Graduate Courses 2019-20

Graduate Courses 2019-20

 

Course Nomenclature:

  • H indicates a half credit course
  • F indicates a half year course in the first term (Sept – Dec)
  • S indicates a half year course in the second term (Jan – Apr)
  • Y indicates a full year course (Sept – Apr)
  • M, T, W, R, F = days of the week

 

CORE COURSE

ASI1000Y-Y Issues in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies T 2-4 LA213 J. Bertrand (F) and Y. Wu (S)
The core seminar in examines the dynamics of transformation in the Asia-Pacific in relation to a number of theoretical debates in history and the social sciences. The seminar is required of graduate students in the Collaborate Master’s Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies.

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

ASI1001H Independent Research in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
Students wishing to take this independent research credit in order to work on their major research paper must find an appropriate faculty member willing to supervise them, and fill out the Add/Drop form and submit it to ai.asianstudies@utoronto.ca. Please contact Katherine MacIvor at ai.asianstudies@utoronto.ca if you have questions.

In addition to ASI courses, CESEAS students in the program’s affiliated departments may enrol in courses relevant to the East and Southeast region, some of which are listed below. Please check with individual departments for course prerequisites and enrolment procedures. CESEAS cannot guarantee students a space in courses offered by other departments.

Other courses not listed below might also meet the requirements, provided that they have strong Asia content. If you have another course in mind, please contact the CESEAS director for pre-approval. Options in other departments for independent studies focused on Asia may also be counted.

 

EAST ASIAN STUDIES

Non-EAS students should enrol after seeking the professor’s permission by submitting a filled-in Add/Drop form to the EAS office.

EAS1182H-F Writing as Technology in Modern China T 10-12 RL14228 Y. Zhong
EAS2020H-F Critical Approaches to East Asia W 3-5 RL14228 G. Sanders
EAS1431H-S Crisis, Population, Archive W 3-5 RL14228 K. Kawashima
EAS1475H-S Contemporary Cultural Theories: Worlds, Worlding, Globalization T 1-3 M. Cho

 

Global Affairs

GLA2091H-S Seeing Taiwan T 10-12:30 BF215 T. Lam
This course uses Taiwan as a site to examine some of the most pressing contemporary and historical issues. They include state-building, environmental politics, colonialism and empire, the politics of memory, innovation and urbanism, as well as visual culture. In so doing, students do not only acquire a body of knowledge about Taiwan and its dynamic global connections; they also develop interdisciplinary skills to improve their understanding of major global issues.

 

HISTORY

HIS1662HF Rethinking Modernity through Japan M 1-3 UC B203 T. Fujitani
The purpose of this seminar is to introduce graduate students to the major problems, paradigms, and literature on global modernity as seen through the lens of Japan. The course will begin with reflections on area studies as it has addressed questions of modernity and modernization in Japan, while also attending to recent criticisms of this body of knowledge. Although specific topics will vary from year to year, they may include considerations of nationalism, democracy,   labor, social management, science, education, biopolitics, empire, temporality, gender and sexuality, culture and ideology, warfare, social conflict, and shifting understandings of human difference. Readings selected for their theoretical or comparative utility will complement those on Japan. In the 2017-18 year the course will especially highlight the period that stretches from the 1930s to 1945.

 

Political Science

POL2353HF Authoritarianism in Comparative Perspective M 12-2 LA340 L. Ong
This course examines the politics of authoritarianism in theory and practice. It covers major theories in authoritarian politics, ranging from selectorate theory, authoritarian institutions, impact of institutions on political outcome, ways of measuring authoritarian state power, democracy and development, to social movement and state repression in authoritarian regimes, and political transitions. On empirical application, we will draw on cases from around the world, with some emphasis on Asian authoritarian states.
POL2810YY MA Research Seminar I: Exploring Political Transformations R 12-2 SS 1078 V. Falkenheim
This course is intended primarily for M.A. students to meet the research requirements of the Departmental M.A. program. The primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity for students to design and conduct an independent research project on a topic of their choice. Topics chosen may fit within the major themes of the course, but equally students are free to define their own topics outside of those parameters. The course is designed to assist students with their choice of research topic, with framing the research appropriately in terms of conceptualization and research design, and in identifying useful methodologies and appropriate resources and research materials. The substantive focus will be on issues of political transition. The purpose is not so much to introduce the broad field of transitology as to assess the various approaches that have been used in the study of “Third Wave” transitions. A number of sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of research projects as they take shape over the course of the year.
POL2811YY MA Research Seminar II: Exploring Political Transformations M 4-6 AH 105 V. Falkenheim
This course is intended primarily for M.A. students to meet the research requirements of the Departmental M.A. program. The primary purpose of the seminar is to provide an opportunity for students to design and conduct an independent research project on a topic of their choice. Topics chosen may fit within the major themes of the course, but equally students are free to define their own topics outside of those parameters. The course is designed to assist students with their choice of research topic, with framing the research appropriately in terms of conceptualization and research design, and in identifying useful methodologies and appropriate resources and research materials. The substantive focus will be on issues of political transition. The purpose is not so much to introduce the broad field of transitology as to assess the various approaches that have been used in the study of “Third Wave” transitions. A number of sessions will be devoted to the presentation and discussion of research projects as they take shape over the course of the year.

 



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