Past Events at the Asian Institute

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October 2019

  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    Speaker
    King’s College London

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 8th Asian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Coinciding with the current Canadian Federal Election season, the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) is pleased to host a panel discussion on Asian-Canadian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics. The event focuses on examining Asian representation in Canadian Electoral Politics, exploring the unique sociopolitical conditions that candidates, politicians, and public servants who identify as of Asian-descent experience when navigating Canadian electoral politics.

    Topics of discussion will range from the public perception of Asian-Canadian political leaders in Canada, specific sociopolitical experiences and hurdles that candidates encounter when running for office, and projected shifts in voting behaviour as a result of demographic changes in Canada (i.e. influx of newcomers).

    SPEAKERS:
    Professor Ludovic Rheault
    Ludovic Rheault is Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to his appointment as faculty, he joined an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Toronto as a postdoctoral fellow in 2014. He also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Riverside. Prof. Rheault obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Montreal in 2013.

    Professor Rheault’s research interests focus on areas of the Canadian government, and applications of statistical methods to examine public opinions and policy-related questions. As a member of the French-Canadian minority, he will provide examples illustrating the challenges involved with cultural diversity in Canadian federal politics. In addition, Professor Rheault will provide statistical Canadian electoral insights on the topic.

    Kuo Yin
    Kuo Yin began her career in Canadian politics as a constituency assistant for the Member of Parliament in Toronto. She later held the position of parliamentary assistant at the House of Commons in Ottawa. Prior working in federal politics, Yin studied, worked and lived in Edmonton, Washington D.C and Oxford. According to Yin, “What makes me feel powerful as an Asian woman in Canadian politics is that I was given a variety of opportunities on different platforms to lead this country towards the direction where Canadians want to be.”

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi
    Tenzin Chogkyi was born in Tibet and raised in India. She came to Toronto 15 years ago to study filmmaking. Prior to joining politics, Tenzin worked for the Canadian Oscar nominee, Deepa Mehta.

    Over the past 4 years, Tenzin has served as the Community Liaison for MP Arif Virani at the Parkdale-High Park riding. Parkdale is home to the largest Tibetan community outside of India. In addition to her active role at the office, she is also the coordinator for Parliamentary Friends of Tibet Canada Friendship group.


    Speakers

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi

    Ludovic Rheault

    Kuo Yin


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th The dark night of love in the Indian tradition

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture

    Description

    This talk focuses on the dark nights of desire, on the difficulties and ordeals lovers have to face and overcome in the pursuit of fulfilment, and also on the tricks that their ingenuity manages to invent in order to escape detection, which sometimes can lead to disgrace or even death. Indian literature covers both illicit and marital love with great nuance. It ranges from problems to do with secrecy to problems of marital privacy in a crowded extended family situation. The differences between literary representations and visual representations of love stories will also be dealt with.

    Dr. Fabrizia Baldissera teaches Sanskrit Language and Literature at University of Florence. She lectures abroad extensively. Her interests are kāvya, satire, Goddess worship, dance, Indian alchemy and Arthaśāstra. Her books include The Narmamālā of Kṣemendra; Śāradātilakabhāṇa; L’universo di Kāma; King and Devī and Emotions in Indian Dramas and Dances.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Fabrizia Baldissera
    Speaker
    Sanskrit Language and Literature, University of Florence


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Instituto Italiano di Cultura Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 11th Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 11, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will be based on my newly published book Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War (University of Washington Press). The book examines the life of the Sri Lankan Tamil community in the time of war and migration before the war was ended in 2009. Three decades of war in Sri Lanka ended in 2009, but the prolonged violence during the war devastated the Sri Lankan Tamil community, leading to a serious disruption of ordinary life and mass migrations to escape the violence of the state and of Tamil militants. Jaffna Tamils are now widely dispersed across the world – predominantly in Canada, continental Europe, UK, Australia and India. In the book I have focused on marriage processes (arrangements of transnational marriages), transit places where the actual marriage performance takes place, figures (e.g. marriage brokers, photographers) who facilitate marriages, visual documents (e.g. wedding photos), and laws, in order to understand how Sri Lankan Tamils, who have been dispersed across spaces, rebuilt and shaped their fragmented lives and communities through these documents/figures/ spaces/zones. This study suggests that those fragmented communities were rekindled by ‘in-betweens’ associated with the marriage process, actors like wedding photographers or marriage brokers, legal corpuses, and transit places. The practices, ceremonies, and performances during the marriage process hold an imagined and lived future/s, entangled with past and present. This book deals with temporalities, documents, relatedness and political violence.

    Sidharthan Maunaguru is currently an assistant professor in anthropology at Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies at National University of Singapore. His research interests cover the areas of marriage, migration, religion, diaspora, politics, conscience, ethics, and law. He was awarded a Newton Fellowship by British Academia and Royal Society which was held at University of Edinburgh before he joined NUS. Maunaguru’s work is placed within the South Asian regions and beyond, it often includes multi-site fieldwork and intersects with anthropology, history and philosophy. He has published in Modern Asian Studies, Comparative Studies on Society and History, Religion and Society and Contributions to Indian Sociology. Maunaguru’s book titled Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War is published in 2019 with University of Washington Press, and another of his article is forthcoming in Current Anthropology.

    Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Sidharthan Maunaguru
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Tamil Worlds Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMEast Asian Studies Lounge, 14th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Mari Yoshihara will speak about her new book, Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro, which interweaves the history of Leonard Bernstein’s transformation from an American icon to a world maestro with an intimate story of his relationships with two Japanese individuals: Amano Kazuko, a loyal fan who began writing letters to Bernstein in 1947, and Kunihiko Hashimoto, a young man who fell deeply in love with Bernstein in 1979 and later became his business representative. During the period in which these two relationships unfolded, Japan’s place in the world and its relationship vis-à-vis the United States changed dramatically, which in turn shaped Bernstein’s connection to the country. Yoshihara will trace the making of a global Bernstein amidst the shifting change of classical music that made this American celebrity turn increasingly to Europe and Japan.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).

    *Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro will be available for purchase at the venue.

    Location
    The lounge is located on the 14th floor of the Robarts Library. Take the P4 elevator from the 2nd floor of Robarts to the 14th floor. On exiting the elevator, head LEFT and follow signs to EAS.


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Speaker
    American Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th American Quarterly: Information Session with Mari Yoshihara

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 201911:00AM - 12:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Prof. Yoshihara, who is the Senior Editor of American Quarterly, the journal of the American Studies Association, will offer an informal session about the journal, including advice on submitting an article for publication.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Senior Editor, American Quarterly


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Through the interrogation rooms of the Korean War, this talk demonstrates how the individual human subject became both the terrain and the jus ad bellum for this critical U.S. war of ‘intervention’ in postcolonial Korea. In 1952, with the US introduction of voluntary POW repatriation proposal at Panmunjom, the interrogation room and the POW became a flashpoint for an international controversy ultimately about postcolonial sovereignty and political recognition.

    The ambitions of empire, revolution and non-alignment converged upon this intimate encounter of military warfare: the interrogator and the interrogated prisoner of war. Which state could supposedly reinvent the most intimate power relation between the colonizer and the colonized, to transform the relationship between the state and subject into one of liberation, democracy or freedom? Tracing two generations of people across the Pacific as they navigate multiple kinds of interrogation from the 1940s and 1950s, this talk lay outs a landscape of interrogation – a dense network of violence, bureaucracy, and migration – that breaks apart the usual temporal bounds of the Korean War as a discrete event.

    Monica Kim is Assistant Professor in U.S. and the World History in the Department of History at New York University. Her book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (Princeton University Press), is a trans-Pacific history of decolonization told through the experiences of two generations of people creating and navigating military interrogation rooms of the Korean War. She has published work in journals such as Critical Asian Studiesand positions: asia critiqueconcerning U.S. empire, war-making, and decolonization. She is also a member of the Editorial Collective for Radical History Review. Her research and writing have been supported by fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), the Penn Humanities Forum at University of Pennsylvania, and the Korea Foundation.

    *Copies of “The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History” will be available for sale during this event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 case studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to securing the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?

    Dr. Gwenn Pulliat is a researcher in geography at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). She has worked on Southeast Asia for a decade, with a focus on urban development issues. Her research deals with urban food security and the urban environment. In 2017, she has held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto, working on the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia partnership.


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th Sphere of Knowledge and Experience in Literature: A Case Study of Nepali Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This case study of Nepali literature shows how literature can reflect the expanding spheres of knowledge in societies like that of Nepal where multiple cultural modes prevail. I will present a study on the expanding sphere of Nepali literature in areas such as the choice of subject for writing, the growth of ‘print capitalism’ or printing and dissemination from the last decades of the 19th century, the role of literary journals in keeping up the creative and free spirit under the autocratic regimes, and the creation of the reading public. The presentation will show how in the first half of the twentieth century did Nepali poetry use romanticism as the important literary trend, and how the literary writers, critics and academics see and interpret modernism, and people understand it in common parlance. I will mention my own experience as a playwright in the selection of the motifs for the plays and how that reflects the sphere of creative writing, in terms of cultural diversity and plurality of subjects.

    Abhi Subedi (PhD) received his higher education in Nepal and Britain. He is an essayist, literary critic, linguist, playwright, and poet. He has over two-dozen books on different subjects to his credit. Professor Subedi has taught since 1970. He writes on issues of freedom, culture, literature, arts and social transformations.


    Speakers

    Dr. Abhi Subedi
    Professor Emeritus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Frederick Lee Story and the Hill 70 Memorial Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    During World War I (WWI), approximately 300 Chinese soldiers enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force despite rampant anti-Chinese discrimination. Anonymous until recently, Frederick “Freddy” Lee was one of those soldiers.

    Born into a Chinese Canadian Merchant family in Kamloops, BC, Freddy volunteered for the war, enlisting with the 172nd Battalion and served in a vital role as a machine gunner. Freddy fought in and survived the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1916, but was later killed in the Battle of Hill 70 in August 1917 at only 21 years of age. He fought and died as a Canadian. Freddy was among the 11,286 Canadians killed in France with no known graves.

    Freddy’s story is one that not only symbolizes the strength and determination of Chinese Canadians’ long struggle to gain acceptance as full Canadian citizens, but also embodies the Canadian spirit of “strength in diversity”, where Canadians of all ethnicities contributed to the history and development of their nation.

    While featuring Frederick Lee, the symposium will present a larger Chinese Canadian story. Based on historical research by experts on Chinese Canadian studies and WWI, along with invaluable insights from key figures involved in various Frederick Lee projects, the event will shine new light on Chinese Canadians’ contributions to Canadian history.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca, or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Opening Remarks
    Chancellor Emerita, University of Toronto, and retired Senator of Canada

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Dr. Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Robert C. Engen
    Panelist
    Department of Defence Studies, Canadian Forces College

    Mr. Mark Hutchings
    Panelist
    Chairman, The Hill 70 Memorial Project

    Mr. Jack Gin
    Panelist
    Finding Frederick Lee Project

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Welcoming Remarks
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2019

  • Friday, November 1st Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 1, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Within the labor literature, with its predominant focus on wage workers, self-employed workers are too often ignored and under-examined as part of the modern proletariat. However, this neglect of self-employed workers creates major blind spots in our understanding of the multiplicity of agents of social change that are organizing as workers outside the Global North. As urban spaces are increasingly being captured as a speculative commodity, especially in rapidly urbanizing cities beyond the often-theorized and studied West, urban spaces are becoming a source of precarity for the many self-employed workforce who depend on them to make a living. However, the same spaces are also emerging as loci for building workers’ power. I focus on the South Korean tenant shopkeepers who are waging creative collective actions to defend their rights to their shops and attracting outside allies within the progressive networks to join them. Through ethnographic research, I analyze how and when the making of what I refer to as protest space—a symbolic space challenging the entrenched power structure—can effectively translate into workers’ power. The case of Seoul presents broader implications for understanding how the previously fragmented and isolated self-employed workers can form collective consciousness.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Prior to coming to Toronto, she completed her doctoral degree in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles.
    As a political and labor sociologist and urban ethnographer, Yewon is broadly interested in how speculative real estate interests increasingly dictate the shapes and characters of urban landscapes and how, in response, ordinary people organize to preserve their ways of living. Her dissertation, Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: The Untold Gentrification Story of Tenant Shopkeepers’ Displacement and Resistance in Seoul, examines tenant shopkeepers in Seoul, Korea—how the previously unorganized organize under their collective identity as workers. A manuscript that emerged from this dissertation is currently forthcoming at Critical Sociology and has received many awards including Honorable Mention in the 2019 American Sociological Association’s Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship/ Graduate Student Paper Award competition.


    Speakers

    Yewon Andrea Lee
    Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th Reel Asian Film Screening: The Dragon Painter

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    The Dragon Painter

    USA 1919
    53:00
    Silent with English intertitles
    G

    DIRECTOR
    William Worthington

    CAST
    Sessue Hayakawa
    Tsuru Aoki
    Edward Peil
    Toyo Fujita

    An early Hollywood silent film, The Dragon Painter is a fantasy romance about love and creative inspiration. Tatsu (Hayakawa) is a reclusive artist who lives in the mountains of Japan painting images of the dragon princess he loved in another life. He comes to believe the daughter of a wealthy art collector is his lost princess, but as Tatsu finds happiness in love, his art begins to suffer.

    In his prime, Hayakawa was as popular as Charlie Chaplin, as rich as Douglas Fairbanks, and to this day, the only Asian American to own his own Hollywood studio. Hayakawa founded Haworth Pictures Corporation after becoming fed up with the self-proclaimed Orientalist roles in which he was cast by the major studios, including his character in Cecil B. DeMille’s The Cheat. Hayakawa’s studio subsequently released 19 films between the years of 1918 to 1922.

    Although set in Japan, The Dragon Painter was shot on location in Yosemite National Park and stars a predominantly Japanese American cast, including Hayakawa’s wife, Tsuru Aoki. Produced by Hayakawa’s own studio, the film deliberately strived to provide an authentic perspective on Japanese culture that countered the dominant narrative of stereotypes, violence, and melodramatic conflict expected in so-called “Oriental” films of the period. For these reasons, it is considered it to be one of the first Asian American films in history. – Rob Buscher

    On the occasion of the film’s 100th Anniversary, The Dragon Painter will be presented with a live musical accompaniment and an original score by Los Angeles-based musician Goh Nakamura that was originally commissioned by the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival. A presentation on Hayakawa’s work and legacy will be given by Stephen Gong, film archivist and executive director of the Center for Asian American Media, who was responsible for locating and overseeing the restoration of the last existing print of The Dragon Painter.

    The screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Silent Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th The Indian Water Crisis: Does Technology Offer a Way Forward?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The 2019 Indian water crisis has been termed by researchers, civil society and the national media in that country as being unprecedented in its geographical span and severity. This panel examines some of the policy and technological responses to this multidimensional crisis and argues that current problems, while challenging, have been decades in the making. It also highlights years of missed opportunities towards crafting imaginative solutions to what are primarily issues of unsustainable water use. From the problems of sanitation, the growing disparities in urban water access, and the over extraction of groundwater in many parts of India, the panelists shall also examine the nexus of the water crisis with technological and institutional choices made in the past. In this context, the panelists while maintaining their focus on policy questions shall also map out possible technological solutions and political responses to the present crisis.

    Introductory remarks
    Vladimiros Papangelakis, Director, Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi, Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto
    Understanding recent national policy responses to the water crisis in India. Is governance reform sufficient?

    K J Joy, Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Promoting Participative Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India
    Responding to the Indian water crisis: Emergent ideas and pathways for restructuring the water sector

    David Taylor, Assistant Professor, Civil and Global Engineering, University of Toronto
    Urban water regimes

    Moderator
    Amy Bilton, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Note of thanks: Vladimiros Papangelakis, Institute for Water Innovation


    Speakers

    Amy Bilton
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Vladimiros Papangelakis
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Institute for Water Innovation, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    K. J. Joy
    Panelist
    Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Participatory Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India

    David Taylor
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Global Engineering, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th Reel Asian Roundtable with Chop Suey Nation and A Sweet & Sour Christmas

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    PULSE PRESENTATION
    CHOP SUEY NATION
    Canada 2019
    English

    AUTHOR
    Ann Hui
    (in attendance)

    A SWEET AND SOUR CHRISTMAS
    Canada 2019
    16:00
    English, Cantonese with English Subtitles
    G · Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Aram Collier
    (in attendance)

    PRODUCER
    Betty Xie
    (in attendance)

    How do food stories speak to a convoluted history of multiculturalism? What does it take to trace back the stories of diasporic community to its roots? If and when we do arrive, what next? This multimedia program explores this question through an excerpt reading of Chop Suey Nation and a screening of A Sweet and Sour Christmas.

    In 2016, Journalist Ann Hui drove across Canada seeking answers to two questions: Why is there a Chinese restaurant in every small town? Who are the families who run them? Meeting with owners and eating at their restaurants, Hui shares stories of diasporic Chinese communities in her book Chop Suey Nation, while unexpectedly, uncovering her own family history – revealing the importance of these restaurants to Canada’s history.

    In A Sweet and Sour Christmas, director Aram Siu Wai Collier and producer Betty Xie follow two types of holiday meals at the King Wok Restaurant: the deep-fried take-out Chinese Canadian food staples delivered to families across Kitchener and the traditional Cantonese meal for a family sharing a rare Christmas celebration. This film is a CBC Short Doc to be released on CBC Gem and the CBC Short Docs Channel in December 2019.
    – KL

    BIOs:

    Raised in a Chinese-Canadian family in Vancouver, Ann Hui grew up in a food-obsessed household to parents who always knew where the freshest Cantonese seafood or barbecued duck could be found. Since 2015, Hui has been The Globe’s national food reporter. Her work includes investigations into the role of lobbying in the development of Canada’s Food Guide, and a 2018 story that uncovered widespread sexual harassment in one of the country’s most prominent wineries. She has a Masters of Journalism from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia.

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a Toronto-based filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He edited the feature documentary Refugee and directed the short doc Who I Became, nationally broadcasted on PBS. His omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown (‘11-’14) toured Canada, Asia, and the USA. His Telefilm Canada-funded feature, Stand Up Man (‘17) premiered at multiple international film festivals. Collier is a mixed-race Asian Canadian/American who has a BFA and MFA in Film Production from the University of California at Santa Cruz and York University respectively.

    Betty Xie is a Chinese Canadian filmmaker and a festival curator. Her short documentary The Home Promised (‘14) won the Air Canada Best Short Film at the Reel Asian Film Festival and played at various international film festivals. She produced the Telefilm Canada funded-feature, Stand Up Man (‘17), which premiered at multiple international film festivals. Her short doc Chado: A Way of Tea was selected as a top 10 finalist of the 2018 TVO ShortDoc Contest. She was also a 2019 Doc Institute Canada Breakthrough Fellow.

    Join Hui, Collier and Xie in conversation moderated by multidisciplinary artist Shellie Zhang to discuss the Chinese-Canadian cuisine known as chop suey. These four artists dive by way of food stories into a deeper inquiry around constructs of citizenship, belonging, and tolerance.

    *Chop Suey Nation will be on sale prior to the event and Ann Hui will be available for book signings after the event.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Critical Distance Centre for Curators


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th Reel Asian Film Screening: What We Left Unfinished

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    WHAT WE LEFT UNFINISHED

    Afghanistan/USA 2019
    71:00
    Dari with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Mariam Ghani

    CAST
    Latif Ahmadi
    Hossain Fakhri
    Said Miran Farhad
    Juwansher Haidary
    Wali Latifi
    Faqir Nabi
    Yasamin Yarmal

    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    2019 Berlinale Forum
    2019 SFFILM
    2019 Sheffield Doc/Fest

    From 1978 to 1991, the Afghan Films Institute had been producing propaganda features to fit with the times. This documentary follows the incredible story of five of these unfinished works from Afghanistan’s Communist era, when the constantly shifting political regimes resulted in films remaining unfinished, unedited, and thought to be destroyed.

    In her debut feature, Mariam Ghani pieces fragments of this once-lost footage, from The April Revolution (1978), Downfall (1987), The Black Diamond (1989), Wrong Way (1990), and Agent (1991), unedited (and therefore, uncensored). Just as the original filmmakers did when they shot action scenes with real bullets, hired ex-agents to play spies, or restaged the Communist coup d’état with the army, air force, and an awful lot of tanks and missiles, What We Left Unfinished interweaves histories and fictions. Ultimately, we come to understand both the price paid by Afghan filmmakers for the benefits they gained under Communism and the reasons they persisted despite the risks they faced—and why they still believe that film could save Afghanistan from the divisions tearing it apart today.

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Mariam Ghani’s previous projects in Afghanistan have documented the spatial politics of the post-war constitutional assembly, real-estate speculations in reconstructed Kabul, afterlives of former secret prisons, diasporic translators in theatres of war, and forgotten histories of Afghan modernists, artists and intellectuals. What We Left Unfinished is her first feature.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Shahrzad Mojab, a scholar, teacher, and activist, internationally known for her work on the impact of war, displacement, dispossession, and violence on women’s learning and resistance. She is professor of Adult Education and Community Development and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto, and currently, the Director of Equity Studies at New College.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Farsi Cinema Centre

    Regent Park Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th King Milinda in Independent Burma and the Struggle to Control the Buddhist Canon

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Institute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The first independent Burmese administration of U Nu embarked on a national Buddhist revivalist project that included laws regulating Buddhism, sponsorship of lay-centred meditation centres, and the so-called Sixth Buddhist Council. This paper focuses on Burmese monk Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw (1868-1954) and the controversy over his Pali commentary in the early 1950s, the Commentary on the Questions of [King] Milinda (Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā). Published in 1948 by a pioneer of mass-lay meditation in the most classical commentarial genre, this text sparked protest in the streets and forced U Nu to send police to confiscate almost 400 copies from a monastery in Rangoon at night. Ostensibly the uproar was over reforms the Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw proposed to the monastic code (vinaya), possibly hurrying the enactment of the Monastic Courts Act of 1949 (Ṭhana Vinicchaya). By examining the controversy over this text through newspaper articles, epigraphic evidence and government documents, this paper will explore the intersection between Buddhist statecraft, emerging communities of insight (vipassanā) meditation, and control of the Pali canon in mid-twentieth-century Burma.

    Tony Scott is a PhD Candidate in the Department for the Study of Religion in collaboration with the Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. His research interests lie in South and Southeast Asian Pali discourse and its intersection with communities of practice, vernacular language, and twentieth-century statecraft. He currently focuses on the Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā, a modern Pali commentary on the Questions of King Milinda (circa 1st century B.C.E.) written by a Burmese pioneer of insight (vipassanā) meditation, the Mūla Mingun Jetavan Sayadaw (1868-1954).

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Tony Scott
    PhD Candidate, Department for the Study of Religion and Collaborative Specialization in South Asian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th The Rise of Illiberal Politics in Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    9:00 AM – Welcome and opening remarks by CSK Director Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto): “The rise of extreme illiberal politics in East Asia: Conceptual propositions”

    9:30 AM – Panel 1: Illiberal Politics in China
    Chair and discussant: Sida Liu (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Lynette Ong (Political Science, University of Toronto): “Contentious Politics in China under Xi Jinping’s Rule”
    Jun Zhang (Geography and Planning, University of Toronto): “The Clash of Liberal Hong Kong and Illiberal Beijing: “One Country, Two Systems” under Fire”

    10:50 AM – Coffee break

    11:00 AM – Panel 2: Illiberal Politics in Japan
    Chair and discussant: Takashi Fujitani (History, University of Toronto)
    Nathaniel Smith (East Asian Studies, University of Arizona): “Trolling for the Emperor?: Race, Empire, and Battles on the ‘Multicultural’ Right in Japan”
    Sharon Yoon (Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University): “Normalizing Japan’s Far-Right: The Zaitokukai and its Impact on Mainstream Discourse”

    12:20 PM – Lunch

    2:00 PM – Panel 3: Illiberal Politics in South Korea
    Chair and discussant: Andre Schmid (East Asian Studies, University of Toronto)
    Myungji Yang (Political Science, University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa): “The Specter of the Past: Reconstructing Conservative Historical Memory in South Korea”
    Taehyun Nam (Political Science, Salisbury University):” Taegeukgi Protests as a Counter Movement?”

    3:20 PM – Coffee break

    3:30 PM – Panel 4: Illiberal Politics in the Philippines and Thailand
    Chair and discussant: Jack Veugelers (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Marco Garrido (Sociology, University of Chicago): “Democracy as Disorder: Democratic Disenchantment among the Middle Class in Metro Manila”
    Celso Villegas (Sociology, Kenyon College): “Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines as a Transnational Narrative Trope”
    Tyrell Haberkorn (Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison): “What Cannot Be Spoken: Violence and the Monarchy in Thailand”


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Nathaniel Smith,
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona

    Sharon Yoon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Myungji Yang
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Hawai'I Mānoa

    Taehyun Nam
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science Department, Salisbury University

    Jack Veugelers
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Marco Garrido
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

    Celso Villegas
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Kenyon College

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Speaker
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Sida Liu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Lynette Ong
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Tagore in China: The Case for Pan-Asian Poetics in the 1920s

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The Annual Bengal Studies Lecture

    Description

    Rabindranath Tagore’s 1924 tour in China has attracted numerous critical analyses throughout the years and continues to pique scholars’ curiosity. The literary luminary’s attempt to raise support for his vision of an Asia-wide investment in spirituality in a rapidly materializing world remains a particularly fraught topic. Scholarship on China’s response to the Eastern spirituality ideal has generally focused on Chinese Marxists’ scathing critiques of Tagore’s vision, epitomized in the cold reception his lectures received from their audience. Less attention has been paid to an array of enthusiastic responses that emerged from May 4th poets in the form of journal articles about Tagore and poetry which directly engaged with his ideas. This talk investigates the exchange with Tagore and his work as an event that deeply informed Chinese poetry. As such, I argue, Tagore’s visit enables a new understanding of the Eastern spirituality project not as a failure, but as a vehicle for the Chinese envisioning of Pan-Asian poetics.

    Gal Gvili is an Assistant Professor at the Department of East Asian Studies at McGill University. She studies and teaches modern, and contemporary Chinese literature, literary and cultural theory. Her first book investigates how interactions between Chinese writers and Indian religions and philosophy fashioned a conviction that literature is the ultimate means for transforming the national fate.

    The lecture will be followed by reception, 7-8 PM.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Department of English


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 19th Book Launch: Policy, Regulation and Innovation in China's Electricity and Telecom Industries

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    LECTURE: 4:00 – 5:30 PM
    RECEPTION: 5:30 – 6:30 PM

    China’s innovation ambitions inspire worldwide commentary, much of it poorly informed. Focusing on several sectors central to China’s innovation drive, Loren Brandt (University of Toronto) and Thomas Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) offer a richly detailed account of China’s innovation efforts in their latest book, Policy, Regulation, and Innovation in China’s Electricity and Telecom Industries. The book’s granular studies look beyond specific technologies to incorporate the policy matrix, regulatory structures and global developments into an appraisal of China’s industrial policy and innovation achievements. The massive application of human and financial resources offers great promise, but institutional obstacles and legacies, conflicting objectives, and ill-advised policies inject inefficiencies, resulting in a complex mosaic of success and failure in both technical and commercial dimensions.

    Loren Brandt is the Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade at the University of Toronto. With Thomas G. Rawski, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His current research focuses on issues of industrial upgrading in China, inequality dynamics, and China’s long-run economic growth and structural change.

    Thomas G. Rawski is emeritus Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh. Recent publications include Tales from the Development Frontier (2013), which he co-authored. With Loren Brandt, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His research focuses on the development and modern history of China’s economy, including studies of China’s reform mechanism and achievements.

    Lecture: 4 – 5:30 PM
    Reception: 5:30 – 6:30 PM


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Loren Brandt
    Speaker
    Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade, University of Toronto

    Thomas G. Rawski
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of Economics and History, University of Pittsburgh

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor and Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 20th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    *Please note this event has been postponed. We will email registrants with updated event timing as soon as it is available.*

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 21st Takako Hikotani Lecture: Japan’s ‘Value Diplomacy’ and the Rise of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 315 Bloor
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Prime Minister Abe, in both his first and second administrations, has emphasized values: democracy, human rights, and the rule of law, in his diplomatic statements. Does the Abe administration’s rhetorical focus on values signify a substantial change in Japanese foreign policy, or is it just window dressing?

    In this public talk, Professor Hikotani argues: (1) Japan’s foreign policy was never value-devoid; but the “value” that drove Japan in its foreign policy was different from other western countries in its emphasis; to be less explicit about the value being promoted, and that the value promoted, especially with regard to Asia, emphasized development assistance over democracy promotion. (2) External developments (the rise of China in the region), and internal developments (institutional empowerment of the Prime Minister) led more emphasis in the use of values as slogans in foreign policy. (3) While values are more often used as slogans, the substance of Japan’s foreign policy has not changed much. Democracy and rule of law is mentioned more frequently as the natural bond among Australia, India and Japan, Japan is also careful about not to force Asian countries to choose between China and Japan and to antagonize China along the way.

    Speaker Bio:

    Takako Hikotani is Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Columbia University. She previously taught at the National Defense Academy of Japan, where she was Associate Professor, and lectured at the Ground Self Defense Force and Air Self Defense Force Staff Colleges, and the National Institute for Defense Studies. Her research focus on civil-military relations and Japanese domestic politics, Japanese foreign policy, and comparative civil-military relations. Her publications (in English) include, “The Japanese Diet and defense policy-making.” International Affairs, 94:1, July, 2018; “Trump’s Gift to Japan: Time for Tokyo to Invest in the Liberal Order,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2017; and “Japan’s New Executive Leadership: How Electoral Rules Make Japanese Security Policy” (with Margarita Estevez-Abe and Toshio Nagahisa), in Frances Rosenbluth and Masaru Kohno eds, Japan in the World (Yale University Press, 2009). She was a Visiting Professional Specialist at Princeton University as Social Science Research Council/Abe Fellow (2010-2011) and Fellow of the US-Japan Leadership Program, US-Japan Foundation (2000- ).

    Professor Hikotani received her BA from Keio University, MA from Keio University and Stanford University, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University, where she was a President’s Fellow.


    Speakers

    Takako Hikotani
    Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 26th Faith in Formaldehyde: Conversion in the Oldest Cabinet of Curiosity in the Philippines

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the oldest existing museum in the Philippines, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Museum of Arts and Sciences, as a cabinet of curiosity and a catalyst of conversion. By Spanish royal decree, its early collection acquired through colonial expeditions, complex evangelical networks, and commercial expositions formed the classroom materials for the Natural History course taught by Dominican friars. By 1877, the fauna, flora, and mineral—from the minute to the monumental, from the ordinary to the odd—were inventoried in a three-volume catalogue raisonné. Its collection has since elicited a sense of wonder in nature’s perfection and diversity. Within the broader philosophical contexts of natural and revealed theology and the revival of Thomism after Charles Darwin’s publication of his theory of evolution through natural selection, the museum’s pursuit of scientific knowledge masked its pursuit of sacred truth, engendering an epiphany through the embalmed and serving the divine through the drama of its dioramas. Operating as a mode of signification and translation of the Word, the museum became a biblical exegesis of the origin of species to archive God, preserving faith in formaldehyde as a means of maintaining the authority of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines.

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. A two-time Fulbright U.S. Scholar (Student/Faculty Grant), a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and a Faculty Learning Community Participant through the NEH Humanities Initiative Grant, she is the co-editor of Confrontations, Crossings, and Convergence: Photographs of the Philippines and the United States, 1898-1998 (1998) and author of Institutions and Icons of Patronage: Arts and Culture in the Philippines during the Marcos Years, 1965-1986 (2012). Besides teaching art history and museum studies at several institutions in the United States, France, and the Philippines, she also served as Advisor for the Arts at the National Museum of the Philippines before her appointment as Project Manager/Curator of the Philippines at the Venice Biennale by the Department of Foreign Affairs. Currently, Baluyut is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Art Department and Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oneonta and Chair of the College Art Association’s International Committee.


    Speakers

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Art History; Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, State University of New York (SUNY), Oneonta

    Nhung Tuyet Tran
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 27th Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 27, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Pl.
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    Description

    Explore the motivations behind the rapid development of museums in China.

    The University of Toronto’s School of Cities, in partnership with the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Faculty of Information (iSchool) and Lord Cultural Resources, invite you to join us for the launch of Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom, a new book by the Chinese Museums Association and Lord Cultural Resources.

    This event will feature a presentation by co-editor Gail Dexter Lord, followed by a panel of experts who will discuss the role cultural diplomacy plays in China-Canada relations and the role of museums as an approach to urbanism and city building.

    Museum Development in China is an international collaboration which aims to discover how much East and West can learn from each other about museum roles, our publics, what and how we preserve and future sustainability — even as we marvel at the amazing
    accomplishments of China’s museum building boom.

    *This is a free event, please register to attend.

    Copies of Museum Development in China will be available for purchase at the event.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Catching
    Contemporary art curator and museum planner

    Gail Dexter Lord
    Co-Founder and President, Lord Cultural Resources

    Jennifer Purtle
    Associate Professor, Department of Art History and affiliated faculty of the Asian Institute

    Yan Zhou
    Curator and PhD student, Faculty of Information (iSchool)


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto

    The School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Xi Jinping’s ‘Proregress’: Recent Political and Economic Policy Moves

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Xi Jinping’s leadership has been marked by ambiguity and unpredictability. Since becoming China’s top leader in 2012, he has pursued fragile balances: portraying himself as inheritor of the legacies of both Mao and Deng; consolidating power based on both his communist “red nobility” and his understanding of “ordinary people”; promoting market reform in some ways while asserting greater state control in others; and offering contradictory clues as to whether China seeks to be a revisionist power or to preserve the status quo in the post-Cold War international order. It is hardly surprising that public judgments of Xi within China and overseas are so strikingly different.

    Cheng Li’s talk focuses on Xi’s two most recent parallel domestic policy moves: launching an ambitious program for poverty elimination and promoting the country’s largest metropolis clusters for economic growth. Given Xi’s role at the epicenter of these major developments, a discussion of China’s future trajectory requires a comprehensive and balanced assessment of this goal-oriented leader.

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.


    Speakers

    Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director and Senior Fellow, the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2019

  • Monday, December 2nd Deadlining: Temporality and Transformation in Nepal’s Post-Conflict, Post-Disaster Reconstruction

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 2, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Spring 2015, Nepal experienced two massive earthquakes. Later that year, the country’s constitution was ‘fast-tracked’ to a hurried conclusion after a nearly decade-long wait since the 2006 end of the country’s Maoist-state civil conflict. This paper considers how the temporal tool of the deadline has yielded particular political and material results within Nepal’s ongoing experience of transformation. Whether used to bring political actors from seven major parties to the bargaining table, or nearly 1 million individual householders to the local administrative office to begin their application for reconstruction subsidies, the deadline is a commonly experienced mediator of relationships between the Nepali state and its citizens. Familiarity with this temporal tool also leads to experimentation: when deadlines are believed to be extendable, they may not lead to the desired result. But even when deadlines are repeatedly extended—as they were both for Nepal’s constitution drafters and for homeowners seeking reconstruction subsidies—they effect significant political and material transformations on the ground. Individuals hedge their bets by building particular kinds of political and material structures that are at once possible to complete quickly, and open to expansion should timeframes allow. From the vantage point of 2019, four years after both the earthquakes and the constitution, this paper explores how the dual processes of post-conflict state restructuring and post-earthquake reconstruction intertwine at the experiential level to yield large-scale structural transformations—in which the deadline may both enable and constrain new forms of political and material life.

    Sara Shneiderman is Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), in the Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs. She is the author of Rituals of Ethnicity: Thangmi Identities Between Nepal and India(University of Pennsylvania Press 2015; winner of the 2017 James Fisher Prize for First Books on the Himalayan Region) and co-editor of Darjeeling Reconsidered: Histories, Politics, Environments (Oxford University Press, 2018). She has also published widely on the themes of ethnicity, mobility, citizenship, and borders in the Himalayas and South Asia. Her current transdisciplinary research partnership funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) focuses on the social and political dimensions of post-earthquake reconstruction in Nepal in collaboration with Social Science Baha, the Department of Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, and several other partners. At UBC, she coordinates the Himalaya Program, and served as Co-Director of the Centre for India and South Asia Research from 2017-2019.


    Speakers

    Sara Shneiderman
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs, University of British Columbia


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th On Native Testimony: Military Tribunals, War Crimes, and Imperial Judgment in Guam

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1944, the U.S. Navy established the War Crimes Tribunals Program in Guam, one of several Japanese colonies located in the Pacific. For the next five years, the military commission reviewed war crimes cases about assault, murder, treason, and other acts against white civility. Throughout this period, the tribunal also featured more than 100 indigenous Chamorro and Chamorro-Japanese testimonies about Japanese militarism, policing, and torture in Guam. How did these testimonies support the U.S. effort to eradicate Japan’s sovereignty and remake the political bodies and territorial borders of Guam and the Pacific Islands more generally? By drawing on various philosophies and proverbs about life and death, this talk examines the legal and political impact of military courts, native testimonies, and white supremacist violence.

    Keith L. Camacho is an associate professor in the Asian American Studies Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the author of Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam, the co-editor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific, and the former senior editor of Amerasia Journal.

    * Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam by Keith L. Camacho will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Keith L. Camacho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Speaker Biographies:

    Bharat Punjabi is a Lecturer in the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water governance, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. His research on water governance has been published in journals such as World Development, Environmental Research Letters and India Review.

    Aparna Sundar teaches in the Comparative Asian Studies programme. Dr. Sundar has previously taught at universities in Bangalore, India. She works on democratic politics and contemporary struggles over the meanings of democracy in India, and is currently involved in two collaborative comparative research projects, one on authoritarian populisms, and the other on neoliberalization, precarity, and contentious politics in the BRICS countries.

    Francis Cody is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on language and politics in southern India. He first brought these interests to bear on a study of citizenship, literacy, and social movement politics in rural Tamilnadu. This work was published as a book called The Light of Knowledge (Cornell 2013), winner of the 2014 Edward Sapir Book Prize awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology. Cody’s more recent research traces the emergence of populism and transformations of political publicity through Tamil and English news media. This work explores questions of law, technology, and violence in claims to representing popular sovereignty. Taken as a whole, his work contributes to the transdisciplinary project of elaborating critical social theories of mass mediation and politics in the postcolonial world.


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute

    Aparna Sundar
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th Anatomy of a Protest: The Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture in the History of India

    Description

    Kunti, a dalit (“untouchable” caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximately 1.3 million workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This paper explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierarchy in India became the face for an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti’s role in the movement illustrates an important dimension of the abolitionist movement: the construction of the “people” (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in late colonial India.

    Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor (by courtesy) in the Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transregional approaches. She is the author of Colonial Masculinity: The ‘manly Englishman’ and the ‘effeminate Bengali’ in the late nineteenth century (1995) and of Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006), winner of the Joan Kelley Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association and the Albion Book Prize from the North American Conference of British Studies. She is currently working on a book project with the working title, “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” for which she received the 2012 John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Sinha is also a past President of the Association of Asian Studies (2015).


    Speakers

    Mrinalini Sinha
    Speaker
    Alice Freeman Palmer Professor, Department of History; Professor (by courtesy), Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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