Events after March 1, 2019

Past Events Login

March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    It is recognized that the military coups in Thailand in 2006 and 2014 were the orchestrated attempts of the anti-democratic alliance of the old powers against the rise of electoral politics. After the coups, they have tried to establish firm control through various measures, including the constitutions of 2007 and 2017 and strengthening the bureaucracy. However, little attention has been paid to the Thai military’s expansive civil affairs projects, including rural and urban development programs, mass organizations and mobilization campaigns, ideological and psychological programs. Puangthong argues that the Thai military has always paid great importance to its civil affairs projects as a political offensive to control popular politics since the counter-insurgency period. The conservatives craftily manipulated legal and moral legitimacy in order to protect and expand the army’s role beyond its combatant sphere. The entrenchment has been more apparent and aggressive since the 2006 coup. Old apparatuses were reactivated and new ones were created. Power of the army over other state agencies increased more than ever. On one hand, the military’s civil affairs projects allow the military and conservative elites to dictate the country’s long-term political direction. This potent tool, on other hand, effectively polarizes the populace deeper and thus makes democratization in the future difficult.

    Biography:
    Puangthong R. Pawakapan is Associate Professor of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Harvard University, 2018-2019. Her recent works include “The Central Role of Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command in the Post-Counter-insurgency Period,” Trends in Southeast Asia (ISEAS: Singapore 2017); “The Foreign Press’ Changing Perceptions of Thailand’s Monarchy.” Trends in Southeast Asia. (2015); State and Uncivil Society in Thailand at the Temple of Preah Vihear, (2013).


    Speakers

    Puangthong R. Pawakapan
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Book Launch for "Diasporic Media Beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Korea in a celebration of Dr. Sherry Yu’s book “Diasporic Media beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles.” Dr. Yu will be joined by Dr. Karim Karim who will be the discussant for the event.

    Sherry S. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

    Karim H. Karim is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication and the Director of the Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam at Carleton University. He is also an Associate of Migration and Diaspora Studies and the Centre for European Studies at Carleton University.

    Coffee and refreshments available at event.


    Speakers

    Karim H. Karim
    Discussant
    Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton Universty; Director, Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam

    Sherry Yu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Arts, Culture and Media, and the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE B. N. PANDEY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF INDIA

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Novetzke
    Speaker
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Democracy in Asia: Building Sustainable Institutions and Practices in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars whose work either frames contemporary global assessments of the state of democracy around the world or focuses attention directly on the political struggle now underway between democracy and authoritarianism across the Asian region. Its purpose is to bring current comparative research on the evolution of democratic institutions and practices of government into dialogue with cutting-edge conceptual work on democracy and democratization. The participants together address the challenge of maintaining domestic and international stability when countries are facing competing political imperatives generated both by globalizing capitalism and by the contemporary diffusion of systemic power.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
    2:10-2:15PM Welcoming Remarks
    RANDALL HANSEN
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    2:15-4:00PM Panel I
    LUCAN AHMAD WAY
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Are we actually in the Midst of a Democratic Recession?

    SEVA GUNITSKY
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Great Powers and the Future of Democracy

    LYNETTE ONG
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto
    Studying “China in the World” in 2019

    PHILLIP LIPSCY
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    Democracy, Financial Crises, and Economic Volatility

    MAIKO ICHIHARA
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    Understanding Japan’s International Democracy Assistance Policy

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    4:00-4:15PM Break

    4:15-5:55PM Panel II

    YUSUKE TAKAGI
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan
    Democracy in Asia: The Case of the Philippines

    JOSEPH WONG
    Professor, Department of Political Science
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School
    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Japan: Asia’s First Unlikely Democracy

    DAN SLATER
    Professor of Political Science
    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies
    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan
    Indonesia: Asia’s Newest Unlikely Democracy

    SANG-YOUNG RHYU
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
    Upgrading Democracy in Korea: Resilient Consolidation and Complex Challenges

    DIANA FU
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    State Control in China under Xi Jinping

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    5:55-6:00PM Closing Remarks
    TAKAKO ITO
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    6:00-7:00PM Reception

    Event Program and Announcement

    Democracy in Asia Symposium Program

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Discussant
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Takako Ito
    Closing Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Seva Gunitsky
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Maiko Ichihara
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

    Phillip Lipscy
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Sang-young Rhyu
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, South Korea

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor Political Science

    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies

    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan

    Yusuke Takagi
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Notes for a History of Prakrit Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE INDIA-CANADA ASSOCIATION LECTURE

    Prakrit was, along with Sanskrit and Tamil, one of the main languages of literature in premodern South Asia. It flourished in the first half of the first millennium BCE, although it continued to be cultivated for many centuries afterwards. This talk will begin by sketching the historical outlines of this tradition and then explain why it is important to corroborate, elaborate, and reflect upon its history. First, Prakrit textuality was closely connected to broader developments in the religious and expressive literatures of South Asia, and gives us a unique perspective onto those developments. Second, the many ways in which Prakrit texts defy being ‘historicized’—verses that slip in and out of anthologies, stories told again and again, works that survive only in fragments or abridgements—actually tell us something important about the historical being of literary texts.

    Andrew Ollett is a Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows. He works on the literary and intellectual traditions of premodern South Asia.


    Speakers

    Andrew Ollett
    Speaker
    Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th Life Force Atrocities during the Korean War and their Aftermath: Repression, Resistance and the Construction of Solidarities of Bereavement

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Korean civil war, thousands of real and imagined “leftists” were massacred by the emerging South Korean state. In the wake of South Korea’s long process of post-authoritarian transitional justice, the nature of many of these atrocities has to come to light, in turn leading to increased interest from South Korean and international scholars. This talk builds upon this research by focusing on the role that the family structure played in determining the targets and methods of the perpetrators. Drawing on Elisa Von Joeden-Forgey’s concept of “life force atrocities,” I discuss the ways in which counter-insurgency forces incorporated the decimation the family unit as part of the broader process of anti-leftist liquidation. This pattern was continued into the post-war years, as survivors and families of accused “leftists” were denied the right to properly mourn and placed under the “guilt by association system”. I argue that this process of systematic persecution gave rise to novel forms of communal identities, anchored around the notion of the collective bereaved family. This, in turn, led to unique forms of political resistance in the 1960-1961 period.

    Dr Wright is currently the Korea Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto. He completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2016. He is currently working on completing his manuscript “Civil War, Politicide, and the Politics of Memory in South Korea, 1948-1961”. His work has been published in Cross Currents, The Asia Pacific Journal, and by Routledge.


    Speakers

    Brendan Wright
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; Director, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 16th A Body in Fukushima: Reflections on the Nuclear in Everyday Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 16, 20191:00PM - 5:00PMExternal Event, Innis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    NOTE: This event consists of three components: (1) Photo Exhibitions – March 4 to April 14; (2) A Body in a Library Performance by Eiko Otake – March 15; (3) Video Screening and Symposium – March 16. All three are free of charge. Registration is required ONLY for the the third part – Video Screening and Symposium.

    This is a multi-sited, multi-media, and multi-disciplinary event that demonstrates how art can contribute to critical reflection on the nuclearization of everyday life in our contemporary world. Since 2014 Eiko Otake and William Johnston have photographed the performer among the ruins and abandoned places that have been left in the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe of March 2011. Following a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Northeastern Japan, a massive tsunami inundated reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, resulting in meltdowns in three reactors. The Fukushima disaster is regarded as the second largest nuclear accident in history, and yet its full consequences remain temporally and spatially boundless and ultimately unknowable — a reality that Otake’s haunting bodily performances and Johnston’s striking photography make so compelling. Otake’s and Johnston’s collaborative work on Fukushima has been exhibited in major venues across the Americas and appears in Canada for the first time.

    Otake is a world-renowned, movement-based artist who performed as Eiko and Koma for more than forty years before beginning her solo performances for the project, A Body in Places. Her awards include a Guggenheim, MacArthur, Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award, and Dance Magazine Award for lifetime achievement. William Johnston is a photographer and historian whose critically acclaimed written work and photography have focused on issues of the body, sexuality, disease, the environment, and public health. The symposium accompanying the exhibitions and performance will feature presentations by leading scholars and artists working across disciplines.

    PHOTO EXHIBITIONS
    DATES: March 4 – April 14, 2019 (depending on the library hours)
    LOCATIONS:
    Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, ON
    1st floor exhibition area,and 8th floor, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library
    Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge St., Toronto, ON
    3rd and 5th floors

    CURATORS:
    Takashi Fujitani, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies
    Henry Heng Lu, Independent Curator and Founder, Call Again

    A BODY IN A LIBRARY PERFORMANCE BY EIKO OTAKE
    DATE: Friday, March 15, 5:15 – 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

    VIDEO SCREENING AND SYMPOSIUM
    * Registration is required *
    DATE: Saturday, March 16, 1:00 – 5:00 PM, followed by reception
    LOCATION: Innis Town Hall, Innis College, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON
    SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS:
    Eiko Otake, Independent movement-based performance artist
    William Johnston, Department of History, Wesleyan University

    CHAIR
    Takashi Fujitani, Department of History and Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto
    PANELISTS
    Marilyn Ivy, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
    Photography and 3.11, with a meditation on William Johnston’s photographs of Eiko Otake in Fukushima
    Katy McCormick, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University
    Searching for A Body, Finding Trees
    Lisa Yoneyama, Women and Gender Studies Institute and Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    Post-Fukushima Epistemology
    Tong Lam, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Fallout, promise! Some reflections on pink landscapes

    For more information from the Toronto Public Library, please click here.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reference Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department, University of Toronto

    School of Image Arts, Ryerson University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Identification Technologies and Biometric Power: A Transition from Occupied China to Post-World War II Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The invention of identification technologies is deeply connected with the surveillance of colonial populations. Fingerprinting, the forerunner of biometrics, was created by the British police in colonial India in 1897, and was also employed in Manchuria and Northeast China under Japanese occupation from the 1920’s to 1945. Why did fingerprint identification attract the Japanese imperialist power, and how effectively was it practiced? We examine narratives surrounding the Japanese identification systems in Manchuria, especially regarding Chinese workers who were placed under severe surveillance, and discuss how a similar scheme survived the lost war and was actually legitimated in post-World War Ⅱ Japan. The expansion and transformation of biometric power can be seen in the Japanese government’s repeated attempts to establish “perfect” identification systems. Surveillance has spread from ex-colonial populations to foreign workers and to citizens, culminating in recent legislative changes concerning enhanced technologies.

    ASAKO TAKANO is an Associate Professor at Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan. She received her Ph.D. in Social Sciences from Hitotsubashi University, and published her book in Japan in 2016, Fingerprints and Modernity.

    MIDORI OGASAWARA is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University, and a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. She conducted field research in China to investigate the Chinese experiences of Japanese colonial identification systems and obtained her Ph.D. in Sociology from Queen’s in 2018.


    Speakers

    Asako Takano
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan

    Midori Ogasawara
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University; Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Ottawa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd – Saturday, March 23rd Beauty, Brutality, and the Neocolonial City

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20199:30AM - 3:00PM108N, North House, University of Toronto
    Saturday, March 23, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, University of Toronto
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    Description

    Please use the registration button above to sign up for the lecture on March 22. To sign up for a reading on March 23, please click here to register on Eventbrite.

    This two-day event brings together international scholars and critics to explore the complexity, dynamism, and significance of Manila within and beyond Asia. As a city that has experienced the multiple vestiges of empire, the disciplinary machinations of dictatorial rule, the effects an infamous “war on drugs”, and the continued realities of uneven resource distribution, Manila serves as a productive physical and ideological space to explore the dialogic nature of beauty and brutality—as these concepts intertwine in the urban repertoires of the global south. On March 22, speakers will reflect on how Manila influences their work as diasporic critics scholars. On March 23, renowned Filipino American author Jessica Hagedorn will have her Toronto debut and read from her most famous works. She will also converse with Lucy San Pablo Burns (UCLA), discussing her thoughts on the city, and Manila, as an imaginative space for her artistry and craft. Books can be purchased at the venue, in collaboration with Another Story Bookshop.

    FRIDAY, MARCH 22
    108N – NORTH HOUSE, MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC POLICY,
    1 DEVONSHIRE PLACE
    Program:
    9:30 AM – 10:00 AM – Welcoming Remarks
    10:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Dialogue 1: Sensing the City
    SPEAKERS: Ferdinand Lopez (Toronto); Gary Devilles (Ateneo De Manila); Paul Nadal (Princeton); Genevieve Clutario (Harvard)
    12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – Lunch
    1:00 PM – 3:00 PM – Dialogue 2: Intimacies and the City
    SPEAKERS: Robert Diaz (Toronto); Denise Cruz (Columbia); Martin Manalansan (Minnesota); Christine Balance (Cornell); Allan Isaac (Rutgers)

    ***********************
    SATURDAY, MARCH 23
    NEXUS LOUNGE, 12TH FLOOR, OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), 252 BLOOR ST. W.
    A Reading with Noted Author Jessica Hagedorn, in Conversation with Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns (UCLA)
    Program:
    4:00 PM – 4:10 PM – Welcoming Remarks
    4:10 PM – 4:30 PM – Performance by Patrick Salvani
    4:30 PM – 6:00 PM – Reading with Jessica Hagedorn, and Conversation with Lucy Burns (UCLA)


    Speakers

    Christine Bacareza Balance
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies and Performance Studies, Cornell University

    Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department, University of California, Los Angeles

    Genevieve Clutario
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Harvard University

    Denise Cruz
    Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

    Robert Diaz
    Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Gary Devilles
    Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of the Filipinos Studies, Ateneo De Manila University

    Jessica Hagedorn
    Author of Toxicology, Dream Jungle, The Gangster of Love and Dogeaters; Winner of the American Book Award

    Allan Punzalan Isaac
    Associate Professor, English and American Studies, Rutgers University

    Ferdinand Lopez
    Associate Professor of English, University of Santo Tomas; an incoming PhD student in Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto

    Paul Nadal
    Post-Doctoral Research Associate of American Studies, Princeton University

    Martin Manalansan
    Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Minnesota


    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI)

    School of Cities, University of Toronto

    New College Initiatives Fund

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd The Feminist Awakening in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    On the eve of International Women’s Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for thirty-seven days. The Feminist Five became a global cause célèbre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of university students, labor activists, civil rights lawyers, performance artists, and online warriors prompting an unprecedented awakening among young Chinese women. Through interviews with the Feminist Five and other Chinese activists, Hong Fincher illuminates both the difficulties they face and their “joy of betraying Big Brother,” as one of the Feminist Five wrote of the defiance she felt during her detention. Tracing the rise of a new feminist consciousness now finding expression through the #MeToo movement, Hong Fincher describes how the movement against patriarchy could reconfigure China and the world.

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher is a journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China (Verso 2018), which was named a best book of 2018 by Vanity Fair, Newsweek and others. She is the first American to receive a Ph.D. from Tsinghua University’s Department of Sociology in Beijing. She also has a master’s degree from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree with high honors from Harvard University. Her first book was the critically acclaimed Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China (Zed 2014).

    * Dr. Fincher’s book Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China will be available for purchase at the venue.*


    Speakers

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher
    Speaker
    Journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother:The Feminist Awakening in China.

    Prof. Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Prof. Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th Sex and Power in Occupied Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Based on Robert Kramm’s book Sanitized Sex, the talk will discuss the various attempts to sanitize sexuality through the regulation of prostitution, venereal disease and intimacy in occupied Japan after World War II. It features sexuality as key element in issues of security, health and morale during the occupation period. In doing so it underscores how the sanitization of sex was a male-dominated struggle for control and authority in the clash of two competing patriarchal, imperial powers: Japan and the United States. That said, the talk is more than a study of the postwar sexual encounters. An analysis of sex, its regulation and negotiation between occupiers and occupied sheds new light on the everyday experiences and asymmetries of power in occupied Japan, the legacies of the Japanese Empire, and the particularities of postwar U.S. imperialism in the postcolonial formation of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Robert Kramm is a post-doctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and is affiliated with the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong. He holds a doctoral degree in history from ETH Zurich and received his B.A. and M.A., also in history, from the University of Erfurt.


    Speakers

    Robert Kramm
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities, Department of History, University of Hong Kong

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Trends in Internet Control in Southeast Asia and China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What are the current trends in internet control in China and Southeast Asia? How has increasing state control over the internet impacted human rights and civil liberties in the region? What implications do such trends hold for Canada?

    As a fast-growing region with increasing ties to Canada, issues of technology, security, privacy and surveillance across Asia cannot be ignored. From increasing threats to press freedom in the Philippines under Rodrigo Duterte to the broad monitoring of telecommunications in Singapore, Southeast Asia is home to numerous examples of state control over the internet, media, and speech at large. Such a discussion would be incomplete without considering China, where the Communist regime continues to tighten its grip on information flow across cyberspace. And with the recent Sino-Canadian dispute over the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, the presence of Chinese cybertechnology in Canada and the intersection between cybertechnology issues and the Asia-Pacific at large have been thrust to the forefront of socio-political discourse in our country.

    Irene Poetranto is a Senior Researcher for the Citizen Lab and a Doctoral Student in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interest is on the cybersecurity policy development in the Global South, especially in Asia. Her dissertation project focuses on the issue of Internet controls in Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. She obtained her Master’s degree in Political Science and Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto, and Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

    Lotus Ruan is a researcher at The Citizen Lab, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the interplay of the state and private companies in terms of internet management and innovation in the digital age with an area focus on China. Prior to joining University of Toronto, Lotus received her master’s degree in Asia Pacific Policy Studies at the University of British Columbia and worked as a journalist and news editor in China for over two years.

    Contact

    Mia Nguyen


    Speakers

    Irene Poetranto
    Senior Researcher, Citizen Lab; Doctoral Student, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lotus Ruan
    Researcher, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Holy Infrastructure: Transnational Korean Churches in Seoul and Los Angeles

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, AP367, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    A multisite church is a single church that meets at multiple locations, often through the use of audio, projection, and even hologram technologies. Nearly all megachurches in the world have adopted this franchise-like form in the last decade, but this fairly new organizational practice originated in South Korea in the 1970s. This talk draws upon transnational ethnographic research at two of the first multisite churches in the world: Yoido Full Gospel Church and Onnuri Church. Following the speaker’s participant-observation on production technology teams at these churches, this talk illustrates Christian efforts to create and maintain “holy infrastructures” [kŏrukhan inp’ŭra] through one’s body, actions, and the objects of one’s practice. Ultimately, this talk asks how one might imagine ethics and pursue the good life in a world permeated by often unseen networks of contact and communion, conscription and contagion.

    Heather Mellquist Lehto is a cultural anthropologist who studies religion, technology, and social relations. She is currently a Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at the University of Toronto, and she holds a PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and a master’s degree in religious studies from Harvard Divinity School. Her first book manuscript, Holy Infrastructure: The Multisite Church Revolution in South Korea and the United States draws on two years of multisited ethnographic research in Seoul and Los Angeles to explore the coordination of technological and religious innovation in some of the world’s first and largest multisite churches.


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Heather Mellquist Lehto
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Cosmogony and Literacy in the Bengali “Book of Light”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE ANNUAL BENGAL STUDIES LECTURE

    Once considered the “primordial source of all books” and a proxy for the Qurʾān itself, the Persian and Bengali versions of theNūrnāma (Book of Light) virtually disappeared from the religious landscape of contemporary Bangladesh and West Bengal. The Book of Light narrates the creation of the world by God through the body of the Muḥammad of light. This creation story played a key role in shaping the popular understanding of Islamic cosmology, language, and the significance of the written word in Bengali Islam. With this lecture, I will address the topic of vernacular literacy and multilingualism in Bengal between the 17th and 19th century through the study of the Nūrnāma tradition. A fresh look at the textual tradition that surrounded the transmission of this creation story reveals ways to conceive of vernacular Islam beyond categories of elite vs. popular, or orthodox vs. heterodox.

    Thibaut d’Hubert is associate professor in the department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations (SALC) at the University of Chicago. He published several articles in periodicals and collective volumes, and contributed entries on Bengal for Brill’s Encyclopedia of Islam, THREE. In his book titled In the Shade of the Golden Palace: Ālāol and Middle Bengali Poetics in Arakan(New York: Oxford University Press, 2018), d’Hubert studies the encounter of Persian, Sanskrit, and vernacular poetics in the courtly milieu of the frontier region between today’s Bangladesh and Myanmar. He is also the co-editor with Alexandre Papas of the volume Jāmī in Regional Contexts: The Reception of ʿAbd al-Raḥmān Jāmī’s Works in the Islamicate World, ca. 9th/15th-14th/20th (Handbook of Oriental Studies, Leiden: Brill, 2019).

    Reception to follow

    *In the Shade of the Golden Palace by Thibaut d’Hubert will be available for purchase at the venue.*

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Thibaut d'Hubert
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of English

    Department for the Study of Religion


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2019

  • Tuesday, April 2nd Innovation under Hypercompetition: Firm Capabilities and Strategies for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 2, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Innovation is the source of sustainable competitive advantage for firms. Innovation itself has been argued to stem from control of valuable and non-imitable resources. As the pace of technology change has increased, however, firms find that resources or resulting innovations fail to secure sustained competitive advantage. Drawing upon field research on contract manufacturers in China, this talk will discuss how resource-constrained SMEs develop different categories of innovations and their impacts on firm organization and performance.

    Michael Murphree is assistant professor of international business at the University of South Carolina and is currently a visiting professor with the Innovation Policy Lab at the University of Toronto. Professor Murphree is currently working with the Innovation Policy Lab on a study of knowledge transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship, economic growth and employment in the offshore petroleum industry in Newfoundland and Labrador. His primary research interests include globalization, innovation in emerging economies, technology standards and market formation, and intellectual property rights. His research considers China in comparative perspective with other emerging economies and the developed West, particularly Europe. His other research interests are globalization, state-firm relations, innovation, technology standards and market formation, and intellectual property rights, especially in China and East Asia. He has conducted field research in China since 2007 and speaks fluent Mandarin. Professor Murphree has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as a book, chapters in edited volumes and numerous commissioned reports for groups including the Global Commission on Internet Governance and the U.S. National Academies.


    Speakers

    Michael Murphree
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of International Business, University of South Carolina; Visiting Professor with the Innovation Policy Lab, University of Toronto

    Darius Ornston
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Chair
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Professor, Department of Political Science; Associate Vice-President, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 3rd Ban Damunhwa and its Neoliberal Affect of Fairness and Equity

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 3, 20193:00PM - 5:00PMExternal Event, AP 330, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    This talk discusses the rapid emergence of ban damunhwa (“anti-multiculture”) or the sentiment of anti-immigration in South Korea. Ban damunhwa discourse centers on a variety of issues such as the state’s multicultural policy, crimes by foreigners and problems of the so-called “illegal sojourners” and has been most active and visible on the Internet especially since the mid-2000s. In this talk, I specifically focus on the way ban damunhwa defines the state’s multicultural policy as what gives special preferences to migrants, which, in turn, is said to destroy the livelihoods of the nationals. Represented as “voices of ordinary citizens,” ban damunhwa narratives appeal to, not nationalist or racist sentiments, but rather a neoliberal commonsense of fairness and equity, under which migrants emerge as demonic free-riders. I show how ban damunhwa not only serves as a symptom of a neoliberal ethic but also mirrors the dilemma of the people who struggle under neoliberal system of precarity and yet persist it by reproducing its main ideologies.

    EuyRyung Jun is assistant professor of anthropology at Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, South Korea. Jun primarily works on migration, multiculturalism, right-wing populism, and biopolitics and animal discourse. She has published articles in FOCAAL, Positions, Anthropological Quarterly, Kyeongje wa Sahoe [Economy and Society], and Hanguk Munhwa Inryuhak [Korean Cultural Anthropology]. She also writes for Kyunghyang Shinmun, a major newspaper in South Korea, on animal issues.


    Speakers

    EuyRyung Jun
    Assistant Professor, Department of Archaeology and Cultural Anthropology, Chonbuk University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 4th Magical Capitalism, Gambler Subjects: South Korea's Bitcoin Investment

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, AP 330, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    “First, it was just tech people. Now, literally everyone is interested in Bitcoin,” said New York Times while reporting on the Bitcoin mania that haunted South Korean society in the winter of 2017-2018. In this talk, I take this collective effervescence as an entry point to explore the “magical” features of contemporary financial capitalism. Drawing upon an ethnographic research on a South Korean Bitcoin investor online community, I first examine how the logics of uncertainty and luck are found at the heart of casino capitalism and how lay investors deal with the ambiguous future and luck in their everyday practices. In analogizing their logic and practices with those of gamblers, I illuminate how the emerging mass investment culture exhibits the religious and magical understanding of the world based on self-fulfilling “performativity” and what André Orléan calls “collective belief.” In consequence, this talk seeks to situate the Bitcoin frenzy and its mass investment culture within the broader transformation of human condition with the triumphant rise of financial capitalism. 

    Seung Cheol LEE is an assistant professor of Anthropology and East Asian Studies at the University of Mississippi. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on the formation of mass investment culture in South Korea in the context of its post-developmental and post-work transition. 


    Speakers

    Seung Cheol LEE
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Mississippi



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 10th A New Era of China-Canada-US Relations: Strategic Tensions & Economic Interests

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 10, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center. Dr. Li is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Committee of 100, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. He is the author/editor of numerous books, including Rediscovering China: Dynamics and Dilemmas of Reform (1997), China’s Leaders: The New Generation (2001), Bridging Minds Across the Pacific: The Sino-US Educational Exchange (2005), China’s Changing Political Landscape: Prospects for Democracy (2008), China’s Emerging Middle Class: Beyond Economic Transformation (2010), China’s Political Development: Chinese and American Perspectives (2014), Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership (2016), and The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks in China (2017).He is the principal editor of the Thornton Center Chinese Thinkers Series published by the Brookings Institution Press.

    Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Dr. Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director and Senior Fellow of the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 11th Securitizing Overseas NGOs, Foundations and Thinktanks in China: Two Years of Implementation of a New Policy and Legal Framework

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 11, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    We are now into the third year of implementation of a new law and framework for Chinese security governance of overseas NGOs, foundations and thinktanks in China — which already has one of the largest and most rapidly growing NGO and charitable communities in the world. This presentation analyzes these important policy and regulatory shifts in China in control and monitoring of the overseas NGO, foundation and thinktank sector, including the recent detention of a Canadian citizen in which this new framework has been mentioned, and draws some conclusions about the future work of these organizations in China.

    Mark Sidel is Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and consultant for Asia at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL). He was part of the team that opened the Ford Foundation office in Beijing in the late 1980s, has consulted widely with international donors and NGOs in China, including the Ford, Gates, Asia and other foundations, and has worked in China since 1972. He writes and speaks frequently on the nonprofit sector and philanthropy in China, India, Vietnam, and elsewhere in Asia.


    Speakers

    Mark Sidel
    Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Consultant for Asia at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL)


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 12th In the Presence of the Divine: Identity and Meaning in Newar Buddhist Art

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 12, 20196:00PM - 8:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Event Series "The Newars and Their Neighbours"

    Description

    Vibrant colors and pulsating sounds of religious devotion punctuate the streets and gullies of Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley. Among the Valley’s Newar Buddhist community, art and ritual work in concert to make the divine present in the urban landscape of the city. For Newar Buddhists, art and ritual performance reinforce core philosophical principles and cultural ideals related to sacred space and ritual cosmology. This lecture examines the role of festivals and image processions in manifesting the divine in the city of Patan. The vibrant ritual festivities and artistic traditions build layers of sacred geography and Buddhist cosmology into the streets and courtyards of the city spaces. Thus, this lecture explores the creation of sacred space in the city of Patan through festivals and other celebrations to examine how the Newar Buddhist community navigates the diversity of religious experience in the Kathmandu Valley to ultimately reaffirm their own religious identity.

    Kerry Lucinda Brown, Professor of Art History at Savannah College of Art and Design, is a specialist in South Asian and Himalayan art. Her research explores the relationship between art and religious identity in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, situating Newar Buddhist art within the larger context of South Asian Buddhist heritage.


    Speakers

    Kerry Lucinda Brown
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Savannah College of Art and Design

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 16th Beyond the Headlines: India, Pakistan and the Kashmir Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 16, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Joseph McQuade is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute’s Centre for South Asian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge as a Gates Scholar, with a dissertation that examined the origins of terrorism in colonial South Asia in international perspective. This research is currently being revised into a book manuscript, tentatively titled Anti-colonial nationalism and the birth of ‘terrorism’ in colonial India, 1857-1947. His postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto will interrogate the role of terrorism and insurgency in defining national identity in postcolonial India and Burma (Myanmar). His broader research and teaching interests include critical genealogies of ‘terrorism’ as a political and legal category, the global history of political violence, and the relationship between insurgency and nation-states.

    Kanta Murali is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include comparative political economy of development, Indian politics, politics of growth and economic policy, state-business relations and labor policy. Her Ph.D. dissertation (“Economic Liberalization, Electoral Coalitions and Private Investment in India”) at Princeton University aims to understand the political conditions favourable to growth-oriented policies in poor democracies by focusing on a specific empirical puzzle related to India. It examines sub-national policy variation in the competition for private investment in India after the country undertook market reforms in 1991 and analyzes the political factors behind why some subnational governments have been more pro-active in undertaking investment promotion policies than their counterparts.

    Jaby Mathew is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto. Mathew received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto and he is currently revising his doctoral dissertation “Representation in the Shadow of Colonialism: Conceptions of Political Representation in 19th and 20th Century India” into a book manuscript. Mathew’s research focuses on modern Indian thought, contemporary democratic theory, and postcolonial theory with particular attention to the ethics of comparison and translation.

    Christoph Emmrich is Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor for South and Southeast Asian Buddhism at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department for Historical Studies and is Chair of the UofT/McMaster Numata Buddhist Studies Program. His research bridges Southeast and South Asia as it engages with fields as diverse as Burmese and Nepalese Buddhism, and Tamil Jainism.


    Speakers

    Joseph McQuade
    Panelist
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Kanta Murali
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science; Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Jaby Mathew
    Panelist
    Postdoctoral Associate, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, April 21st – Thursday, May 30th Asian Heritage Month Festival 2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, April 21, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.; Metro Hall Rotunda, 55 John St.
    Thursday, May 30, 20191:00PM - 2:00PMExternal Event, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.; Metro Hall Rotunda, 55 John St.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Opening Ceremony with Special Presentations & Launch of Asian Canadian Artists in Digital Age Workshops

    *Please click here to RSVP on Eventbrite*

    @ City Hall Rotunda & City Hall Library (100 Queen St. W.)
    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 | 2-6 PM

    Mr. Justin Poy | “What’s happening in the world of film in China, and its opportunities for Canada”?”

    Over the last two decades we have seen China develop into a blockbuster machine. Yet, Chinese films rarely get much international attention. Is it an intentional snub? Or are Chinese films not made for the international market? Was “Wolf Warrior 2” actually a good action flick? Or was it good considering it came from China? With recent big budget flops like “Asura” (backed in part by Alibaba’s Jack Ma), that cost $122MM USD to make yet only brought in $7.1MM before it was yanked from theatres, to cross over movies like “The Great Wall” starring leading man, Matt Damon, that garnered a dismal audience and reviews — what is actually happening that has made “Chinawood” rethink their movie production formula? How can Canada optimize this opportunity, and what are the implications for Toronto, Hollywood North?

    Mr. Stephen Siu | “Jews in Shanghai — Revisited and Parallels to Canada”

    Stephen is the producer of the “Jews in Shanghai” project in Toronto and a researcher on that period of history who has met with Dr Ho Feng Shan’s daughter Manli Ho in both Winnipeg and Toronto, and interviewed the head of the Jewish Studies Centre in Shanghai. Dr Ho was the Chinese Consul General to Vienna from 1938 to 1940, and he was called “Chinese Schindler” because he saved thousands of Jews. How will this talk rekindle memories of the Holocaust, and in what ways Toronto is serving similar roles as Shanghai in addressing multiculturalism and providing asylum?

    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 – THURSDAY, APRIL 25
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Rotunda

    THURSDAY, MAY 16 – THURSDAY, MAY 30
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Library

    THURSDAY, MAY 30 | 1-2 PM
    Professor Chef Leo Chan’s Presentation at City Hall Library
    “Chinese festivals and Foods” | City Hall Library will focus on the Dragon Boat Festival

    *******************
    @ Metro Hall Rotunda (55 John St.)
    MONDAY, MAY 13 – SUNDAY, MAY 19
    Asian Heritage Month Art & Photo Exhibitions at Metro Hall Rotunda


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Patron, Asian Heritage Month-CFACI

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor and Past Chair, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST)


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Heritage Month - Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.

    Canada Council for the Arts

    Cambridge Food & Wine Society

    Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto

    Department of Canadian Heritage and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Social Services Network

    The Justin Poy Agency

    York Centre for Asian Research, York University

    WE Artists' Group

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 23rd Urban Data as Public Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 23, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    At this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Internet companies applied their online knowledge to the analogue world for the first time. Facebook, Palantir, Microsoft and Google tried to impress the business elite with three-storey-high temporary buildings at the most central spots in Davos, and Google revealed its ambition to build an entire suburb of Toronto.

    In this talk Von Borries argues that Google’s “Sidewalk City Lab” applies reinforced learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence (AI), to the real world. (Similar approaches can be observed at Microsoft’s CityNext, Baidou AI City Xiongang, Moscow, Taipei and Singapore Smart Nation, and it is only a question of time until Facebook and Tencent will join in.) This has implications not only for architecture as a creative handcraft, but more importantly for the relationship between people (especially minorities, notoriously overlooked by code based on statistics), as well as social relations, and the private sector.

    In this new setting, city planning and architectural design are sourced through machine learning algorithms fed by the big data collected from anyone involved— be they future tenants or critics—potentially any user of Google’s services, in the case of Toronto. Ultimately, we all become unconscious architects as our digital lives are exploited as data. Still, for some time, the results will be unpredictable, even for Google’s coders. It remains to be seen if this can be interpreted as an opportunity or as a failure.

    The Taiwanese architect Hsieh Ying-Chun has another approach to collaboration. He considers architecture and town-planning a collective endeavour and a participatory effort.

    Smart city algorithms lead to the disappearance of the architect. This lecture aims to highlight how “Urban Data as Public Space” is actually working and how it is different from supposedly similar developments on China’s New Silk Road. Lanzhou New Area is a rather top-down, centrally planned development, reminiscent of Corbusier’s 90 year-old Plan Voisin for Paris, but pimped up with cinema-city style theme parks. Last but not least, Von Borries will connect this discussion to central Moscow, where urban facades mimic a clichéd Russian-ness for the football World Cup and beyond, combined with facial recognition software for all.

    The lecture will be accompanied by excerpts of Christian von Borries’ upcoming social science fiction film AI is the Answer – What was the Question?

    Christian von Borries is a musician and film director who was guest professor for architecture at Nuremberg’s Art Academy. He is a visiting professor at the School of Inter-Media Art at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou. He lives in a self developed green house on top of an old warehouse building in Berlin. His artistic practice can be read in the tradition of the Situationist’s psychogeography. He just cocurated a tech fair in Seoul and Beijing called A BETTER VERSION OF YOU. Together with Andreas Dzialocha, he is AI Unit.


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Academic Director, Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, Graduate Department of History

    Christian von Borries
    Speaker
    Musician and film director; Visiting Professor at the School of Inter-Media Art, China Academy of Art in Hangzhou


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2019

  • Thursday, May 9th Delayed Promises: Female Film Projectionists On and Off Screen in the People's Republic of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 9, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A Talk By TINA CHEN

    The celebration and promotion of mobile film projection has been central to the multi-media landscape of the PRC at two historical moments: 1950s-1960s and 2010s-present. In each moment, the female film projectionist occupies privileged space, albeit in radically different contexts. This talk explores apparent visual, rhetorical, and experiential continuities framing the female film projectionist from socialist to post-socialist China. Through critical consideration of female film projectionists as conduits of advanced media technology and spatial projects, this talk considers how and why feminism has been a delayed promise in the PRC.

    Tina Mai Chen is Professor of History at the University of Manitoba. Her current research considers the intersection of feminism, cultural politics, media landscapes, and subjectivity in the People’s Republic of China. She is co-editor with David Churchill of The Material of World History as well as Film, History, and Cultural Citizenship: Sites of Projection.

    ROUNDTABLE: From Socialist Mobile Cinema to Global Media Now

    TINA CHEN (University of Manitoba)
    YI GU (University of Toronto)
    TONG LAM (University of Toronto)
    YUROU ZHONG (University of Toronto)


    Speakers

    Tina Chen
    Head, Department of History, University of Manitoba

    Yi Gu
    Assistant Professor, Art History, University of Toronto

    Tong Lam
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto

    Yurou Zhong
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History , University of Toronto

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 10th – Saturday, June 8th Tong Lam: Moving Images, Moving People

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 10, 201911:00AM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Bachir/Yerex Presentation Space, 401 Richmond Street West, Suite 450A
    Saturday, June 8, 201911:00AM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Bachir/Yerex Presentation Space, 401 Richmond Street West, Suite 450A
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    Description

    Presented by the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival in partnership with Vtape. Supported by the University of Manitoba, the University of Toronto, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

    Tong Lam’s series meticulously documents contemporary China’s outdoor film phenomena, where films are sometimes screened next to dancing people and even animals, and where propaganda films have to compete with images of conspicuous consumption. In addition to showing the diversity of people and places in a rapidly changing nation, Lam’s work also invites viewers to consider an increasingly complex global media environment overrun with commercials, misinformation, and media spectacle.

    Curated by Tina Chen (Head, Department of History, Unviersity of Manitoba)

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada

    University of Manitoba


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2019

  • Tuesday, June 4th RIZAL: THE HERO AS TRAVELLER

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    While the words travel and tourism are often used interchangeably, there is a difference between the two: a tourist travels for leisure, he dips into a foreign culture but remains largely unchanged while a traveller aims for experience as a means of understanding himself in the context of the foreign. Every Filipino child knows that Rizal travelled a great deal when air travel was but a figment of the imagination, but what is not emphasized is how Rizal was formed by his exposure to other lands, peoples, and cultures. It is not well known that Rizal travelled to America, travelling by land from San Francisco to New York to catch a voyage to London. Looking back on Rizal’s travels helps us understand the hero, ourselves, and the emergence of the Filipino nation.

    José Rizal, in full José Protasio Rizal Mercado y Alonso Realonda, was born on June 19, 1861 in Calamba, Philippines and died on December 30, 1896 in Manila. Jose Rizal, the Philippine National Hero was a man of gifts: a multilingual writer, poet, artist, scholar, and physician, as well as a leading figure in a movement that called for basic reforms and civil liberties in the Spanish overseas colony.

    AMBETH R. OCAMPO is a public historian whose research covers the late 19th century Philippines: its art, culture, and the people who figure in the birth of the nation.

    Prof. Ocampo is Associate Professor and former Chairman of the Department of History, Ateneo de Manila University. He served as Chairman, National Commission for Culture and the Arts (2005-2007) and Chairman, National Historical Commission of the Philippines (2002-2011), and President of the Philippine Historical Association.

    Prof. Ocampo has published over 30 books, writes a widely read Editorial Page column for the Philippines Daily Inquirer, and moderates a growing Instagram and Facebook Fan Page.

    Reception to follow


    Speakers

    Dr. Ambeth Ocampo
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Ateneo de Manila University 

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto 


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 25th Governing the Environment of Small Cities: The Role of Municipalities in Gujarat and West Bengal

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 25, 20192:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There is a widely shared belief that decentralization has the potential to lead to more efficient, responsive and accountable government. In the Indian context, however, the existing literature indicates that state (provincial) governments failed to devolve substantive powers and funds to municipalities. This presentation discusses municipal-state relations through the lens of urban environmental governance and in the case of small cities, which are generally understudied. While our findings based on in-depth research in Gujarat and West Bengal largely confirm the conclusions from the literature, they also point to important differences between the two states and to differing degrees of municipal agency and relative autonomy influenced by institutional frameworks and the flow of funds and personnel.

    René Véron is professor of social geography based at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. His research focuses on urban environmental governance with a regional specialization on India. He is particularly interested in exploring socio-environmental processes related to urban environmental services, waste and pollution using an approach of urban political ecology.


    Speakers

    René Véron
    Speaker
    Professor, Social Geography, University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Visiting Professor, Asian Institute

    Rajyashree Narayanareddy
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Planning; University of Toronto at Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Planning

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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August 2019

  • Thursday, August 8th Growing Religious Conservatism in Indonesian Higher Education: The Case of Bandung

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, August 8, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    While scientific inquiry is often expected to be free from ideological interference, religiosity has become a feature in Indonesian higher education. In this paper, we explore the formation of scholars’ identity in terms of religious orientation. We show that many student groups in Indonesia have made it a mission to raise religious consciousness and experiences on campus. Over the last 20 years, there are significant tensions between managing students’ exposure to religiously conservative efforts, maintaining religious tolerance, and balancing these elements with religious freedom and association. These questions are important because they determine the kinds of identities and organizational forms that students contribute to nation-building projects.

    Teti A. Argo is a Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at Bandung Institute of Technology – Indonesia. Her research on religious conservatism in universities is a part of a larger research dedicated to looking at the role of higher education and nation building.

    Frans A. Prasetyo holds a masters degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia. He is currently a fellow at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Teti A. Argo
    Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

    Frans A. Prasetyo
    Fellow, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2019

  • Wednesday, September 18th Four Faultlines of the Indian Republic

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 18, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Asian Institute and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Click here to watch the webcast.

    India is an ancient civilization but a new nation. As a political experiment it is very much a work in progress. This lecture will provide a brief political history of India since Independence before discussing four key challenges facing the Republic in 2019; these are (1) inter-religious disharmony; (2) environmental abuse; (3) institutional decay; (4) the cult of personality.

    Dr. Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bengaluru. His books include a pioneering environmental history, The Unquiet Woods (University of California Press, 1989), and an award-winning social history of cricket, A Corner of a Foreign Field (Picador, 2002), which was chosen by The Guardian as one of the ten best books on cricket ever written. India after Gandhi (Macmillan/Ecco Press, 2007; revised edition, 2017) was chosen as a book of the year by the Economist, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal, and as a book of the decade in the Times of London and The Hindu.

    Dr. Guha’s most recent work is a two volume biography of Mahatma Gandhi. The first volume, Gandhi Before India (Knopf, 2014), was chosen as a notable book of the year by the New York Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. The second volume, Gandhi: The Years That Changed the World (Knopf, 2018, was chosen as a notable book of the year by the New York Times and The Economist.

    Dr. Guha’s awards include the Leopold-Hidy Prize of the American Society of Environmental History, the Daily Telegraph/Cricket Society prize, the Malcolm Adiseshiah Award for excellence in social science research, the Ramnath Goenka Prize for excellence in journalism, the Sahitya Akademi Award, and the Fukuoka Prize for contributions to Asian studies.

    This lecture is also presented as a part of Hopper Lecture in International Development.


    Speakers

    Dr. Ramachandra Guha
    Speaker
    Historian and biographer; Distinguished Fellow, Asian Institute and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks and Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th Justice in an Age of Global Politics: The case of Unit 731 Medical Atrocities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, Robarts Library, Blackburn Room (4th floor), 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Unit 731 was the codename for the Japanese Imperial Army’s biochemical warfare experimentation center located in China during the Asia-Pacific War. As a part of the forgotten history of WWII in Asia, and often characterized as the “Auschwitz of the East,” Unit 731 was the site of countless medical atrocities including human experimentation and field experimentation of biochemical weapons. Unlike in postwar Germany, perpetrators escaped legal punishment in post-war trials. This panel will discuss crucial issues surrounding the history of Unit 731, the American government’s cover-up of Unit 731 war crimes after the war, and how politics and justice interacted to shape war memory during the Cold War and beyond.

    Programme:

    1. Historical Overview of Unit 731: History and the Human Experience
    Professor Yang Yanjun, Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    2. The Tokyo Trials and Medical Atrocities: Unit 731’s Postwar (In)Justice
    Professor Gong Zhiwei, Shanghai Jiaotong University, War Trials and World Peace Research Center

    3. Verification in Japan on “War and Medical Ethics”: Aiming for No More Unit 731
    Professor Nishiyama, Shiga University of Medicine, Japan

    4. Politics of Memory: Unit 731 at the Margins of Historical Memory
    Professor Takashi Fujitani, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Q & A session moderated by Sachiyo Tsukamoto

    Closing Remarks
    Looking to the Future: The Role of Education
    Gen-Ling Chang, ALPHA Education


    Speakers

    Professor Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute

    Professor Takashi Fujitani
    Panelist
    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Professor Yang Yanjun
    Panelist
    Director, Unit 731 Research Center in Harbin, China

    Dr. Gong Zhiwei
    Panelist
    Shanghai Jiaotong University, China

    Professor Katsuo Nishiyama
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan


    Sponsors

    ALPHA Education

    Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    Robarts Library, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th Literature, the Human, and Governmentality: Between Ideas and Experience

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk is interested in how Korean literary and cultural critics have defined the idea of literature and what roles the idea serves in their larger arguments about the human being and history. It focuses in particular on mid-century Korea, from the late Japanese colonial period until the 1950s. The intention behind this periodization is to recognize both continuity and discontinuity between “before and after liberation,” particularly in relation to concepts of the human and their intersection with imperial, colonial, and national politics. Through texts by Paek Ch’ŏl, Ch’oe Chaesŏ, Sŏ Insik, and An Hamgwang, published in the Japanese empire, South Korea, and North Korea, I will discuss how and why these critics conceived of literature as the most important mediation between transcendental concepts, including moral and political ideas, and the everyday experiences of modernity. This situating of literature between ideas and experience was connected to the figure of the human, the “empirico-transcendental doublet” of modernity (Foucault), and thereby to modes of governmentality between Japanese empire, US and Soviet occupation, and the Korean national population. This talk comes out of a current book project, a collection of translations titled Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism.

    Travis Workman is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He is the author of Imperial Genus: The Formation and Limits of the Human in Modern Korea and Japan (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016). He has published articles in journals such as PMLA and positions and book chapters in volumes such as The Korean Popular Culture Reader and Rediscovering Korean Cinema. He is currently working on a collection of translations, Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism and a book manuscript, Political Moods: Melodrama and the Cold War in Korean Film.


    Speakers

    Travis Workman
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

    Michelle Cho
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 26th Transformative Student Research at the Asian Institute

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 26, 201912:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Featuring presentations from the Asian Institute’s 2018-19 RICHARD CHARLES LEE INSIGHTS THROUGH ASIA CHALLENGE (ITAC) & BIG IDEAS COMPETITION: EXPLORING GLOBAL TAIWAN Student Research Awardees

    Event Program

    12:00-1:15PM
    Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) Presentations

    Yujuan (Emmy) Fu, Ethics, Society & Law; Literature & Critical Theory
    Jennifer Han, Peace, Conflict & Justice and Political Science
    Sites of (Un)belonging: Spaces/Faces of Honjok Youth in Seoul, South Korea

    Amrita Kumar-Ratta, MGA, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning
    Shades of Brown Girl: The Many Colours of Transnational South Asian Femininity

    Katie Kwang, Psychology; Economics
    Benita Leong, History; Political Science (UTM)
    Hui Wen Zheng, Contemporary Asian Studies; Peace, Conflict, and Justice
    Moving in and moving out: understanding the effects of social exclusion on the mental health of rural-urban migrants in Shenzhen

    Zixian Liu, PhD Candidate, Department of History
    Rural Land Marketization, the Displacement of the Urban Poor and the Neoliberalizing Developmental State in Beijing

    Habiba Maher
    Aliza Rahman
    Asian Modest Fashion in the Museum Space

    Minh Anh (Mia) Nguyen, Contemporary Asian Studies; Political Science
    Unwanted Children

    Man (Angela) Xu, Sociology Department
    The Invisible Hand of South-South Globalization: A Study of Chinese Migrants in Tehran

    1:15-1:45PM
    Lunch Break

    1:45-3:00PM
    Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan Presentations

    Adam Zivokinovic (“Zivo”) – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Ji Chen (Tony) Yin – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    The Referendum

    Anson Au, Department of Sociology; Department of Chinese Literature (Joint Appointment), National Sun Yat-Sen University
    The Everyday Politics of LGBTQ Minorities in Taiwan: Discrimination, Legalization, and Community

    Sabrina Teng-io Chung, PhD, East Asian Studies
    Exhibiting In-Justices: Human Rights Discourses in Taiwan’s Recent Redress Efforts

    Yiwei Jin, MA student, Department of Political Science
    Hsieh-Piao and the Politics of Personalization in Taiwan

    Niki C Yang, Criminology
    Celina B. Servanez, Criminology and Sociolegal Studies (graduate department)
    Sohrab Naderi, Political Science and Criminology
    Anti-Death Penalty Efforts in Taiwan

    3:00-4:00PM
    Reception

    About the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC)
    The Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) is an interdisciplinary experiential learning program at the Asian Institute that offers students the opportunity for an academically rooted, life-changing field research experience in Asia. On the vanguard of supporting the University’s wider goals of internationalization, redesigning undergraduate teaching, and increasing student mobility, ITAC supports students through the complete trajectory of their research, providing workshops on proposal writing, project management, research methods, ethical research practices, and data analysis as well as direct mentoring. Encouraging students to produce their research in various forms ranging from policy reports to documentary films or something else entirely, ITAC is open to undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines, across all three UofT campuses. Out of approximately 100 applications, five to seven research teams are awarded annually by an academic jury. More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/rcl-itac/

    About the Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan
    The Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan is a student research competition, which supports selected undergraduate and graduate student teams to conduct their outstanding research and creative projects in Taiwan. The Competition provides opportunities for student experience in Taiwan by combining research on issues connected to Taiwanese culture/society with travel, taking classroom learning into the field in order to develop academic research skills and self-confidence. The program is enthusiastically interdisciplinary, encouraging student-researchers across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences to collaborate with complementary skills and knowledge bases.

    Throughout the winter, awarded teams collectively participated in workshops on project management, research methods, ethical research practices, data analysis, and safety abroad. Teams work closely with an academic mentor and Asian Institute staff, rigorously developing their research projects before departing for field research in the summer semester. Spending up to a month immersed in local cultures, developing cultural fluencies, and conducting research, students return to write up final reports and produce their projects in the late summer.
    More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/global-taiwan-studies-program-big-ideas-competition/

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 30th Buddhism, Politics and Law in a Changing Southern Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 30, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the last ten years, Buddhist monks and activist organisations have played an increasingly visible role in South and Southeast Asia. While not an entirely new phenomenon, this new upsurge appears to have unique and alarming features. These include a growing climate of violence, the increasing use of law and policy in the exclusion of Muslim minorities and the spread of social media and other technologies alternately used to mobilise, educate, communicate and incite. This ‘new Buddhicization’ of political life comes at a time of renewed or continued autocratic and populist tendencies in the politics of Theravada majority countries. Scholars have responded to these trends, but largely without addressing them holistically, institutionally and comparatively.

    This interactive and conversation-oriented workshop—led by scholars with expertise in Buddhism, politics and law in Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand respectively—aims to map out a path forward for researching the ‘new Buddhicization’ of public life in the region. This research programme would seek to identify new patterns, processes and problems that ought to be the focus of scholarship, moving beyond investigations into the motivations and activities of individual monks or groups to ask broader comparative questions about the structural conditions that enable or accelerate the processes described above. We invite colleagues with related interests and expertise to provide feedback on this programme in its early stages.

    For example, how are the current dynamics different from previous moments of politicised Buddhism in the region? What trends or patterns can be found in the countries’ legal, political and social systems and how have Buddhist actors worked to influence institutional changes? What historical factors—premodern, colonial, postcolonial, etc.— seem relevant or determinative? What features of Buddhist ecclesiastical organisation and governance enable or discourage the rise of groups like Ma Ba Tha or Bodu Bala Sena? Under what conditions have Buddhist pressure groups been particularly successful (or not) across the Bay of Bengal? Are there key features of Buddhist political philosophy or tropes of Buddhist literature that appear prominently in the speeches given by prominent monks? What new methodologies will be important in considering these new trends? What gaps exist in currently available data that would enable more robust comparisons and analysis over time? What blind spots have been left by existing scholarship?

    Tomas Larsson is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of St John’s College. Tomas has a PhD in Government from Cornell University. He is the author of Land and Loyalty: Security and the Development of Property Rights in Thailand, published by Cornell University Press in 2012. In recent years his research has increasingly focused on religion and politics, and especially on various aspects of state regulation of Buddhism in Southeast Asia, resulting in a number of publications in journals such as International Political Science Review, Modern Asian Studies, and Journal of Law and Religion.

    Benjamin Schonthal is Associate Professor of Buddhism and Asian Religions at the University of Otago in New Zealand, where he is also Associate Dean (International) for the Humanities Division. He received his Ph.D. in the field of History of Religions at the University of Chicago, where his dissertation received the 2013 Law & Society Association Dissertation Award. Ben’s work examines the intersections of religion, law and politics in late-colonial and contemporary Southern Asia, with a particular focus on Buddhism and law in Sri Lanka. His research appears in The Journal of Asian Studies, Modern Asian Studies, the International Journal of Constitutional Law, Journal of the American Academy of Religions and other places. Ben is the author of Buddhism, Politics and the Limits of Law, appeared with Cambridge University Press in 2016. His current research project, supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand, looks at the interactions of state law and Buddhist monastic law in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Southern Asia.

    Matthew J. Walton is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he was the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar. Matt’s first book, Buddhism, Politics, and Political Thought in Myanmar, was published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press. His articles on Buddhism, ethnicity, politics and political thought in Myanmar have appeared in Politics & Religion, Journal of Burma Studies, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Journal of Contemporary Buddhism, Buddhism, Law & Society, and Asian Survey. Matt was P-I for an ESRC-funded 2-year research project entitled “Understanding ‘Buddhist nationalism’ in Myanmar” and was a co-founder of the Myanmar Media and Society project and of the Burma/Myanmar blog Tea Circle.


    Speakers

    Tomas Larsson
    Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge

    Benjamin Schonthal
    Associate Professor, Buddhism and Asian Religions, University of Otago in New Zealand

    Matthew J. Walton
    Assistant Professor, Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2019

  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    Speaker
    King’s College London

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 8th Asian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Coinciding with the current Canadian Federal Election season, the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) is pleased to host a panel discussion on Asian-Canadian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics. The event focuses on examining Asian representation in Canadian Electoral Politics, exploring the unique sociopolitical conditions that candidates, politicians, and public servants who identify as of Asian-descent experience when navigating Canadian electoral politics.

    Topics of discussion will range from the public perception of Asian-Canadian political leaders in Canada, specific sociopolitical experiences and hurdles that candidates encounter when running for office, and projected shifts in voting behaviour as a result of demographic changes in Canada (i.e. influx of newcomers).

    SPEAKERS:
    Professor Ludovic Rheault
    Ludovic Rheault is Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to his appointment as faculty, he joined an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Toronto as a postdoctoral fellow in 2014. He also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Riverside. Prof. Rheault obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Montreal in 2013.

    Professor Rheault’s research interests focus on areas of the Canadian government, and applications of statistical methods to examine public opinions and policy-related questions. As a member of the French-Canadian minority, he will provide examples illustrating the challenges involved with cultural diversity in Canadian federal politics. In addition, Professor Rheault will provide statistical Canadian electoral insights on the topic.

    Kuo Yin
    Kuo Yin began her career in Canadian politics as a constituency assistant for the Member of Parliament in Toronto. She later held the position of parliamentary assistant at the House of Commons in Ottawa. Prior working in federal politics, Yin studied, worked and lived in Edmonton, Washington D.C and Oxford. According to Yin, “What makes me feel powerful as an Asian woman in Canadian politics is that I was given a variety of opportunities on different platforms to lead this country towards the direction where Canadians want to be.”

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi
    Tenzin Chogkyi was born in Tibet and raised in India. She came to Toronto 15 years ago to study filmmaking. Prior to joining politics, Tenzin worked for the Canadian Oscar nominee, Deepa Mehta.

    Over the past 4 years, Tenzin has served as the Community Liaison for MP Arif Virani at the Parkdale-High Park riding. Parkdale is home to the largest Tibetan community outside of India. In addition to her active role at the office, she is also the coordinator for Parliamentary Friends of Tibet Canada Friendship group.


    Speakers

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi

    Ludovic Rheault

    Kuo Yin


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th The dark night of love in the Indian tradition

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture

    Description

    This talk focuses on the dark nights of desire, on the difficulties and ordeals lovers have to face and overcome in the pursuit of fulfilment, and also on the tricks that their ingenuity manages to invent in order to escape detection, which sometimes can lead to disgrace or even death. Indian literature covers both illicit and marital love with great nuance. It ranges from problems to do with secrecy to problems of marital privacy in a crowded extended family situation. The differences between literary representations and visual representations of love stories will also be dealt with.

    Dr. Fabrizia Baldissera teaches Sanskrit Language and Literature at University of Florence. She lectures abroad extensively. Her interests are kāvya, satire, Goddess worship, dance, Indian alchemy and Arthaśāstra. Her books include The Narmamālā of Kṣemendra; Śāradātilakabhāṇa; L’universo di Kāma; King and Devī and Emotions in Indian Dramas and Dances.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Fabrizia Baldissera
    Speaker
    Sanskrit Language and Literature, University of Florence


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Instituto Italiano di Cultura Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 11th Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 11, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will be based on my newly published book Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War (University of Washington Press). The book examines the life of the Sri Lankan Tamil community in the time of war and migration before the war was ended in 2009. Three decades of war in Sri Lanka ended in 2009, but the prolonged violence during the war devastated the Sri Lankan Tamil community, leading to a serious disruption of ordinary life and mass migrations to escape the violence of the state and of Tamil militants. Jaffna Tamils are now widely dispersed across the world – predominantly in Canada, continental Europe, UK, Australia and India. In the book I have focused on marriage processes (arrangements of transnational marriages), transit places where the actual marriage performance takes place, figures (e.g. marriage brokers, photographers) who facilitate marriages, visual documents (e.g. wedding photos), and laws, in order to understand how Sri Lankan Tamils, who have been dispersed across spaces, rebuilt and shaped their fragmented lives and communities through these documents/figures/ spaces/zones. This study suggests that those fragmented communities were rekindled by ‘in-betweens’ associated with the marriage process, actors like wedding photographers or marriage brokers, legal corpuses, and transit places. The practices, ceremonies, and performances during the marriage process hold an imagined and lived future/s, entangled with past and present. This book deals with temporalities, documents, relatedness and political violence.

    Sidharthan Maunaguru is currently an assistant professor in anthropology at Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies at National University of Singapore. His research interests cover the areas of marriage, migration, religion, diaspora, politics, conscience, ethics, and law. He was awarded a Newton Fellowship by British Academia and Royal Society which was held at University of Edinburgh before he joined NUS. Maunaguru’s work is placed within the South Asian regions and beyond, it often includes multi-site fieldwork and intersects with anthropology, history and philosophy. He has published in Modern Asian Studies, Comparative Studies on Society and History, Religion and Society and Contributions to Indian Sociology. Maunaguru’s book titled Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War is published in 2019 with University of Washington Press, and another of his article is forthcoming in Current Anthropology.

    Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Sidharthan Maunaguru
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Tamil Worlds Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMExternal Event, East Asian Studies Lounge, 14th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Mari Yoshihara will speak about her new book, Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro, which interweaves the history of Leonard Bernstein’s transformation from an American icon to a world maestro with an intimate story of his relationships with two Japanese individuals: Amano Kazuko, a loyal fan who began writing letters to Bernstein in 1947, and Kunihiko Hashimoto, a young man who fell deeply in love with Bernstein in 1979 and later became his business representative. During the period in which these two relationships unfolded, Japan’s place in the world and its relationship vis-à-vis the United States changed dramatically, which in turn shaped Bernstein’s connection to the country. Yoshihara will trace the making of a global Bernstein amidst the shifting change of classical music that made this American celebrity turn increasingly to Europe and Japan.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).

    *Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro will be available for purchase at the venue.

    Location
    The lounge is located on the 14th floor of the Robarts Library. Take the P4 elevator from the 2nd floor of Robarts to the 14th floor. On exiting the elevator, head LEFT and follow signs to EAS.


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Speaker
    American Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th American Quarterly: Information Session with Mari Yoshihara

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 201911:00AM - 12:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Prof. Yoshihara, who is the Senior Editor of American Quarterly, the journal of the American Studies Association, will offer an informal session about the journal, including advice on submitting an article for publication.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Senior Editor, American Quarterly


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Through the interrogation rooms of the Korean War, this talk demonstrates how the individual human subject became both the terrain and the jus ad bellum for this critical U.S. war of ‘intervention’ in postcolonial Korea. In 1952, with the US introduction of voluntary POW repatriation proposal at Panmunjom, the interrogation room and the POW became a flashpoint for an international controversy ultimately about postcolonial sovereignty and political recognition.

    The ambitions of empire, revolution and non-alignment converged upon this intimate encounter of military warfare: the interrogator and the interrogated prisoner of war. Which state could supposedly reinvent the most intimate power relation between the colonizer and the colonized, to transform the relationship between the state and subject into one of liberation, democracy or freedom? Tracing two generations of people across the Pacific as they navigate multiple kinds of interrogation from the 1940s and 1950s, this talk lay outs a landscape of interrogation – a dense network of violence, bureaucracy, and migration – that breaks apart the usual temporal bounds of the Korean War as a discrete event.

    Monica Kim is Assistant Professor in U.S. and the World History in the Department of History at New York University. Her book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (Princeton University Press), is a trans-Pacific history of decolonization told through the experiences of two generations of people creating and navigating military interrogation rooms of the Korean War. She has published work in journals such as Critical Asian Studiesand positions: asia critiqueconcerning U.S. empire, war-making, and decolonization. She is also a member of the Editorial Collective for Radical History Review. Her research and writing have been supported by fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), the Penn Humanities Forum at University of Pennsylvania, and the Korea Foundation.

    *Copies of “The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History” will be available for sale during this event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 case studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to securing the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?

    Dr. Gwenn Pulliat is a researcher in geography at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). She has worked on Southeast Asia for a decade, with a focus on urban development issues. Her research deals with urban food security and the urban environment. In 2017, she has held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto, working on the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia partnership.


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th Sphere of Knowledge and Experience in Literature: A Case Study of Nepali Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This case study of Nepali literature shows how literature can reflect the expanding spheres of knowledge in societies like that of Nepal where multiple cultural modes prevail. I will present a study on the expanding sphere of Nepali literature in areas such as the choice of subject for writing, the growth of ‘print capitalism’ or printing and dissemination from the last decades of the 19th century, the role of literary journals in keeping up the creative and free spirit under the autocratic regimes, and the creation of the reading public. The presentation will show how in the first half of the twentieth century did Nepali poetry use romanticism as the important literary trend, and how the literary writers, critics and academics see and interpret modernism, and people understand it in common parlance. I will mention my own experience as a playwright in the selection of the motifs for the plays and how that reflects the sphere of creative writing, in terms of cultural diversity and plurality of subjects.

    Abhi Subedi (PhD) received his higher education in Nepal and Britain. He is an essayist, literary critic, linguist, playwright, and poet. He has over two-dozen books on different subjects to his credit. Professor Subedi has taught since 1970. He writes on issues of freedom, culture, literature, arts and social transformations.


    Speakers

    Dr. Abhi Subedi
    Professor Emeritus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Frederick Lee Story and the Hill 70 Memorial Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMExternal Event, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    During World War I (WWI), approximately 300 Chinese soldiers enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force despite rampant anti-Chinese discrimination. Anonymous until recently, Frederick “Freddy” Lee was one of those soldiers.

    Born into a Chinese Canadian Merchant family in Kamloops, BC, Freddy volunteered for the war, enlisting with the 172nd Battalion and served in a vital role as a machine gunner. Freddy fought in and survived the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1916, but was later killed in the Battle of Hill 70 in August 1917 at only 21 years of age. He fought and died as a Canadian. Freddy was among the 11,286 Canadians killed in France with no known graves.

    Freddy’s story is one that not only symbolizes the strength and determination of Chinese Canadians’ long struggle to gain acceptance as full Canadian citizens, but also embodies the Canadian spirit of “strength in diversity”, where Canadians of all ethnicities contributed to the history and development of their nation.

    While featuring Frederick Lee, the symposium will present a larger Chinese Canadian story. Based on historical research by experts on Chinese Canadian studies and WWI, along with invaluable insights from key figures involved in various Frederick Lee projects, the event will shine new light on Chinese Canadians’ contributions to Canadian history.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca, or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Welcoming Remarks
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Opening Remarks
    Chancellor Emerita, University of Toronto, and retired Senator of Canada

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Dr. Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Robert C. Engen
    Panelist
    Department of Defence Studies, Canadian Forces College

    Mr. Mark Hutchings
    Panelist
    Chairman, The Hill 70 Memorial Project

    Mr. Jack Gin
    Panelist
    Finding Frederick Lee Project


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2019

  • Friday, November 1st Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 1, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Within the labor literature, with its predominant focus on wage workers, self-employed workers are too often ignored and under-examined as part of the modern proletariat. However, this neglect of self-employed workers creates major blind spots in our understanding of the multiplicity of agents of social change that are organizing as workers outside the Global North. As urban spaces are increasingly being captured as a speculative commodity, especially in rapidly urbanizing cities beyond the often-theorized and studied West, urban spaces are becoming a source of precarity for the many self-employed workforce who depend on them to make a living. However, the same spaces are also emerging as loci for building workers’ power. I focus on the South Korean tenant shopkeepers who are waging creative collective actions to defend their rights to their shops and attracting outside allies within the progressive networks to join them. Through ethnographic research, I analyze how and when the making of what I refer to as protest space—a symbolic space challenging the entrenched power structure—can effectively translate into workers’ power. The case of Seoul presents broader implications for understanding how the previously fragmented and isolated self-employed workers can form collective consciousness.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Prior to coming to Toronto, she completed her doctoral degree in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles.
    As a political and labor sociologist and urban ethnographer, Yewon is broadly interested in how speculative real estate interests increasingly dictate the shapes and characters of urban landscapes and how, in response, ordinary people organize to preserve their ways of living. Her dissertation, Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: The Untold Gentrification Story of Tenant Shopkeepers’ Displacement and Resistance in Seoul, examines tenant shopkeepers in Seoul, Korea—how the previously unorganized organize under their collective identity as workers. A manuscript that emerged from this dissertation is currently forthcoming at Critical Sociology and has received many awards including Honorable Mention in the 2019 American Sociological Association’s Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship/ Graduate Student Paper Award competition.


    Speakers

    Yewon Andrea Lee
    Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th Reel Asian Film Screening: The Dragon Painter

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMExternal Event, Innis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    The Dragon Painter

    USA 1919
    53:00
    Silent with English intertitles
    G

    DIRECTOR
    William Worthington

    CAST
    Sessue Hayakawa
    Tsuru Aoki
    Edward Peil
    Toyo Fujita

    An early Hollywood silent film, The Dragon Painter is a fantasy romance about love and creative inspiration. Tatsu (Hayakawa) is a reclusive artist who lives in the mountains of Japan painting images of the dragon princess he loved in another life. He comes to believe the daughter of a wealthy art collector is his lost princess, but as Tatsu finds happiness in love, his art begins to suffer.

    In his prime, Hayakawa was as popular as Charlie Chaplin, as rich as Douglas Fairbanks, and to this day, the only Asian American to own his own Hollywood studio. Hayakawa founded Haworth Pictures Corporation after becoming fed up with the self-proclaimed Orientalist roles in which he was cast by the major studios, including his character in Cecil B. DeMille’s The Cheat. Hayakawa’s studio subsequently released 19 films between the years of 1918 to 1922.

    Although set in Japan, The Dragon Painter was shot on location in Yosemite National Park and stars a predominantly Japanese American cast, including Hayakawa’s wife, Tsuru Aoki. Produced by Hayakawa’s own studio, the film deliberately strived to provide an authentic perspective on Japanese culture that countered the dominant narrative of stereotypes, violence, and melodramatic conflict expected in so-called “Oriental” films of the period. For these reasons, it is considered it to be one of the first Asian American films in history. – Rob Buscher

    On the occasion of the film’s 100th Anniversary, The Dragon Painter will be presented with a live musical accompaniment and an original score by Los Angeles-based musician Goh Nakamura that was originally commissioned by the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival. A presentation on Hayakawa’s work and legacy will be given by Stephen Gong, film archivist and executive director of the Center for Asian American Media, who was responsible for locating and overseeing the restoration of the last existing print of The Dragon Painter.

    The screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Silent Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th The Indian Water Crisis: Does Technology Offer a Way Forward?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The 2019 Indian water crisis has been termed by researchers, civil society and the national media in that country as being unprecedented in its geographical span and severity. This panel examines some of the policy and technological responses to this multidimensional crisis and argues that current problems, while challenging, have been decades in the making. It also highlights years of missed opportunities towards crafting imaginative solutions to what are primarily issues of unsustainable water use. From the problems of sanitation, the growing disparities in urban water access, and the over extraction of groundwater in many parts of India, the panelists shall also examine the nexus of the water crisis with technological and institutional choices made in the past. In this context, the panelists while maintaining their focus on policy questions shall also map out possible technological solutions and political responses to the present crisis.

    Introductory remarks
    Vladimiros Papangelakis, Director, Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi, Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto
    Understanding recent national policy responses to the water crisis in India. Is governance reform sufficient?

    K J Joy, Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Promoting Participative Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India
    Responding to the Indian water crisis: Emergent ideas and pathways for restructuring the water sector

    David Taylor, Assistant Professor, Civil and Global Engineering, University of Toronto
    Urban water regimes

    Moderator
    Amy Bilton, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Note of thanks: Vladimiros Papangelakis, Institute for Water Innovation


    Speakers

    Amy Bilton
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Vladimiros Papangelakis
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Institute for Water Innovation, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    K. J. Joy
    Panelist
    Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Participatory Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India

    David Taylor
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Global Engineering, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th Reel Asian Roundtable with Chop Suey Nation and A Sweet & Sour Christmas

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMExternal Event, Innis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    PULSE PRESENTATION
    CHOP SUEY NATION
    Canada 2019
    English

    AUTHOR
    Ann Hui
    (in attendance)

    A SWEET AND SOUR CHRISTMAS
    Canada 2019
    16:00
    English, Cantonese with English Subtitles
    G · Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Aram Collier
    (in attendance)

    PRODUCER
    Betty Xie
    (in attendance)

    How do food stories speak to a convoluted history of multiculturalism? What does it take to trace back the stories of diasporic community to its roots? If and when we do arrive, what next? This multimedia program explores this question through an excerpt reading of Chop Suey Nation and a screening of A Sweet and Sour Christmas.

    In 2016, Journalist Ann Hui drove across Canada seeking answers to two questions: Why is there a Chinese restaurant in every small town? Who are the families who run them? Meeting with owners and eating at their restaurants, Hui shares stories of diasporic Chinese communities in her book Chop Suey Nation, while unexpectedly, uncovering her own family history – revealing the importance of these restaurants to Canada’s history.

    In A Sweet and Sour Christmas, director Aram Siu Wai Collier and producer Betty Xie follow two types of holiday meals at the King Wok Restaurant: the deep-fried take-out Chinese Canadian food staples delivered to families across Kitchener and the traditional Cantonese meal for a family sharing a rare Christmas celebration. This film is a CBC Short Doc to be released on CBC Gem and the CBC Short Docs Channel in December 2019.
    – KL

    BIOs:

    Raised in a Chinese-Canadian family in Vancouver, Ann Hui grew up in a food-obsessed household to parents who always knew where the freshest Cantonese seafood or barbecued duck could be found. Since 2015, Hui has been The Globe’s national food reporter. Her work includes investigations into the role of lobbying in the development of Canada’s Food Guide, and a 2018 story that uncovered widespread sexual harassment in one of the country’s most prominent wineries. She has a Masters of Journalism from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia.

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a Toronto-based filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He edited the feature documentary Refugee and directed the short doc Who I Became, nationally broadcasted on PBS. His omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown (‘11-’14) toured Canada, Asia, and the USA. His Telefilm Canada-funded feature, Stand Up Man (‘17) premiered at multiple international film festivals. Collier is a mixed-race Asian Canadian/American who has a BFA and MFA in Film Production from the University of California at Santa Cruz and York University respectively.

    Betty Xie is a Chinese Canadian filmmaker and a festival curator. Her short documentary The Home Promised (‘14) won the Air Canada Best Short Film at the Reel Asian Film Festival and played at various international film festivals. She produced the Telefilm Canada funded-feature, Stand Up Man (‘17), which premiered at multiple international film festivals. Her short doc Chado: A Way of Tea was selected as a top 10 finalist of the 2018 TVO ShortDoc Contest. She was also a 2019 Doc Institute Canada Breakthrough Fellow.

    Join Hui, Collier and Xie in conversation moderated by multidisciplinary artist Shellie Zhang to discuss the Chinese-Canadian cuisine known as chop suey. These four artists dive by way of food stories into a deeper inquiry around constructs of citizenship, belonging, and tolerance.

    *Chop Suey Nation will be on sale prior to the event and Ann Hui will be available for book signings after the event.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th Reel Asian Film Screening: What We Left Unfinished

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMExternal Event, Innis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    WHAT WE LEFT UNFINISHED

    Afghanistan/USA 2019
    71:00
    Dari with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Mariam Ghani

    CAST
    Latif Ahmadi
    Hossain Fakhri
    Said Miran Farhad
    Juwansher Haidary
    Wali Latifi
    Faqir Nabi
    Yasamin Yarmal

    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    2019 Berlinale Forum
    2019 SFFILM
    2019 Sheffield Doc/Fest

    From 1978 to 1991, the Afghan Films Institute had been producing propaganda features to fit with the times. This documentary follows the incredible story of five of these unfinished works from Afghanistan’s Communist era, when the constantly shifting political regimes resulted in films remaining unfinished, unedited, and thought to be destroyed.

    In her debut feature, Mariam Ghani pieces fragments of this once-lost footage, from The April Revolution (1978), Downfall (1987), The Black Diamond (1989), Wrong Way (1990), and Agent (1991), unedited (and therefore, uncensored). Just as the original filmmakers did when they shot action scenes with real bullets, hired ex-agents to play spies, or restaged the Communist coup d’état with the army, air force, and an awful lot of tanks and missiles, What We Left Unfinished interweaves histories and fictions. Ultimately, we come to understand both the price paid by Afghan filmmakers for the benefits they gained under Communism and the reasons they persisted despite the risks they faced—and why they still believe that film could save Afghanistan from the divisions tearing it apart today.

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Mariam Ghani’s previous projects in Afghanistan have documented the spatial politics of the post-war constitutional assembly, real-estate speculations in reconstructed Kabul, afterlives of former secret prisons, diasporic translators in theatres of war, and forgotten histories of Afghan modernists, artists and intellectuals. What We Left Unfinished is her first feature.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Shahrzad Mojab, a scholar, teacher, and activist, internationally known for her work on the impact of war, displacement, dispossession, and violence on women’s learning and resistance. She is professor of Adult Education and Community Development and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto, and currently, the Director of Equity Studies at New College.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Regent Park Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th King Milinda in Independent Burma and the Struggle to Control the Buddhist Canon

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Institute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The first independent Burmese administration of U Nu embarked on a national Buddhist revivalist project that included laws regulating Buddhism, sponsorship of lay-centred meditation centres, and the so-called Sixth Buddhist Council. This paper focuses on Burmese monk Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw (1868-1954) and the controversy over his Pali commentary in the early 1950s, the Commentary on the Questions of [King] Milinda (Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā). Published in 1948 by a pioneer of mass-lay meditation in the most classical commentarial genre, this text sparked protest in the streets and forced U Nu to send police to confiscate almost 400 copies from a monastery in Rangoon at night. Ostensibly the uproar was over reforms the Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw proposed to the monastic code (vinaya), possibly hurrying the enactment of the Monastic Courts Act of 1949 (Ṭhana Vinicchaya). By examining the controversy over this text through newspaper articles, epigraphic evidence and government documents, this paper will explore the intersection between Buddhist statecraft, emerging communities of insight (vipassanā) meditation, and control of the Pali canon in mid-twentieth-century Burma.

    Tony Scott is a PhD Candidate in the Department for the Study of Religion in collaboration with the Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. His research interests lie in South and Southeast Asian Pali discourse and its intersection with communities of practice, vernacular language, and twentieth-century statecraft. He currently focuses on the Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā, a modern Pali commentary on the Questions of King Milinda (circa 1st century B.C.E.) written by a Burmese pioneer of insight (vipassanā) meditation, the Mūla Mingun Jetavan Sayadaw (1868-1954).

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Tony Scott
    PhD Candidate, Department for the Study of Religion and Collaborative Specialization in South Asian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th The Rise of Illiberal Politics in Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    9:00 AM – Welcome and opening remarks by CSK Director Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto): “The rise of extreme illiberal politics in East Asia: Conceptual propositions”

    9:30 AM – Panel 1: Illiberal Politics in China
    Chair and discussant: Sida Liu (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Lynette Ong (Political Science, University of Toronto): “Contentious Politics in China under Xi Jinping’s Rule”
    Jun Zhang (Geography and Planning, University of Toronto): “The Clash of Liberal Hong Kong and Illiberal Beijing: “One Country, Two Systems” under Fire”

    10:50 AM – Coffee break

    11:00 AM – Panel 2: Illiberal Politics in Japan
    Chair and discussant: Takashi Fujitani (History, University of Toronto)
    Nathaniel Smith (East Asian Studies, University of Arizona): “Trolling for the Emperor?: Race, Empire, and Battles on the ‘Multicultural’ Right in Japan”
    Sharon Yoon (Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University): “Normalizing Japan’s Far-Right: The Zaitokukai and its Impact on Mainstream Discourse”

    12:20 PM – Lunch

    2:00 PM – Panel 3: Illiberal Politics in South Korea
    Chair and discussant: Andre Schmid (East Asian Studies, University of Toronto)
    Myungji Yang (Political Science, University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa): “The Specter of the Past: Reconstructing Conservative Historical Memory in South Korea”
    Taehyun Nam (Political Science, Salisbury University):” Taegeukgi Protests as a Counter Movement?”

    3:20 PM – Coffee break

    3:30 PM – Panel 4: Illiberal Politics in the Philippines and Thailand
    Chair and discussant: Jack Veugelers (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Marco Garrido (Sociology, University of Chicago): “Democracy as Disorder: Democratic Disenchantment among the Middle Class in Metro Manila”
    Celso Villegas (Sociology, Kenyon College): “Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines as a Transnational Narrative Trope”
    Tyrell Haberkorn (Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison): “What Cannot Be Spoken: Violence and the Monarchy in Thailand”


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Nathaniel Smith,
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona

    Sharon Yoon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Myungji Yang
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Hawai'I Mānoa

    Taehyun Nam
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science Department, Salisbury University

    Jack Veugelers
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Marco Garrido
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

    Celso Villegas
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Kenyon College

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Speaker
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Sida Liu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Lynette Ong
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Tagore in China: The Case for Pan-Asian Poetics in the 1920s

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The Annual Bengal Studies Lecture

    Description

    Rabindranath Tagore’s 1924 tour in China has attracted numerous critical analyses throughout the years and continues to pique scholars’ curiosity. The literary luminary’s attempt to raise support for his vision of an Asia-wide investment in spirituality in a rapidly materializing world remains a particularly fraught topic. Scholarship on China’s response to the Eastern spirituality ideal has generally focused on Chinese Marxists’ scathing critiques of Tagore’s vision, epitomized in the cold reception his lectures received from their audience. Less attention has been paid to an array of enthusiastic responses that emerged from May 4th poets in the form of journal articles about Tagore and poetry which directly engaged with his ideas. This talk investigates the exchange with Tagore and his work as an event that deeply informed Chinese poetry. As such, I argue, Tagore’s visit enables a new understanding of the Eastern spirituality project not as a failure, but as a vehicle for the Chinese envisioning of Pan-Asian poetics.

    Gal Gvili is an Assistant Professor at the Department of East Asian Studies at McGill University. She studies and teaches modern, and contemporary Chinese literature, literary and cultural theory. Her first book investigates how interactions between Chinese writers and Indian religions and philosophy fashioned a conviction that literature is the ultimate means for transforming the national fate.

    The lecture will be followed by reception, 7-8 PM.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Department of English


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 19th Book Launch: Policy, Regulation and Innovation in China's Electricity and Telecom Industries

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    LECTURE: 4:00 – 5:30 PM
    RECEPTION: 5:30 – 6:30 PM

    China’s innovation ambitions inspire worldwide commentary, much of it poorly informed. Focusing on several sectors central to China’s innovation drive, Loren Brandt (University of Toronto) and Thomas Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) offer a richly detailed account of China’s innovation efforts in their latest book, Policy, Regulation, and Innovation in China’s Electricity and Telecom Industries. The book’s granular studies look beyond specific technologies to incorporate the policy matrix, regulatory structures and global developments into an appraisal of China’s industrial policy and innovation achievements. The massive application of human and financial resources offers great promise, but institutional obstacles and legacies, conflicting objectives, and ill-advised policies inject inefficiencies, resulting in a complex mosaic of success and failure in both technical and commercial dimensions.

    Loren Brandt is the Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade at the University of Toronto. With Thomas G. Rawski, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His current research focuses on issues of industrial upgrading in China, inequality dynamics, and China’s long-run economic growth and structural change.

    Thomas G. Rawski is emeritus Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh. Recent publications include Tales from the Development Frontier (2013), which he co-authored. With Loren Brandt, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His research focuses on the development and modern history of China’s economy, including studies of China’s reform mechanism and achievements.

    Lecture: 4 – 5:30 PM
    Reception: 5:30 – 6:30 PM


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Loren Brandt
    Speaker
    Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade, University of Toronto

    Thomas G. Rawski
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of Economics and History, University of Pittsburgh

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor and Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 20th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    *Please note this event has been postponed. We will email registrants with updated event timing as soon as it is available.*

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 21st Takako Hikotani Lecture: Japan’s ‘Value Diplomacy’ and the Rise of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 315 Bloor
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Prime Minister Abe, in both his first and second administrations, has emphasized values: democracy, human rights, and the rule of law, in his diplomatic statements. Does the Abe administration’s rhetorical focus on values signify a substantial change in Japanese foreign policy, or is it just window dressing?

    In this public talk, Professor Hikotani argues: (1) Japan’s foreign policy was never value-devoid; but the “value” that drove Japan in its foreign policy was different from other western countries in its emphasis; to be less explicit about the value being promoted, and that the value promoted, especially with regard to Asia, emphasized development assistance over democracy promotion. (2) External developments (the rise of China in the region), and internal developments (institutional empowerment of the Prime Minister) led more emphasis in the use of values as slogans in foreign policy. (3) While values are more often used as slogans, the substance of Japan’s foreign policy has not changed much. Democracy and rule of law is mentioned more frequently as the natural bond among Australia, India and Japan, Japan is also careful about not to force Asian countries to choose between China and Japan and to antagonize China along the way.

    Speaker Bio:

    Takako Hikotani is Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Columbia University. She previously taught at the National Defense Academy of Japan, where she was Associate Professor, and lectured at the Ground Self Defense Force and Air Self Defense Force Staff Colleges, and the National Institute for Defense Studies. Her research focus on civil-military relations and Japanese domestic politics, Japanese foreign policy, and comparative civil-military relations. Her publications (in English) include, “The Japanese Diet and defense policy-making.” International Affairs, 94:1, July, 2018; “Trump’s Gift to Japan: Time for Tokyo to Invest in the Liberal Order,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2017; and “Japan’s New Executive Leadership: How Electoral Rules Make Japanese Security Policy” (with Margarita Estevez-Abe and Toshio Nagahisa), in Frances Rosenbluth and Masaru Kohno eds, Japan in the World (Yale University Press, 2009). She was a Visiting Professional Specialist at Princeton University as Social Science Research Council/Abe Fellow (2010-2011) and Fellow of the US-Japan Leadership Program, US-Japan Foundation (2000- ).

    Professor Hikotani received her BA from Keio University, MA from Keio University and Stanford University, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University, where she was a President’s Fellow.


    Speakers

    Takako Hikotani
    Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 26th Faith in Formaldehyde: Conversion in the Oldest Cabinet of Curiosity in the Philippines

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the oldest existing museum in the Philippines, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Museum of Arts and Sciences, as a cabinet of curiosity and a catalyst of conversion. By Spanish royal decree, its early collection acquired through colonial expeditions, complex evangelical networks, and commercial expositions formed the classroom materials for the Natural History course taught by Dominican friars. By 1877, the fauna, flora, and mineral—from the minute to the monumental, from the ordinary to the odd—were inventoried in a three-volume catalogue raisonné. Its collection has since elicited a sense of wonder in nature’s perfection and diversity. Within the broader philosophical contexts of natural and revealed theology and the revival of Thomism after Charles Darwin’s publication of his theory of evolution through natural selection, the museum’s pursuit of scientific knowledge masked its pursuit of sacred truth, engendering an epiphany through the embalmed and serving the divine through the drama of its dioramas. Operating as a mode of signification and translation of the Word, the museum became a biblical exegesis of the origin of species to archive God, preserving faith in formaldehyde as a means of maintaining the authority of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines.

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. A two-time Fulbright U.S. Scholar (Student/Faculty Grant), a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and a Faculty Learning Community Participant through the NEH Humanities Initiative Grant, she is the co-editor of Confrontations, Crossings, and Convergence: Photographs of the Philippines and the United States, 1898-1998 (1998) and author of Institutions and Icons of Patronage: Arts and Culture in the Philippines during the Marcos Years, 1965-1986 (2012). Besides teaching art history and museum studies at several institutions in the United States, France, and the Philippines, she also served as Advisor for the Arts at the National Museum of the Philippines before her appointment as Project Manager/Curator of the Philippines at the Venice Biennale by the Department of Foreign Affairs. Currently, Baluyut is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Art Department and Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oneonta and Chair of the College Art Association’s International Committee.


    Speakers

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Art History; Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, State University of New York (SUNY), Oneonta

    Nhung Tuyet Tran
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 27th Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 27, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Pl.
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    Description

    Explore the motivations behind the rapid development of museums in China.

    The University of Toronto’s School of Cities, in partnership with the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Faculty of Information (iSchool) and Lord Cultural Resources, invite you to join us for the launch of Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom, a new book by the Chinese Museums Association and Lord Cultural Resources.

    This event will feature a presentation by co-editor Gail Dexter Lord, followed by a panel of experts who will discuss the role cultural diplomacy plays in China-Canada relations and the role of museums as an approach to urbanism and city building.

    Museum Development in China is an international collaboration which aims to discover how much East and West can learn from each other about museum roles, our publics, what and how we preserve and future sustainability — even as we marvel at the amazing
    accomplishments of China’s museum building boom.

    *This is a free event, please register to attend.

    Copies of Museum Development in China will be available for purchase at the event.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Catching
    Contemporary art curator and museum planner

    Gail Dexter Lord
    Co-Founder and President, Lord Cultural Resources

    Jennifer Purtle
    Associate Professor, Department of Art History and affiliated faculty of the Asian Institute

    Yan Zhou
    Curator and PhD student, Faculty of Information (iSchool)


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto

    The School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Xi Jinping’s ‘Proregress’: Recent Political and Economic Policy Moves

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Xi Jinping’s leadership has been marked by ambiguity and unpredictability. Since becoming China’s top leader in 2012, he has pursued fragile balances: portraying himself as inheritor of the legacies of both Mao and Deng; consolidating power based on both his communist “red nobility” and his understanding of “ordinary people”; promoting market reform in some ways while asserting greater state control in others; and offering contradictory clues as to whether China seeks to be a revisionist power or to preserve the status quo in the post-Cold War international order. It is hardly surprising that public judgments of Xi within China and overseas are so strikingly different.

    Cheng Li’s talk focuses on Xi’s two most recent parallel domestic policy moves: launching an ambitious program for poverty elimination and promoting the country’s largest metropolis clusters for economic growth. Given Xi’s role at the epicenter of these major developments, a discussion of China’s future trajectory requires a comprehensive and balanced assessment of this goal-oriented leader.

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.


    Speakers

    Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director and Senior Fellow, the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2019

  • Monday, December 2nd Deadlining: Temporality and Transformation in Nepal’s Post-Conflict, Post-Disaster Reconstruction

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 2, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Spring 2015, Nepal experienced two massive earthquakes. Later that year, the country’s constitution was ‘fast-tracked’ to a hurried conclusion after a nearly decade-long wait since the 2006 end of the country’s Maoist-state civil conflict. This paper considers how the temporal tool of the deadline has yielded particular political and material results within Nepal’s ongoing experience of transformation. Whether used to bring political actors from seven major parties to the bargaining table, or nearly 1 million individual householders to the local administrative office to begin their application for reconstruction subsidies, the deadline is a commonly experienced mediator of relationships between the Nepali state and its citizens. Familiarity with this temporal tool also leads to experimentation: when deadlines are believed to be extendable, they may not lead to the desired result. But even when deadlines are repeatedly extended—as they were both for Nepal’s constitution drafters and for homeowners seeking reconstruction subsidies—they effect significant political and material transformations on the ground. Individuals hedge their bets by building particular kinds of political and material structures that are at once possible to complete quickly, and open to expansion should timeframes allow. From the vantage point of 2019, four years after both the earthquakes and the constitution, this paper explores how the dual processes of post-conflict state restructuring and post-earthquake reconstruction intertwine at the experiential level to yield large-scale structural transformations—in which the deadline may both enable and constrain new forms of political and material life.

    Sara Shneiderman is Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), in the Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs. She is the author of Rituals of Ethnicity: Thangmi Identities Between Nepal and India(University of Pennsylvania Press 2015; winner of the 2017 James Fisher Prize for First Books on the Himalayan Region) and co-editor of Darjeeling Reconsidered: Histories, Politics, Environments (Oxford University Press, 2018). She has also published widely on the themes of ethnicity, mobility, citizenship, and borders in the Himalayas and South Asia. Her current transdisciplinary research partnership funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) focuses on the social and political dimensions of post-earthquake reconstruction in Nepal in collaboration with Social Science Baha, the Department of Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, and several other partners. At UBC, she coordinates the Himalaya Program, and served as Co-Director of the Centre for India and South Asia Research from 2017-2019.


    Speakers

    Sara Shneiderman
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs, University of British Columbia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th On Native Testimony: Military Tribunals, War Crimes, and Imperial Judgment in Guam

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1944, the U.S. Navy established the War Crimes Tribunals Program in Guam, one of several Japanese colonies located in the Pacific. For the next five years, the military commission reviewed war crimes cases about assault, murder, treason, and other acts against white civility. Throughout this period, the tribunal also featured more than 100 indigenous Chamorro and Chamorro-Japanese testimonies about Japanese militarism, policing, and torture in Guam. How did these testimonies support the U.S. effort to eradicate Japan’s sovereignty and remake the political bodies and territorial borders of Guam and the Pacific Islands more generally? By drawing on various philosophies and proverbs about life and death, this talk examines the legal and political impact of military courts, native testimonies, and white supremacist violence.

    Keith L. Camacho is an associate professor in the Asian American Studies Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the author of Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam, the co-editor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific, and the former senior editor of Amerasia Journal.

    * Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam by Keith L. Camacho will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Keith L. Camacho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Speaker Biographies:

    Bharat Punjabi is a Lecturer in the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water governance, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. His research on water governance has been published in journals such as World Development, Environmental Research Letters and India Review.

    Aparna Sundar teaches in the Comparative Asian Studies programme. Dr. Sundar has previously taught at universities in Bangalore, India. She works on democratic politics and contemporary struggles over the meanings of democracy in India, and is currently involved in two collaborative comparative research projects, one on authoritarian populisms, and the other on neoliberalization, precarity, and contentious politics in the BRICS countries.

    Francis Cody is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on language and politics in southern India. He first brought these interests to bear on a study of citizenship, literacy, and social movement politics in rural Tamilnadu. This work was published as a book called The Light of Knowledge (Cornell 2013), winner of the 2014 Edward Sapir Book Prize awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology. Cody’s more recent research traces the emergence of populism and transformations of political publicity through Tamil and English news media. This work explores questions of law, technology, and violence in claims to representing popular sovereignty. Taken as a whole, his work contributes to the transdisciplinary project of elaborating critical social theories of mass mediation and politics in the postcolonial world.


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute

    Aparna Sundar
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th Anatomy of a Protest: The Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture in the History of India

    Description

    Kunti, a dalit (“untouchable” caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximately 1.3 million workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This paper explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierarchy in India became the face for an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti’s role in the movement illustrates an important dimension of the abolitionist movement: the construction of the “people” (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in late colonial India.

    Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor (by courtesy) in the Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transregional approaches. She is the author of Colonial Masculinity: The ‘manly Englishman’ and the ‘effeminate Bengali’ in the late nineteenth century (1995) and of Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006), winner of the Joan Kelley Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association and the Albion Book Prize from the North American Conference of British Studies. She is currently working on a book project with the working title, “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” for which she received the 2012 John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Sinha is also a past President of the Association of Asian Studies (2015).


    Speakers

    Mrinalini Sinha
    Speaker
    Alice Freeman Palmer Professor, Department of History; Professor (by courtesy), Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2020

  • Friday, January 17th A Transnational History of Victimhood Nationalisms: On the Global Memory Space of East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 17, 20204:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture will be followed by a reception, 6:00 – 7:00 PM.

    Professor Jie-Hyun Lim’s book project of “victimhood nationalism” aims to illustrate competing memories of victimhood in the postwar Vergangenheitsbewältigung in the global memory space across East and West. Throughout this book, he explores the dialectical interplay of global and national memory with a critical inquiry of the dichotomy of: perpetrators vs. victims, collective guilt vs. innocence, national vs. cosmopolitan memory, historical actors vs. passive objects, over-contextualization vs. de-contextualization, historical conformism vs. presentism, etc. With the emergence of global memory space, unconnected historical actors and memory activists are linked mnemonically a posteriori in the global mnemoscape and memories of victimhood have become more contested. With the histoire croisée as the methodological background, he will trace the global history of victimhood nationalism by drawing entangled memories between victimizers and victimized.

    Jie-Hyun Lim is Professor of Transnational History and director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul. He is also a principal investigator of the research project on the “Mnemonic Solidarity: colonialism, war, and genocide in the global memory space” and the series editor of “Entangled Memories in the Global South” at Palgrave. His most recent book is Memory War: How Could Perpetrators Become Victims? (2019).


    Speakers

    Robert Austin
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies; Associate Professor, CERES

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jie-Hyun Lim
    Speaker
    Professor of Transnational History; Director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Retrospect and Prospect of Hong Kong Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 202012:30PM - 2:00PMExternal Event, Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Diving into the historical development of Postwar Hong Kong film culture reveals complexity beyond our understandings of the typical “rise and fall” narrative. Any investigation into Postwar Hong Kong cinema must entail an examination of Hong Kong’s colonial history and its changing sociopolitical conditions as well. During the 1960s, Hong Kong was the site for numerous ideological struggles between Britain, China, and Hong Kong, and it is this intersection of culture and politics that this symposium hopes to emphasize.

    Dr. Jing Jing Chang will be speaking on her new book Screening Communities, an exciting new analysis that situates Hong Kong cinema within the city’s colonial past. An incredible historical narrative on shaping a local community through film narrative.

    Dr. Jessica Li will be presenting her paper “Eileen Chang: Hong Kong Screenplays in the 1960s.” An insightful research tracing the trajectory of Shanghai writer Eileen Chang who had brought together the cultural interflows between Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies & Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of East Asian Studies

    Bart Testa
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Jing Jing Chang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Jessica Tsui-Yan Li
    Speaker
    Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Chinese Language and Literature, York University


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    China Studies Workshop

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20201:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This is a book panel on George Anderson & Sujit Choudhry’s recently published edited volume, Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions (Oxford University Press, 2019). This edited volume, and an accompanying policy paper, are the major outputs of the “Territory and Power” project, a 5-year, thematic, collaborative, global research initiative led by the Center for Constitutional Transitions, the Forum of Federations, and International IDEA, that brought together 24 experts from 13 countries. The research question is how territorial claims relate to constitution-making processes and constitutional design during periods of intense political engagement over constitutional reform or “constitutional moments”. The book includes 17 case studies. Anderson & Choudhry will present the main findings of Territory and Power, followed by commentary by Jacques Bertrand & Lucan Way, who were in participants in this project and contributed chapters.

    Sujit Choudhry (WZB Berlin Social Science Research Centre) is one of the world’s leading scholars of comparative constitutional law. His edited volumes include The Migration of Constitutional Ideas (CUP), Constitutional Design for Divided Societies (OUP), the Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution (OUP), Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions(OUP), and Security Sector Reform in Constitutional Transitions (OUP). He is currently working on the public law theory of political parties. He has advised constitutional processes in Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Myanmar, Nepal, South Africa, Tunisia, Ukraine and Yemen.

    George Anderson has been a federal deputy minister, president of the Forum of Federations, and member of the UN’s stand-by team of mediation experts. He is a fellow at Queen’s University’s Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity. In addition to his extensive work internationally, he is author of the widely translated Federalism: An Introduction and Fiscal Federallsim: A Comparative Introduction, as well as editor of volumes on oil and gas, water, and internal markets in federal systems.

    Lucan Ahmad Way is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (2015) and co-author of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes After the Cold War (2010). Together with Steven Levitsky, he is completing a book on the durability of autocracies founded in violent social revolution.

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Filiz Kahraman is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and an affiliate faculty member at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of the Munk School at the University of Toronto. Her research investigates law and politics from international and comparative perspectives. She is currently working on a book manuscript examining why labor activists in Europe pursue human rights law as a new mobilization strategy and how international law has affected the lives of aggrieved workers on the ground.


    Speakers

    Sujit Choudhry
    Speaker

    George Anderson
    Speaker

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Speaker

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker

    Filiz Kahraman
    Chair


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Hong Kong: Global China’s Restive Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Post-1997 Hong Kong has become the restive frontier of global China – it is the place where the major strategies of global Chinese power are in full display, and where these have provoked the strongest popular resistance yet to Chinese domination. In this talk, I will first analyze Hong Kong as the testing ground for China’s power playbook around the world – (1) economic statecraft (2) patron-clientelism (3) symbolic violence. How do these mechanisms play out in Hong Kong? Second, I will trace the trajectory of countermovements in Hong Kong to generate lessons about the limits and effectiveness of global China.

    Ching Kwan Lee is Dr. Chung Sze-yuen Professor of Social Science at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Professor of Sociology at UCLA. Her latest books include The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor and Foreign Investment in Africa (Chicago 2017) and Take Back Our Future: An Eventful Sociology of the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement (Cornell 2019).

    RELATED EVENT: “Stand with Hong Kong Journalists” Photo Exhibit
    DATES: December 2, 2019 – January 6, 2020
    HOURS: please click here for regular and winter holidays hours
    LOCATION: Hart House, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle
    Please click here for more information
    PRESENTING PARTNERS:
    Hart House, University of Toronto 
    Stand With Hong Kong Journalists (SWHKJ)
    The International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law 


    Speakers

    Ching Kwan Lee
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Panel Discussion on Taiwan Presidential Election 2020: The outcomes and implications

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Taiwan will hold its 7th direct Presidential election on January 11, 2020. The incumbent candidate, President Tsai Ing-wen (Democratic Progressive Party – DPP) will face off the opposition candidates, the Kaohsiung mayor of Han Kuo-yu (Chinese Nationalist Party – KMT), and the People First Party (PFP) candidate, James Soong. After suffering a huge defeat in the 2018 local elections, polls suggest Tsai Ing-wen in the lead. The two key election issues this time are China, particularly in light of Hong Kong protests, and Taiwan’s economy.

    We will bring together a distinguished group of Taiwan specialists to discuss and help us understand the election outcomes and their implications for Taiwan, Canada, global economy and international relations.

    Please join us for the Panel Discussion followed by reception.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Sida Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Speaker
    Vice Provost, International Studies Experiences, Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Catherine Y. M. Hsu
    Speaker
    Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, Department of Sociology, and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto (TAAT)

    Global Taiwan Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Monday, February 3rd Terror Capitalism: Turkic Muslim Dispossession in Northwest China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Description

    A new system of control, made up of a multi-billion dollar industry of computer-vision technologies, militarized policing, and the mass mobilization of civil servants and private industrialists, is attempting to transform Uyghur and Kazakh native societies in Northwest China. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this talk describes the history which produced these forms of surveillance and demonstrates the quotidian experience of their effects on Turkic Muslim social institutions. It argues that this system of “reeducation” is, in fact, a social engineering system that works in concert with a Chinese form of illiberal capitalism to produce forms of family separation and economic production. As it is implemented, it has the effect of partitioning and radically disempowering women and men who are already marginalized within national and international systems.

    Darren Byler is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. His book project titled Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City focuses on the effects of digital cultural production and surveillance industries in the lives of Uyghur and Han male migrants in the city of Ürümchi, Xinjiang.


    Speakers

    Vincent Wong
    Discussant
    William C. Graham Research Associate at the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History and Global Asia Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 6th Democracy in Myanmar: What to Look for in 2020

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 6, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    For the past several years, Myanmar has found itself in the international spotlight. The state once thought of a pariah in the international community made headlines in 2010 when its military rulers dissolved the junta that had ruled the country since 1962 in favour of a democratically elected civilian government. However, the path to democracy has not been without significant challenges. The Rohingya crisis has shed light on the continued control of military officials over the new government, and once revered leader Aung San Suu Kyi faces increased scrutiny for her defense of their practices at the International Court of Justice. By all accounts, the fight for democracy is ongoing in Myanmar. What are the obstacles to its achivement of a quality democracy? What is the role of international actors in advancing or suppressing this? How will the governing National League for Democracy handle the Rohingya Crisis with increasing nativist sentiments?

    Join the Contemporary Asian Studies Students’ Union and the Synergy Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies on February 6th from 2-4PM as we dissect the democratic progress of Myanmar. Refreshments and snacks will be provided!

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Matthew Walton is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he was the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar.

    Joseph McQuade is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada, where he runs the newly-created Centre for Disinformation Studies program stream. Dr. McQuade is affiliated with the Queen’s University Global History Initiative and with the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, and is a Managing Editor of the Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies.


    Speakers

    Joseph McQuade
    Moderator
    The Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Matthew Walton
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker
    Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Contemporary Asian Studies Students Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Between Human, Non-Human, and Woman: An Actress Theorizes Exhaustion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1940, at the height of her stardom, the star-actress Shanta Apte wrote a harsh polemic against the Bombay film industry. I interrogate this curious text – Should I Join the Movies? – by placing it at the intersection of female stardom, the corporeality of cinematic labor, and techno-scientific interest in industrial fatigue. The weariness of the actress, her capacity for “being spent,” is an experiential category that pushes us to think embodiment as production experience. This essay positions Apte’s text as theory from the South that helps us rethink the meanings of gender, embodiment, affective labor, inequality, and human-machine relations at a critical phase in the career of cinema in India. In dialogue with Apte, I think through the materiality of the off-screen world of film work and parse her insistence on embodiment as the grounds for refusal and resistance.

    Debashree Mukherjee is Assistant Professor of film and media in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University. Her first book, Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City (forthcoming from Columbia University Press) brings together insights from film and media studies, feminist cultural studies, new materialisms, and technology studies to narrate the history of Bombay cinema as a history of material practice.


    Speakers

    Debashree Mukherjee
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 13th Buffers Against Famine: Social Ties and the Effects of Collectivization in Khmer Rouge Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 13, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This paper addresses the causes of non-execution deaths during the Cambodian Genocide. Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979) had one of the highest mortality rates of any communist revolution, with the deaths of approximately one quarter of the population: half from direct violence and the other half from indirect means, in particular starvation. What explains the variation in indirect deaths, those that resulted from means other than execution, during this period of mass violence? I argue that it was not just control over agricultural production that led to high rates of starvation deaths, but the policies of social control associated with the collectivization process that exacerbated the problems of famine. The set of policies surrounding the family, including forced marriages and the separation of family units, which I call social collectivization, undermined traditional buffers against famine and decreased the likelihood of survival. The decision to include social components was an ideological one, but those it targeted reflect a strategic logic shaped by economic and security interests. I find that collectivization of economic activities also affected the likelihood of survival; but the social elements tipped the balance toward disaster. High levels of social control targeted preexisting social network and communal ties, fracturing those networks that would ordinarily have acted as a buffer against poor policy or economic downturns in a community. As a result, individuals were more vulnerable to the effects of overwork and over-requisitioned rice, making deaths from indirect means—starvation and exhaustion in particular—more likely. Through this study, I demonstrate the consequences of governing a revolutionary state for the indirect victims of mass violence.

    Rachel Jacobs is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Dickinson College. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2019. Her research centers on questions of survival during periods of mass violence. More broadly, she researches issues of political violence, gender and conflict, human rights, and the long-term consequences of conflict.


    Speakers

    Rachel Jacobs
    Assistant Professor, Political Science and International Studies, Dickinson College


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 14th The Ethics of the MeToo Movement--Political Transition-From Politics of Identity to Politics of Solidarity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 14, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The MeToo movement in Korea that happened for the past two years shows some fundamental differences from past political movements against sexual discrimination. First, the former takes on the form of a voluntary mass movement. The MeToo movement began due to the female audience’s active acceptance of the major head slogan of anti-sexual violence movements, “It was not my fault.” The growing feminist awareness of sexual violence and problems that surged after 2015 allowed the women to accept the slogan with all their hearts and launch the movement. Secondly, as testimonies appeared subsequently, the violence was seen as a communal affliction, different from the past feminist movements. In the past, sexual violence victims faced suspicion and criticism as soon as they open up about their experiences and to prove their experiences, they went through individual trials in court. However, the MeToo movement was different. As the name “MeToo” itself signifies, the sexual assault victims’ cases were not perceived as discrete or separate, or cause to socially ostracize the victim. Instead, the Me Too movement allowed more opportunities for solidarity and collaboration.
    Lastly, the MeToo movement does not involve victim identity politics that responds to the demand to prove the assault and adheres to victim centricism that claims that women are disadvantaged. Rather, the movement demands change in socially mandated male-hegemonic, heterosexual normative, authoritative communal culture and behavior status quo. In this presentation, we will look at the hints of possibilities of change demonstrated by the MeToo movement and whether these possibilities will be held back by the process of court and bureaucratic procedures. Sharing these concerns about possible challenges to these new changes, I plan to discuss how sexual assault could be politicized as a social phenomenon.

    Kwonkim Hyeonyoung is a Guest Professor in the Korea National University of Arts, South Korea. She sees herself as a research activist. She is a guest professor at Korean National University of Arts. She is the co-author of Analyzing the Korean man , Feminism of perpetration and victimhood and author of Will never turn back again. She also co-wrote twenty books, including The Politics of the MeToo Movement . Her primary interest as a researcher lies on exploring ways how gender politics of violence and power plays in today’s Korean society. As an activist, she reads written judgments in court, attends hearings at trials, protests in streets, and writes.


    Speakers

    Hyeonyoung Kwonkim
    Speaker
    (Art and Gender Institute, Korea National University of Arts)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    (Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 20th Coronavirus in Context: Interdisciplinary Insights through Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 20, 20204:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Please join us as a group of interdisciplinary scholars shares their expertise on the political and economic implications of the novel Coronavirus outbreak.


    Speakers

    Mary Boyd
    Panelist
    Director, Shanghai Corporate Network, The Economist Intelligence Unit

    Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Economic Geography, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20201:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 9, 2020. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Religion, Medicine, Bioethics, and the Law in End-of-life Care: South Asian Religious Adherent Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk is based on a recently defended doctoral ethnography investigating end-of-life care issues in contemporary India from the perspectives of Indian and Tibetan religious adherents, through the lenses of religious studies, bioethics and the law. The need came in part from a paucity in bioethics studies related to the ancient Indic religious traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, from some studies ignoring the non-theistic Indic traditions altogether and legal challenges in India against Jain fasting at the end of life. Three core themes include attempts to block disclosure of bad news in sharing of sensitive medical information; ritual fasting and immobilization at the end of life; and exposure to and attitudes towards end-of-life care models including pain management, hospice palliative care and assistance in dying. This study is an advocacy anthropology project with hopes that it proves helpful in India and other jurisdictions where South Asian religious adherents receive end-of-life care so that culturally safe care can be better provided.

    Dr. Sean Hillman is a clinical bioethicist with the Centre for Clinical Ethics (CCE), a consultant organization based at Unity Health Toronto and contracted to seven institutions in Ontario. Over the last several years Sean has been the ethics lead for the five-hospital Lakeridge Health system in Durham region. He also is a Buddhist Corrections Chaplain for two facilities in the Kingston region. Sean was a bedside caregiver in hospital for almost two decades and did a year-long fellowship in Clinical and Organizational Bioethics also at the CCE. A medical anthropologist and textualist, Sean recently completed his doctorate in religion and the collaborative programs of bioethics and south Asian studies at U of T.

    A scholar of various Asian philosophies and languages for almost thirty years, with a major focus on the Indic religious traditions, Sean has spent five years living, studying and researching in India. Sean’s current research projects are on maximizing decisional participation by those who might have mental capacity interferences, and on how to better understand why families may request aggressive medical management for their loved-ones despite a poor prognosis (including religious logic such as vitalism, non-harm and filial piety). Sean is a member of Durham Family Resources community advisory committee for their “recognizing capacity” pilot project which advocates for increased inclusion of those with intellectual, cognitive or communication challenges and for including supported decision making in Ontario healthcare law.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Sean Hillman
    PhD, Religion/Bioethics/South Asian Studies, U of T, 2019; Clinical Ethicist, Lakeridge Health (Centre for Clinical Ethics); Buddhist Corrections Chaplain, Bath and Collins Bay Institutions



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Diana Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

    Matthew Walton
    Chair
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th Pop City: Korean Popular Culture and the Selling of Place

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Pop City examines the use of Korean television dramas and K-pop music to promote urban and rural places in South Korea. Building on the phenomenon of Korean pop culture, Youjeong Oh argues that pop culture-featured place selling mediates two separate domains: political decentralization and the globalization of Korean popular culture. The local election system introduced in the mid 90s has stimulated strong desires among city mayors and county and district governors to develop and promote their areas. Riding on the Korean Wave—the overseas popularity of Korean entertainment, also called Hallyu—Korean cities have actively used K-dramas and K-pop idols in advertisements designed to attract foreign tourists to their regions. Hallyu, meanwhile, has turned the Korean entertainment industry into a speculative field into which numerous players venture by attracting cities as sponsors.
    By analyzing the process of culture-featured place marketing, Pop City shows that urban spaces are produced and sold just like TV dramas and pop idols by promoting spectacular images rather than substantial physical and cultural qualities. Popular culture-associated urban promotion also uses the emotional engagement of its users in advertising urban space, just as pop culture draws on fans’ and audiences’ affective commitments to sell its products. Oh demonstrates how the speculative, image-based, and consumer-exploitive nature of popular culture shapes the commodification of urban space and ultimately argues that pop culture–mediated place promotion entails the domination of urban space by capital in more sophisticated and fetishized ways.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th An Indian Outcast in Reform China: Hindi Film and the Chinese Imagination of Global Culture Post-Mao

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    East Asian Seminar Series

    The late 1970s and early ‘80s saw a Chinese craze for Indian films. Members of the generation that came of age in this time have such fond memories of the foreign and exotic Hindi films that many Indian visitors to China are still serenaded with songs from the handful of films that were screened in that period. This talk examines India’s symbolic role in China’s post Cultural Revolution healing, looking especially at the discourse around popular Hindi films such as Caravan, Noorie, and Awara. The contemporary rethinking of the 1980s in China serves as the larger framework of the talk, emphasizing how the India craze of the early 1980s challenges how 21st century scholars see 1985 as marking China’s entry to “world culture.” Looking at Hindi film in the 1980s interrogates the ways in which “the west” can come to symbolize “the world” in contemporary Chinese cultural studies.

    Krista Van Fleit is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies at the University of South Carolina. Her first book, Literature the People Love, examines culture from the Early Maoist Period, providing a new interpretive framework with which to approach texts from this time. She is currently writing a book titled Bollywood to Beijing: Film Exchange and Cultural Production in China and India.


    Speakers

    Krista Van Fleit
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies, University of South Carolina

    Anup Grewal
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2020

  • Friday, March 6th The Politics of the Fatwa: Modern Islamic Legal Authority and Rise of the Indonesian Council of Ulama

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Fatwas from Islamic organizations are prominent elements of public debates in democratic Indonesia, as well as the broader Muslim world. Yet scholars lack a clear theoretical explanation for the power of fatwas in politics. This paper draws on original archival material to explicate the legal authority of the fatwas from the Indonesian Council of Ulama (Majelis Ulama Indonesia, MUI), which over the past twenty years has become one of the country’s most influential actors. The paper distinguishes three periods in the growth and transformation of MUI’s authority; starting with charismatic authority and state corporatism, MUI later gained formal regulatory authority, and now uses agenda setting, lobbying, mass mobilization, and the threat of violence. By examining how the power of MUI’s fatwas increased as the organization accrued more forms of authority, this periodization demonstrates that explaining the political power of the fatwa requires understanding the modern organizational authority of Islamic actors. In the modern age, Islamic legal authority reflects the dominant logic of political authority in society.

    Jeremy Menchik is Assistant Professor in the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and faculty affiliate in Political Science. His first book, Islam and Democracy in Indonesia: Tolerance without Liberalism (Cambridge University Press, 2016) was the co-winner of the 2017 International Studies Association award for the best book on religion and international relations.


    Speakers

    Faisal Kamal
    Discussant
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jacques Bertrand
    Chair
    Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Jeremy Menchik
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Book Launch: The Transcultural Streams of Chinese Canadian Identities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 202010:30AM - 12:30PMExternal Event, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Focusing on the geopolitical and economic circumstances that have prompted migration from Hong Kong and mainland China to Canada, The Transcultural Streams of Chinese Canadian Identities examines the Chinese Canadian community as a simultaneously transcultural, transnational, and domestic social and cultural formation. Taking an innovative interdisciplinary approach to the ways in which Chinese Canadian adapt to and co-construct the Canadian cultural mosaic, the book explores various patterns of Chinese cultural exchanges in Canada and how they intertwine with the community’s sense of belonging and disengagement.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca
    or by calling 416-946-8978


    Speakers

    Dr. Jessica Tsui-yan Li
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Lily Cho
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Guida Man
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Jack Hang-tat Leong
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Asian Institute

    Canadian Studies at University College

    York Centre for Asian Research


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Reading and Writing "Possessed by the Virgin," with Kristin Bloomer

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Kristin Bloomer’s Possessed by the Virgin: Hinduism, Roman Catholicism, and Marian Possession in South India introduces readers to three women who become possessed by the Virgin Mary: Rosalind, Nancy, and Dhanam. In this rich ethnographic account of Marian possession, healing, and exorcism in Tamil Nadu, Bloomer pays particular attention to the experience of possession as articulated by these women and the various community members that surround them, from the skeptical Catholic priest to the devotees, and everyone in between. This beautifully written ethnography raises questions about possessed subjectivities and agencies, gender, Tamil language, Hinduism and Catholicism in South India, and, more generally, how to write about possession.

    In this panel, a group of graduate students from the University of Toronto, with diverse research interests ranging from Tamil Studies to Possession Studies, will critically engage with the author and her book from various perspectives. The event aims to raise questions, deeply reflect, and start a critical conversation about the book and its contents.

    PANELISTS:

    Kainat Bashir, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Janani Mandayam Comar, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Stephanie Duclos-King, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Jesse Pruitt, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Kristina Rogahn, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Austin Simoes-Gomes, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT

    __________________

    Kristin C. Bloomer is an Associate Professor of Religion at Carleton College in Northfield, MN. She is currently working on a book about Tamil family gods and lineage deities, with support from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Carleton College.


    Speakers

    Kristin Bloomer
    Speaker
    Department of Religion, Carleton College, Northfield, MN

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology; Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 13th Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea + film screening of “Family in the Bubble

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 13, 20209:00AM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Friday, March 13, 202010:00AM - 2:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Symposium & Documentary Screening
    Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea
    For screening event info and tickets please go to: https://family-in-the-bubble.eventbrite.ca

    March 13-14, 2020 (Friday-Saturday)

    Friday Symposium: 9:30am-3:15pm
    Saturday Documentary Screening: 2:15-5:30pm

    This event is sponsored by The Academy of Korean Studies, York University’s Korean Office for Research and Education, Center for the Study of Korea (U of Toronto), School of Cities (U of Toronto), and Hope21.

    March 13 (Friday) Symposium

    Room 208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, University of Toronto-St. George campus

    9:30-9:40 Welcome remark by Hyun-Ok Park (York)

    9:40-9:50 Welcome remark by Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)

    9:50-10:00 Introduction to the Symposium: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    10:00-11:00 Keynote Speech
    Chair: Yewon Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    Laam Hae (York) “Toward a Dialectical Vision of Planetary Urbanization: Ecological Pro-Greenbelt Movements against the Construction State in Korea”

    11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

    11:15-12:45 Panel 1: The Making of the Speculative City
    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Seung-Cheol Lee (U of Mississippi)

    Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto) “Juxtaposing biopolitics with speculative urbanisms: the development of private welfare/health institutions in South Korea”

    Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto) “The Dictatorship of Capital: Urban Redevelopment and the Democracy of the Have-Nots in Post-Authoritarian South Korea”

    12:45-2:00 Lunch Break

    2:00-3:30 Panel 2 The Unmaking of the Speculative City
    Chair: Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Jesook Song (U of Toronto)

    Seung-Cheol Lee (U of Mississippi) “Seeing like a community entrepreneur: The capitalization of ‘community’ in Seoul’s community building project (maul mandulgi)”

    Yewon Lee (U of Toronto) “Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space”

    March 14 (Saturday) 2:15pm-5:30pm

    Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Avenue, University of Toronto-St. George campus

    Documentary Screening of Family in the Bubble and Panel Discussion

    For screening event please go to: https://family-in-the-bubble.eventbrite.ca

    Moderator: Michelle Cho (U of Toronto)
    Panel: Yewon Lee (U of Toronto) and Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    Symposium and Documentary Screening Participant Bios

    Michelle Cho is Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Culture at the University of Toronto. She has published on Asian cinemas and Korean wave television, video, and pop music in such venues as Cinema Journal, the International Journal of Communication, The Korean Popular Culture Reader, and Asian Video Cultures. She’s currently at work on a book about gender, media, and fandom in Korean-wave popular cultures.

    Hae Yeon Choo is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She is an author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016), a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses at American military camptown clubs. Her current research examines the politics of land ownership in contemporary South Korea, delving into macro-level political contestations over land rights, together with the narratives of people who pursue class mobility through real estate speculation. She has also translated Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider and Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

    Laam Hae is an Associate Professor in the department of Politics at York University. Her research areas are urban political economy, neoliberal urbanism and urban social movements. She is the author of The Gentrification of Nightlife and the Right to the City: Regulating Spaces of Social Dancing in New York (2012, Routledge), and co-edited On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (2019, University of Toronto Press). She is currently developing a research project that examines the spatiality of social reproduction and gender inequality in South Korea.

    Hyun-Chul Kim is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto. Her research interests include the varied degree of confined, segregated spaces in East Asian regions, from nursing homes to prisons, considering urban constructions, intimacy, and disability. She is writing her dissertation tentatively titled “Between Communal ‘Village’ and an Atomized ‘Home’: Blurring the boundaries of community organization movement and segregated-confined welfare spaces of South Korea in 1950s-1960s”.

    Seung Cheol Lee received his PhD from Columbia University in 2018 and is now an assistant professor of anthropology and East Asian Studies at the University of Mississippi. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on a book manuscript that examines how the ethicality and sociality of gift-giving are grafted onto neoliberal market rationality in the social economy sector in South Korea.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is a Korean Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Study of Korea at University of Toronto. She is an ethnographer and urban and labor sociologist and received her Ph.D. from the Department of Sociology at UCLA. She is interested in speculative urbanism and how it generates new politics of dissent. In particular, her dissertation focuses on tenant shopkeepers whose livelihoods are disrupted by speculation on the urban spaces on which their shops stand and how these subjects organize via transforming everyday mundane spaces of work into symbolic spaces of dissent.

    Yoonkyung Lee is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism with a regional focus on East Asia. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Hyun Ok Park teaches sociology and the director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University. With archival and ethnographic research, her research investigates global capitalism in colonial, industrial, and financial forms, democracy, socialism, and post-socialist transition. She is the author of Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution in Manchuria (Duke University Press, 2005). Her latest book is The Capitalist Unconscious: From Korean Unification to Transnational Korea (Columbia University Press, 2015). She is completing a book manuscript, “A Sublime Disaster: The Sewŏl Ferry Incident and the Politics of the Living Dead.”

    Jesook Song is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on contemporary urban transformation and welfare issues, including homelessness, youth unemployment, single women’s housing, mental health in South Korea. She is author of South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society (Duke University Press, 2009) and Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea (SUNY Press, 2014), On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (University of Toronto Press 2019, co-edited with Laam Hae).


    Speakers

    Yewon Andrea Lee
    Chair
    Post-doctoral Fellow, Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Laam Hae
    Keynote
    Associate Professor, Department of Politics, York University

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Seung-Cheol Lee
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Mississippi

    Hyun-Chul Kim
    Speaker
    Ph.D Candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto

    Jesook Song
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2020

  • Friday, May 8th Asian Institute Student Leadership Celebration

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 8, 20205:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event:
    Please RSVP to ai.coordinator@utoronto.ca for the Zoom link.
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    Description

    We’re marking the achievements of students at the Asian Institute with a virtual Asian Institute Student Leadership Celebration this Friday, May 8, 5:00-6:00PM (EST). Faculty, staff, friends, family, pets etc. welcome!

    During the ceremony, we encourage you to fold a paper crane with us, following these simple instructions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTY-nGYYq_c

    Please RSVP to ai.coordinator@utoronto.ca for the Zoom Video Conferencing details.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2020

  • Monday, June 8th Rhodes Scholarships for China Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 8, 20209:30AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join Professor Diana Fu for a webinar on applying to the Rhodes Scholarship in the China Constituency.

    Rhodes Scholarships for China

    Watch the recording of this webinar here.

    The inaugural class of Chinese Rhodes Scholars joined Oxford University in 2016. As of 2020, there are twenty Rhodes Scholars from China. They are “fighting the world’s fight.” Join them. The Rhodes Scholarship programme is the oldest (established 1903) international scholarship programme in the world, and one of the most prestigious. Administered by the Rhodes Trust in Oxford, the programme offers 102 fully-funded Scholarships each year for postgraduate study at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom – one of the world’s leading universities. Rhodes Scholarships are for young leaders of outstanding intellect and character who are motivated to engage with global challenges, committed to the service of others and show promise of becoming value-driven, principled leaders for the world’s future.

    This information session is geared towards eligible candidates for the Rhodes Scholarships for China (Citizens of the People’s Republic of China with a GPA 3.75 or higher). Full eligibility criteria here. Interested applicants to Rhodes Scholarships from other universities and for other constituencies are also welcome to attend.

    Please email questions in advance to ai.asianstudies@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Diana Fu
    National Co-Secretary, Rhodes Scholarship for China Constituency; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Yan Chen
    China Rhodes Scholar, Class of 2019



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2020

  • Friday, September 4th Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 4, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    Professor Naoki Sakai’s Distinguished Lecture on “Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity” is the inaugural event for the JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 on “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics.” The respondent is Professor Takashi Fujitani from the University of Toronto.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________________

    Naoki Sakai teaches in the departments of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies and is a member of the graduate field of History at Cornell University. He has published in a number of languages in the fields of comparative literature, intellectual history, translation studies, the studies of racism and nationalism, and the histories of semiotic and literary multitude – speech, writing, corporeal expressions, calligraphic regimes, and phonographic traditions.

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). Much of his past and current research has centred on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Elizabeth Wijaya works at the intersection of cinema, philosophy, and area studies. She is especially interested in the material and symbolic entanglements between East Asia and Southeast Asia cinema. Her work emphasizes a multimethodological approach, which is attentive to media forms, ethnographic detail, material realities, archival practices, international networks, and interdisciplinary modes of theorization. For 2020-2021, she is the convenor of “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics,” JHI-UTM Seminar.


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Respondent
    Professor, Department of History and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Naoki Sakai
    Speaker
    Goldwin Smith Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institue

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20202:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pan-Asian Seminar Series: The Political Life of Information

    Description

    “The Political Life of Information” series at the Asian Institute brings together scholars, activists, artists, and other practitioners to reflect on practices of surveillance, data visualization, population management and identification, news and journalism, and the social aspects of algorithms from a perspective based in Asia, but speaking to a broad audience interested in the political ramifications of media and information technology.

    As our inaugural event, Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance will consist of a panel of three experts who will speak about the socio-technical dimensions of digital spying and the contested sphere of privacy shaping contemporary activism and journalism in Asia. Speakers will focus on counter-surveillance work done at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, and how this research and public outreach has been engaged by privacy and free speech advocates.
    _______________________________

    Chinmayi Arun is a resident fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and an affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society at Harvard University. She has served on the faculties of two of the most highly regarded law schools in India from 2010 onwards, and was the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi. Chinmayi has been consultant to the Law Commission of India and member of the Indian government’s multi stakeholder advisory group for the India Internet Governance Forum in the past.

    Irene Poetranto is a Senior Researcher for The Citizen Lab and a Doctoral Student in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interest is on cybersecurity policy development in the Global South, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. She obtained her Master’s degree in Political Science and Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto, and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

    John Scott-Railton is a Senior Researcher at the Citizen Lab, University of Toronto. His work focuses on technological threats to civil society, including targeted malware operations and online disinformation. His greatest hits include a collaboration with colleague Bill Marczak that uncovered the first iPhone zero-day and remote jailbreak seen in the wild, as well as the use of NSO Group’s Pegasus spyware to human rights defenders, journalists, and opposition movements around the globe. Other investigations with Citizen Lab colleagues include the first report of ISIS-led malware operations, and China’s “Great Cannon,” the Government of China’s nation-scale DDoS attack. John has also investigated Russian and Iranian disinformation campaigns, and the manipulation of news aggregators such as Google News. John has been a fellow at Google Ideas and Jigsaw at Alphabet. He graduated with a University of Chicago and a Masters from the University of Michigan. He is completing a PhD at UCLA. Previously he founded The Voices Projects, collaborative information feeds that bypassed internet shutdowns in Libya and Egypt.


    Speakers

    Chinmayi Arun
    Speaker
    Resident Fellow of the Information Society Project, Yale Law School; affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society, Harvard University; the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance, National Law University Delhi

    Irene Poetranto
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    John Scott-Railton
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology (UTM)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Transnational Solidarities / Complicities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    “Transnational Solidarities/Complicities” is the second lecture for the Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics, JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________

    Nadine Chan, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University
    “Asynchronicity and the Time-Lagged Medium: Racializing Space-Time in the Colonial Documentaries of British Malaya.”

    Ryan A. Buyco, Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College
    “Navigating Asian Settler Colonialism: Okinawa-Hawai’i Connections through the Works of Laura Kina and Lee A. Tonouchi.”

    Cheryl Suzack, Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto
    “Indigenous-Feminist Political Imaginaries in Four Settler-Colonial Countries.”

    Jessica Harris, Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University
    “African-American Women and Love, Italian Style in 20th and 21st Century Media.”

    Moderator: Kun Huang, PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Speakers

    Nadine Chan
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University

    Ryan A. Buyco
    Speaker
    Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College

    Cheryl Suzack
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto

    Jessica Harris
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University

    Kun Huang
    Moderator
    PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto

    Department of Visual Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 23rd Engendering History: Gender, Sexuality, and Love in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 23, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Ashley Thompson suggests an engendering of history that bears “the potential to make history, literally and figuratively, insofar as it threatens or promises to upset established notions of the field” (2008:106). This panel takes up Thompson’s call to engender history and interrogates dominant conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love in modern Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. From texts to textiles, classrooms to forests, and wedding photos to state records, the papers focus on particular spaces and materials that vibrated with social and political intensities through the long period of the Cold War in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. The panel shows how materiality and spatiality were key aspects that shaped the ideological extremes that manifested in violence and unrest in Southeast Asia, and the panel begins its inquiries in the 1950s.

    Alexandra Dalferro – “Weaving Queer Pasts and Futures in Thailand”

    Chairat Polmuk – “Of Eros and the Forest: The Topography of Love in Lao Revolutionary Literature”

    Catriona Miller – “Sewing Patterns and Visions of Democracy: Khmer Women Organizing during Decolonization (1948 – 1952)”

    ___________________

    ALEXANDRA DALFERRO is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University. She is currently writing her dissertation about the politics and practices of sericulture and silk weaving in Surin, Thailand, and she pays particular attention to the sensory and affective dimensions of these processes. Her fieldwork was supported by the Wenner Gren Foundation and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program, and for the 2019-2020 academic year, she was a Mellon Graduate Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell. Alexandra likes to weave and to sew and to think about how craft and art intersect with daily life.

    CHAIRAT POLMUK teaches Southeast Asian languages and literature, cultural theory, and media studies at the Department of Thai, Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He received a PhD in Asian Literature, Religion, and Culture from Cornell in 2018. His doctoral project titled, “Atmospheric Archives: Post-Cold War Affect and the Buddhist Temporal Imagination in Southeast Asian Literature and Visual Culture,” received the 2018 Lauriston Sharp Prize for best dissertation.

    CATRIONA MILLER is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Her dissertation, Gendering the Cambodian State (1900 – 1970) utilizes transnational feminist methods to recast the political history of Cambodia during the transition from a French Protectorate to a neutral Buddhist nation-state. She conducted this research with generous funding from the NSEP Boren Fellowship and Center for Khmer Studies Fellowship.

    ARNIKA FUHRMANN is an interdisciplinary scholar of Southeast Asia, working at the intersections of the region’s aesthetic, religious, and political modernities. She is an associate professor of Asian Studies at Cornell University and the author of Ghostly Desires: Queer Sexuality and Vernacular Buddhism in Contemporary Thai Cinema (Duke University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Alexandra Dalferro
    Panelist
    Phd Candidate, Cornell University

    Chairat Polmuk
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Chulalongkorn University

    Catriona Miller
    Panelist
    PhD Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cornell University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Book Launch of On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 202012:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *Please RSVP to Grayson Lee at grayson.lee@utoronto.ca to receive the Zoom link*

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis features a set of ethnographic works from the peripheries of urban, regional, and transnational development in South Korea, and discusses the ways in which places can be studied in an increasingly globalized world. Engaging with the ideas of “core location,” a term coined by Baik Young-seo, and “Asia as method,” a concept with a century-old intellectual lineage in East Asia, the book explores relational understandings of place as a constellation of local and global forces and processes that interact and contradict with each other in particular ways. Each chapter also explores multiple modes of urban marginality and discusses how understanding them shapes the methods of academic praxis to further social justice causes and decolonialized scholarship. This book is the outcome of several years of interdisciplinary collaborations and dialogues among scholars based in geography, architecture, anthropology, and urban politics.

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis is available for purchase from the University of Toronto Press. Please use the following promocode: UTPLAUNCH10

    For any inquiries, please email Professor Jesook Song at jesook.song@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Hyun Ok Park
    Opening Remarks
    Sociology, York University

    Hyun Gyung Kim
    Discussant
    Institute of Korean Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

    Albert Park
    Discussant
    History, Claremont McKenna College

    Hyun Bang Shin
    Discussant
    Geography and Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Alan Smart
    Discussant
    Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

    Jesook Song (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Laam Hae (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Politics, York University

    Sujin Eom (contributor)
    Speaker
    Geography, Dartmouth College

    Hyeseon Jeong (contributor)
    Speaker
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle and Migrant Workers Centre, Victorian Trades Hall Council, Australia

    You Jeong Oh (contributor)
    Speaker
    Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin

    Seo Young Park (contributor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, Scripps College

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea and Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Global and Diasporic Military Medicine in the Republic of China, 1946 - 1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This presentation argues that the global connections and medical culture forged by diasporic WWII medical personnel was central to the survival, growth, and centrality of military medicine in postwar China and Taiwan. Established in post-war Shanghai in 1946 from a military medical complex during World War II, the main military medical institution (National Defense Medical Center NDMC) faced existential threat when its primary source of financial and logistical support from the Chinese diaspora and American aid organizations shriveled up. As the only medical center to move from China to Taiwan in 1949, the NDMC faced an uncertain future on the island. In the mid-1950s, the NDMC’s personnel developed an elaborate Cold War vision of NDMC as a center for training anti-Communist Overseas Chinese students. This vision persuaded the U.S. government to financially support the NDMC in the mid-1950s, enabling the center to become one of the three leading medical colleges on the island today. The center’s philosophy of fusing medical therapy, training, and ideology played a unique role in shaping Taiwan’s exemplary universal health care system, and left an important legacy in its fight against SARS and COVID-19.
    ______________________

    WAYNE SOON (PhD Princeton) is an Assistant Professor of History at Vassar College. He researches on how international ideas and practices of medicine, institution-building, and diaspora have shaped Chinese East Asia’s interaction with its people and the world in the twentieth century. His forthcoming book, Global Medicine in China: a Diasporic History (Stanford University Press), tells the global health histories of Chinese East Asia through the lens of diasporic medical personnel. The book argues that the Overseas Chinese were central in introducing new practices of military medicine, blood banking, mobile medicine, and mass medical training to China and Taiwan. Universal care, practical medical education, and mobile medicine are all lasting legacies of this effort on both sides of the Taiwan Straits. Dr Soon’s published and forthcoming articles can be found in Twentieth Century China, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, American Journal of Chinese Studies, and East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal.

    SHELLY CHAN is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a historian of modern China and the Chinese diaspora and the author of Diaspora’s Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration. This recent book was published by Duke University Press in 2018 and shortlisted for the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) Humanities Book Prize. Chan’s new research focuses on the history of “homegoings” involving China, Taiwan, and the diaspora in the Cold War, as well as the historical geography of Nanyang (the South Seas) in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Chan received her Ph.D. from UC Santa Cruz and taught at the University of Victoria (2009-11) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2011-20) before returning this year to her Ph.D. alma mater as a faculty member.


    Speakers

    Wayne Soon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Vassar College

    Shelly Chan
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of History, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, The Factory and The Future of the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    As discussed in his new book The Myth of Chinese Capitalism, Dexter Roberts will describe how surging income inequality, an unfair social welfare system, and rising social tensions block China’s continued economic rise with implications for companies and countries around the world. He will discuss how China is struggling to leave behind its “Factory to the World” growth model, and include its hundreds of millions of left-behind migrant workers into a more innovative, consumption-driven economy and why that means China may not become the superpower the world expects. He will also discuss how COVID-19 has exacerbated the already huge social disparities in China further complicating its ongoing economic transition and putting it at risk of falling into the middle income trap. And he will discuss how global supply chain diversification is affecting China and whether a change in U.S. presidents is likely to do anything to reduce the growing tensions between Washington and Beijing.
    ________________

    Dexter Tiff Roberts is an award-winning writer and speaker on China now serving as a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative and an adjunct instructor in political science at the University of Montana as well as a Fellow at the university’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center. Previously he was China bureau chief and Asia News Editor at Bloomberg Businessweek, based in Beijing for more than two decades. He has reported from all of China’s provinces and regions including Tibet and Xinjiang, covering the rise of companies and entrepreneurs, manufacturing and migrants, demography and civil society. He has also reported from North Korea, Mongolia and Cambodia, on China’s growing economic and political influence. Roberts’ first book, The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, the Factory, and the Future of the World, was published by St. Martin’s Press in March 2020 and he created and now publishes a weekly newsletter called Trade War. He has a BA in Political Science from Stanford University and Master of International Affairs from Columbia University and studied Mandarin Chinese at Taiwan Normal University.


    Speakers

    Dexter Tiff Roberts
    Speaker
    Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative; Adjunct Instructor in Political Science, University of Montana

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2020

  • Thursday, October 1st A Thousand Cuts: On Media, Policing, and Authoritarian Brutality

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20208:00PM - 10:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Following an online screening of Ramona Diaz’s film A Thousand Cuts (2020), please join us for a panel featuring Maria Ressa (Rappler), Jinee Lokaneeta (Drew University), Gina Dent (UCSC), moderated by Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College). A Thousand Cuts focuses on the current effects of Rodrigo Duterte’s infamous “war on drugs” and the shutting down of independent news outlets as well as the arrest, detention, threats and humiliation of journalists, including Maria Ressa. This post-screening panel focuses on policing, state violence, and how the media and ideological landscapes enable populism and authoritarianism across the Philippines, U.S. and India. The discussion also serves as the staging ground for transnational forms of creativity, solidarity, and resistance.


    Speakers

    Maria Angelita Ressa
    Speaker
    a Filipino-American journalist and author, best known for co-founding Rappler as its chief executive officer

    Jinee Lokaneeta
    Speaker
    Professor in Political Science and International Relations, Drew University

    Gina Dent
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Legal Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Neferti Xina M. Tadiar
    Moderator
    Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, Columbia University.


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Cornell Southeast Asia Program

    Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, Barnard College

    Global Asias Faculty Collaborative, Rutgers University

    Rutgers Global

    UCLA Department of Asian American Studies

    UCLA Asian American Studies Center

    UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd Race and Singapore Short Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    For JHI-UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series, Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics presents “Race and Singapore Short Cinema”, co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, Jackman Humanities Institute, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto and Objectifs.

    October 1-23, 2020 | The following film screenings are available for viewing via Objectifs Film Library: “Dahdi” by Kirsten Tan, “Timeless” by K. Rajagopal, “Last Trip Home” by Han Fengyu, “Not Working Today” by Tan Shijie. Link: https://objectifsfilmlibrary.uscreen.io/categories/mediating-race-reimagining-geopolitics-webinar.
    _____________________________

    Kirsten Tan is a New York-based Singaporean filmmaker whose debut feature Pop Aye premiered as the opening night film of Sundance Film Festival 2017 and was awarded a Special Jury Prize for screenwriting. It traveled to 50 film festivals around the world, picking up several accolades along the way. Her shorts have collectively received over ten international awards. She was accorded the Young Artist Award by the NAC Singapore and was nominated as a Singaporean of the Year by The Straits Times.

    Han Fengyu graduated with a diploma in Film, Sound and Video from Ngee Ann Polytechnic in 2014. His graduation short film Last Trip Home premiered at the 67th Cannes Film Festival in the Cinefondation category in 2014. Last Trip Home has also competed at the Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival, and the Singapore International Film Festival in 2014. It has won ‘The Best Fiction’ film at the 6th Singapore Short Film Awards in 2015.

    As a filmmaker, K.Rajagopal has won the Singapore International Film Festivalʼs Special Jury Prize for 3 consecutive years. I Can’t Sleep Tonight (1995), The Glare (1996) and Absence (1997) have been featured at international festivals around the world. Other works include Brother (1997), The New World (2008) and Timeless (2010), which won Best Cinematography and Best Editing at the Singapore Short Film Awards 2011. His short film was also part of the omnibus film 7 Letters (2015) which had its Asian premiere at the Busan Film Festival in 2015. He directed a segment in the LUCKY 7 film project with other six prominent Singaporean directors. He has also written and directed television films like Maddy, Two Mothers in a HDB Playground and Heartland. He also worked on stage for over ten years. He has collaborated with many notable theatre directors on projects such as Medea, Beauty World and Private Parts. A Yellow Bird is his first feature film and it premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016.

    Shijie Tan studied philosophy before pursuing filmmaking at New York University’s Tisch Asia School. His first school short, For Two, was In Competition for the Short Film Golden Lion at the 66th Venice Film Festival and was acclaimed by the International Film Guide as one of the Top 5 Singapore Films of the year. The Hole won 4 of the 5 awards it was nominated for at the Singapore Short Film Awards that year, including Best Film, Direction and Script. Not Working Today, his third short film, competed at the Clermont-Ferrand Short Film Festival and clinched Best Singapore Short Film at the 25th Singapore International Film Festival. It was also selected as one of fifty significant films in Singapore cinema history, showcased at the Cinematheque Francaise in Paris. His next work, The Lake, part of the omnibus feature Distance, was a cross-territory collaboration between Singapore, China, Taiwan and Thailand. It was selected as the Opening Film of the Golden Horse Film Festival in 2015, the premier festival for Chinese-language cinema. He is currently in development for a feature debut.

    Alfian Sa’at is the Resident Playwright of Wild Rice. His published works include three collections of poetry: ‘One Fierce Hour’, ‘A History of Amnesia’ and ‘The Invisible Manuscript’; a collection of short stories, ‘Corridor’; a collection of flash fiction, ‘Malay Sketches’; three collections of plays as well as the published play ‘Cooling Off Day’. In 2001, Alfian won the Golden Point Award for Poetry as well as the National Arts Council Young Artist Award for Literature. His plays and short stories have been translated into German, Swedish, Danish and Japanese.

    Sophia Siddique holds a PhD from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Her research interests include Singapore cultural studies, representations of trauma and memory in Cambodian, Indonesian, and Thai cinema, and genre (Asian Horror and Global Science Fiction). She has published in the Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, and the Journal of Chinese Cinemas. She co-edited Transnational Horror Cinema: Bodies of Excess and the Global Grotesque (Palgrave Macmillan 2016) with Raphael Raphael. Sophia Siddique is completing two manuscripts: Screening Singapore: Sensuous Citizenship Formations and the National (AUP) and Skin Matters: Horror Films and the Phenomenology of the Monstrous.

    Tan Eng Kiong is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of English, and Asian and Asian American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative and World Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World. His essays have also appeared in publications such as Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities, Journal of Modern Chinese Literature, and Journal of Chinese Cinemas. He is currently working on two separate book projects tentatively titled Queer Homecoming in Sinophone Cultures: Translocal Remapping of Kinship, and Mandarinization and Its Impact on Sinophone Cultural Production: A Transcolonial Comparison of Ethnic China, Singapore and Taiwan.


    Speakers

    Tan Eng Kiong
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Stony Brook University

    Kirsten Tan
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    K.Rajagopal
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    Tan Shijie
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    Alfian Sa'at
    Speaker
    Writer, poet, and playwright

    Sophia Siddique
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Film and Chair of Film, Vassar College

    Han Fengyu
    Speaker
    Filmmaker


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Objectifs

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Pacific Transformation: The Korean War and Korean-Canadian Engagement since 1950

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 202010:00AM - 2:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    (Virtual) Symposium in commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Korean War

    Symposium program:

    10:00 am. Opening remarks and introduction
    Korean Embassy: Chang Keung Ryong, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea to Canada
    Bill Graham Center: Jack Cunningham, Program Coordinator of the Bill Graham Centre
    Centre for the Study of Korea: Yoonkyung Lee, Director of Centre for the Study of Korea and Associate Professor in Sociology

    10:20 am – 12:00 pm. Session 1. Chaired by Don Rickerd (Trinity College, U of T)
    Heonik Kwon (Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge): “Experiencing the Korean War”
    Andre Schmid (East Asian Studies, U of T): “The Global and Local Significance of the Korean War”
    Jack Cunningham (Bill Graham Center, U of T): “Canada’s Korean War”

    12:00 – 12:05 pm. Remarks by Mr. Bill Black, President of Korean War Veterans Association Ottawa Unit 7

    12:05 – 12:55 pm. Lunch break

    12:55 – 1:00 pm. Haegum Performance by Ms. Sosun Suh

    1:00 – 2:00 pm. Session 2. Chaired by Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology and CSK, U of T)
    Michelle Cho (East Asian Studies, U of T): “K-drama and global publics: Netflix and the case of Crash Landing on You”
    Dimitry Anastakis (Rotman School and History, U of T): “Canadian-South Korean trade relations in the 20th and 21stcenturies: Trading places”

    2:00 – 2:30 pm. Ambassadors’ address: Chang Keung Ryong (Ambassador the Republic of Korea to Canada): “Leveraging Korea-Canada relations in a post-COVID world”

    2:30 pm. Closing
    _________________________________

    Participant bios and presentation abstracts:

    HEONIK KWON is Senior Research Fellow in Social Science and Professor of Social Anthropology at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. He has authored several prize-winning books on the Vietnam War and Cold War social histories, including his new book, After the Korean War: An Intimate History (Cambridge University Press2020).

    “Experiencing the Korean War”: What constitutes “experience” in the experience of war continues to be a subject of debate in the social and cultural studies of modern warfare, especially with reference to the 1914-1918 war, a foundational episode of modern Europe and in the history of decolonization. In this talk, I will extend this debate to the theatre of the Korean War, a pivotal episode of modern Koreas and in the history of the postcolonial Cold War. The focus will be on the non-combatant experience of the 1950-1953 war and on the collusion and collision between traditional and modern political subjectivities in the constitution of this historical experience.

    ANDRE SCHMID is an Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies where he has taught Korean and East Asian history for over 20 years. He is the author of Korea Between Empire, 1895-1919 (Columbia University Press 2002) and is currently working on a book about the postwar cultural and socio-economic origins of North Korea.

    “The Local and Global Significance of the Korean War”: This talk examines the Korean War as a multitude of conflicts working at different, inter-related levels, whether in local spaces around the world or defined in term of its global significance. Moving from 1950s Toronto to the war-torn Korean countryside to the racial politics of global Cold War formations, the presentation weaves together narratives of the war that are not combined in our usual histories of what in Korea is called the 6.25 war.

    JACK CUNNINGHAM has a PhD in History from the University of Toronto, where he is Program Coordinator of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. He has edited volumes on the recent conflict in Afghanistan and the invasion of Iraq, and is a former editor of International Journal.

    “Canada’s Korean War”: In 1950, Korea was peripheral to Canadian strategic and economic interests. But Communist aggression in Asia raised the spectre of the same in Europe, as well as fears that the United States would be diverted from European security concerns by the sideshow in Korea. At the same time, Korea was a test case for the United Nations and for collective security. As a result, Canada made a substantial contribution to the UN effort in Korea, while trying to balance displays of alliance solidarity with diplomatic efforts to ensure the war neither grew too wide nor lasted too long. At the same time, fears of Soviet aggression in Europe following the attack on South Korea triggered a massive rearmament effort in Canada, focused on Europe, which would ensure that defense remained the ranking demand on the public into the 1960s.

    MICHELLE CHO is Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Culture at the University of Toronto. She has published on Asian cinemas and Korean wave television, video, and pop music in such venues as Cinema Journal, the International Journal of Communication, the Korean Popular Culture Reader, and Asian Video Cultures. She is currently at work on a book about gender, media, and fandom in Korean-wave popular cultures.

    “K-drama and global publics: Netflix and the case of Crash Landing on You”: North American television, as we know it, has transformed in the last two decades, away from network television mainly produced in the form of sitcoms, police procedurals, and medical or courtroom dramas, towards serial narratives, with continuous storylines developed across episodes. Alongside this shift towards serial narrative, the notion of “quality television” has changed the way we evaluate TV content, from intentionally mindless entertainment to innovative cultural works. These shifts have been fortuitous for the rise in popularity of Korean television shows in Canada, since Korean narrative television has long been formatted as stand-alone, complete series, with clearly defined beginnings and endings. This talk will focus on the 2019-2020 series Crash Landing on You (Sarangŭipulshich’ak, tvN), a hit, fantasy drama set in a fictionalized North Korea, to discuss the characteristics of Korean television serials that account for their intense binge-ability, and to contextualize the place of Korean television content in our increasingly global media landscape.

    DIMITRY ANASTAKIS is the LR Wilson/RJ Currie Chair in Canadian Business History at the Rotman School of Management and in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A scholar of postwar Canadian business and the economy, his current research projects include finishing a book about the Bricklin SV-1, a car produced in Canada in the 1970s, and embarking on a major research project on postwar Canadian neoliberalism and free trade as part of the SSHRC Partnership Grant, “Deindustrialization and the Politics of Our Time.” As Wilson/Currie Chair, Professor Anastakis’s mandate is to advance the study of Canadian business history at the University of Toronto and in Canada and beyond. He is Chair of the Canadian Business History Association – l’association canadienne pour l’histoire des affaires (CBHA/ACHA), oversees the Business History Reading Group at the University of Toronto, and is general editor of the Themes in Business and Society series from the University of Toronto Press.

    Canadian-South Korean Trade Relations in the 20th and 21st Centuries: Trading Places: The history of Canada’s trade relations with the Republic of Korea stretch back much further than the 2014 Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement (CKFTA) and include important developments such as the establishment of Hyundai’s short-lived Canadian manufacturing facilities in the 1980s. While trade between the two countries has evolved relatively amicably since the emergence of Korea as a major economic power starting in the 1960s, the nature of the relationship has been marked some important flashpoints, including the 2014 free trade agreement. Indeed, this presentation will focus on some of the key issues that have led to and emanated from this historic trade pact between the two countries—the first FTA signed by Canada with an Asian country.

    H.E. CHANG KEUNG RYONG was appointed Ambassador the Republic of Korea to Canada in June 2020.The Ambassador holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy from Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea (1980); an M.A. in International Relations from Fairleigh Dickinson University, New Jersey, USA (1984); and a Ph.D. in Political Science from McGill University, Montreal, Canada (1996). He taught political science and international relations at Kwangju Women’s University in Gwangju, Korea (1999-2018). During his tenure at KWU, he held a Visiting Professor Fellowship at McGill University (2014-2015). Ambassador Chang left academia to become a Research Advisor at the Institute for National Security Strategy (2018-2020) while also serving as the Chairman of the International Cooperation Standing Committee for the 19th National Unification Advisory Council. He has received various awards, including the prestigious Korean Presidential Citation (2001). Ambassador Chang is married to SUH Yong Suk. They have two sons.

    “Leveraging Korea-Canada relations in a post-COVID world”: Seventy years ago, Canada participated in the Korean War (1950-1953). A decade later, Korea and Canada established formal diplomatic relations in 1963. Since then, Korea’s rapid development, democratic evolution, and growing regional and international interests have enhanced cooperation – politically, economically and culturally – between Korea and Canada. The landmark Korea-Canada Free Trade Agreement, which entered force on January 1, 2015, fostered new avenues of collaboration and innovation, as well as enhancing people-to-people exchanges between the two countries. Now, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose significant challenges for the international community, Korea and Canada have been working closely together to exchange information and best practices; and both countries continue to coordinate closely in response to the virus’s impact on the global economy. With an outlook towards the future, Ambassador Chang will lay out his priorities and prospects for Korea-Canada relations in the upcoming years; including issues of enhancing bilateral security cooperation for improving inter-Korean relations and peace on Korean Peninsula, deepening economic cooperation – particularly in field of AI, and expanding people-to-people exchanges with an emphasis on deepening cultural diplomacy.

    DONALD S. RICKERD did his undergraduate work at Queen’s University and St. Andrews University in Scotland and obtained his MA degree in Modern History from Balliol College, Oxford University. He graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School and practiced with Fasken and Co. in Toronto. He served as Registrar and Secretary of the Senate of York University and was an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Administrative Studies. Subsequently he was appointed President of the Donner Canadian Foundation in Toronto and the W.H. Donner Foundation of New York. Mr. Rickerd also served for a number of years as President of the Max Bell Foundation. He is a Research Fellow at the Asian Institute of the Munk School of Global Affairs and a Senior Fellow at Massey College at the University of Toronto. Mr. Rickerd has visited the DPRK on four occasions, most recently in October 2014.

    YOONKYUNG LEE is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism. She earned her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University and was associate professor in Sociology at SUNY-Binghamton (2006-2016) before joining U of T. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Embassy of the Republic of Korea to Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 29th Repression and Protest in Contemporary China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 29, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    The struggle between state agents and grassroots activists is central to politics everywhere. Is this dynamic any different in China? How have state repression and grassroots activism evolved and varied across localities in China, the world’s most powerful authoritarian state? Dan Mattingly (Yale) on his new book, “The Art of Political Control in China” and Juan Wang (McGill) on environmental protestors in China. Sida Liu (Toronto) provides commentary on the “cat and mouse” game between repressive agents and protestors.
    ___________________

    Daniel Mattingly is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Yale University. His current research looks at how the military, protest, and nationalism shape Chinese politics. His first book, The Art of Political Control in China, was published by Cambridge in 2020.

    Juan Wang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. Her research interests include contentious politics, and law and politics, with a country focus of China. Her works have appeared in a number of academic journals, including the China Quarterly, Modern China, the Journal of Contemporary China, Asian Journal of Law and Society, Problems of Post Communism, and Crime, Law, and Social Change. Her first book, entitled The Sinews of State Power: The Rise and Demise of the Cohesive Local State in China (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017), focuses on the intergovernmental relationship among China’s county, township, and village levels of government in explaining the persistence of collective resistance in rural areas.

    Sida Liu is Associate Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Toronto. His research interests include the sociology of law, organizations and professions, criminal justice, globalization, and social theory, with a geographical focus on the Greater China Region. Professor Liu has conducted extensive empirical research on China’s legal reform and legal profession, including the globalization of corporate law firms, the political mobilization of criminal defense lawyers, the feminization of judges, and the career mobility of law practitioners. One of his current research projects examines influence of colonialism and authoritarianism on the professions in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Liu is the author of three books in Chinese and English, most recently, Criminal Defense in China: The Politics of Lawyers at Work (with Terence C. Halliday, Cambridge University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Daniel Mattingly
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University

    Juan Wang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Political Science, McGill University

    Sida Liu
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, University of Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2020

  • Wednesday, November 4th Poetic Refuge: Migration and the Films of Phuttiphong Aroonpheng

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    “Poetic Refuge: Migration and the Films of Phuttiphong Aroonpheng.” is the fourth seminar for the Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics, JHI-UTM Seminar 2020-2021, co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, the UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto, the Toronto Film and Media Seminar and Objectifs.

    * Screenings details for Manta Ray will be provided on Oct 31st to the first 100 registrants based in Canada.

    * The film “Ferris Wheel” can be screened for free until November 4th here: https://objectifsfilmlibrary.uscreen.io/programs/ferris_wheel_

    Both films will be available from Oct 31st to Nov 4th.


    Speakers

    Selmin Kara
    Organizer
    Associate Professor of Film and New Media, OCAD University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Organizer
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

    Jacques Bertrand
    Panelist
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Ishita Tiwary
    Panelist
    Horizon Post Doctoral Fellow at the Mel Hoppenheim school of Cinema, Concordia University

    Mai Meksawan
    Panelist
    Producer of Manta Ray

    Ornwara Tritrakarn
    Moderator
    Graduate student, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto

    Toronto Film and Media Seminar

    Objectifs


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 6th Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 20209:00AM - 10:30AMExternal Event, Online Event
    Friday, November 6, 20206:00PM - 8:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Morning Session | 9:00 – 10:30 am EST

    9:00-9:10am Welcome remark by Hyun-Ok Park (York)

    9:10-9:20am Introduction to the Symposium: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    9:20-10:30am Keynote Speech
    Chair: Yewon Lee (George Washington University)
    Discussant: Laam Hae (York University)

    Hyun Bang Shin (LSE) “Whither Progressive Urban Futures? Critical Reflections on the Politics of Temporality in Asia”
    _______________________________

    Evening Session | 6:00 – 8:45 pm EST

    6:00-7:15pm Panel 1: The Making of the Speculative City: Past and Present
    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Hyun Bang Shin (LSE)

    Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto) “Juxtaposing Biopolitics with Speculative Urbanisms: The Development of Private Welfare/Health Institutions in South Korea”

    Seung-Cheol Lee (Seoul National University) “Seeing Like a Community Entrepreneur: The Capitalization of ‘Community’ in Seoul’s Community Building Project (maul mandulgi)”

    7:15-7:30pm Break

    7:30-8:45pm Panel 2: The Unmaking of the Speculative City
    Chair: Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Jesook Song (U of Toronto)

    Laam Hae (York) “Toward a Dialectical Vision of Planetary Urbanization: Ecological Pro-Greenbelt Movements against the Construction State in Korea”

    Yewon Lee (George Washington University) “Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space”

    Symposium Participant Bios:

    Hae Yeon Choo is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She is an author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016), a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses at American military camptown clubs. Her current research examines the politics of land ownership in contemporary South Korea, delving into macro-level political contestations over land rights, together with the narratives of people who pursue class mobility through real estate speculation. She has also translated Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider and Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

    Laam Hae is an Associate Professor in the department of Politics at York University. Her research areas are urban political economy, neoliberal urbanism and urban social movements. She is the author of The Gentrification of Nightlife and the Right to the City: Regulating Spaces of Social Dancing in New York (2012, Routledge), and co-edited On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (2019, University of Toronto Press). She is currently developing a research project that examines the spatiality of social reproduction and gender inequality in South Korea.

    Hyun-Chul Kim is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto. Her research interests include the varied degree of confined, segregated spaces in East Asian regions, from nursing homes to prisons, considering urban constructions, intimacy, and disability. She is writing her dissertation tentatively titled “Between Communal ‘Village’ and an Atomized ‘Home’: Blurring the boundaries of community organization movement and segregated-confined welfare spaces of South Korea in 1950s-1960s”.

    Seung Cheol Lee received his PhD from Columbia University in 2018 and is now an assistant professor of anthropology at Seoul National University. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on a book manuscript that examines how the ethicality and sociality of gift-giving are grafted onto neoliberal market rationality in the social economy sector in South Korea.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies at George Washington University. As a political and labor sociologist and urban ethnographer, Yewon is broadly interested in how speculative real estate interests increasingly dictate the shape and character of urban landscapes and how, in response, ordinary people organize everyday space and practice politics of dissent. Her dissertation, Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: The Untold Gentrification Story of Tenant Shopkeepers’ Displacement and Resistance in Seoul, examines how tenant shopkeepers, who are often labeled as either micro-entrepreneurs or petit bourgeoisie and overlooked as workers, are emerging as agents of social change. She sheds light on the fascinating case of tenant shopkeepers in Seoul organizing to expose the precarity of their livelihoods and, along the way, finding their collective voice as workers.

    Yoonkyung Lee is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism with a regional focus on East Asia. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Hyun Ok Park teaches sociology and the director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University. With archival and ethnographic research, her research investigates global capitalism in colonial, industrial, and financial forms, democracy, socialism, and post-socialist transition. She is the author of Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution in Manchuria (Duke University Press, 2005). Her latest book is The Capitalist Unconscious: From Korean Unification to Transnational Korea (Columbia University Press, 2015). She is completing a book manuscript, “A Sublime Disaster: The Sewŏl Ferry Incident and the Politics of the Living Dead.”

    Hyun Bang Shin is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre at LSE. His research centres on the critical analysis of the political economic dynamics of urbanisation with particular attention to cities in Asian countries such as China, South Korea, Malaysia, Vietnam, and Singapore. His research themes include speculative urbanisation; the politics of redevelopment; displacement; gentrification; housing; the right to the city; mega-events as urban spectacles; mega-projects. He has published widely in major international journals and contributed to numerous books on the above themes. His books include Global Gentrifications: Uneven Development and Displacement (Policy Press, 2015); Planetary Gentrification (Polity Press, 2016); Anti Gentrification: What is to be Done (Dongnyok, 2017); Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019).

    Jesook Song is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on contemporary urban transformation and welfare issues, including homelessness, youth unemployment, single women’s housing, mental health in South Korea. She is author of South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society (Duke University Press, 2009) and Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea (SUNY Press, 2014), On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (University of Toronto Press 2019, co-edited with Laam Hae).

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto).
    This event is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. It is co-presented by the Centre for the Study of Korea (University of Toronto). It is co-sponsored by School of Cities (University of Toronto).

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th – Thursday, November 19th November 12 - 19 Reel Asian Film Screening: Labyrinth of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Friday, November 13, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Saturday, November 14, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Sunday, November 15, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Monday, November 16, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Tuesday, November 17, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Wednesday, November 18, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Thursday, November 19, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Japan | 2019 | 179 min | Japanese with English subtitles | Closed Captions, Drama, Fantasy

    In the port town of Onomichi, Japan, the only movie theatre is bidding goodbye to its local audiences. The owners organize a nightlong screening devoted to historical Japanese war films. Noriko, a teenager who regularly helps in the theatre, walks toward the stage and astonishes the audience as suddenly, she mystically projects herself into an old musical. Film buff Mario, film-history nerd Hosuke, and aspiring yakuza Shigeru are also warped into the cinema screen in sequences that represent the second Sino-Japanese War, Boshin War and Hiroshima bombing. The four embark on an immersive, surreal and vicious cycle of damnation and salvation in the face of war’s savagery.

    Nobuhiko Obayashi’s swan song Labyrinth of Cinema dives into the senselessness of wars, wrapped in cinematic oddities. His abstracted reconstruction of Japan’s darkest events points out that movies, though a fabrication of reality, epitomize suffering as universal truth.

    – Rolando Basmayor
    ________________________

    CAST:
    Rei Yoshida
    Yoshihiko Hosoda
    Hirona Yamazaki
    Riko Narumi

    Recognitions:
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Tokyo International Film Festival, 2019
    International Film Festival Rotterdam, 2020
    Fantasia International Film Festival, 2020

    Director Bio:
    Nobuhiko Obayashi 大林 宣彦

    Nobuhiko Obayashi (9 January 1938 – 10 April 2020) was a Japanese director, screenwriter, and editor of films and television advertisements. He began his filmmaking career as a pioneer of Japanese experimental films before transitioning to directing more mainstream media, and his resulting filmography as a director spanned almost 60 years

    _________________________

    RELATED EVENT: Live Online Discussion With Special Guests
    DATE: November 18, 6:30 PM

    Unpack the layers of this film with our special guests Rob Buscher of Philly Asian American Film Festival and Daisuke Miyao of University of California San Diego. ASL interpretation will be made available thanks to Toronto Sign Language Interpreter Services. Ticket holders can watch on the CineSend Reel Asian portal.

    GUEST SPEAKERS:

    ROB BUSCHER
    Board Chair of the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival

    Rob Buscher is a film and media specialist, educator, arts administrator, and published author who has worked in non profit arts organizations for over a decade. Buscherʼs expertise is Japanese and Asian American & Pacific Islander Cinema although he has worked as a professional film programmer, critic, and lecturer across a variety of fields. He currently lectures at University of Pennsylvania, and is a contributing writer at Pacific Citizen and Broad Street Review. Buscher also serves as President of the Philadelphia Chapter of civil rights group Japanese American Citizens League and chairs the editorial board of Pacific Citizen, the organization’s national newspaper.

    DAISUKE MIYAO
    Professor in Department of Literature, University of California at San Diego

    Considering cinema to be a transnational cultural form from the beginning of its history and simultaneously to be a national entity, formed by specific discourses on nationalism and modernization, Daisuke Miyao has been conducting research on film history. His interdisciplinary training in cinema studies, East Asian studies, and American studies, combined with his bicultural background, living and studying both in Japanese and North American academia, made it possible for him to recognize that the study of film could benefit from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th – Thursday, November 19th November 12 - 19 Reel Asian Film Screening: A.K.A. Don Bonus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 13, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 14, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 15, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 16, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 17, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 18, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 19, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    * Screening Dates: November 12 – 19, 2020
    * Register above for FREE screening
    * Related Event: A.K.A Don Bonus Masterclass – November 17, 6:30 – 8:30 PM (Scroll down for details; by registering for the screening, you are also getting access to the masterclass and vice versa)

    USA | 1995 | 65 min | English | Archive Presentation | Documentary

    Cambodian-born Sokly “Don Bonus” Ny takes a Hi8 camcorder into his final year of high school in the San Francisco Bay Area, documenting intersecting events happening at school, at home, and amongst friends and family. Filmed and released in 1995, the film can be seen as a forerunner of the now-popular diary or vlog documentary format, featuring raw footage and voiceover from Don Bonus.

    Although made in the 1990s, the beats of the film are familiar and still relevant, moving through issues of low-income housing, gang violence, academic struggle, and family fractures, while also featuring communal celebration, youthful camaraderie and intimate family life. These scenes are simultaneously casual and intentional, recontextualized and given resonance through Don Bonus’ frank, teenage monologic reflections.

    A.K.A Don Bonus highlights how the stories that came before us, although constructed from their time and space, can continue to speak powerfully into our present. – Jasmine Gui
    _____________________

    CAST: Sokly Ny

    Recognitions
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Berlin International Film Festival, 1996
    San Francisco Film Festival, 1995

    AWARDS
    National Emmy Award, 1996
    Golden Gate Award, San Francisco Film Festival, 1995

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Spencer Nakasako has over three decades of experience as an independent filmmaker and is the founder of the groundbreaking Media Lab at the Vietnamese Youth Development Center in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District. Nakasako is a member of the Writers Guild of America, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
    ____________________

    RELATED EVENT: A.K.A. Don Bonus Masterclass
    DATE: November 17, 6:30 – 8:30 PM

    Deep dive into this critical archival film with director Spencer Nakasako, Reel Asian, and the Asian Institute! This masterclass will explore the narrative construction of A.K.A Don Bonus, methods of production, the vlog-style documentary format, and contextualize the film in its era but also situate it in ongoing contemporary conversations.

    SPEAKERS:
    Spencer Nakasako • Director

    Spencer Nakasako has over three decades of experience as an independent filmmaker. He won a National Emmy Award for a.k.a. Don Bonus, the video diary of a Cambodian refugee teenager that aired on the PBS series P.O.V. and screened at the Berlin International Film Festival. Kelly Loves Tony, a video diary about a Iu Mien refugee teenage couple growing up too fast in Oakland, California, also aired on P.O.V. His third film in his trilogy about Southeast Asian youth, Refugee, aired on the PBS series Independent Lens, and garnered major awards at the Hawaii International Film Festival and Hamptons Film Festival. Nakasako is the founder of the ground-breaking Media Lab at the Vietnamese Youth Development Center in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District where he collaborated with youth from the neighborhood on filmmaking for 17 years.

    Miko Revereza • Filmmaker

    Miko Revereza is a filmmaker raised in California and currently residing between several countries. His upbringing as an undocumented immigrant in the United States informs his relationship with moving images. DROGA! (2014), DISINTEGRATION 93-96 (2017), No data plan (2018) and Distancing (2019) have widely screened at festivals such as Locarno Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, NYFF Projections and Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Art of the Real. Aside from these films, Revereza produces expanded cinema, direct animation, performance, criticism and publishing including works such as Biometrics (2018), Live Cinema (2019-2020) and Towards a Stateless Cinema (2019). Revereza is listed as Filmmaker Magazine’s 2018 25 New Faces of Independent Cinema, a 2019 Flaherty Seminar featured filmmaker and MFA graduate at Bard College Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts. He is a 2021 recipient of the Vilcek Foundation Prize for Creative Promise in Filmmaking.

    MODERATOR:
    Aram Siu Wai Collier • Head of Programming, Reel Asian

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He has a background in documentary, editing the award-winning feature documentary Refugee and directing/editing the short doc Who I Became. His subsequent dramatic and experimental film work has played festivals in the United States, Canada, Japan, and China. From 2011-2014, his omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown toured Canada, Asia, and the United States. In 2017, he wrote, directed, edited, and produced the feature film Stand Up Man, which had its World premiere at the Atlantic Film Festival and its International Premiere at the Hawaii International Film Festival. Most recently Aram directed and edited the award-winning short documentary A Sweet & Sour Christmas for CBC. He is currently the Head of Programming at the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival and teaches Media Production at Humber College.

    Registration for Masterclass: https://www.reelasian.com/festival-events/aka-donbonus-masterclass/
    ***Ticket Registration for the A.K.A Don Bonus Masterclass includes access to the A.K.A Don Bonus film.

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Toronto International Reel Asian Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 17th The Fall of Hong Kong: A Tragedy in Five Acts

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 17, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    This talk will draw on material in the speaker’s recent book, Vigil:Hong Kong on the Brink, while also dealing with events that have happened since he finished making the last corrections to the proofs of it almost exactly a year before the day this presentation will be made. The quintet of key moments in Hong Kong history addressed (the five “acts” in the title) will be the period around the time of the following events: the 1997 Handover, the 2014 Umbrella Movement, series of lesser known but important events in late 2015 and 2016, the 2019 protest surge, and the 2020 actions associated with imposing of the new National Security Law.

    ______________________

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom is the Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, where he also holds courtesy appointments in Law and Literary Journalism. His most recent books are Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink (Columbia Global Reports, 2020) and, as co-author with Maura Elizabeth Cunningham, China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford, third edition, 2018). He often contributes to newspapers (the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, etc.), literary reviews (such as the TLS, Mekong Review, and LARB), and magazines (e.g., The Nation and Dissent). He served as Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies from 2008 until 2019; he was an adviser to the Hong Kong International Literary Festival; he has consulted on documentary films about the Tiananmen protests and the Umbrella Movement; and he has edited or co-edited books on topics ranging from gender in China’s past and present to human rights and revolutions.

    Sebastian Veg is a Professor of intellectual history of modern and contemporary China at EHESS (School of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences), Paris and an Honorary Professor at the University of Hong Kong. His most recent books are Minjian: The Rise of China’s Grassroots Intellectuals (Columbia UP, 2019) and Sunflowers and Umbrellas: Social Movements, Expressive Practices and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong (co-edited with Thomas Gold, 2020).


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    Speaker
    Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California, Irvine

    Sebastian Veg
    Discussant
    Professor of Intellectual History of 20th century China, School of Advanced Studies in Social Sciences (EHESS), Paris

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 19th – Thursday, November 26th Resilience and Disaster: The Global South During COVID-19

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 19, 20203:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Monday, November 23, 20203:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Thursday, November 26, 202010:00AM - 1:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Re: Locations Symposium 2020

    COVID-19 is a public health crisis occurring on a global scale. It has caused widespread suffering and disruption, and in the process, it has exacerbated existing inequalities; strengthened networks of solidarity; birthed new crises; devastated economies, altered politics at local, national, and international levels; and, more. In these ways, the virus is a disaster that has given rise to complex and uncertain transformations, but it has also led to a great display of resiliency, with different states, communities, and individuals adapting to and resisting this disaster. The global spread has laid bare the need for critical engagement with cross-disciplinary, cross-national, and cross-cultural dialogues.

    SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

    November 19: Migration, Care Work, and Solidarity

    2:50 PM- 3:00 PM Co-Chairs Introduction

    3:00 PM | Keynote Address: Dr. Tungohan

    COVID-19, Immigration, & Care Work: Thinking Through the Implications of COVID-19 on the Lives of Asian Migrants

    3:45 – 5:45 PM | Panel 1

    John Paul Catungal | Mediating Contagion: Asian International Students in Canada during COVID

    Md. Zarif Rahman, Saifuddin Ahmed & Mahabuba Islam Meem | Fatalistic Views and Its Impact on Combating COVID-19: Bangladesh Context

    Joy Saade | The Beirut Explosion and Covid-19: Crisis relief and community reactions during Lebanon’s collapse

    Yuriko Cowper-Smith, Dr. Yvonne Smith & Tyler Valiquette | Displaced and in the dark: Protecting LGBTQI+ asylum-seekers during a pandemic

    5:45 – 6:15 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS
    _________________________________________

    November 23 | Media, Security, and Communications

    2:50 PM- 3:00 PM Co-Chairs Introduction

    3:00 PM | Keynote Address: Dr. Ong

    3:45 – 5:25 PM | Panel 2

    Gabrielle Lim, Irene Poetranto & Justin Law | Securitizing COVID-19 in the Philippines: Outcomes and Risks

    Anmol Dutta | Coro(Na)tional Solidarity Amidst the Covid-19 Pandemic in India

    Richard Atimniraye Nyelade | The Racial and Olfactory Origin of Social Distancing

    Isurika Sevwandi | COVID-19 Disaster Prevention Mechanism undertaken by Sri Lanka: SWOT Analysis

    5:25 – 6:00 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS
    _________________________________________

    November 26: Public Health and the Global South

    9:50 PM- 10:00 AM Co-Chairs Introduction

    10:00 AM | Keynote Address: Dr. Lasco

    Medical Populism in the Global South

    11:14AM – 12:15PM | Panel 3

    Ritapriya Nandy | India during Pandemic: The Curious Case of Witch-hunting

    Faizan Malik | Covid-19, Necropolitics, and Marginalized Experiences During a Global Pandemic

    Mufassir Rashid | ‘Corona Effect’ on South Asian Politics: Diminishing Geopolitics and the inception of Geo-economics

    Adrian Khan | Migration and Social Isolation during the Global Pandemic: Uncertainty, advocacy, and resilience

    12:15 – 12:45 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS


    Speakers

    Dr. Gideon Lasco
    Physician and medical anthropologist; Senior Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of the Philippines Diliman; Research Fellow, Development Studies Program, Ateneo de Manila University

    Dr. Ethel Tungohan
    Canada Research Chair in Canadian Migration Policy, Impacts and Activism; Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics, York University

    Dr. ​Jonathan Corpus Ong
    Associate Professor of Global Digital Media, University of Massachusetts - Amherst


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Department of Anthropology

    Department of Political Science

    Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th Water sharing in the Himalayas: How do the India-China border skirmishes affect the future of transboundary water cooperation on South Asian rivers?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The recent border skirmishes between India and China have brought to the surface the growing prospect of transboundary water conflict as an emerging flashpoint in the Himalayas. While India has bilateral water sharing treaties with all its neighbours in South Asia, the last decade has highlighted the challenge of encouraging and including China as an important stakeholder within transboundary water governance in the region. However, a disputed land border between the Asian giants, new rounds of skirmishes between their respective armies and the reluctance of both countries to move beyond bilateral approaches on water sharing has stymied transboundary cooperation on all major river basins in Himalayan South Asia. Our panel of water experts will examine the impact of recent developments on the prospects for peace based on current water cooperation; as well as the future of transboundary water agreements in the larger South Asian region.
    ______________________________

    ZAFAR ADEEL is Professor of Professional Practice at the School of Resource and Environmental Management and Executive Director of the Pacific Water Research Centre, Simon Fraser University, Canada. Adeel is interested in environmental policy formulation and governance in its broadest sense. His current research interests lie at the intersection of water security with the international development agenda, particularly the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). He serves as the Series Editor for a book series by Springer: “Water Security in a New World.” He also serves on the editorial boards of Sustainability Science (Springer) and New Water Policy and Practice Journal (PSO). He has served with the United Nations for over 18 years with progressively increasing responsibilities in the international development and research environment. This includes a 10-year tenure as the Director of United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH) in Hamilton, Canada. Adeel has helped develop networks of scientists in countries with water challenges, particularly those in Africa, Middle East and Asia.

    NIMMI KURIAN is Professor at the Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi and Faculty Advisor, India China Institute, The New School, New York. She was Fellow (2008-2010) and India Academic Representative (2010-2015), India China Institute, The New School, New York. Her research interests include Asian borderlands, comparative regionalism and subregionalism, Indian foreign policy, constituent diplomacy and transboundary water governance. She is one of the contributors to the India Country Report as part of the Bangladesh China India Myanmar Economic Corridor (BCIM EC) Joint Study Group, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India. She is also part of the Asian Borderlands Research Initiative, a network of scholars interested in the reconfiguration of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of borderlands.

    DAVID MICHEL a Senior Researcher with SIPRI’s Environment of Peace 2022 initiative. His work explores the cooperative opportunities and potential security risks posed by mounting pressures on the world’s shared natural resources, and the possibilities for collective institutions to meet global environmental challenges. Prior to joining SIPRI in May 2020 he served as Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Climate and Security, Senior Manager in the Transboundary Water Management Department with the Stockholm International Water Institute, and as Director of the Environmental Security Program at the Stimson Center. He has advised the US Department of State and the National Intelligence Council on transboundary water governance, food security, and climate policy issues, and held fellowships with the Geneva Centre for Security Policy and the United States Institute of Peace.

    BHARAT PUNJABI is a Research Fellow at the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto. He has taught courses in economic geography, political ecology, water management, Asian urbanization, and the political economy of development at institutions such as the University of Western Ontario, the University of Toronto and the University of Guelph. His research has been funded by the International Development Research Centre, the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute and other organizations. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water policy, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. This work is based on his dissertation and current field research in large mega regions in India. Dr. Punjabi is also a visiting fellow at the Indian Council for Research in International Economic Relations (ICRIER) in New Delhi.


    Speakers

    Zafar Adeel
    Panelist
    Professor of Professional Practice, School of Resource and Environmental Management and Executive Director, Pacific Water Research Centre, Simon Fraser University, Canada

    Nimmi Kurian
    Panelist
    Professor, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India

    David Michel
    Panelist
    Senior Researcher, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Stockholm, Sweden

    Bharat Punjabi
    Moderator
    Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute and Lecturer, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th Authoritarian Legacies, Citizens, and Protest: Lessons from the Taegeukgi Rally in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Supporters of South Korean authoritarian successor party have organized a movement called the Taegeukgi Rally. This movement started in late 2016 to oppose the impeachment of then President, Park Geun-hye. Then, the movement transformed into anti-government protest after the formation of the new administration by President Moon Jae-in. This movement is puzzling in many ways and the literature on mass mobilization does not provide a good explanation about the movement’s timing, demographic composition, and protest agendas. This study suggests an alternative explanation to understand the mobilization. By conducting in-depth interviews with 25 rally participants, this study finds that the collective identity of participants that was shaped in the authoritarian period motivates certain individuals to participate in the rally.

    Myunghee Lee is a visiting fellow at the University of Missouri and a non-resident research fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. She earned her Ph.D in Political Science at the University of Missouri. She is the recipient of the 2020 David M. Wood Excellence in Political Science Research Award. Her research focuses on protest, democratization, and state violence. Her research appears in International Security and Politics & Gender.

    *Zoom Details*

    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/81616949449

    Meeting ID: 816 1694 9449
    Passcode: 030791
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    Passcode: 030791
    Find your local number: https://utoronto.zoom.us/u/kdE396AbqY


    Speakers

    Myunghee Lee
    Visiting fellow at the University of Missouri and a non-resident research fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 27th The Indian Economy at the Crossroads: Towards Reform or Further Stagnation?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 27, 202010:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    The Indian economy, one of the largest in the world, is set to contract significantly this year. Our panel of experts will discuss policy measures adopted by the Indian government to tackle the economic downturn as a result of the devastating effects of COVID 19 pandemic in the country. The panel will also discuss short and medium run scenarios for the Indian economy highlighting the interdependence between democratic institutions, economic growth and welfare. Finally, the panelists will also discuss India’s regional and international economic relations in the context of the present crisis in globalization and the country’s border impasse with China.


    Speakers

    Dr. Sanjay Reddy
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Economics, New School University, New York, USA

    Dr. Lekha Chakraborty
    Panelist
    Professor, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy (NIPFP), New Delhi, India and Research Associate, Bard College, NY, USA

    Dr. Saon Ray
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Indian Council of International Economic Relations (ICRIER), New Delhi, India

    Dr. Bharat Punjabi
    Moderator
    Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute and Lecturer, Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Dr. John Harriss
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Canada


    Sponsors

    Canadian International Council - Toronto Branch

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 27th The "Skeleton in the Closet": Unveiling Submerged Histories in Contemporary Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Which histories of Asia are remembered and which are forgotten? The process of remembering is selective, such that certain histories are granted the status of truth and highlighted in public dialogue, while others are forgotten or deliberately swept under the rug. This event seeks to unearth some examples of the latter to underscore the histories of marginalized groups and their lived experiences. In order to do so we are delighted to be joined by two experts:
    Dr. Takashi Fujitani will discuss the issue of comfort women and how it ties into the transnational cover-up of Japanese war and colonial crimes.
    Dr. Jessica Soedirgo will focus her discussion on the little known Ahmadiyah minority in Indonesia and why its members are being discriminated against today.

    After their respective talks we will have a 45 minute Q&A session to address any queries and to facilitate dialogue between the speakers and audience members.

    TAKASHI FUJITANI is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). Much of his past and current research has centered on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues. He is the author of Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996; Japanese version, NHK Books, 1994; Korean translation, Yeesan Press, 2003) and Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Koreans in WWII (UC Press, 2011; Japanese version forthcoming from Iwanami Shoten); co-editor of Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (Duke U. Press, 2001); and editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).

    JESSICA SOEDIRGO is a postdoctoral fellow in the Asian Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Studies, Georgetown University. She will be starting as an Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam in April 2021. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto. Her research is motivated by an interest in ethnic and religious conflict, with a regional focus on Southeast Asia. She primarily uses qualitative methods, grounded in extensive fieldwork. Her book project, The Threat of Small Things: Patterns of Repression and Mobilization Against Micro-Sized Groups in Indonesia, asks why very small groups become targets of state repression and mobilization despite their economic and political insignificance. Her work has been published in Citizenship Studies, Southeast Asia Research, Qualitative and Multi-Method Research, and PS: Political Science and Politics.


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jessica Soedirgo
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Studies, Georgetown University

    Deep Leekha
    Moderator
    President of the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union at the Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2020

  • Thursday, December 3rd Landscapes for Authoritarianism: Japan, China, India, and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 3, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Asia-Pacific Conversation Series

    Description

    How do ideas of forestry, rural life, nature, and environment contribute to the rise of fascism and authoritarian rule? In this timely conversation, a group of historians and visual scholars will draw on specific cases from early twentieth-century Japan to contemporary China and India to examine the relationship between aesthetics, politics, and temporality.


    Speakers

    Yi Gu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Art, Culture & Media, University of Toronto

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto

    Richard Reitan
    Speaker
    Associate Professor and Chair, Department of History, Franklin & Marshall College

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of History and Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 4th Envisioning the Buddhist Mandala of Bhutan: The Importance of Terminology, Language, and “Secularities”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 4, 20204:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Tibetan emic terminologies used as functional equivalents for “religion” and “politics” in Bhutanese textual sources shed light on institutionalized and conceptualized boundaries between societal spheres in pre-modern Bhutan―in the spirit of the multiple secularities approach understood as social distinction and differentiation in a non-evaluating sense. Among the three major Buddhist governments established in the Tibetan cultural area in the 17th century, the Bhutanese government, nowadays as a constitutional monarchy with a Buddhist king, is the only one still in existence. Since Bhutan’s societal order is still profoundly grounded in the cosmological order of Tantric Buddhism, I present here an alternative analytical and inclusive framework for determining social distinction and differentiation in Bhutan in a chronological perspective that does include not only actual institutional arrangements but also integrates formative religious-doctrinal conceptualizations. Consequently, discourses about Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness (GNH) can adequately consider the importance of terminology, language, and “secularities.”

    Dagmar Schwerk is the Khyentse Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Tibetan Buddhist Studies at the University of British Columbia and recipient of the Khyentse Foundation Award for Excellence in Buddhist Studies 2012. Her forthcoming monograph addresses the longstanding philosophical debate about Mahāmudrā, an essential Buddhist doctrine and meditative system in Tibetan Buddhism, from a Bhutanese perspective. In general, her research focuses on Tibetan and Bhutanese intellectual and political history.


    Speakers

    Dagmar Schwerk
    Speaker
    Khyentse Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Tibetan Buddhist Studies, University of British Columbia

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies; Associate Professor in Buddhist Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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