Student Programs

Undergraduate

  • American Studies

    The American Studies Program is designed to provide students with a broad, yet deep, education about the United States. To ensure breadth, students are required to take an interdisciplinary core course that ranges widely both with respect to the themes covered and disciplinary perspectives applied. As well, the Program offers a wide selection of courses from participating departments and programs in the Faculty, giving students broad exposure to fundamental themes of American life. To ensure depth, the American Studies Program relies heavily on upper level courses, including its own capstone seminars at the 400-level. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the American Studies website.


  • Contemporary Asian Studies

    The Contemporary Asian Studies (CAS) program prepares undergraduate students for new global dynamics, of which Asia’s rise over the past century has been a key component. Several of the world’s largest and fastest-growing economies are in Asia, yet the outcomes of modernization across the region have been varied, as seen through differing approaches to democracy, the distribution of wealth, ethnic diversity, gender dynamics, human rights, and immigration policy. The pathways to modernity in Asia are also varied, with diverse colonial/independent histories, roads to democracy, and strategies for economic growth. The CAS program provides undergraduate students with the knowledge and analytical tools to dissect these outcomes and processes and draw meaningful linkages between them. The CAS program provides a multidisciplinary lens through which to examine the links between Asia’s history, its emergence onto the global stage, the challenges and opportunities inherent in its modernity, and its future(s) in the global arena. Both the major and minor programs are thematically-driven and pan-Asian in geographic scope, providing empirical and critical coverage of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Students will encounter multiple disciplinary approaches to the study of the region, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the Contemporary Asian Studies website.


  • European Studies

    Europe, like other major regions of the globe, has long been a significant focus of study at the University of Toronto. In recognition of the increasingly major role played by the European region on the global stage, and the importance of understanding the continent in a comprehensive way, the Munk School of Global Affairs offers an undergraduate major program in European Studies and a minor program in European Union Studies.

    Drawing on the expertise of thirteen departments, the program is designed for students who desire the linguistic competence, the cultural comprehension, and the specialized knowledge necessary to operate effectively in the “new” Europe. The major provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to focus on the region through a wide variety of courses and disciplines. It offers preparation either for further specialized study at the graduate level or for work either in Europe itself or within a Canadian-based organization dealing with Europe. Students may also take a minor program in European Union Studies, which consists of four full credits. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the European Studies website.


  • Hungarian Studies

    The Hungarian language is spoken by ten and a half million inhabitants of present-day Hungary, about three million people in the neighboring countries, and perhaps as many as an additional two million around the world. Despite the isolation that might have been imposed by the uniqueness of their language, Hungarians have been engaged with, and participants in, greater European affairs since their arrival in the Carpathian basin more than a thousand years ago. Hungarians have made signal contributions in the fields of arts, science, and mathematics, winning Nobel prizes in Chemistry, Medicine, Physics, Economics, and Literature.

    Hungarian Studies at the University of Toronto includes both a major and minor program for undergraduate students at the Faculty of Arts and Science. These programs focus on the history, language, literature, and culture of Hungary and on its international role – particularly on Hungarian immigration to Canada. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the Hungarian Studies website.


  • International Relations

    The International Relations Program is based at Trinity College and has offices in the Munk School of Global Affairs. It offers undergraduates at the University of Toronto interdisciplinary major and specialist programs that emphasizes the history, politics and economics of international relations. Particular emphasis is given to the role of Canada as an international actor.

    This program is designed to examine the origins, development and expansion of the international state system and international institutions and their effects on political, economic, and humanitarian issues. Much of the teaching is done by practitioners – people with experience as professional diplomats or in international agencies. It is also the host of the very successful G8/G20 research group; The Attaché Journal of International Affairs, an academic journal of student publications; and a vibrant International Relations Society. There is a range of in-course and graduation scholarships available to International Relations students, and since the year 2000 three graduates have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships.

    For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the International Relations website.


  • Munk One Program

    Think Big. Work in teams to solve real world problems. Innovate. Munk One provides students with a focus on innovation and global problem-solving. Through case studies of complex challenges worldwide, Munk One students identify innovations that succeed, how successful innovation can be fostered, and why innovative solutions sometimes fail to address global problems. Beyond the classroom, you are placed in cutting-edge global affairs policy labs that are tackling real-world problems. Join a community of students engaging the role of innovation in areas such as cyber security, health, development and sustainability, and human rights.

    • Number of credits: 2 credits
    • Program structure: Two small half year seminars and one full year lab course
    • Eligibility: Faculty of Arts & Science (St. George) undergraduate applicants
    • Application procedure: Apply online with a brief personal statement (Link coming soon...)

  • Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies

    The Program in Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies confronts some of humanity’s most complex challenges. It offers an undergraduate B.A. degree that emphasizes the integration of practical and theoretical knowledge, the interdisciplinary nature of peace and conflict studies, and the value of incorporating research into undergraduate education.

    Ninety selected undergraduates gain a wide-ranging understanding of the causes and nature of violence and peace. This degree program, which is guided by three distinct perspectives, moves beyond traditional international studies. It examines violent strife, from war between countries to revolution, insurgency, ethnic clashes, terrorism, and genocide within countries. Students study the underlying causes of this strife, including poverty, resource scarcity, weapons proliferation, competing claims for justice, and failures of foreign-policy decision making.

    Based at the Munk School of Global Affairs in the University of Toronto, The Trudeau Centre gives students access to all the resources of the University of Toronto, considered the leading research university in Canada. Access to Trudeau Centre faculty and the broad range of courses and faculty in related disciplines allows students to tailor their programs according to their interests.

    Students apply for acceptance into either the specialist or major program after completing four full-year university credits. For more information on the program and the application process, please visit the website for the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict, and Justice.


  • South Asian Studies

    The Minor in South Asian Studies, offered by the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, allows students to study South Asia in an approach attentive to global formations. With access to the faculty and resources of the Contemporary Asian Studies program, students are introduced to the study of South Asia—Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka—through a wide angle view of Asian modernities, political economies, and cultures, all the while delving into to specialist close-ups of South Asia. The program poses crucial questions for understanding global processes and diverse worlds—the tribal forest land, the bazaar, sacred sites, and the urban slum, among many others—preparing students for globally-minded careers and advanced social science and humanities research.

    With a curriculum motivated by the moving present—the changing face of South Asia today—the minor offers rigorous training in major debates and questions in the rich field of South Asian Studies, and provides a basic foundation for many directions of future study. From historical contexts of ethnic conflict, to postcolonial readings of ancient traditions, to the politics of religious and ethnic identities, to the workings of vast-scale democracy and capitalism, to the worlds of cinema and public culture, students are exposed to the dynamic landscapes—political, material, and mythic—that constitute present-day South Asia. Through open access to comparative courses in the Contemporary Asian Studies program, students can learn from tenured and tenure-track faculty specialists in South, East, and Southeast Asia. For more information about the program and its requirements, please visit the Centre for South Asian Studies website.


Graduate

  • Collaborative Master’s/PhD Program in South Asian Studies

    The Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies offers entry into a graduate student community, as well as a basic methodological grounding for students already accepted into a graduate program in one of the collaborating departments (listed on the program website). The program is designed to give students an interdisciplinary overview for the critical study of South Asia as a field of expertise and as a lens through which to read a wide range of global processes. Engagement with these questions through the collaborative program will be noted on the transcripts of participating students.

    All students who wish to participate in the collaborative program, at the Master’s or PhD level, are required to take the core course, SAS2004H, Critical Issues in South Asian Studies: A Region and the Disciplines. This course aims to familiarize students with aspects of the construction and critique of area studies, the history of disciplinary engagement with the region, and major contemporary debates in the field.

    Students in the program are also required to be active participants in the Centre for South Asian Studies lecture and seminar series. The wide range of events organized by the Centre and the Asian Institute offers a significant opportunity for students to think critically about the role of area studies in providing new perspectives on problems of universal significance, as well as to meet regularly and build a community. For further information about the program requirements and collaborating departments, please visit the Centre for South Asian Studies website.


  • Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The Asia-Pacific region has emerged in the past half century as a major force in global economics and politics. The interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies is designed for students wishing to pursue professional careers that will require them to understand this vibrant and sometimes tumultuous part of the world, whether their chosen fields are in academia, business, government, international or non-governmental organizations. Located at Canada’s premier research university, the program limits the number of students to 20 in order to facilitate learning and intellectual exchange in a small group setting.

    The program provides graduates with advanced training in traditional disciplines and also interdisciplinary expertise in historical and social science studies of modern East and Southeast Asia. It also provides a strong background for a doctoral-level academic focus on Asia-Pacific. The major topical areas of study include political economy, modern and contemporary social history, international relations, gender and the family, political and social change, economic development, and cultural studies.

    Please note that this is not a standalone graduate program. Students wishing to be admitted to the collaborative program must apply online to one of the home departments. For more information about the application process, including a list of participating home department units, please visit the program website.


  • Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Collaborative Graduate Program

    This program offers students with interests in ethnic and pluralism studies the opportunity to widen their horizons – to expand their knowledge beyond a single disciplinary base, and to take advantage of the wealth and diversity of academic resources available at the University of Toronto – a great university situated in a large and culturally-cosmopolitan city.

    Each participating faculty provides a distinctive perspective and knowledge-base for the study of topics such as ethnic and race relations, international migration and immigration, cultural and linguistic communities, inter-group dynamics, nationalist movements, aboriginal affairs, and human rights. The program also features a basic interdisciplinary seminar on “Ethnic Relations Theory, Research, and Policy.” This wide range of program opportunities makes it valuable for students planning careers in academic research and teaching, policy research, and professional practice and administration.

    Students may also take advantage of special lectures, conferences, and workshops sponsored by the Robert F. Harney Professorship and Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies. These events bring eminent researchers and practioners from around the world to enhance the research community at the University of Toronto, and to further broaden the foundation for professional development.

    Ethnic and Pluralism Studies at the University of Toronto is not a degree granting program. Rather it is a collaborative graduate program open only to students who have been admitted to and enrolled in a Master’s or Doctoral program in one of the affiliated departments. Upon successfully completing the requirements, in addition to a Master’s or a Doctoral degree in their disciplines, students will receive a specialization noted on their transcripts as “Completed Collaborative Program in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies.” For more information on the application process, including a list of participating departments, please visit the program website.


  • Fellowships in Global Journalism

    Each year the Munk School of Global Affairs awards 20 Fellowships in Global Journalism to qualified candidates. Over the course of eight months, Fellows report on their own discipline for major media outlets, study at the University of Toronto, attend lectures from leading journalists around the world, and receive direct mentorship from a “bureau chief” – an experienced journalist whose job it is to hone skills and help launch careers.

    When the program is completed, Fellows can return to their profession able to cover their discipline as a global journalist and use their outstanding knowledge of media to add value to their professional work. Fellows can go on to become “super-freelancers” with the skills and relationships to sustain a career for a portfolio of media organizations around the world. They can also compete for staff jobs with media companies that want the unique mix of specialization, reporting experience, global understanding and business ability that is gained through participation in this program.

    For those who have already earned advanced knowledge, this opportunity is a powerful running start into global journalism in less time than most Master’s degrees. In order to qualify for admission, candidates must have a graduate degree, professional degree, or a few years’ work experience in their discipline and must possess strong communication instincts. In addition, they must be hungry to cover their disciplines as journalists for media around the world, in all platforms including print, on-line, broadcast and radio. For more information about the program and application process, please visit the Fellowships in Global Journalism website.


  • Master of Arts in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Recognized as one of the best of its kind in North America, the MA Program at the University of Toronto’s Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) offers students the opportunity to engage in a comprehensive, rigorous and hands-on study program. In addition to the top faculty in their fields, CERES provides generous funding to MA candidates through fellowships or financial support for internships, language training and study abroad opportunities. In fact, students typically are engaged in research or training internationally, with advisory and logistical support from CERES. This field component alone sets the program apart from other MA programs.

    CERES also provides students with unique learning opportunities outside the classroom.

    The diverse array of courses available to students of the MA program is supplemented by short intensive workshops. Workshops can be taken for academic credit and CERES hosts two or more per year on specialized topics of regional interest. This is in addition to the Centre’s busy agenda of seminars and conferences. Every week, top specialists from around the world take part in an engaging series of debates at the Munk School. Students are encouraged as well to develop their own projects and initiatives, and every year CERES students host their own graduate student conference.

    For more information on the program and the application process, please visit the Centre’s website.


  • Master of Global Affairs

    The University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs combines training in analytical methods and practical management skills with an immersion in the latest thinking on global issues. The Master of Global Affairs degree positions graduates to accelerate their careers in business, government and NGOs, as these sectors pursue their strategies in an increasingly interconnected and multipolar world.

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is a hub for scholars and practitioners at the forefront of research, debate, and action in global affairs. Against the backdrop of one of the world’s most diverse cities, the University of Toronto’s new professional school is curating a vital dialogue about the challenges, organizations, and ideas that are reshaping the international landscape—creating an environment which will equip students to thrive in a world where working internationally demands not only professional skills but strategic agility and cultural fluency.

    Immersed in this unfolding conversation, students enhance the value they derive from their formal studies even as they expand their networks to include hundreds of global alumni, scholars, mentors, and employers.

    For more information on the application process, please visit the Master of Global Affairs’ website.


  • The Dynamics of Global Change Collaborative Doctoral Program

    The Dynamics of Global Change (DGC) is a multi-disciplinary doctoral program at the Munk School of Global Affairs that explores the frontiers of global change across a wide range of issues. In a rapidly evolving, complex, and loosely structured global system, it is essential to understand the sources, structure and pace – in short, the dynamics – of change. From their home departments, students may take up questions from their own disciplines and explore them through the kaleidoscopic perspective created by multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    Students must be admitted to a doctoral program in a collaborative home department in order to take the DGC program. Please note that DGC is not a standalone doctoral program. For more information about the application process, including a list of participating departments and institutions, please visit the program’s website.


Alumni

  • Master of Global Affairs

    The University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs combines training in analytical methods and practical management skills with an immersion in the latest thinking on global issues. The Master of Global Affairs degree positions graduates to accelerate their careers in business, government and NGOs, as these sectors pursue their strategies in an increasingly interconnected and multipolar world.

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is a hub for scholars and practitioners at the forefront of research, debate, and action in global affairs. Against the backdrop of one of the world’s most diverse cities, the University of Toronto’s new professional school is curating a vital dialogue about the challenges, organizations, and ideas that are reshaping the international landscape—creating an environment which will equip students to thrive in a world where working internationally demands not only professional skills but strategic agility and cultural fluency.

    Immersed in this unfolding conversation, students enhance the value they derive from their formal studies even as they expand their networks to include hundreds of global alumni, scholars, mentors, and employers.

    For more information on the application process, please visit the Master of Global Affairs’ website.


  • Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies Alumni Network

    Graduates of the Trudeau Centre have taken diverse and intriguing paths in their efforts to make a positive contribution to the global community. Their biographies reveal that they are already making outstanding contributions.

    If you are an alumnus who would like to become a mentor, please fill out an application form (Word doc) and send it, along with a copy of your C.V., to pcs.programme@utoronto.ca

     


Events


Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.