Faculty

Among the internationally renowned faculty who are affiliated with the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice:

Wendy Wong(on sabbatical for 2014-15)

wendyProf. Wendy Wong is Director of the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice and is Associate Professor of Political Science.  Her main research interests lie at the crossroads of International Relations and Comparative Politics.  She is interested in the politics of organization, why human being choose to act collectively, their choices to go about doing it, and the effects of those choices.  Research interests include: human rights, humanitarianism, international law, social movements, indigenous politics, the rights of ethnic minorities, and the role of networks.  Her research has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Successful Societies research program.  Her book, Internal Affairs, was published by Cornell University Press in 2012.  She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego. Go to Prof Wong's website

Vera Achverina

Prof. Vera Achvarina’s research focuses on human security and mobilization of people for armed conflict. Her current work examines the conditions under which children are recruited by non-state armed groups. She has published several articles, including in the journal International Security and Political Science Quarterly. She is currently preparing her first book, Adult Abductors and Child Conscripts: Explaining Child Soldier Recruitment by Non-state Armed Groups, which examines the aspects of child recruitment in intrastate wars. Prof. Achvarina holds a Ph.D. in International and Public Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh, USA. In 2006 she was a visiting researcher at the International Peace Research Institute, Oslo, Norway.

 

Nancy Bertoldi

nancy bertoldiNancy’s research focuses on normative questions in international relations, with the goal of uncovering global principles that can provide a realistic moral foundation for a just and peaceful global order. Entitled Beyond Power and Plenty, her first book develops a civic conception of global justice to address the challenges of poverty and inequality as they arise in a plural world. Her second book will examine the practical implications of this theory for policy debates on the global governance of trade, health, and the environment. This work will pay special attention to the roles played by practices of collective justification in the construal of fairness claims and the necessity of developing governance mechanisms that allow for principled and rule-governed civil disobedience within multilateral global institutional frameworks.

Wilfrid (Will) Greaves

Wilfred (Will) Greaves Wilfrid (Will) Greaves is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.  His primary research examines how the security implications of climate change have been conceptualized and pursued in the Canadian and circumpolar Arctic regions.  An Ontario Graduate Scholar, SSHRC Doctoral Scholar and DFAIT Graduate Student Fellow, he is author of several peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and working papers.  He has taught undergraduate courses in security studies, International Relations, and Canadian foreign policy at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto.  A graduate of the University of Calgary and Bishop’s University, his research interests include security theory, human and environmental security studies, natural resource development and climate change, Canadian foreign policy, and complex peacebuilding operations.

Seva Gunitsky (on leave for 2014-15)

SevaProf. Gunitsky's research examines the effects of international influences such as major wars and economic crises on the evolution of democracy over the twentieth century. His articles have appeared or are forthcoming in journals such as International OrganizationInternational Theory, and The Journal of International Affairs. His current book project examines how the sudden rise and fall of powerful states have shaped the spread of democracy since World War I. A native of St. Petersburg, he also has a regional interest in the post-Soviet space. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University. Go to Prof Gunitsky's website

Judith Teichman

Photo of Judith TeichmanProf. Teichman is Professor of Political Science and International Development Studies.  She is the author of four books, one co-authored book, and over 40 articles on politics and development in the global south and in Latin America. Her work has appeared in such scholarly journals as International Political Science Review, World Development, Global Governance, Comparative Politics, Latin American Politics and Society, Third World Quarterly, Studies in Comparative International Development, and Mexican Studies, among others. She is a former editor of The Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean, has served as Consultant to the U.S. Library of Congress and contributing editor for the library’s collection on the political economy of Mexico, and on the Academic Advisory Council on International Trade, Government of Canada. Her current research focuses on poverty, inequality and social welfare regimes in the global south, politics and policymaking in Chile, Argentina and Mexico, and on the relationship between inequality and political and criminal violence, with a focus on rural insurgency and drug trafficking in Mexico. Email Prof. Teichman

 

2014 Graduate fellows

Kiran Banerjee

Kiran BanerjeeKiran Banerjee is a Vanier Scholar and doctoral candidate in Political Science at the University of Toronto and holds a M.A. in Political Science from the University of Chicago.  His research interests include human rights, citizenship, immigration and migration, the history of political thought, political philosophy and legal theory. Banerjee's dissertation examines the relationship of citizenship, human rights, and territoriality in the context of contemporary international relations, with a particular focus on statelessness. The project contributes to the turn to the problem of membership and political exclusion in international political theory that has begun to take seriously the challenge of radical exclusion posed by statelessness and the denial of citizenship. The aim of the dissertation is to articulate a novel account of statelessness as domination and with that to lay the foundation for addressing the claims to justice of stateless persons. Banerjee's recent work has been published in Refuge: Canada’s Periodical on Refugees, the Journal of International Law and International Relations, and he is co-editor and contributor to a forthcoming volume from University of Toronto Press.

Wilfrid (Will) Greaves

Wilfred (Will) Greaves Wilfrid (Will) Greaves is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.  His primary research examines how the security implications of climate change have been conceptualized and pursued in the Canadian and circumpolar Arctic regions.  An Ontario Graduate Scholar, SSHRC Doctoral Scholar and DFAIT Graduate Student Fellow, he is author of several peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and working papers.  He has taught undergraduate courses in security studies, International Relations, and Canadian foreign policy at Ryerson University and the University of Toronto.  A graduate of the University of Calgary and Bishop’s University, his research interests include security theory, human and environmental security studies, natural resource development and climate change, Canadian foreign policy, and complex peacebuilding operations.

 

Michael Morden

Michael MordenMichael Morden is a PhD candidate in the department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is also a Research Associate with the peace and pluralism think tank the Mosaic Institute. His doctoral research focuses on explaining change in the history of Indigenous-non-Indigenous relations in Canada, with a particular focus on contentious action and conflict in the modern context. He is the author of several peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and policy papers. His research interests include Indigenous politics in Canada, nationalism and ethnic conflict, institutional design for divided societies, narrative in political behaviour, and the social-psychological dimensions of intergroup conflict.