Past Events at the Asian Institute

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January 2019

  • Thursday, January 10th Marching in Garuda's Nest: East Timor's Path to Independence through Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The independence struggle of East Timor from Indonesia rested on a three-pronged strategy. An aspect of it was to Indonesianize the war that Jakarta had unleashed on the half-island country. Under the overall guidance – and sometimes strict instructions – of their nationalist movement, East Timorese students and activists across Indonesia progressively broke the government’s stranglehold on information about East Timor. They informed the Indonesian public and forged formidable alliances with Indonesian human rights activist and political reformists. These Indonesians rallied against the day-to-day human right violations that the Indonesian military committed in East Timor and gradually came to recognize that the exercise of the right to self-determination in East Timor was a step in the direction of their much-delayed democratic transition. This talk will explore how it was that the East Timorese nationalists marched – and won – in Jakarta while fighting a losing battle in East Timor itself.

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael is a former refugee goatherd and currently a stateless person. He is an Associate Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of History at Queen’s University. He holds a Ph.D. in history and LL.M. in public international law. He studied the history and politics of Northeast Africa and Southeast Asia and wrote a dissertation on the East Timorese and Eritrean struggles for independence from Indonesia and Ethiopia, respectively. He is the author of Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and East Timor Compared (Cambridge, 2013), among others. He has since been researching Northeast African political economy of conflict and his book on the root causes, dynamics and consequences of maritime piracy in Somalia has just been published (Piracy in Somalia: Violence and Development in the Horn of Africa). He has previously held teaching and research positions at African, European and U.S. universities; and has worked for United Nations peacekeeping and The Carter Center election monitoring.


    Speakers

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael
    Speaker
    Department of History, Queen's University

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2019

  • Friday, February 1st Extreme Protest Repertoire in 21st Century South Korea

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Alongside the celebrated candlelight protests, South Korea has witnessed the spread of unusual protest tactics in the context of diminishing political opportunities and movement decline in the age of neoliberalism. These tactics include prolonged protests atop high shipyard cranes, advertisement towers or power transmission towers (high-altitude protest), marching distances during which participants adopt the Buddhist practice of prostrating on the ground after every three steps as a form of protest (three-step-one-bow), occupation of public space where protesters set up protest camps and stage indefinite camp-ins that often last for years (protest camp), and persisting suicidal protests such as self-immolation. Why are South Korean protesters using these extreme means when alternatives are seemingly available? Who uses these tactics, and what do they accomplish? How do we make sense of the extreme protest repertoire? This talk explores why and how South Koreans resort to extreme protest forms on a regular basis, and what it tells us about the South Korean culture of protest in the 21st century.

    Sun-Chul Kim is Assistant Professor of Korean Studies in the Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures, Emory University. His book, Democratization and Social Movements in South Korea, 1984-2002: Defiant Institutionalization (Routledge, 2016), examines the evolution of social movements in the course of South Korea’s democratization. His recent research focuses on extreme forms of protest and what they mean in the rapidly changing context of 21st century South Korea.


    Speakers

    Sun-Chul Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Russian and East Asian languages and Cultures, Emory University

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, February 2nd Sixth Annual China Law Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, February 2, 20198:30AM - 5:30PMJ140 (First floor) Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 78 Queen's Park Crescent
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    Description

    The sixth annual China Law Conference will bring together scholars and practitioners across North America to address the intersection between Chinese Law and current events. The conference will feature panels on the South China Sea Dispute, Trade and “One Belt One Road” Initiative, and Human Rights and Ethnic Minorities of China. Speakers for the SCS panel are: Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon (University of Toronto), Ted McDorman (University of Victoria), Chris Chung (University of Toronto), and Nong Hong (Institute for China-America Studies). Speakers for the Trade panel are: Thomas S. Axworthy (Massey College), Gil Lan (Ryerson University), Julia Qin (Wayne State University), and Cyndee Todgham Cherniak (LexSage). Speakers for the Human Rights panel are: Alvin Y.H. Cheung (New York University), Masashi Crete-Nishihata (Citizen Lab), Mehmet Tohti (Canadian Uyghur Association), and Louisa Greve (Uyghur Human Rights Project).

    Please note that you can either register on the chinalawconference.ca website OR on Eventbrite.

    Contact

    Emily Tsui


    Speakers

    Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon
    Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre, University of Toronto

    Ted McDorman
    Professor, University of Victoria Faculty of Law

    Chris Chung
    PhD Candidate, University of Toronto Department of History

    Nong Hong
    Executive Director, Institute for China-America Studies

    Thomas S. Axworthy
    Chair of Public Policy, Massey College

    Gil Lan
    Professor, Ryerson University Ted Rogers School of Management

    Julia Qin
    Professor, Wayne State University Faculty of Law

    Cyndee Todgham Cherniak
    Founding Lawyer, LexSage

    Alvin Y.H. Cheung
    JSD Candidate, New York University Faculty of Law

    Masashi Crete-Nishihata
    Associate Director, Citizen Lab

    Mehmet Tohti
    Founder, Uyghur Canadian Association

    Louisa Greve
    Director of External Affairs, Uyghur Human Rights Project


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Bennett Jones LLP

    Jones & Co

    McMillan LLP

    Scotiabank Fund at the Faculty of Law

    Students' Law Society

    Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

    University of Toronto Students Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 7th Colonial Secularism, Buddhism and the Continuing Violence of Burmese Women's ‘Freedom’

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 7, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMRoom 2098, Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room, Sidney Smith Hall, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street
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    Description

    The idea that Burmese women enjoy greater freedom than either their Asian or European counterparts has been a persistent theme in both British colonial and Burmese nationalist discourse of the last two centuries. While Burmese feminists challenge the empirical reality of this myth of women’s freedom, in this talk I will explore the history and conceptual underpinnings of this discourse and its devastating consequences. At three moments in Burmese history (late 1920s, 1950s and 2015) the defense of Burmese Buddhist women’s freedom against perceived oppression of Islam, has mobilized anti-Muslim sentiment and violence. While many diagnose this Burmese Buddhist nationalism as illiberal excessive religion, I will argue instead that the discourse of Burmese women’s freedom and the ways it has been used to construct difference between Buddhists and Muslims finds its origins in colonial secularism and its ways of knowing and order in the world. Working from the frameworks laid out by Saba Mahmood and Talal Asad, this talk explores how colonial secularism enmeshed constructions of religion and gender in order to shed light on the current crisis in Burma.

    Alicia Turner is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Humanities at York University in Toronto. Her first book Saving Buddhism: Moral Community and the Impermanence of Colonial Religion explores concepts of sāsana, identity and religion through a study of Buddhist lay associations. She is currently working on a book, entitled Buddhism’s Plural Pasts: Religious Difference and Indifference in Colonial Burma, that offers a genealogy of religious division.


    Speakers

    Alicia Turner
    Speaker
    Department of Humanities and Religious Studies, York University

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 8th Ambedkar, Buddha, and Marx...Again

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My talk will engage with a set of late works by B. R. Ambedkar—Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Ancient India, The Buddha and His Gospel, The Buddha and His Dhamma, and Buddha or Karl Marx—where the analysis of Buddhism’s history in India intersects with Ambedkar’s understanding of “religion” and his philosophy of conversion. My talk returns to a question that haunts Ambedkar scholarship. This concerns the issue of how to understand Buddhist conversion within the complexly ramified temporalities of “return” and (Marxist) “revolution” that frames the project of human emancipation for B. R. Ambedkar.

    Anupama Rao is Senior Editor, Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East; and Acting Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. Rao has written widely on the themes of colonialism and humanitarianism, and on non-Western histories of gender and sexuality. Her book, The Caste Question (University of California Press, 2009) theorized caste subalternity, with specific focus on the role of anti-caste thought (and its thinkers) in producing alternative genealogies of political subject-formation.

    She is currently working on a book on the political thought of B. R. Ambedkar; and a project titled Dalit Bombay, which explores the relationship between caste, political culture, and everyday life in colonial and postcolonial Bombay. Her most recent book, the edited volume Gender, Caste, and the Imagination of Equality was published in December 2017.

    Her work has been supported by grants from the ACLS; the American Institute for Indian Studies; the Mellon Foundation; the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the SSRC. She was a Fellow-in-Residence at the National Humanities Center from 2008-09, and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford during 2010-11. She was a Fellow at REWORK (Humboldt University, Berlin) in 2014-2015.


    Speakers

    Anupama Rao
    Speaker
    TOW Associate Professor, History and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    UofT/McMaster University Numata Buddhist Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th Authoritarianism and Populism in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    From the rise of Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines to Myanmar’s military dictatorship, Southeast Asia is home to several fascinating cases of authoritarianism and populism. Efforts to combat corruption and drug trafficking have become authoritarian mechanisms through which to crack down on dissent and tighten the state’s stronghold on civil societies. Do such observations point to a recent resurgence of historical trends, or are we witnessing new forms of populism and authoritarianism in the 21st century? What are the political and socio-economic factors that give rise to and sustain populism in Southeast Asia? How is authoritarianism in Southeast Asia different from, or similar to, centralized governance in other parts of the world?

    We are honoured and excited to welcome three distinguished panelists to our event:

    Professor Arne Kislenko (Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto) will discuss the regression in Thailand witnessed with the return of military government and a new king. He will also speak to the entrenchment of authoritarianism in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar/Burma. Our second panelist Petra Molnar (Research Associate. International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law) will be discussing her fact-finding trip to the Philippines in 2018, the impacts of the drug war, and more generally about human rights advocacy. Our third panelist, Irene Poetranto (PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab) will be commenting on the digital/cyber component of populism and authoritarianism, for example, Duterte’s use of social media.

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Arne Kislenko
    Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Petra Molnar
    Research Associate, International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Irene Poetranto
    PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20191:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 15. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    It is recognized that the military coups in Thailand in 2006 and 2014 were the orchestrated attempts of the anti-democratic alliance of the old powers against the rise of electoral politics. After the coups, they have tried to establish firm control through various measures, including the constitutions of 2007 and 2017 and strengthening the bureaucracy. However, little attention has been paid to the Thai military’s expansive civil affairs projects, including rural and urban development programs, mass organizations and mobilization campaigns, ideological and psychological programs. Puangthong argues that the Thai military has always paid great importance to its civil affairs projects as a political offensive to control popular politics since the counter-insurgency period. The conservatives craftily manipulated legal and moral legitimacy in order to protect and expand the army’s role beyond its combatant sphere. The entrenchment has been more apparent and aggressive since the 2006 coup. Old apparatuses were reactivated and new ones were created. Power of the army over other state agencies increased more than ever. On one hand, the military’s civil affairs projects allow the military and conservative elites to dictate the country’s long-term political direction. This potent tool, on other hand, effectively polarizes the populace deeper and thus makes democratization in the future difficult.

    Biography:
    Puangthong R. Pawakapan is Associate Professor of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Harvard University, 2018-2019. Her recent works include “The Central Role of Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command in the Post-Counter-insurgency Period,” Trends in Southeast Asia (ISEAS: Singapore 2017); “The Foreign Press’ Changing Perceptions of Thailand’s Monarchy.” Trends in Southeast Asia. (2015); State and Uncivil Society in Thailand at the Temple of Preah Vihear, (2013).


    Speakers

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Puangthong R. Pawakapan
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Book Launch for "Diasporic Media Beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Korea in a celebration of Dr. Sherry Yu’s book “Diasporic Media beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles.” Dr. Yu will be joined by Dr. Karim Karim who will be the discussant for the event.

    Sherry S. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

    Karim H. Karim is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication and the Director of the Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam at Carleton University. He is also an Associate of Migration and Diaspora Studies and the Centre for European Studies at Carleton University.

    Coffee and refreshments available at event.


    Speakers

    Karim H. Karim
    Discussant
    Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton Universty; Director, Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam

    Sherry Yu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Arts, Culture and Media, and the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE B. N. PANDEY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF INDIA

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Novetzke
    Speaker
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Democracy in Asia: Building Sustainable Institutions and Practices in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars whose work either frames contemporary global assessments of the state of democracy around the world or focuses attention directly on the political struggle now underway between democracy and authoritarianism across the Asian region. Its purpose is to bring current comparative research on the evolution of democratic institutions and practices of government into dialogue with cutting-edge conceptual work on democracy and democratization. The participants together address the challenge of maintaining domestic and international stability when countries are facing competing political imperatives generated both by globalizing capitalism and by the contemporary diffusion of systemic power.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
    2:10-2:15PM Welcoming Remarks
    RANDALL HANSEN
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    2:15-4:00PM Panel I
    LUCAN AHMAD WAY

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Are we actually in the Midst of a Democratic Recession?

    SEVA GUNITSKY
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Great Powers and the Future of Democracy

    LYNETTE ONG
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto
    Studying “China in the World” in 2019

    PHILLIP LIPSCY
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    Democracy, Financial Crises, and Economic Volatility

    MAIKO ICHIHARA
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    Understanding Japan’s International Democracy Assistance Policy

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    4:00-4:15PM Break

    4:15-5:55PM Panel II

    YUSUKE TAKAGI
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan
    Democracy in Asia: The Case of the Philippines

    JOSEPH WONG
    Professor, Department of Political Science
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School
    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Japan: Asia’s First Unlikely Democracy

    DAN SLATER
    Professor of Political Science
    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies
    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan
    Indonesia: Asia’s Newest Unlikely Democracy

    SANG-YOUNG RHYU
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
    Upgrading Democracy in Korea: Resilient Consolidation and Complex Challenges

    DIANA FU
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    State Control in China under Xi Jinping

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    5:55-6:00PM Closing Remarks
    TAKAKO ITO

    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    6:00-7:00PM Reception

    Event Program and Announcement

    Democracy in Asia Symposium Program

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Discussant
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Takako Ito
    Closing Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Seva Gunitsky
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Maiko Ichihara
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

    Phillip Lipscy
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Sang-young Rhyu
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, South Korea

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor Political Science

    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies

    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan

    Yusuke Takagi
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Notes for a History of Prakrit Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE INDIA-CANADA ASSOCIATION LECTURE

    Prakrit was, along with Sanskrit and Tamil, one of the main languages of literature in premodern South Asia. It flourished in the first half of the first millennium BCE, although it continued to be cultivated for many centuries afterwards. This talk will begin by sketching the historical outlines of this tradition and then explain why it is important to corroborate, elaborate, and reflect upon its history. First, Prakrit textuality was closely connected to broader developments in the religious and expressive literatures of South Asia, and gives us a unique perspective onto those developments. Second, the many ways in which Prakrit texts defy being ‘historicized’—verses that slip in and out of anthologies, stories told again and again, works that survive only in fragments or abridgements—actually tell us something important about the historical being of literary texts.

    Andrew Ollett is a Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows. He works on the literary and intellectual traditions of premodern South Asia.


    Speakers

    Andrew Ollett
    Speaker
    Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th Life Force Atrocities during the Korean War and their Aftermath: Repression, Resistance and the Construction of Solidarities of Bereavement

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Korean civil war, thousands of real and imagined “leftists” were massacred by the emerging South Korean state. In the wake of South Korea’s long process of post-authoritarian transitional justice, the nature of many of these atrocities has to come to light, in turn leading to increased interest from South Korean and international scholars. This talk builds upon this research by focusing on the role that the family structure played in determining the targets and methods of the perpetrators. Drawing on Elisa Von Joeden-Forgey’s concept of “life force atrocities,” I discuss the ways in which counter-insurgency forces incorporated the decimation the family unit as part of the broader process of anti-leftist liquidation. This pattern was continued into the post-war years, as survivors and families of accused “leftists” were denied the right to properly mourn and placed under the “guilt by association system”. I argue that this process of systematic persecution gave rise to novel forms of communal identities, anchored around the notion of the collective bereaved family. This, in turn, led to unique forms of political resistance in the 1960-1961 period.

    Dr Wright is currently the Korea Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto. He completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2016. He is currently working on completing his manuscript “Civil War, Politicide, and the Politics of Memory in South Korea, 1948-1961”. His work has been published in Cross Currents, The Asia Pacific Journal, and by Routledge.


    Speakers

    Brendan Wright
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; Director, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 16th A Body in Fukushima: Reflections on the Nuclear in Everyday Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 16, 20191:00PM - 5:00PMInnis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    NOTE: This event consists of three components: (1) Photo Exhibitions – March 4 to April 14; (2) A Body in a Library Performance by Eiko Otake – March 15; (3) Video Screening and Symposium – March 16. All three are free of charge. Registration is required ONLY for the the third part – Video Screening and Symposium.

    This is a multi-sited, multi-media, and multi-disciplinary event that demonstrates how art can contribute to critical reflection on the nuclearization of everyday life in our contemporary world. Since 2014 Eiko Otake and William Johnston have photographed the performer among the ruins and abandoned places that have been left in the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe of March 2011. Following a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Northeastern Japan, a massive tsunami inundated reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, resulting in meltdowns in three reactors. The Fukushima disaster is regarded as the second largest nuclear accident in history, and yet its full consequences remain temporally and spatially boundless and ultimately unknowable — a reality that Otake’s haunting bodily performances and Johnston’s striking photography make so compelling. Otake’s and Johnston’s collaborative work on Fukushima has been exhibited in major venues across the Americas and appears in Canada for the first time.

    Otake is a world-renowned, movement-based artist who performed as Eiko and Koma for more than forty years before beginning her solo performances for the project, A Body in Places. Her awards include a Guggenheim, MacArthur, Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award, and Dance Magazine Award for lifetime achievement. William Johnston is a photographer and historian whose critically acclaimed written work and photography have focused on issues of the body, sexuality, disease, the environment, and public health. The symposium accompanying the exhibitions and performance will feature presentations by leading scholars and artists working across disciplines.

    PHOTO EXHIBITIONS
    DATES: March 4 – April 14, 2019 (depending on the library hours)
    LOCATIONS:
    Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, ON
    1st floor exhibition area,and 8th floor, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library
    Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge St., Toronto, ON
    3rd and 5th floors

    CURATORS:
    Takashi Fujitani, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies
    Henry Heng Lu, Independent Curator and Founder, Call Again

    A BODY IN A LIBRARY PERFORMANCE BY EIKO OTAKE
    DATE: Friday, March 15, 5:15 – 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

    VIDEO SCREENING AND SYMPOSIUM
    * Registration is required *
    DATE: Saturday, March 16, 1:00 – 5:00 PM, followed by reception
    LOCATION: Innis Town Hall, Innis College, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON
    SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS:
    Eiko Otake, Independent movement-based performance artist
    William Johnston, Department of History, Wesleyan University

    CHAIR
    Takashi Fujitani, Department of History and Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto
    PANELISTS
    Marilyn Ivy, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
    Photography and 3.11, with a meditation on William Johnston’s photographs of Eiko Otake in Fukushima
    Katy McCormick, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University
    Searching for A Body, Finding Trees
    Lisa Yoneyama, Women and Gender Studies Institute and Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    Post-Fukushima Epistemology
    Tong Lam, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Fallout, promise! Some reflections on pink landscapes

    For more information from the Toronto Public Library, please click here.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reference Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department, University of Toronto

    School of Image Arts, Ryerson University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Identification Technologies and Biometric Power: A Transition from Occupied China to Post-World War II Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The invention of identification technologies is deeply connected with the surveillance of colonial populations. Fingerprinting, the forerunner of biometrics, was created by the British police in colonial India in 1897, and was also employed in Manchuria and Northeast China under Japanese occupation from the 1920’s to 1945. Why did fingerprint identification attract the Japanese imperialist power, and how effectively was it practiced? We examine narratives surrounding the Japanese identification systems in Manchuria, especially regarding Chinese workers who were placed under severe surveillance, and discuss how a similar scheme survived the lost war and was actually legitimated in post-World War Ⅱ Japan. The expansion and transformation of biometric power can be seen in the Japanese government’s repeated attempts to establish “perfect” identification systems. Surveillance has spread from ex-colonial populations to foreign workers and to citizens, culminating in recent legislative changes concerning enhanced technologies.

    ASAKO TAKANO is an Associate Professor at Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan. She received her Ph.D. in Social Sciences from Hitotsubashi University, and published her book in Japan in 2016, Fingerprints and Modernity.

    MIDORI OGASAWARA is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University, and a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. She conducted field research in China to investigate the Chinese experiences of Japanese colonial identification systems and obtained her Ph.D. in Sociology from Queen’s in 2018.


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Asako Takano
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan

    Midori Ogasawara
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University; Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Ottawa


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd Beauty, Brutality, and the Neocolonial City

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20199:30AM - 3:00PM108N, North House, University of Toronto
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    Description

    Please use the registration button above to sign up for the lecture on March 22. To sign up for a reading on March 23, please click here to register on Eventbrite.

    This two-day event brings together international scholars and critics to explore the complexity, dynamism, and significance of Manila within and beyond Asia. As a city that has experienced the multiple vestiges of empire, the disciplinary machinations of dictatorial rule, the effects an infamous “war on drugs”, and the continued realities of uneven resource distribution, Manila serves as a productive physical and ideological space to explore the dialogic nature of beauty and brutality—as these concepts intertwine in the urban repertoires of the global south. On March 22, speakers will reflect on how Manila influences their work as diasporic critics scholars. On March 23, renowned Filipino American author Jessica Hagedorn will have her Toronto debut and read from her most famous works. She will also converse with Lucy San Pablo Burns (UCLA), discussing her thoughts on the city, and Manila, as an imaginative space for her artistry and craft. Books can be purchased at the venue, in collaboration with Another Story Bookshop.

    FRIDAY, MARCH 22
    108N – NORTH HOUSE, MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC POLICY,
    1 DEVONSHIRE PLACE
    Program:
    9:30 AM – 10:00 AM – Welcoming Remarks
    10:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Dialogue 1: Sensing the City
    SPEAKERS: Ferdinand Lopez (Toronto); Gary Devilles (Ateneo De Manila); Paul Nadal (Princeton); Genevieve Clutario (Harvard)
    12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – Lunch
    1:00 PM – 3:00 PM – Dialogue 2: Intimacies and the City
    SPEAKERS: Robert Diaz (Toronto); Denise Cruz (Columbia); Martin Manalansan (Minnesota); Christine Balance (Cornell); Allan Isaac (Rutgers)

    ***********************
    SATURDAY, MARCH 23
    NEXUS LOUNGE, 12TH FLOOR, OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), 252 BLOOR ST. W.
    A Reading with Noted Author Jessica Hagedorn, in Conversation with Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns (UCLA)
    Program:
    4:00 PM – 4:10 PM – Welcoming Remarks
    4:10 PM – 4:30 PM – Performance by Patrick Salvani
    4:30 PM – 6:00 PM – Reading with Jessica Hagedorn, and Conversation with Lucy Burns (UCLA)


    Speakers

    Christine Bacareza Balance
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies and Performance Studies, Cornell University

    Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department, University of California, Los Angeles

    Genevieve Clutario
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Harvard University

    Denise Cruz
    Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

    Robert Diaz
    Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Gary Devilles
    Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of the Filipinos Studies, Ateneo De Manila University

    Jessica Hagedorn
    Author of Toxicology, Dream Jungle, The Gangster of Love and Dogeaters; Winner of the American Book Award

    Allan Punzalan Isaac
    Associate Professor, English and American Studies, Rutgers University

    Ferdinand Lopez
    Associate Professor of English, University of Santo Tomas; an incoming PhD student in Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto

    Paul Nadal
    Post-Doctoral Research Associate of American Studies, Princeton University

    Martin Manalansan
    Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Minnesota


    Co-Sponsors

    New College Initiatives Fund

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI)

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd The Feminist Awakening in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    On the eve of International Women’s Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for thirty-seven days. The Feminist Five became a global cause célèbre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of university students, labor activists, civil rights lawyers, performance artists, and online warriors prompting an unprecedented awakening among young Chinese women. Through interviews with the Feminist Five and other Chinese activists, Hong Fincher illuminates both the difficulties they face and their “joy of betraying Big Brother,” as one of the Feminist Five wrote of the defiance she felt during her detention. Tracing the rise of a new feminist consciousness now finding expression through the #MeToo movement, Hong Fincher describes how the movement against patriarchy could reconfigure China and the world.

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher is a journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China (Verso 2018), which was named a best book of 2018 by Vanity Fair, Newsweek and others. She is the first American to receive a Ph.D. from Tsinghua University’s Department of Sociology in Beijing. She also has a master’s degree from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree with high honors from Harvard University. Her first book was the critically acclaimed Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China (Zed 2014).

    * Dr. Fincher’s book Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China will be available for purchase at the venue.*


    Speakers

    Prof. Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Prof. Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher
    Speaker
    Journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother:The Feminist Awakening in China.


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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