over prisoners, especially the Chinese prisoners wishing to “return to Taiwan,” from late 1951 to July 1953. While the first war restored territorial status quo ante, the second war’s only visible outcome was the “defection” of 14,220 Chinese prisoners to Taiwan and 7,574 North Korean prisoners to South Korea—at the cost of doubling the length of the war and numerous casualties on all sides. Contrary to the Communist allegation of an American conspiracy, this outcome was unplanned. Two separately conceived U.S. policies—prisoner reindoctrination and voluntary repatriation—became intertwined and resulted in the rise of anti-Communist prisoners, who soon hijacked the war agenda. The U.S. government became hostage to its own moralistic but ultimately hypocritical policy and to prisoners—a reality so embarrassing that it has remained largely unknown to the American people. Using archival documents and oral histories, this talk will examine the interplay between policies and prisoners’ actions. It will also chart the extraordinary experiences of several prisoner leaders.

    Speaker Bio:

    David Cheng Chang (常成) is an Assistant Professor of History at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in modern Chinese history from the University of California, San Diego in 2011. He studies the Korean War, the Cold War, U.S.-China relations, and the history of war photography.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    David Cheng Chang (常成)
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Asian Institite and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Hong Kong Stories -- A Historical Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Leo K. Shin
    Associate Professor of History and Asian Studies, Convenor of the Hong Kong Studies Initiative at the University of British Columbia
    Author of The Making of the Chinese State: Ethnicity and Expansion on the Ming Borderlands (Cambridge, 2006)
    Presentation Topic: The Story of the Story of Pre-colonial Hong Kong

    Clement Tong
    Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies at the Carey Theological College, Vancouver
    Lecturer of Hebrew and Koine Greek at the Vancouver School of Theology
    Presentation Topic: The Riots and The Festival – The Emergence of Hong Kong Identity in 1967

    Light Refreshment will be provided.

    Please register by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca.

    Speakers

    Leo K. Shin
    Associate Professor, University of British Columbia

    Clement Tong
    Assistant Professor, Carey Theological College


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 15th Resettlement of North Korean Migrants in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Cat's Eye Student Pub & Lounge
    150 Charles Street W
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Synergy Lecture: South Korea has long promoted a sense of ethnic and cultural homogeneity, but the macro economic and political changes and a substantial increase in the numbers of immigrants, both non-ethnic Koreans and ethnic Koreans from abroad, has irreversibly altered the cultural and demographic makeup of the country. These structural changes have precipitated a new discourse on Korean national belonging and “Koreaness.” But how, exactly, has the increase in immigrants – co-ethnics and non-ethnically Korean peoples alike – changed what it means to be Korean? What can the re-socialization experiences of new comers tell us about changes and variations in contemporary South Korean ethnic and national identity?

    Given their unique status as Korean nationals who bear the right to citizenship in the Republic of Korea, there is much to learn from the resettlement experiences of South Korea’s 30,000+ North Korean migrants. Do the national identities of Korean migrants change upon resettlement? How much do their prior experiences matter, if they matter at all? Do migrants learn from their new environment in South Korea, or do they resist change? What can the resettlement of North Korean migrants elsewhere tell us? This conference seeks to provide answers – some concrete, others preliminary – to these questions.

    Speakers:

    Austin BuHeung Hyeon is a senior at Columbia University. He is originally from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, more commonly known as North Korea. Humbled and honored to be the first student of North Korean descent to attend Columbia, Austin carries a sense of responsibility in making known the resilient narrative of his fellow North Koreans. After graduating, Austin looks forward to playing a role in shaping policies related to NK affairs.

    Christopher Green is the former Manager of Intl’ Affairs for Daily NK and a PhD candidate at Leiden University. His research interests span the socio-political economy, ideology and mediascape of the two Koreas. He has written for The Guardian and Al Jazeera, and interviewed by the BBC, Reuters, and CNN.

    Steven Denny is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on the variations in South Korean political attitudes and social identities with a focus on intergenerational changes and the rise of a ‘new’ nationalism among young South Koreans. He is also a columnist for The Diplomat.

    Jack Kim is the founder of HanVoice, Canada’s largest organisation advocating for improved human rights in North Korea. He holds a MSc in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a LLB from Osgoode Hall Law School.

    Associate Professor Yoonkyung Lee is a political sociologist studying labor politics, social movements, and political representation at the University of Toronto. Her research probes how socially marginalized actors such as labor mobilize to gain a social and political voice and how they interact with civil society and political institutions.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christopher Green
    Former Manager of Intl’ Affairs for Daily NK; PhD candidate, Leiden University

    Steven Denny
    PhD candidate, University of Toronto

    Jack Kim
    Founder, HanVoice

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Austin BuHeung Hyeon
    Undergraduate Student, Columbia University


    Sponsors

    Synergy: The Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 16th Thinking about China's Past and Future in the Globally Unsettling Present

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM170 St. George Street, Room JHB100, 1st floor, Jackman Humanities Building
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    What does Xi Jinping’s China mean for the West? How will Trump’s attitude towards Taiwan affect cross-strait relations? What are the implications of China’s recent shift from majority rural to majority urban population?

    Such questions may form a starting point for this roundtable conversation, in which speakers will discuss China’s past and future in light of current global events.

    Event Poster

    Event poster (repeats information listed in description above, and presents 2 images from China. In first image, a group of people stand in a square in Beijing, holding up their cell phones as cameras. In the second, a Chinese street artist paints pictures of Donald Trump.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    Speaker
    Editor, Journal of Asian Studies, Chancellor's Professor of History, University of California, Irvine

    Tong Lam
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Maura Elizapeth Cunningham
    Speaker
    Historian and Writer

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Critical China Studies Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 16th Music of Survival: The Story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, John P. Robarts Research Library, 130 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is one of courage and true grit – a vivid chronicle that celebrates the human spirit. This is the triumphant story of the original 17 members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus who survived World War II as a musical ensemble. The film brings out the deepest roots of a fragile tradition, celebrating the resiliency of a music culture that has survived centuries. Set against the backdrop of the war itself, the story reveals the ways that music and musicians are used and abused by political regimes.

    It provides an educational, informative and compelling perspective – the personal stories of the last two survivors inter cut with the collective history of the bandura throughout the ages. Interwoven with contemporary musical performances, the film illustrates the bandurist as bard, as seer, as spiritual emissary for the soul of the Ukrainian people, then and now, in Ukraine and beyond.

    Orest Sushko is a member of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, following in the footsteps of his father Makar Sushko, the first Canadian member of the Chorus in 1949 – and grandfather Paul Stepowy, a bandura craftsman and honorary patron of the Chorus. As an Emmy award-winning Re-recording mixer in both film and television, Orest has worked with a broad range of directors from David Cronenberg to Barry Sonnenfeld to Guillermo del Toro – television series including Orphan Black and documentaries from David Suzuki, to The North Face, The Patagonia and Alan Doyle of Great Big Sea.

    See http://musicofsurvival.com/ for more information about the film (includes the trailer)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Orest Sushko
    producer/director



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th The New Nature of Democracy - Munk School Graduate Student Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 201710:00AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    FREE Students with Student Card
    $10 General Admission CASH payable at the door

    The 2017 Munk Graduate Student Conference
    The New Nature of Democracy, is focused on the ever-changing landscape of global democracy and the rise of populist movements. The conference brings together a wide variety of perspectives from academia to practitioners, to explore the challenges that are facing the liberal institutions we so often associate with democracy.
    Lunch will be provided for those in attendance and the day will end with a keynote address followed by a reception and networking event.
    Populism at the Ballot Box will focus on how elections function in the 21st century. What strategies have made recent populist style campaigns successful? What implications might this have in Canada, and around the globe? This panel will consist of members of the media, democratic strategists, and public opinion researchers who can provide practical insights into how and why populism translates into success at the polls.
    Government for the People? will be a round table discussion focusing on the development of populism outside of North America and Western Europe. Is the rise of populism a new phenomenon around the globe, or are these Western movements merely reflections of trends that already exist elsewhere?
    The Democratic-Generational Divide will be a panel discussion consisting of graduate students from the Munk School and associated faculties which try to identify where to situate youth within the context of this rise in populism. From identity politics to economic opportunity, there is clearly an ideological divide between the generations. This panel will explore what elements of this divide are unique, what areas are intransigent, and where there may be opportunities to bridge the gap.

    Schedule
    10:00 – 11:30 am: Government For the People?
    12:00 – 1:30 pm: The Democratic-Generational Divide
    1:30 – 2:30 pm: Networking Lunch
    2:30 – 4:00 pm: Populism at the Ballot Box

    Keynote 4:30 – 6:00 pm
    Symone D. Sanders is a democratic strategist and CNN Political Commentator who rose to prominence during her tenure as the National Press Secretary for U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders presidential campaign. At 25, Symone served as the youngest presidential press secretary on record. Ms. Sanders will be discussing her experiences on the 2016 Presidential campaign, engaging with youth on political issues, and offer some insight into the changing nature of the American electorate.
    Symone is the immediate past chair of the Coalition for Juvenile Justice’s Emerging Leaders Committee and former member of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice. Through her involvement with CJJ and the FACJJ, Symone worked to raise the profile of young voices in the fight for juvenile justice reform and bring millennial perspectives to policy conversations.
    In 2013, Symone Sanders was honored as the youngest recipient to ever receive the Midlands Business Journal’s 40 Under 40 Award. Most recently, she was honored by Fusion as one of 30 women under 30 who will influence the 2016 elections, named one of 16 young Americans shaping the 2016 election by Rolling Stone and one of the most influential African-Americans of 2016 by The Root

    Reception 6:00-7:30pm
    Following the keynote address, there will be a networking meeting session with food and drinks provided. The reception will offer an opportunity for students, staff, and faculty to interact with speakers from the day’s events. Confirmation of attendance is required to attend the reception.

    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Master of Global Affairs Program

    Abacus Data

    Master of Global Affairs Student Association


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th Geopolitical Risks: China, Russia and the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bio: Thomas Gomart founded and was director of the Russia/NIS Centre of Ifri (Institut francais des relations internationals) from 2004 to 2013. He was Vice-President for Strategic Development of Ifri from September 2010 to March 2015, and was appointed Director of Ifri in April 2015. His academic and professional background has been closely related to post-Soviet space, as Lavoisier Fellow at the Moscow State Institute for International Relations (2001), Visiting Fellow at the EU Institute for Security Studies (2003) and Marie Curie Fellow at Department of War Studies at King’s College (2003-2004). He holds a PHD in History (Paris I – Panthéon La Sorbonne) and an EMBA from HEC Paris.

    Description: The year 2014 was defined by the conflict in Ukraine, the emergence of Daesh, and tensions between China and Japan. The next year witnessed the spread of Daesh, the conflict in Yemen, the Greek crisis, revelations about the activity of the National Security Agency (NSA), the migrant crisis, and a ramping-up of terrorist attacks. This proliferation of crises has contributed to a “return” of geopolitics, or, in other words, to power rivalries that may sound the death-knell for the kind of globalization that ignores territorial boundaries.
    The presentation focuses on China, Russia and the United States, which together form a strategic triangle of systemic importance for the global world order.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 17th The Age of Three Emperors: The Direction of US Foreign Policy and the Future of US-Japan Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    First Floor Conference Room
    170 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Abstract:

    America’s 45th president, Donald J. Trump, was inaugurated in January of this year. His unexpected victory was a surprise to many and it became the second major global shock in 2016 after Brexit. As an individual who has never held public office, he came to power by adroitly harnessing the anger of the American voter. Despite comparisons to past US presidents such as Jackson, TR, Nixon, and Reagan, in many ways he is a new type of leader that America has not witnessed since the beginning of the Republic. Although it will require many more months to be able to fully assess the new president’s policies, one can assume that his policies will be quite different than those of his predecessor.

    In a world which an undercurrent toward a power transition can be witnessed, in which direction will President Trump lead the US? Moreover, as a leader devoid of any strong ideology besides “Making America Great Again,” his policies will surely be much vaguer and harder to pin down. However, he has surrounded himself with advisors and senior administration officials who do not necessarily toe the same foreign policy position toward such countries as China and Russia. Considering that he also does not have full support of a few senior GOP leaders on matters of foreign policy, how will this multilevel tug-o-war play out? And amid an era of ever increasing uncertainties, what can we expect the future course of US foreign policy be, particularly toward Asia? Will the previous Asia Pivot policy become an Asia Pullback policy similar to Nixon’s Guam doctrine of the 1970s? Furthermore, how should Japan and other nations deal with an increasingly inward America that will be much less predictable and perhaps even more reckless? Through this presentation, I would like to present a possible geopolitical scenario of the future that incorporates the major powers of US, Japan, China, Russia, and the EU.

    Speaker:

    Tosh Minohara is Professor of Diplomacy at the Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University where he holds a joint appointment with the Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies. He received his B.A. in International Relations from University of California, Davis, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science and Diplomatic History from Kobe University. In the past, he has had various visiting appointments with such universities as Harvard University, University of California at Irvine, University of Iowa (Noguchi Distinguished Fellow), University of Oxford, Leiden University, Stockholm University, Kuwait University, Seoul National University, and most recently, Inha University, ROK. His main research themes are, from a historical perspective, the diplomatic, political, and security dimension of US-Japan relations. He is currently interested in applied history. He has published widely and his first monograph, The Japanese Exclusion Act and US-Japan Relations [in Japanese], was awarded the Shimizu Hiroshi Prize in 2002. He is also the editor of Tumultuous Decade: Empire, Society, and Diplomacy in 1930s Japan (University of Toronto Press, 2016) and Decade of the Great War: Japan and the Wider World during the 1910s (Brill, 2014). He is also the English translation editor of the forthcoming,The History of US-Japan Relations: From Perry to Present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). He has several op-ed columns and comments frequently for major new outlets throughout the world. In addition to NHK in Japan, he regularly appears as a navigator in several National Geographic programs.

    Discussants:

    Aleksandra Babovic is currently a PhD student at Kobe University Graduate School of Law with a specialization in Diplomatic History. She earned her MA degree from Paris School of International Affairs. She is a Lecturer at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies and Osaka University. Her research interests include Japanese post-war history, international criminal law and justice, and more specifically the Tokyo Tribunal.

    Ms Babovic will speak on International Relations under Trump Administration, from perspective of Europe.

    David A. Welch is CIGI Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, and Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, where he has recently been working on Asia-Pacific Security.

    Professor Welch will speak on International Relations under Trump Administration, from perspective of Canada.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Tosh Minohara
    Speaker
    Professor of U.S.-Japan Relations, International History and Security Studies, Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University

    David Welch
    Discussant
    Munk School Fellow; CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo

    Aleksandra Babovic
    Discussant
    Lecturer, Department of Global Affairs, Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Japan

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Pluralism and Islam: Muslim Citizenship in Western Liberal Democracies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20179:00AM - 1:00PMMassey College
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
    Toronto ON M5S 2E1
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Presented by Massey College, Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation & Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Islam is one of the fastest growing religions in Canada with its adherents projected to triple in numbers within 20 years. Those on the far-right have argued that Islam is not compatible with Western civilizations and perpetuate the rhetoric that Daesh /ISIS represents all Muslims. Despite Canada priding itself on values of pluralism, diversity and inclusion, on January 29th 2017, six Muslim worshippers were killed at the Centre Culturel Islamique de Québec in Quebec City. A recent Motion, (Motion 103) proposed by MP Iqra Khalid requesting that the Commons committee study the issue of Islamophobia have resulted in thousands of hate mails and death threats against her for supposedly “threatening freedom of speech”. Are Muslim identities in conflict with Canada’s values of pluralism, free speech and democracy? This program will explore the future of peace and pluralism in Canada amidst growing Islamophobia and global conflict. The first panel will showcase diverse Muslim voices (e.g. Sunni, Shi’a (both Twelver and Ismaili), Ahmadi) to counter the idea that Muslims are one monolithic block and to challenge sectarian ideologies that have affected other countries. The second panel will feature female Muslim scholars and authors whose work have shattered common misconceptions about women’s roles in Islam and are challenging policies in Canada (e.g niqab ban) that fetishize the surveillance of women’s bodies.

    Light lunch served at 1:00pm

    Speakers

    Dr. Shafique Virani
    Keynote
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Aisha Ahmad
    Panelist
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Melissa Finn
    Panelist
    Distinguished Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto

    Saima Hussain
    Panelist

    Dr. Liyakat Takim
    Panelist

    Dr. Aman Haji
    Panelist

    Ustadh Amjad Tarsin
    Panelist

    Imam Farhan Iqbal
    Panelist


    Sponsors

    Massey College

    Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Chino: Anti-Chinese Racism in Mexico 1880-1994

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Chino is a history of comparative race relations that considers the function of anti-Chinese politics in shaping Mexican mestizo national identity during and after the 1910 revolution. Evidence from U.S. and Mexican archives shows how anti-Chinese politics created a nationalistic public sphere. Building on the hemispheric turn in Asian American Studies, this talk argues that Mexican anti-Chinese politics differed from U.S. racial politics because Mexican Orientalism was expressed, as mob violence, social campaigns, and government policy to aid the post-revolutionary enlistment of an indigenous citizenry. These developments became the basis of new social bonds across the country and enabled a diverse Mexican polity to claim and occupy a state-endorsed mixed-race, mestizo identity (inclusive of indigeneity). Chino critiques a monolithic notion of racism by marking out a comparative methodology for transnational racial analysis in the Americas.

    Jason Oliver Chang is Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies and History at the University of Connecticut. He also serves as Associate Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Association. He earned his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Comparative Ethnic Studies.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason Oliver Chang
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Latin American Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th EU Trade Policy in a More Protectionist World

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20172:00PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström will set out the trade agenda of the EU, the world’s biggest trader, in the wake of an uncertain future for trade deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the proposed EU-US agreement known as TTIP. Pursuing an ambitious programme of trade deals, the EU will seek to work with major partners such as Canada to “shape globalisation”, with trade policy that is effective, transparent and based on values. The Commissioner will also highlight the benefits of the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) due to take effect soon, which she cites as the most progressive and ambitious ever concluded.

    As EU Commissioner for Trade since 1 November 2014, Dr. Malmström is responsible for EU trade policy. She is representing the EU in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and other international trade for a. She is negotiating bilateral trade agreements with key countries around the globe.

    As EU Commissioner for Home Affairs 2010-2014, she was responsible for the European Commission’s work within the fields of asylum and migration, police cooperation, border control and the fight against organised crime and human trafficking. Formerly a Member of the European Parliament and Minister for European Affairs of Sweden. As Minister for European Affairs, Malmström was responsible for issues such as the Lisbon Treaty, the EU strategy for growth and employment and the review of the EU budget and for the preparation and co-ordination of the Swedish EU Presidency.

    Cecilia Malmström has a Ph.D. in political science and was a researcher at Göteborg University in Sweden for several years, teaching in European politics.

    On Twitter: @MalmstromEU. Website: ec.europa.eu/malmstrom

    Contact

    J. Hawker


    Speakers

    Cecilia Malmström
    EU Trade Commissioner



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th HUMANITARIAN AUTHORITARIANISM: WHY “CAPACITY BUILDING” CAN BACKFIRE

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    HUMANITARIAN AUTHORITARIANISM: WHY “CAPACITY BUILDING” CAN BACKFIRE

    Professor Elizabeth Dunn, Anthropology, Indiana University

    Over the last decade, many humanitarian agencies have moved away from the direct provision of services to needy population, and towards what they call “capacity building” for host governments. “Capacity building” involves not only installing bureaucratic routines and dictating policy changes, but also routing millions or even billions of dollars through host governments so that they, not the humanitarian
    agencies, can provide services. But where, exactly, does that money
    end up? In this paper, I look at what happened in the Republic of Georgia in 2008, when nearly a billion dollars was routed through the government of Mikheil Saakashvili, and trace the link between humanitarian funding and the rise of authoritarianism in the
    Saakashvili administration. I compare this to other cases, including
    the increasing authoritarianism of the Erdogan government in Turkey.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 20th Weapons of Mass Instruction: Prospects for Human Security In & Out of North Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 20, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMRoom J130, Jackman Law Building
    78 Queens Park
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    “Weapons of Mass Instruction” presents a soft power approach to North Korea security as an alternative to the dominant security focus on weapons of mass destruction and hard power solutions. Considering values and data of human security and intelligence, this talk aims to highlight the past, current, and future work of Canadian and international NGOs, governmental representatives, and passionate academics about information smuggling and cultural soft power as a means to effect peaceful change and resistance within North Korea.

    According to HanVoice, a Toronto-based human rights NGO for North Koreans, 74% of North Koreans have access to TV and 46% to DVD players. The growing numbers of communications-savvy North Koreans are playing an increasingly important role in changing perspectives of power through their consumerist practices and will to learn more. This is a narrative we do not hear enough in foreign security media.
    To approach the North Korean security case differently, this event will acknowledge and highlight growing research on marketization and information breaches in North Korea, as well as refugee and resettlement studies. We will also link USB keys to defense policies and technology as another way to widen traditional views on security strategies.

    his discussion panel will question whether a USB key can bring change in a totalitarian regime, followed by a Q&A session with our three tremendous guest speakers: Mr. Jang Jin-Sung, former North Korean official and founder of NewFocus International (via Skype); Mr. Christopher Kim, executive director of HanVoice; and Ms. Sharon Stratton, US Program Officer at the North Korean Strategy Centre. Our discussion will be moderated by Mr. Steven Denney, PhD candidate at the University of Toronto and managing editor of Sino-NK.
    Special interpretation by: Daniel Jung

    RSVP Here: info@atlantic-council.ca

    Tickets:
    Student members – free
    Students – $7 online, $10 at the door
    Adults – $12 online, $15 at the door
    Adult members – $10 online, $12 at the door

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jang Jin-Sung
    Speaker
    Former North Korean official and founder of NewFocus International

    Christopher Kim
    Speaker
    Executive directorr, HanVoice

    Sharon Stratton
    Speaker
    US Program Officer, North Korea Strategy Centre

    Steven Denney
    Moderator
    PhD candidate, University of Toronto; managing editor, Sino-NK


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute

    Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 21st Innovation Policy in International Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Professor Taylor, drawing on his acclaimed book The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology? will open the panel with a keynote address setting the international stage for innovation policy. He will be followed by Dr. Munro, responding to his arguments and positioning Canada within the global league of innovative nations. Concluding the panel will be Sagi Dagan, reflecting on these arguments from a practitioner’s perspective by sharing the experience of what is arguably the most successful innovation agency in the world since the 1970s. Professor Breznitz will moderate the panel, which will conclude with lessons for Canada as the federal government launches its new Innovation Agenda.

    Contact

    Jennifer Colvin
    416-9465670


    Speakers

    Mark Zachary Taylor
    Speaker
    Professor & Author of The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology?

    Dr. Daniel Munro
    Speaker
    Director of Public Policy at the Conference Board of Canada

    Sagi Dagan
    Speaker
    Head of Growth Financing in Israel’s Innovation Authority

    Dan Breznitz
    Moderator
    Professor, Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, March 21st The Crisis of “Society” and the Explosion of “The Social”: Social Construction Projects in South Korea and China

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This paper, which I wrote with Seung-Cheol Lee, gives attention to the coexistence between increasing concerns about the “crisis” of society and increasing “social construction” projects exercised in the name of “the social.” Under circumstances where neoliberal doctrines penetrate deep into a realm of subjectification, how can we understand the reality that “society” is central to state governance and, furthermore, reconstructed as an ethical field? With an eye to recent projects of social construction in South Korea and China, this study aims to answer the following inquiries. How can social construction projects be analyzed and contextualized in countries where the state did not go through the so-called stage of “social government” found in the Western welfare state? How does the state accomplish a double mission to disperse its functions to social realms and re-articulate managerial power when it intervenes in social construction projects? How do various participants in social construction projects in the two countries experience and react to the tensions between “society” as the assemblage of social rights, solidarities, and socialities, and “society” as the target of state governance and engineered projects?

    Mun Young Cho is an associate professor of the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Yonsei University, South Korea. Her research focuses on poverty, labor, development, and youth in China and South Korea. She is the author of the book The Specter of “The People”: Urban Poverty in Northeast China (Cornell University Press, 2013).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for the Study of Diaspora and Transnationalism, University of Toronto

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Mun Young Cho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, South Korea)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Diaspora and Transnationalism Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 22nd Conceptualizing and Measuring Social Inequalities in Distributions of Birth Outcomes in Canada and its Peer Nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 22nd Writing the Commune: The Lived and the Conceived

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this talk, Kristin Ross examines some of the methodological and theoretical problems she confronted while writing Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune in her attempt to construct the seventy-two-day insurrection as a laboratory of political invention.

    Kristin Ross is Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. Her first book, The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune (1988; reissued, Verso, 2008) examined cultural movement during the 1871 insurrection. Her cultural history of the French 1950s, Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture (1995), won the Laurence Wylie award for French cultural studies and a Critic’s Choice award; it has been published in France under the title Rouler plus vite, laver plus blanc (Flammarion, 2006). May ’68 and Its Afterlives (Chicago, 2002), a study of French memory of the political upheavals of the 1960s, was published in France as Mai 68 et ses vies antérieures (2005; re-issued, Agones, 2010). Her most recent book, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune (2015) appeared in France from La Fabrique as L’Imaginaire de la Commune.


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd The Double: Dubbing Western Films in the Soviet Union

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    This presentation discusses the incorporation of Western films into Soviet cities and visual culture during the 1950s and 60s. In this talk, I will compare Soviet dubbing with various translation theories debated in the 1950s; describe how the process altered Western films to create what I call sensory forgery – the amalgam of foreign materiality and Russian language; and explore the implications of the incongruity between speech and image for audience reception.

    I am a historian of Russia and the Soviet Union. The enduring concern of my research is how texts, images, objects, and people move across geopolitical and ideological borders. This interest has led me to focus on translation practices and cultural diplomacy in my first book, Western Culture in the Soviet Union, a history of the Soviet opening to the West during the 1950s and 1960s. I am beginning research for a second book, Weary Sun, a history of tango in Russia and the Soviet Union. I teach at the University of Chicago.


    Speakers

    Eleonor Gilburd
    Department of History, University of Chicago



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd From Belleville to Notre-Dame-des-Landes: Today's Communal Imaginary

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20173:00PM - 4:30PMSenior Common Room, Room 317
    Glendon College, York University
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this talk, Kristin Ross will examine some of the continuities and discontinuities between the Paris Commune of 1871 and the commune-in-the-making on the zad in Notre-Dame-des-Landes. The anti-airport struggle in western France, the longest ongoing battle in the country, has become more than a major environmental opposition to an imposed infrastructural project: it is in the process of becoming an autonomous zone in secession from the state.

    Kristin Ross is Professor of Comparative Literature at New York University. Her first book, The Emergence of Social Space: Rimbaud and the Paris Commune (1988; reissued, Verso, 2008) examined cultural movement during the 1871 insurrection. Her cultural history of the French 1950s, Fast Cars, Clean Bodies: Decolonization and the Reordering of French Culture (1995), won the Laurence Wylie award for French cultural studies and a Critic’s Choice award; it has been published in France under the title Rouler plus vite, laver plus blanc (Flammarion, 2006). May ’68 and Its Afterlives (Chicago, 2002), a study of French memory of the political upheavals of the 1960s, was published in France as Mai 68 et ses vies antérieures (2005; re-issued, Agones, 2010). Her most recent book, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune (2015) appeared in France from La Fabrique as L’Imaginaire de la Commune.


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd Reading Revolution: Then and Now

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Borrowing the name of the recent Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library exhibit, , I will consider the visual imagery of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) over a longer period than the “Ten Years of Chaos.” I will look back at some of the earlier, non-revolutionary sources, at the dissemination of those images during the Cultural Revolution, and show some of them in a more recent context. In particular, I will look at some of the most ubiquitous items of the time – for example, the red, bright and shiny Mao badges and the more restrained designs on coins and banknotes. These items were some of the smallest in everyday use, and the imagery on these items can be understood immediately – if you know the visual and political vocabulary.

    Helen Wang is Curator of East Asian Money at the British Museum. She is the author of The Chairman Mao Badges: Symbols and Slogans of the Cultural Revolution (based on the British Museum collection of Mao badges). She is also the translator of Cao Wenxuan’s Bronze and Sunflower, a children’s novel set in a rural area during the Cultural Revolution.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jenny Purtle
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art

    Helen Wang
    Speaker
    Curator, East Asian Money, British Museum


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 23rd The West in search of its identity in three simultaneous states of mind: Pre-modern, modern and post-modern

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20175:30PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Thanos Veremis is Professor Emeritus of Political history at the University of Athens, Department of European and International Studies and Founding Member of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP).

    He has been Research Associate, at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London 1978-79; Visiting Scholar, Center for European Studies, Harvard Univ. 1983; Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton Univ. 1987; Visiting Fellow, St. Antony’s College, Oxford 1993-94; Constantine Karamanlis Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford Massachusetts (2000-2003); and more recently President of the National Council of Education, 2004-2010 .


    Speakers

    Professor Thanos Veremis
    ELIAMEP Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, Athens, Greece


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - DAY 1

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20179:30AM - 3:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Conference Program (Day I):

    Panel 1: What Was the Revolution in Ukraine?
    9:45–11:45 a.m.

    “Ukrainians in 1917. Not so Rural and not so Russified”
    Stephen Velychenko. Research Fellow, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    “‘The Most Unconquerable Stronghold of Our Rightlessness will be Captured:’ Jews between Emancipation, Ukrainization, and Pogroms in 1917”
    Mihaly Kalman. Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies, Central European University

    “‘Kievlianin’: Cultural Life in Kyiv between the February and October Revolutions of 1917”
    Roman Tashlitskyy, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

    Panel 2: Building the Soviet Ukrainian State in the 1920s and 1930s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Reconciling the Irreconcilable? Left-Wing Ukrainian Nationalism and the Soviet Regime”
    Christopher Gilley, independent scholar, Durham, U.K., and author of The “Change of Signposts” in the Ukrainian Emigration: A Contribution to the History of Sovietophilism in the 1920s

    “Chronicling the Jewish Attitude Toward Ukrainian Statehood: Writing and Rewriting Bolshevik History in the 1920s”
    Myroslav Shkandrij, Professor, Department of German and Slavic Studies, University of Manitob

    THE CONFERENCE CONTINUES ON MARCH 25. PLEASE REGISTER FOR DAY 2 SEPARATELY IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON BOTH DAYS

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge: Winners Report Back

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In April 2016, nine teams pitched their ideas to a panel of judges to compete for funding in the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC, formerly Big Ideas Competition). In this presentation, the winning teams will present the results of their projects to show how they applied their academic studies to make a difference in addressing real-world issues in Asia and what they learned from the process.

    Winners of this year’s Insights through Asia Challenge, who will carry out their projects in summer 2017, will also be presented with their awards.

    Presenters Include:

    Evaporative Cooling Vests – Preventing Deadly Heat Stress
    Presentation by Adam Sheikh

    Thousands of migrant construction workers in the Gulf have died as a result of heat induced heart complications. Local governments have done little to address serious workplace safety problems giving construction companies little incentive to ensure the safety of cheap, easily replaceable, labour. Through use of low cost cooling vests we have found a means of changing this dynamic and ensure protecting workers’ is less costly then leaving them exposed.

    Upward
    Presentation by David Tobiasz and Melody Liang

    Upward is a small-scale educational development project founded by three University of Toronto graduate students that provides dynamic classroom experiences to migrant children in China.

    Cleanopy Air4Kids
    Presentation by Natalia Mykhaylova and Julie Huber

    Our overall goal is to reduce the health risk factors of air pollution for children by providing affordable devices for monitoring and purifying the air and an awareness campaign that together will result in reduced disease incidence and improved health. We have conducted a detailed survey of parents, clinicians and NGOs and used the findings to improve the design of our solution.

    Red Pocket

    Our goal was to disrupt stereotypes of Chinese people as silent and conservative by elevating lived experiences and voices of youth. Through our media production company, we have aimed to encourage discussion about racial stereotyping and to share real stories from real people.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Forget Chineseness: On the Geopolitics of Cultural Identification

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    Forget Chineseness provides a critical interpretation not only of discourses of Chinese identity—Chineseness—but also of how they have reflected differences between “Chinese” societies, such as in Hong Kong, Taiwan, PRC, Singapore and communities “overseas”. It asserts that identity has meaning not only in cultural, representational terms but is moreover a product of its embeddedness in specific entanglements of modernity, colonialism, nation-state formation, and globalization. By articulating these processes underlying institutional practices vis-à-vis public mindsets, it is thus possible to elucidate various epistemic moments that lay the basis for their socio-political transformation.
    From a broader perspective, this should have salient ramifications for prevailing discussions of identity politics. Not only has the concept of identity been predicated on flawed notions of ethnicity and culture in the social “sciences”, but it has been acutely exacerbated by polarizing assumptions that drive our understanding of identity “politics”.

    Speaker Bio:

    Allen Chun is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. His research interests include socio-cultural theory, (trans)national identity, and (post)colonial formations. Most of his work has dealt with Chinese-speaking societies, contemporary and late traditional. In addition to a monograph, Unstructuring Chinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of “Land” in the New Territories of Hong Kong (2000), he edited a special double issue of Cultural Studies (vol. 14, nos. 3–4), “(Post)Colonialism and Its Discontents”; a special issue of Social Analysis (vol. 46, no. 2), “Global Dissonances”; and co-edited a book, Refashioning Pop Music in Asia: Cosmopolitan Flows, Political Tempos and Aesthetic Industries (2004). His major articles have appeared in diverse journals, including Toung Pao, Late Imperial China, History and Anthropology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Historical Sociology, Current Anthropology, Theory Culture & Society, boundary 2, Communal/Plural, Cultural Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Critique of Anthropology, Anthropological Theory, and positions.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Allen Chun
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Indian Visual Culture and Contemporary Art, Department of Visual Studes

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, March 25th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - Day 2

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 25, 20179:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Conference Program (Day II):

    Panel 3: Soviet State-Building and Ukrainian Culture
    10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

    “What was Soviet and Ukrainian about Soviet Ukrainian Culture?”
    Mayhill C. Fowler, Assistant Professor of History, Stetson University

    “In Search of Own “Self”: Anticolonial Discourse of Soviet Ukrainian Cinema in the 1920s”
    Yana Prymachenko, Researcher, Institute of the History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences

    “Rehabilitating a Mythology: The Ukrainian SSR’s Foundational Myth after Stalin”
    Markian Dobczansky, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Panel 4: Toward a Consolidated Statehood? The Ukrainian SSR in the 1960s–1980s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Corruption and Ideological Subversion: Soviet Ukrainian Political Elites in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the 1970s–80s”
    Olga Bertelsen, Research Fellow, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

    “Making Soviet Ukraine Ukrainian: Ideas of Ukrainian Statehood in the Ukrainian Diaspora of Canada and the USA (1960–80s)”
    Simone Attilio Bellezza, Research Fellow, Department of Humanities, University of Trento, and Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    “Building Socialism, Being a Professional: Everyday Life and Professional Identity in Late Soviet Ukraine”
    Oleksandra Gaidai, Senior Research Fellow, Museum of History of Kyiv

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS DAY II OF A 2-DAY CONFERENCE. IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON DAY I (MARCH 24) AS WELL, PLEASE REGISTER FOR IT SEPARATELY.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
« October 2016 - December 2016 January 2017 - Present

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.