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December 2019

  • Monday, December 2nd Deadlining: Temporality and Transformation in Nepal’s Post-Conflict, Post-Disaster Reconstruction

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 2, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Spring 2015, Nepal experienced two massive earthquakes. Later that year, the country’s constitution was ‘fast-tracked’ to a hurried conclusion after a nearly decade-long wait since the 2006 end of the country’s Maoist-state civil conflict. This paper considers how the temporal tool of the deadline has yielded particular political and material results within Nepal’s ongoing experience of transformation. Whether used to bring political actors from seven major parties to the bargaining table, or nearly 1 million individual householders to the local administrative office to begin their application for reconstruction subsidies, the deadline is a commonly experienced mediator of relationships between the Nepali state and its citizens. Familiarity with this temporal tool also leads to experimentation: when deadlines are believed to be extendable, they may not lead to the desired result. But even when deadlines are repeatedly extended—as they were both for Nepal’s constitution drafters and for homeowners seeking reconstruction subsidies—they effect significant political and material transformations on the ground. Individuals hedge their bets by building particular kinds of political and material structures that are at once possible to complete quickly, and open to expansion should timeframes allow. From the vantage point of 2019, four years after both the earthquakes and the constitution, this paper explores how the dual processes of post-conflict state restructuring and post-earthquake reconstruction intertwine at the experiential level to yield large-scale structural transformations—in which the deadline may both enable and constrain new forms of political and material life.

    Sara Shneiderman is Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), in the Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs. She is the author of Rituals of Ethnicity: Thangmi Identities Between Nepal and India(University of Pennsylvania Press 2015; winner of the 2017 James Fisher Prize for First Books on the Himalayan Region) and co-editor of Darjeeling Reconsidered: Histories, Politics, Environments (Oxford University Press, 2018). She has also published widely on the themes of ethnicity, mobility, citizenship, and borders in the Himalayas and South Asia. Her current transdisciplinary research partnership funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) focuses on the social and political dimensions of post-earthquake reconstruction in Nepal in collaboration with Social Science Baha, the Department of Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, and several other partners. At UBC, she coordinates the Himalaya Program, and served as Co-Director of the Centre for India and South Asia Research from 2017-2019.


    Speakers

    Sara Shneiderman
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs, University of British Columbia


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th On Native Testimony: Military Tribunals, War Crimes, and Imperial Judgment in Guam

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1944, the U.S. Navy established the War Crimes Tribunals Program in Guam, one of several Japanese colonies located in the Pacific. For the next five years, the military commission reviewed war crimes cases about assault, murder, treason, and other acts against white civility. Throughout this period, the tribunal also featured more than 100 indigenous Chamorro and Chamorro-Japanese testimonies about Japanese militarism, policing, and torture in Guam. How did these testimonies support the U.S. effort to eradicate Japan’s sovereignty and remake the political bodies and territorial borders of Guam and the Pacific Islands more generally? By drawing on various philosophies and proverbs about life and death, this talk examines the legal and political impact of military courts, native testimonies, and white supremacist violence.

    Keith L. Camacho is an associate professor in the Asian American Studies Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the author of Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam, the co-editor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific, and the former senior editor of Amerasia Journal.

    * Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam by Keith L. Camacho will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Keith L. Camacho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Speaker Biographies:

    Bharat Punjabi is a Lecturer in the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water governance, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. His research on water governance has been published in journals such as World Development, Environmental Research Letters and India Review.

    Aparna Sundar teaches in the Comparative Asian Studies programme. Dr. Sundar has previously taught at universities in Bangalore, India. She works on democratic politics and contemporary struggles over the meanings of democracy in India, and is currently involved in two collaborative comparative research projects, one on authoritarian populisms, and the other on neoliberalization, precarity, and contentious politics in the BRICS countries.

    Francis Cody is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on language and politics in southern India. He first brought these interests to bear on a study of citizenship, literacy, and social movement politics in rural Tamilnadu. This work was published as a book called The Light of Knowledge (Cornell 2013), winner of the 2014 Edward Sapir Book Prize awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology. Cody’s more recent research traces the emergence of populism and transformations of political publicity through Tamil and English news media. This work explores questions of law, technology, and violence in claims to representing popular sovereignty. Taken as a whole, his work contributes to the transdisciplinary project of elaborating critical social theories of mass mediation and politics in the postcolonial world.


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute

    Aparna Sundar
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th Anatomy of a Protest: The Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture in the History of India

    Description

    Kunti, a dalit (“untouchable” caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximately 1.3 million workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This paper explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierarchy in India became the face for an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti’s role in the movement illustrates an important dimension of the abolitionist movement: the construction of the “people” (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in late colonial India.

    Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor (by courtesy) in the Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transregional approaches. She is the author of Colonial Masculinity: The ‘manly Englishman’ and the ‘effeminate Bengali’ in the late nineteenth century (1995) and of Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006), winner of the Joan Kelley Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association and the Albion Book Prize from the North American Conference of British Studies. She is currently working on a book project with the working title, “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” for which she received the 2012 John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Sinha is also a past President of the Association of Asian Studies (2015).


    Speakers

    Mrinalini Sinha
    Speaker
    Alice Freeman Palmer Professor, Department of History; Professor (by courtesy), Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2020

  • Friday, January 17th A Transnational History of Victimhood Nationalisms: On the Global Memory Space of East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 17, 20204:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture will be followed by a reception, 6:00 – 7:00 PM.

    Professor Jie-Hyun Lim’s book project of “victimhood nationalism” aims to illustrate competing memories of victimhood in the postwar Vergangenheitsbewältigung in the global memory space across East and West. Throughout this book, he explores the dialectical interplay of global and national memory with a critical inquiry of the dichotomy of: perpetrators vs. victims, collective guilt vs. innocence, national vs. cosmopolitan memory, historical actors vs. passive objects, over-contextualization vs. de-contextualization, historical conformism vs. presentism, etc. With the emergence of global memory space, unconnected historical actors and memory activists are linked mnemonically a posteriori in the global mnemoscape and memories of victimhood have become more contested. With the histoire croisée as the methodological background, he will trace the global history of victimhood nationalism by drawing entangled memories between victimizers and victimized.

    Jie-Hyun Lim is Professor of Transnational History and director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul. He is also a principal investigator of the research project on the “Mnemonic Solidarity: colonialism, war, and genocide in the global memory space” and the series editor of “Entangled Memories in the Global South” at Palgrave. His most recent book is Memory War: How Could Perpetrators Become Victims? (2019).


    Speakers

    Robert Austin
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies; Associate Professor, CERES

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jie-Hyun Lim
    Speaker
    Professor of Transnational History; Director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Retrospect and Prospect of Hong Kong Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 202012:30PM - 2:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Diving into the historical development of Postwar Hong Kong film culture reveals complexity beyond our understandings of the typical “rise and fall” narrative. Any investigation into Postwar Hong Kong cinema must entail an examination of Hong Kong’s colonial history and its changing sociopolitical conditions as well. During the 1960s, Hong Kong was the site for numerous ideological struggles between Britain, China, and Hong Kong, and it is this intersection of culture and politics that this symposium hopes to emphasize.

    Dr. Jing Jing Chang will be speaking on her new book Screening Communities, an exciting new analysis that situates Hong Kong cinema within the city’s colonial past. An incredible historical narrative on shaping a local community through film narrative.

    Dr. Jessica Li will be presenting her paper “Eileen Chang: Hong Kong Screenplays in the 1960s.” An insightful research tracing the trajectory of Shanghai writer Eileen Chang who had brought together the cultural interflows between Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Jing Jing Chang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Jessica Tsui-Yan Li
    Speaker
    Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Chinese Language and Literature, York University

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies & Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of East Asian Studies

    Bart Testa
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    China Studies Workshop

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20201:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This is a book panel on George Anderson & Sujit Choudhry’s recently published edited volume, Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions (Oxford University Press, 2019). This edited volume, and an accompanying policy paper, are the major outputs of the “Territory and Power” project, a 5-year, thematic, collaborative, global research initiative led by the Center for Constitutional Transitions, the Forum of Federations, and International IDEA, that brought together 24 experts from 13 countries. The research question is how territorial claims relate to constitution-making processes and constitutional design during periods of intense political engagement over constitutional reform or “constitutional moments”. The book includes 17 case studies. Anderson & Choudhry will present the main findings of Territory and Power, followed by commentary by Jacques Bertrand & Lucan Way, who were in participants in this project and contributed chapters.

    Sujit Choudhry (WZB Berlin Social Science Research Centre) is one of the world’s leading scholars of comparative constitutional law. His edited volumes include The Migration of Constitutional Ideas (CUP), Constitutional Design for Divided Societies (OUP), the Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution (OUP), Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions(OUP), and Security Sector Reform in Constitutional Transitions (OUP). He is currently working on the public law theory of political parties. He has advised constitutional processes in Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Myanmar, Nepal, South Africa, Tunisia, Ukraine and Yemen.

    George Anderson has been a federal deputy minister, president of the Forum of Federations, and member of the UN’s stand-by team of mediation experts. He is a fellow at Queen’s University’s Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity. In addition to his extensive work internationally, he is author of the widely translated Federalism: An Introduction and Fiscal Federallsim: A Comparative Introduction, as well as editor of volumes on oil and gas, water, and internal markets in federal systems.

    Lucan Ahmad Way is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (2015) and co-author of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes After the Cold War (2010). Together with Steven Levitsky, he is completing a book on the durability of autocracies founded in violent social revolution.

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Filiz Kahraman is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and an affiliate faculty member at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of the Munk School at the University of Toronto. Her research investigates law and politics from international and comparative perspectives. She is currently working on a book manuscript examining why labor activists in Europe pursue human rights law as a new mobilization strategy and how international law has affected the lives of aggrieved workers on the ground.


    Speakers

    Sujit Choudhry
    Speaker

    George Anderson
    Speaker

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Speaker

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker

    Filiz Kahraman
    Chair


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Hong Kong: Global China’s Restive Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Post-1997 Hong Kong has become the restive frontier of global China – it is the place where the major strategies of global Chinese power are in full display, and where these have provoked the strongest popular resistance yet to Chinese domination. In this talk, I will first analyze Hong Kong as the testing ground for China’s power playbook around the world – (1) economic statecraft (2) patron-clientelism (3) symbolic violence. How do these mechanisms play out in Hong Kong? Second, I will trace the trajectory of countermovements in Hong Kong to generate lessons about the limits and effectiveness of global China.

    Ching Kwan Lee is Dr. Chung Sze-yuen Professor of Social Science at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Professor of Sociology at UCLA. Her latest books include The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor and Foreign Investment in Africa (Chicago 2017) and Take Back Our Future: An Eventful Sociology of the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement (Cornell 2019).

    RELATED EVENT: “Stand with Hong Kong Journalists” Photo Exhibit
    DATES: December 2, 2019 – January 6, 2020
    HOURS: please click here for regular and winter holidays hours
    LOCATION: Hart House, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle
    Please click here for more information
    PRESENTING PARTNERS:
    Hart House, University of Toronto 
    Stand With Hong Kong Journalists (SWHKJ)
    The International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law 


    Speakers

    Ching Kwan Lee
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Panel Discussion on Taiwan Presidential Election 2020: The outcomes and implications

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Taiwan will hold its 7th direct Presidential election on January 11, 2020. The incumbent candidate, President Tsai Ing-wen (Democratic Progressive Party – DPP) will face off the opposition candidates, the Kaohsiung mayor of Han Kuo-yu (Chinese Nationalist Party – KMT), and the People First Party (PFP) candidate, James Soong. After suffering a huge defeat in the 2018 local elections, polls suggest Tsai Ing-wen in the lead. The two key election issues this time are China, particularly in light of Hong Kong protests, and Taiwan’s economy.

    We will bring together a distinguished group of Taiwan specialists to discuss and help us understand the election outcomes and their implications for Taiwan, Canada, global economy and international relations.

    Please join us for the Panel Discussion followed by reception.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Sida Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Speaker
    Vice Provost, International Studies Experiences, Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Catherine Y. M. Hsu
    Speaker
    Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, Department of Sociology, and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto (TAAT)

    Global Taiwan Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Monday, February 3rd Terror Capitalism: Turkic Muslim Dispossession in Northwest China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Description

    A new system of control, made up of a multi-billion dollar industry of computer-vision technologies, militarized policing, and the mass mobilization of civil servants and private industrialists, is attempting to transform Uyghur and Kazakh native societies in Northwest China. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this talk describes the history which produced these forms of surveillance and demonstrates the quotidian experience of their effects on Turkic Muslim social institutions. It argues that this system of “reeducation” is, in fact, a social engineering system that works in concert with a Chinese form of illiberal capitalism to produce forms of family separation and economic production. As it is implemented, it has the effect of partitioning and radically disempowering women and men who are already marginalized within national and international systems.

    Darren Byler is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. His book project titled Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City focuses on the effects of digital cultural production and surveillance industries in the lives of Uyghur and Han male migrants in the city of Ürümchi, Xinjiang.


    Speakers

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History and Global Asia Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Vincent Wong
    Discussant
    William C. Graham Research Associate at the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 6th Democracy in Myanmar: What to Look for in 2020

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 6, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    For the past several years, Myanmar has found itself in the international spotlight. The state once thought of a pariah in the international community made headlines in 2010 when its military rulers dissolved the junta that had ruled the country since 1962 in favour of a democratically elected civilian government. However, the path to democracy has not been without significant challenges. The Rohingya crisis has shed light on the continued control of military officials over the new government, and once revered leader Aung San Suu Kyi faces increased scrutiny for her defense of their practices at the International Court of Justice. By all accounts, the fight for democracy is ongoing in Myanmar. What are the obstacles to its achivement of a quality democracy? What is the role of international actors in advancing or suppressing this? How will the governing National League for Democracy handle the Rohingya Crisis with increasing nativist sentiments?

    Join the Contemporary Asian Studies Students’ Union and the Synergy Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies on February 6th from 2-4PM as we dissect the democratic progress of Myanmar. Refreshments and snacks will be provided!

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Matthew Walton is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he was the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar.

    Joseph McQuade is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada, where he runs the newly-created Centre for Disinformation Studies program stream. Dr. McQuade is affiliated with the Queen’s University Global History Initiative and with the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, and is a Managing Editor of the Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies.


    Speakers

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker
    Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Joseph McQuade
    Moderator
    The Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Matthew Walton
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Contemporary Asian Studies Students Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Between Human, Non-Human, and Woman: An Actress Theorizes Exhaustion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1940, at the height of her stardom, the star-actress Shanta Apte wrote a harsh polemic against the Bombay film industry. I interrogate this curious text – Should I Join the Movies? – by placing it at the intersection of female stardom, the corporeality of cinematic labor, and techno-scientific interest in industrial fatigue. The weariness of the actress, her capacity for “being spent,” is an experiential category that pushes us to think embodiment as production experience. This essay positions Apte’s text as theory from the South that helps us rethink the meanings of gender, embodiment, affective labor, inequality, and human-machine relations at a critical phase in the career of cinema in India. In dialogue with Apte, I think through the materiality of the off-screen world of film work and parse her insistence on embodiment as the grounds for refusal and resistance.

    Debashree Mukherjee is Assistant Professor of film and media in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University. Her first book, Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City (forthcoming from Columbia University Press) brings together insights from film and media studies, feminist cultural studies, new materialisms, and technology studies to narrate the history of Bombay cinema as a history of material practice.


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto

    Debashree Mukherjee
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 13th Buffers Against Famine: Social Ties and the Effects of Collectivization in Khmer Rouge Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 13, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This paper addresses the causes of non-execution deaths during the Cambodian Genocide. Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979) had one of the highest mortality rates of any communist revolution, with the deaths of approximately one quarter of the population: half from direct violence and the other half from indirect means, in particular starvation. What explains the variation in indirect deaths, those that resulted from means other than execution, during this period of mass violence? I argue that it was not just control over agricultural production that led to high rates of starvation deaths, but the policies of social control associated with the collectivization process that exacerbated the problems of famine. The set of policies surrounding the family, including forced marriages and the separation of family units, which I call social collectivization, undermined traditional buffers against famine and decreased the likelihood of survival. The decision to include social components was an ideological one, but those it targeted reflect a strategic logic shaped by economic and security interests. I find that collectivization of economic activities also affected the likelihood of survival; but the social elements tipped the balance toward disaster. High levels of social control targeted preexisting social network and communal ties, fracturing those networks that would ordinarily have acted as a buffer against poor policy or economic downturns in a community. As a result, individuals were more vulnerable to the effects of overwork and over-requisitioned rice, making deaths from indirect means—starvation and exhaustion in particular—more likely. Through this study, I demonstrate the consequences of governing a revolutionary state for the indirect victims of mass violence.

    Rachel Jacobs is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Dickinson College. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2019. Her research centers on questions of survival during periods of mass violence. More broadly, she researches issues of political violence, gender and conflict, human rights, and the long-term consequences of conflict.


    Speakers

    Rachel Jacobs
    Assistant Professor, Political Science and International Studies, Dickinson College


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Cente for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 14th The Ethics of the MeToo Movement--Political Transition-From Politics of Identity to Politics of Solidarity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 14, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The MeToo movement in Korea that happened for the past two years shows some fundamental differences from past political movements against sexual discrimination. First, the former takes on the form of a voluntary mass movement. The MeToo movement began due to the female audience’s active acceptance of the major head slogan of anti-sexual violence movements, “It was not my fault.” The growing feminist awareness of sexual violence and problems that surged after 2015 allowed the women to accept the slogan with all their hearts and launch the movement. Secondly, as testimonies appeared subsequently, the violence was seen as a communal affliction, different from the past feminist movements. In the past, sexual violence victims faced suspicion and criticism as soon as they open up about their experiences and to prove their experiences, they went through individual trials in court. However, the MeToo movement was different. As the name “MeToo” itself signifies, the sexual assault victims’ cases were not perceived as discrete or separate, or cause to socially ostracize the victim. Instead, the Me Too movement allowed more opportunities for solidarity and collaboration.
    Lastly, the MeToo movement does not involve victim identity politics that responds to the demand to prove the assault and adheres to victim centricism that claims that women are disadvantaged. Rather, the movement demands change in socially mandated male-hegemonic, heterosexual normative, authoritative communal culture and behavior status quo. In this presentation, we will look at the hints of possibilities of change demonstrated by the MeToo movement and whether these possibilities will be held back by the process of court and bureaucratic procedures. Sharing these concerns about possible challenges to these new changes, I plan to discuss how sexual assault could be politicized as a social phenomenon.

    Kwonkim Hyeonyoung is a Guest Professor in the Korea National University of Arts, South Korea. She sees herself as a research activist. She is a guest professor at Korean National University of Arts. She is the co-author of Analyzing the Korean man <한국남성을 분석한다>, Feminism of perpetration and victimhood <피해와 가해의 페미니즘> and author of Will never turn back again<다시는 그전으로 돌아가지 않을 것이다>. She also co-wrote twenty books, including The Politics of the MeToo Movement <미투의 정치학>. Her primary interest as a researcher lies on exploring ways how gender politics of violence and power plays in today’s Korean society. As an activist, she reads written judgments in court, attends hearings at trials, protests in streets, and writes.


    Speakers

    Hyeonyoung Kwonkim
    Speaker
    (Art and Gender Institute, Korea National University of Arts)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    (Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 20th Coronavirus in Context: Interdisciplinary Insights through Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 20, 20204:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Please join us as a group of interdisciplinary scholars shares their expertise on the political and economic implications of the novel Coronavirus outbreak.


    Speakers

    Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Economic Geography, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Mary Boyd
    Panelist
    Director, Shanghai Corporate Network, The Economist Intelligence Unit

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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