Past Events at the Asian Institute

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April 2018

  • Monday, April 2nd ‘Re-occupying the State’: The Social Housing Movement since 2010 in Taiwan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 2, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Since the 2008 subprime mortgage crisis, housing has been a topic of much debate. Rising inequality and high housing prices have been the core of urban crises around the world. Skyrocketing housing prices since 2005 led to a social housing movement in Taiwan. The concept of social housing, formerly unfamiliar to most, became a buzzword and quickly gained popularity. It has become an important campaign issue and started gradually transforming Taiwanese housing policies in 2010. Under public pressure, the central and local governments announced several future housing projects and enacted housing policy reforms. In the process of policy implementation, the concept of social housing was constantly under contestation and in need of clarification. The complex process of policy reform has exposed many structural problems within Taiwan’s housing system.

    Speaker Bio:
    Yi-Ling Chen is the director of International Studies and an associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Wyoming. Her works are on city development, housing, gender, and urban movements in Taiwan. She recently expanded her research to compare East Asian cities, Amsterdam, and Denver in their implementations of social housing.


    Speakers

    Yi-Ling Chen
    Director of International Studies and Associate Professor, Department of Geography, University of Wyoming


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Planning


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 2nd Islam, Tolerance and Diversity: the Indonesian Model

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 2, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    During the February Reading Week, seven undergraduate students visited Bandung and Jakarta in Indonesia to develop a deeper understanding of Islam’s political and social expression. Led by Professor Jacques Bertrand and PhD candidate Alexandre Pelletier, this International Course Module (ICM) aimed specifically at visiting a range of Islamic boarding schools (pesantren) and Islamic organizations to understand the motivations behind their missions and the role they play in the broader Islamic community. Students will be presenting reflections and observations on various aspects of the social and political activism of these pesantren and organizations. Among others, they have found that there is a vast diversity of activity and missions associated with these “pesantren”, in part due to the vast diversity and loose structure of the Islamic religion. There are surprisingly tolerant, innovative and creative aspects to several of these “pesantren”, even within conservative Islamic organizations. The ICM group’s reflections offer an important corrective to some of the messages and images of Islam often portrayed in the media.

    Contact

    Neena Peterson
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    ICM Bandung students
    Speaker

    Jacques Bertrand
    Chair


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 3rd Tian Xia and the Evolution of Chinese Leadership: former New York Times Asia Correspondent Howard French on his Book “Everything Under the Heavens"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 3, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Live streaming of this event will begin at 5pm EST, April 3, 2018.

    Abstract:
    French describes the foundation of a resilient Pax Sinica as “a basic proposition that was reasonably consistent: accept our superiority and we will confer upon you political legitimacy...”, a tribute system that dates back as far as the Han dynasty. Through its nine-dash- line diplomacy and beyond, is China is now “increasingly determined to brook no rivals in the region”, including the USA? Join Howard French in an insightful discussion of how, based on its history, China might exercise its growing national power in the decades ahead.
    The book will be available for sale at the venue.

    Biography:
    Howard French reported from Africa for The Washington Post and at The New York Times was bureau chief in Central America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa; Japan; and China. He has also written for The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, and Rolling Stone, among other U.S. publications. His work has earned him two Overseas Press Club awards and two Pulitzer Prize nominations. He is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa and China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa. Mr. French is on the faculty of the Columbia University School of Journalism and lives in New York City.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Howard French
    Speaker
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies Professor, Political Science

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 4th Indigenous Politics in Asia: How China and Japan Are Part of Global Dynamics?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 4, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    In 1995, at a UN meeting on indigenous rights, China and Japan each declared that there were no indigenous people in Asia because indigeneity was a product of European colonialism. Yet, their statements belied China’s past and Japan’s future. In the past, China had been a consistent and ardent supporter of global indigenous rights, inviting more indigenous groups than any other country. Thirteen years in the future, the Japanese government reversed its position and declared that its Ainu citizens were indigenous peoples. This talk explores the hidden history of China’s role in mobilizing indigenous groups throughout the Asia Pacific. We focus on how China’s repeated invitations to Ainu led them to transform their own identity, as well as radically challenge Japanese society itself. China was perhaps the Ainu’s most important catalyst for becoming important players in global indigenous dynamics.

    Biographies:
    Michael Hathaway is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. His first book, Environmental Winds: Making the Global in Southwest China (California, 2013), explores the intersections between China’s emergence on the stage of global conservation and the rise of questions of indigeneity within China itself.

    Scott Harrison is Program Manager at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, a not-for-profit organization focused on Canada-Asia relations. His research examines global Indigenous peoples and Cold War history, Canada-Asia business and policy issues, and building Asia-related competencies for Canadians. He obtained a PhD in History from the University of Waterloo.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Hathaway
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Simon Fraser University

    Scott Harrison
    Speaker
    Program Manager, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 9th What is The Migrant Sense of Place? Reflections on urban diversity and encounters from Singapore

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    The growing “diversity-turn” in the social scientific study of migrant-led urban change is an exciting opportunity for geographers. While much has been said about encounters with difference and diversity in public spaces, there has been a silence on the very nature of incorporation within these spatial negotiations and transformations. While Stuart Hall is right in pointing out how the “capacity to live with difference” is one of the key questions of the 21st Century (1993: 361), many Asian urban contexts demonstrate that co-existing and managing difference have always been a fundamental dimension of historical reality. Urban diversification in this part of the world is led largely by carefully calibrated labour migration. Drawing upon ethnographic data collected through mixed methodology in Singapore, this paper both reflects and questions existing literature on urban diversity and coexistence. I examine the spatial and political implications of migrant incorporation by identifying two key strands of geographical imaginations in these two growing fields. The paper, thus, has two objectives. First, to retain critical analytical purchase on what living with difference in shared spaces specifically through “incorporation” means at both the governmental and everyday levels. Measures of inclusion can carry out the political work of management that can structure what form belonging takes and, consequently, stratify who belongs and who does not. Rather than being intriniscally open or opposed to exclusion, the aggregate processes of “incorporation” alluded to above render people subject to particular imaginaries of diversity. The second objective of this paper is to outline the agenda for future research. There needs to be the prompt address of the impact of structural differentiation on the spatial practices of migrants in diversifying contexts and the nature of diversifying spaces themselves. What, indeed, is the migrant sense of place?

    Bio:
    Dr Junjia Ye is an Assistant Professor in Human Geography at Nanyang Technological University who completed her PhD in Geography at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests lie at the intersections of cultural diversity, critical cosmopolitanism, class, gender studies and the political-economic development of urban Southeast Asia. Alongside extensive ethnographic research methods, she also uses techniques of film and photography to create visual narratives through her work. The fundamental question that underlies her research is what accounts for how social and economic differences are constituted through people’s mobilities to, through and from diversifying cities? Her recent work has been published in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Annals of the American Association of Geographers and Environment and Planning D: Society and Space. Her first monograph entitled Class inequality in the global city: migrants, workers and cosmopolitanism in Singapore (2016, Palgrave Macmillan) won Labour History’s annual book prize.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr.Junjia Ye
    Assistant Professor of Human Geography, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research, Department of Geography York University

    Graduate Program in Geography York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 12th A Ballad of Maladies screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 12, 20186:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Avenue, Toronto
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    Description

    Of folk, rock and hip-hop, the film is a portrait of different cultural practitioners whose work engages with the political upheavals and its social costs in contemporary Kashmir. The film is a glance into the collective memory of a people and the expressions of its history to understand the emerging voices of resistance and their resonance in the world’s most heavily militarized zone. In a journey through the metamorphoses of Kashmir’s traditional art practices into its contemporary arts of resistance, the film unfolds a transformed cultural fabric of the valley, which departs from the notion of Kashmir as a ‘paradise’.

    The event will begin with music and poetry recitation, followed by the screening (Urdu/Hindi with English Subtitles) at 6:30 pm and a talk back at 8:00 pm with directors Sarvnik Kaur and Tushar Madhav, and York University filmmaker Ali Kazimi.

    Tushar Madhav is interested in the geopolitics of contemporary and folk art and has independently shot and edited documentaries around the theme. He also conducts workshops on finding audio-visual alternatives for storytelling, documentation and media advocacy programmes with students, university professors and organizations that work with juvenile criminals and underprivileged girls.

    Sarvnik Kaur is a Mumbai based screenplay writer. She’s been working in the Hindi film industry for the past five years. Her first novel Where Arrows Meet was published in 2012. She is an alma mater of the Mass Communication Research Centre, Jamia Millia Islmia University.

    This event is organized by Dr Reeju Ray and co-presented by the York Centre for Asian Research at York University, the Dr David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies and the Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto, and the Kashmir Solidarity Group.

    Contact

    Dr Reeju Ray

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research,York University

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto

    Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Kashmir Solidarity Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 20th Burma in South Asia, South Asia in Burma

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 20, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Burma, or Myanmar as it was renamed in 1989, is largely ignored within the discipline of South Asian studies despite its cultural, religious, economic, and strategic significance for the wider worlds of Asia. Colonial scholarship on Burma, like nineteenth and early twentieth century European interest in Southeast Asia more broadly, with its strong Indological orientation, included Burma within the larger picture of India. With the demise of orientalist India, Burma found its new home in Cold War Southeast Asia, and Burma’s historical and contemporary affiliations with the South Asia that replaced British India seem to have been largely lost in the transfer. The re-reading of both South and Southeast Asia within a globalized, Indian Ocean vision of Asia should allow for a critical assessment of what was lost in a creation of a South Asia that is still largely without Burma and what could be gained by questioning the premises for such locations and relocations. This roundtable brings together specialists working on a range of issues in Burmese studies from the premodern period up to the present day, with a focus on Burma’s relationship to the discipline of South Asian studies. The goal of this roundtable is not to ‘reclaim’ Burma from the field of Southeast Asian studies, nor to essentialize South Asia as a unitary umbrella into which Burma can be neatly slotted, but rather to discuss how a Burma-sited scholarly approach can problematize the neat compartmentalization of Asia into predetermined geographical categories and how a projected mobility of Burma-related research, which such a problematization may facilitate, may open new perspectives of inquiry.

    Panelists:

    Professor Christoph Emmrich (University of Toronto):
    Christoph Emmrich (PhD Heidelberg 2004) is Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Toronto and Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute. He works on Nepalese and Burmese Buddhist and South Indian Jain ritual and literature, engages with Newar, Burman, Mon, and Tamil ritual specialists, literati, and girl children, and is interested in questions of childhood, gender, time, and memory.

    Dr. Joseph McQuade (University of Toronto):
    Joseph McQuade (PhD Cambridge, 2017) is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Centre for South Asian Studies and an Affiliate Researcher at the Canadian Network for Terrorism, Security and Society. His research focuses on genealogies of political violence and counter-terrorism legislation in twentieth century India and Burma.

    Professor Sana Aiyar (Massachusetts Institute of Technology):
    Sana Aiyar is a historian of modern South Asia. She received her PhD from Harvard University in 2009 and held an Andrew Mellon postdoctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University in 2009-10. From 2010 to 2013 she was Assistant Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Her broad research and teaching interests lie in the regional and transnational history of South Asia and South Asian diasporas, with a particular focus on colonial and postcolonial politics and society in the Indian Ocean.
    Her first book, Indians in Kenya: The Politics of Diaspora (Harvard University Press, 2015), explores the interracial and extraterritorial diasporic political consciousness of South Asians in Kenya from c. 1895 to 1968 who mediated constructions of racial and national identity across the Indian Ocean. Her research has appeared in several journals including the American Historical Review, AFRICA: Journal of the International African Institute, and Modern Asian Studies. Professor Aiyar is currently working on two projects. One is a study of the everyday encounters of African soldiers and South Asian civilians during the Second World War when over a hundred thousand military recruits from East and West Africa were stationed in India and Burma. The second, “India’s First Partition”, is an examination of migration, religious and ethnic politics, nationalism, and anticolonial activism across India and Burma in the 1930s.

    Professor Thibaut D’Hubert (University of Chicago):
    Thibaut d’Hubert is assistant professor in the department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations (SALC) at the University of Chicago. He published several articles in various periodicals and collective volumes, and contributed entries on Bengal for Brill’s Encyclopedia of Islam, THREE. In his recently published book titled In the Shade of the Golden Palace: Ālāol and Middle Bengali Poetics in Arakan (New York: Oxford University Press, 2018), d’Hubert studies the encounter of Persian, Sanskrit, and vernacular poetics in the courtly milieu of the kingdom of Arakan (Bangladesh/Myanmar).

    Professor Patrick Pranke (University of Louisville):
    Patrick Pranke is associate professor of Religion in Comparative Humanities at the University of Louisville. His area of specialization is Theravada Buddhism with a focus on Burmese monastic history and Burmese popular religion. He has also conducted research in North India on vernacular Hinduism and Buddhism in the Indian imagination.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thibaut d'Hubert
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Bengali language and Bengal studies, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Joseph McQuade
    Co-Chair
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Sana Aiyar
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Patrick Pranke
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Humanities, University of Louisville


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 26th – Friday, April 27th Inside-Outside: Spatial Connotations of the Urban Culture of the Newars. Conversations with Niels Gutschow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 26, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, April 26, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, April 27, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Each talk is expected to take an hour or a bit more. The presentations are divided into three sessions each in order to allow communication at an early moment. Interruptions are welcome.

    1. Domestic Space (Thursday, April 26 10am – 12pm)
    An introduction into the anthropology of habitation (German “Wohnen”, “Behausung”) or dwelling which in a western context has to do with changing demands and aspirations, with taste and life style. The 20th century turned the obvious into a question of education.
    The presentation reflects the recent experience in the western world (1), in contrast to the way the Newars of the Kathmandu Valley use domestic space, inside and outside (2) and how much this changed within the present generation (3).

    2. Urban Space and Ritual of Bhaktapur (Thursday, April 26 2pm – 4pm)
    The Mesocosm of the city, a term used by Robert Levy to describe an “organized meaningful world intermediate to the microcosmic worlds of individuals and the culturally conceived macrocosm, the universe, at whose center the city lies”. The presentation focusses on the Navadurga and Astamatrka in their manifold manifestations: the definition of urban space by the aniconic seats (pitha) of the Eight Mother Goddesses (1), the Nine Durgas as human actors, their rebirth on the Victorious Tenth Day (in October) (2), and their representation as a group (gana) of Virgin deities, Kumaris (3).

    3. Earthquake and Rebuilding (Friday, April 27 4pm – 6pm)
    Earthquakes causes renewal in regular intervals. The last earthquakes in 1833, 1934 and the most recent one in 2015 resulted in loss of domestic structures, temples and human life (380 in Bhaktapur 2015). In historic times, new temples replaced the lost ones at the same place, fragments were discarded. At present the philosophy (or ideology) of architectural conservation demands the rescue of the smallest fragments in order to ensure the material authenticity. Repairs and replacement are mandatory. The presentation recalls earlier projects of conservation in 1971 and 1990 (1), and focusses on the craftsmen (whose ancestors once shaped the originals) as the embodiment of “authentic, living heritage” (2), and the act of recreating lost iconographical details (3), considered in the west as the fall in conservation practice.

    Biography:
    Niels Gutschow, born in 1941 in Hamburg, Germany, studied architecture in Darmstadt and completed his PhD in 1973 about the early 17th century urban history of Japan (The Castle Town – Jokamachi). He visited Nepal first in 1962 and since 1970 he keeps working there as a conservation architect and architectural historian focusing of urban space and ritual (publications in 1974, 1975, 1882 and 2017) and architecture (The Nepalese Caitya, 1997 and The Architecture of the Newars, 2011). At present he is associated with the Kathmandu Valley Preservation Trust, aiming at the rebuilding of ten buildings at Patan’s Darbar Square, of which four totally collapsed in the 2015 earthquake. As Honorary Professor he is associated with the South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Niels Gutschow
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Culture and Religious History of Asia, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 27th – Saturday, April 28th Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 27, 20188:30AM - 7:30PMUniversity of California, Berkeley
    Saturday, April 28, 20189:30AM - 5:30PMUniversity of California, Berkeley
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    Description

    This conference proposes to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia. Migrations have characterized Southeast Asian lives and livelihoods in different ways in different eras; they have affected work, settlement patterns, resource use, small and large investments, religion, and culture. Migrations have formed and changed the composition of Southeast Asian societies and given rise to complex cultural, social, environmental, and political problems and opportunities. Past and present, migrations have been both forced and voluntary: forced to make way for certain kinds of development; triggered by violence and war; but also intentional and, at times, pioneering: to change lives, secure new livelihoods, or explore new ecologies. Contributors to this conference will discuss continuities and changes in migration practices, patterns, and personnel, addressing a wide range of historical periods, disciplines, and themes.

    (Schedule)

    FRIDAY, APRIL 27
    180 Doe Library

    Registration

    Welcome & Opening Remarks

    Pheng Cheah, Professor of Rhetoric; Chair, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

    Nancy Lee Peluso, Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, College of Natural Resources; core faculty, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

    Rachel Silvey, Professor of Geography; Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    PANEL 1: Migrant Labor and the Law

    Democracy and Indonesian Migrant Workers: Rising Political Salience and Contestation at Home and Abroad
    Ann Marie Murphy, Seton Hall University

    Development and Nation: The Evolution of Malaysian Immigration Laws
    Oanh Nguyen, University of Minnesota

    Absurd Journeys: The Costs of Becoming Legal
    Maryann Bylander, Lewis & Clark College

    Citizen, Refugee, Muslim?: A Preliminary Typology of Rohingya Migration and Membership Politics across Polities
    Nabila Islam, McGill University

    Break

    PANEL 2: Repressive Labor and Forced Mobilities

    Deportable Refugees, Transnationalism and Cambodian-Americans
    Jennifer Zelnick, UC Irvine

    From Sea to City: Migration and Social Wellbeing in Coastal Cambodia
    Furqan Asif, University of Ottawa

    Blood Bricks: Debt-bondage, Carceral Geographies and the (Im)mobile Lives of Brick-kiln Laborers in Cambodia
    Katherine Brickell, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Migration and Refuge in Central and East Java during the Violence of 1965-66
    Siddharth Chandra, Michigan State University

    Chair & Discussant: George Dutton, UCLA

    Lunch Break

    PANEL 3: Place-making and Networks

    The Things They Carried (and Kept): Socialist Mobilities and Vietnamese Remittances from East Germany
    Christina Schwenkel, UC Riverside

    Urban Footprints: Migration, Place-making and the Politics of Presence in Hanoi, Vietnam
    Timothy Karis, Western Oregon University

    Tracing Mining Migration through Indonesia’s National Gold Networks
    Matt Libassi, UC Berkeley

    Labor Migration and Agrarian Change in Indonesia’s Industrial Rural Landscapes
    Lisa Kelley, University of Hawaii-Manoa (co-authored with Nancy Peluso, UC Berkeley; Kim Carlson, University of Hawaii-Manoa; and Suraya Afiff, University of Indonesia)

    Chair & Discussant: Emily Hertzman, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Break

    PANEL 4: Imaginaries and Transformations of Home

    Flexible Filipinas: Global Economic Restructuring, Gendered Labor Migration and the Feminization of Overseas Work in Contemporary Philippine Anglophone Literature
    Alden Sajor Wood, UC Irvine

    Art and the Rantau: Tracking Minangkabau Migration
    Katherine Bruhn, UC Berkeley

    Migration and Da’wa: Exploring the Nexus in the Pen Circle Forum
    Monika Arnez, University of Passau

    ‘Kisah Sukses’: Stories of Indonesian Migrant Worker Returnees Living in Greater Jakarta
    Kilim Park, University of British Columbia

    Chair & Discussant: Sylvia Tiwon, UC Berkeley

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    Migrant Worker Protection in ASEAN [tentative title]
    Anis Hidayah, Migrant Care (Indonesia)

    SATURDAY, APRIL 28
    Morning session
    180 Doe Library

    Registration

    PANEL 5: Brokering, Labor and Bodily Controls

    The Policing of Female Marriage Migrants: Case Studies from Southeast Asia
    Gwenola Ricordeau, CSU Chico

    Unbound and Bound Spheres of Globalization: The Regional Pocket of Free Travel in Asia and Asymmetries in Global Mobility
    Maria Cecilia Hwang, Rice University

    Manufacturing Global Care Workers: Regimes of Labor Control in Indonesia’s Transnational Migrant Industry
    Andy Chang, UC Berkeley

    The Ethnic H-Rê Experiences: Labor Migration from Vietnam to Malaysia and Return
    Angie Ngoc Tran, CSU Monterey Bay

    Chair & Discussant: Catherine Ceniza Choy, UC Berkeley

    Lunch Break

    Afternoon session
    Geballe Room
    220 Stephens Hall, Townsend Center for the Humanities

    Plenary Panel 1
    Migration in Southeast Asia – Structural Shifts, Patterns and Continuities

    Michele Ford (University of Sydney), Johan Lindquist (Stockholm University),
    Aihwa Ong (UC Berkeley), Brenda Yeoh (National University of Singapore)

    Moderator: Rachel Silvey, University of Toronto

    Break
    Plenary Panel 2
    Political Ecology and Migration in Southeast Asia

    Nicole Constable (University of Pittsburgh), Rebecca Elmhirst (University of Brighton),
    Deirdre McKay (Keele University), Christine Padoch (NY Botanical Garden)

    Moderator: Nancy Peluso, UC Berkeley

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asian Studies

    UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 27th Challenges of Migrant Workers Protection in ASEAN

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 27, 20186:00PM - 7:00PM180 Doe Library
    UC Berkeley
    6:15 p.m.
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    Description

    This keynote speech is presented as part of the CSEAS conference Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia, co-sponsored by UCLA’s Center for Southeast Asian Studies and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. See the CSEAS conference page for the program.

    Originally from East Java, Indonesia, Anis Hidayah began advocating for migrant workers in 1995 while studying at Jember University. She founded Migrant Care, a non-profit organization for Indonesians working abroad, in 2004, with an advocacy emphasis on policy change at the national and regional level and on redressing human rights abuses of overseas workers. She has been a particular advocate for Indonesian overseas workers on death row in Saudi Arabia. Her work in this area was also instrumental in supporting Mary Jane Veloso, a domestic worker from the Philippines who was sentenced to death in Indonesia for drug smuggling, but who received a last-minute stay of execution in 2015. Veloso’s case, extensively covered in the press in Indonesia and the Philippines, highlighted the vulnerability of overseas domestic workers to pressures from recruiters linked to criminal syndicates. Anis Hidayah received an Alison Des Forges Award from Human Rights Watch in 2011 and Indonesia’s prestigious Yap Thiam Hien Award for her human rights work in 2014. She is currently head of Migrant Care’s Migration Study Center (Pusat Studi Migrasi) based in Jakarta.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Anis Hidayah
    Migrant Care (Indonesia)


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asian Studies

    UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 30th PATHWAYS MAGAZINE Vol. 2: Chinese-Canadian Mothers and Daughters

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 30, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Description

    Pathways Magazine presents collections of diverse stories of peoples’ mobilities and identities from, between, and within Asia and Canada, produced by undergraduate students working in the Asian Pathways Research Lab. In the Spring 2018 volume of Pathways, we delve into the stories of thirteen pairs of Chinese-Canadian mothers and daughters, exploring their relationships, their mobilities, and their process of negotiating specifically gendered Chinese-Canadian identities across generations and geographies. This research is inspired by the work of Harriet Evans, whose research about the transformation of mother-daughter relationships in the context of post-Cultural Revolution urban China taught us about the connections between political change, social restructuring, and changing family dynamics and intimate relationships. To this body of knowledge, we contribute these thirteen stories, all of which add to the aforementioned context the additional experience of transnational family immigration to Canada. In this session, our undergraduate researchers will present their findings and experiences working at the Asian Pathways Research Lab.

    PRESENTERS:
    EMILY HERTZMAN, Manager, Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute
    AILIN LI, Research Assistant, Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute
    ANGELAH LIU, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    JAMIE CHEN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    JEEBY SUN, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    KATE CHEN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    KELLY LEUNG, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    MIRAGE WU, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    NANCY QIN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    NATALIE BELL, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    XIAOHAN XU, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    YIRAN LI, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    ERIN LI, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    CYNTHIA JUTRAS, undergraduate student, University of Toronto

    Addendum

    Poster for Pathways Magazine Volume 2. Includes painting of a tree against a blue sky and details about the event (which are also in text form on this page).

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2018

  • Tuesday, May 1st Oil Palm Capital: A Feminist Ecology Lens on Mobile Labour and Accelerated Dispossession in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Rebecca Elmhist is a leading feminist political ecologist and human geographer with two decades of research and teaching experience on struggles over environmental governance, migration and social justice in the global South. Her work explores new ways to rethink feminist political ecology by linking theories associated with material feminism to empirical work on mobility, environmental change and gender in Southeast Asia.

    All are welcome!

    This event is presented as part of the Ecologies on the Edge programme by the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, and the York Centre for Asian Research and the Graduate Programme in Geography at York University.

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/171064526946881

    More information: ycar@yorku.ca

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rebecca Elmhirst
    University of Brighton


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Graduate Programme in Geography at York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 2nd A new take on Palestine/Israel: The violence of bureaucracy, and the potential of justice

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 2, 201811:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Palestine/Israel is often described in a sequence of battles or ‘clashes’ regarding ideology, land, violence, economy and international relations. In the media and beyond, these overshadow the everyday experiences of structural or bureaucratic violence. Through a visual tour and narrative presentation, Nadia Abu-Zahra shares her work (completed with Adah Kay) chronicling how millions of Palestinians have been denationalized through the bureaucratic tools of census, population registration, blacklisting and a discriminatory legal framework. Based on first-hand accounts and extensive fieldwork, the presentation shows how identity documents continue to be used as a means of coercion, extortion, humiliation and informant recruitment. The violence of bureaucracy, however, is resisted by Palestinians, Israelis and internationals who refuse to be displaced and divided, to be bound by movement restrictions, and to accept the structural injustice of ‘systematic oppression’ (a term used in international law).

    Biography:
    Dr. Nadia Abu-Zahra is Associate Professor of International Development and Global Studies and a member of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa. She also serves on the Reconciliation Committee of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. She was previously based at the University of Oxford, and has worked on projects for Oxfam, UNICEF, the European Union, the Open Society Foundation, and Global Affairs Canada. As co-Director of Community Mobilization in Crisis — a project to extend higher education to host and refugee communities through blended/distance learning — her collective efforts have garnered several awards.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nadia Abu-Zahra
    Associate Professor, International Development and Global Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ottawa


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dept of Geography and Planning


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 4th (RE)THINKING DIVERSITY & COMPARISON

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 4, 201810:00AM - 4:00PMAnthropology Building, AP246
    19 Russell Street
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    Series

    Osaka University & University of Toronto Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Please join us for a joint graduate student workshop between Osaka University’s RESPECT program, the Asian Institute and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. This workshop puts Japanese conceptions of kyosei (coexistence) in conversation with forms of Canadian multiculturalism. We aim to consider how conceptions of living with or managing difference might learn from each other, revealing occlusions, invisibilities, and the ways that particular histories shape these contemporary conceptions. We ask: On what grounds do we begin to compare these forms of diversity? What similarities, incommensurabilities, connections or divergences emerge, and what do they tell us about our own presumptions of living with, and understanding, difference?

    Organizers: Brenton Buchanan, Bronwyn Frey, Nicholas Feinig & Johanna Pokorny

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Osaka University’s RESPECT program

    Department of Anthropology


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 7th Kim Thúy Talks About Her Novel “Vi”

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 7, 20185:30PM - 7:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Kim Thúy reads from her novel Vi followed by audience Q&A.
    CBC News describes Vi as “exploring the lives, loves and struggles of Vietnamese refugees as they reinvent themselves in new lands.”
    Citation for quote: http://www.cbc.ca/books/vi-1.4480676

    4:00-5:00: Book signing and reception. The book “Vi” will be available for sale and the author will sign copies. Light refreshments will be served.
    5:00-5:30: Break
    5:30-7:30: Presentation by Kim Thuy

    Bio:
    Born in Saigon in 1968, KIM THÚY left Vietnam with the boat people at the age of ten and settled with her family in Quebec. A graduate in translation and law, she has worked as a seamstress, interpreter, lawyer, restaurant owner, and commentator on radio and television. She lives in Montreal and devotes herself to writing.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Thúy
    Governor General’s Award-Winning Vietnamese Canadian Author


    Co-Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Asian Canadian Studies

    Asian Canadian Writers Workshop

    Department of French

    Vietnamese Canadian Students Association

    Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library

    Departmet of English

    Penguin Random House Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 9th ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CEREMONY

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 9, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMMetro Hall
    55 John Street
    Toronto, ON M5V 3C6
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    Description

    Featured talks by Chinese Canadian Legend Award Recipients The photo exhibition will be on “Diversity – Fusion – Unity” with about 80 photographs by members of the Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST), including special exhibits of photographs by Dr. Neville Poy, CCPST Honourary Advisor Mr Stephen Siu, CCPST President Mr Edwin Ho, and international award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Mr. Justin Poy, CFACI Honourary Patron
    Topic: “The challenge of Canadian Asian Media in 2018”
    Local Canadian ethnic media in Asian communities was thriving in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Why? Because these were some of the only ways that immigrants could keep in touch with news from home and stay in touch with their community. Local TV stations would broadcast older shows but still satisfied the masses, local movie houses would screen films that were launched a year ago back home, but many here hadn’t seen them yet. Then the internet happened, followed by social media and now streaming media. How has this affected local media businesses as they attempt to find relevance and provide value to local Canadian immigrants from Asia? Can print, local radio and TV and website survive? And if so, which ones have the advantage?

    Mr. Stephen Siu, Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto
    Topic: “The Fusion of Cultures in Chinese Architecture”
    A talk with slide show of pictures recently taken by Stephen Siu in Shanghai, Nanjing and Ningbo on architectural heritage and modern structures, and the history and stories behind. With China’s booming economy and infrastructure programs, the migration to urban areas has increased. New architectural structures rise up over old neighbourhoods. The blend of heritage and contemporary architecture influenced by both eastern and western cultures is ever-present in these cities which have historically enjoyed the fusion of cultures.
    The speaker will also discuss the disappearing alleys (hutongs), once the lifeblood of Beijing, against the backdrop of the high-rise glamour of the modern capital city, with photographs provided by award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Plus:
    Dr. Lien Chao & Philip Chan on “Canada 150 Unity in Diversity Workshops in Toronto Schools”

    Co-Organizers: Asian Heritage Month-Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto; WE Artists’ Group; Social Services Network Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    CFACI Honourary Patron

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 10th ROM Daytime: Migration Stories: Pathways to Canada and Indonesian Migrant Women

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 10, 201811:00AM - 1:30PMRoyal Ontario Museum
    Lecture held in the Eaton Theatre
    Level 1B
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    Series

    ROM Daytime

    Description

    Discover ground breaking research and fascinating advances in art, culture, and nature as our experts share their cutting edge work in this engaging series of daytime lectures.

    Join Professor Rachel Silvey as she examines the emotional vocabularies and imagined geographies of gendered piety that are deployed in attempts to mobilize, direct, and discipline women’s transnational labor migration. Her in-depth work is based on interviews with migrant recruiters, state officials, and migrants in West Java, as well as data collected by migrant rights activists, and explores the articulations of women’s virtue as a key dimension of the moral geographies of Indonesian women’s overseas migration.

    Rachel Silvey is Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute and Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning. She is a Faculty Affiliate in CDTS, WGSI, and the Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a dual B.A. from the University of California at Santa Cruz in Environmental Studies and Southeast Asian Studies.
    Professor Silvey is best known for her research on women’s labour and migration in Indonesia. She has published widely in the fields of migration studies, cultural and political geography, gender studies, and critical development. Her major funded research projects have focused on migration, gender, social networks, and economic development in Indonesia; immigration and employment among Southeast Asian-Americans; migration and marginalization in Bangladesh and Indonesia; and religion, rights and Indonesian migrant women workers in Saudi Arabia.

    NOTE: This lecture replaces the talk originally scheduled by Lisa Mar

    Free with Museum Admission

    11:00 am – 12:00 pm Lecture in Eaton Theatre
    12:00 pm – 1:15 pm Coffee, Tea & Treats in Theatre Rotunda

    Note: Assistive listening devices and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation are available on request. ASL interpretation requires three weeks advance notice. Please email programs@rom.on.ca to request the service.

    Contact

    Royal Ontario Museum
    (416) 586-5797


    Speakers

    Rachel Silvey
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography


    Co-Sponsors

    Royal Ontario Museum

    Bishop White Committee

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 10th Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 10, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library
    8th floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George St
    Toronto, ON
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    Series

    Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies

    Description

    The York Centre for Asian Research and the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library are co-presenting the Second Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies, titled “Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream” on Thursday, May 10th, 2018 at 4-6PM. This seminar will take place at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George St, Toronto).

    We are pleased to announce that Professor Elizabeth Sinn from the University of Hong Kong and author of Pacific Crossing: California Gold, Chinese Migration, and the Making of Hong Kong will be the keynote speaker for this event. Professor Sinn will be speaking on Hong Kong as an “in-between place” during Chinese migration to California for various opportunities in the latter part of the 19th century. The concept of “in-between places” during migratory periods can also offer a new paradigm for migration studies, which typically only focus on the sending or receiving countries.

    Other notable speakers and participants for the event include:

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy, Chancellor Emerita at the U of T and retired Senator of Canada
    Miss Florence Tsang, Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office (Toronto)
    Professor Abidin Kusno, Director at the York Centre for Asian Research
    Mr. Larry Alford, Chief Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries
    Professor Lisa Mar, Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies at the U of T

    This event is free of charge and light refreshments will be provided.

    For additional information, please visit

    Please RSVP before May 3rd by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    Professor Elizabeth Sinn
    Keynote
    University of Hong Kong

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Speaker
    Chancellor Emerita, U of T Retired Senator of Canada

    Miss Florence Tsang
    Speaker
    Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, Toronto

    Professor Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Director, York Centre for Asian Research

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Speaker
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

    Professor Lisa Mar
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Chair, Chinese Canadian Studies, U of T


    Co-Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    The York Centre for Asian Research


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 11th Past Present and Future of the Political Left in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 11, 20183:30PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Korea has a long and proud history of the socialist/Communist political radicalism, dating back to the colonial age (1910-45) when the dual (class and national) oppression created the conditions under which the Communists came to constitute one of the most influential ideological sectors of the national movement by the mid-1920s. Koreans were also prominent in the Communist parties and movements in China, Japan and the Soviet Far East (until their forced deportation from there in 1937). Under the anti-Communist dictatorships of the 1950-70s, South Korean Left mostly struggled in the underground to survive; however, it underwent a spectacular revival in the 1980s in the wake of South Korea’s high-speed industrialization, spearheading the struggle for both national liberation (vis-à-vis US hegemony over South Korea) and social justice. Today, however, the left-nationalist passions of the 1980s are largely seen as a thing of the past, while South Korea’s working class is on defensive, struggling against fragmentation under the conditions of the neo-liberal regime. What will be the way forward for the South Korean Left in an increasingly multi-ethnic, globalized neo-liberal society? The past, present and the possible futures of the South Korean Left are to be dealt with in this presentation.

    Bio: Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja) is professor of Korean and East Asian Studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University. His research focuses on the history of modern ideas in Korea. He is the author of Social Darwinism and Nationalism in Korea: the Beginnings (Brill, 2010) as well as Modern Korea and its Others: Perceptions of the Neighbouring Countries and Korean Modernity (Routledge, 2015). He also recently co-edited Buddhist Modernities – Re-inventing Tradition in the Globalizing Modern World (Routledge, 2017) and Military Chaplaincy in an Era of Religious Pluralism (Oxford University Press, 2017).

    This event is presented as part of the Transformative Politics in the Transnational Korea series at the York Centre for Asian Research with support from the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.


    Speakers

    Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
    Professor of Korean and East Asian Studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University


    Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Hope 21


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 14th The Not So Popular Aspect of the Indus Civilization: A Biomolecular and Microscopic Study of a Rural Settlement from Kachchh in Gujarat, India.

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 14, 201812:00PM - 1:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Insitute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The Harappan or the Indus Valley Civilization, which flourished in South Asia during the 3rd millennium BCE., is not only about large cities, vast expansion and the production and international trade of shiny Harappan-style crafts. The culture-historical thinking that has long influenced the researchers involved with the Indus Civilization has often failed to acknowledge the existence of varied regional economies, and symbiotic relationships between the rural and urban population that helped the Indus civilization to sustain and maintain its glory. The glorious aspect of the Indus Civilization is known to almost everyone interested in ancient civilizations, but how the local regional populations and micro-cultures within the broad umbrella of the Indus Civilizations have sustained themselves and maintained a harmonic interaction with the so-called elite urban population is an aspect of the Indus Civilization which is still poorly known. A number of recent studies influenced by ‘bottom-up’ models have started to focus on the rural settlements in order to understand the changes in the environment and the sustainability of the Indus Civilization, but, only a very few have looked into the economy and adaptation to the regional environment of these rural settlements. My study is one of these very few attempts that attempt to understand the rural economy, regional interaction, and environmental adaptation of a peripheral region of the Indus Civilization.

    In order to decipher the rural lifestyle during the Indus Age, this study had to depend on a number of proxy methods, the application of these methods to the Indus is still in its infancy. For example, through studying the stable isotopes from the tooth enamel of domesticated animals from the rural settlement of Kotada Bhadli, we have tried to understand how the residents of this settlement treated their animals, and to what extent this was dependent on the regional climate and availability of fodder. Through looking into the lipid residues of the foods that were cooked, stored and served in ceramic vessels, we have tried to evaluate how the residents of this settlement have exploited their domesticated animals and other resources available in the vicinity of the settlement. Kotada Bhadli completely lacked any indication of trade-oriented craft activities, but a huge deposition of fine ash at this settlement tells a different story of human activities involving fire. To understand the kind of human activities that may have produced such a huge amount of ash, we studied the phytoliths from the ash to determine the nature of the things that were burnt. The information these proxies reveal to us is interesting and quite different from what we already know in general about the Indus Civilization.

    Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty is an upper year PhD student in the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto. He completed his Master’s in Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, Deccan College Post-graduate and Research Institute, Pune, India. He specializes in the Indus Valley Civilization, and the focus of his PhD research is the understanding of lifeways in one of the peripheries of the Indus Civilization, including the employment of isotopic and residue analyses, and other archaeological science methods. He has participated in a number of excavations in India and in Europe, where he incorporated photogrammetry and 3D imaging with other established excavation methods. He has presented his research in conferences held in India, the U.S. and Canada, and has published two papers in peer reviewed archaeological journals, and two chapters in edited volumes.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty
    PhD Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Mississaug


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 16th China and North Korea: Friends Without Benefits

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the weeks leading up to the historic meeting between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, China is feeling sidelined. What does Beijing want from Pyongyang? How does China’s interest in North Korea differ from that of the United States? And what might Beijing do to ensure North Korea remains within China’s sphere of influence?

    Isaac Stone Fish is a journalist and a senior fellow at the Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations in New York City; an on-air contributor to CBSN, and an international affairs analyst for PRI’s The World. Previously he served as Foreign Policy Magazine’s Asia Editor: he managed coverage of the region, and wrote about the politics, economics, and international affairs of China, Japan, and North Korea. A fluent Mandarin speaker and formerly a Beijing correspondent for Newsweek, Stone Fish spent seven years living in China prior to joining Foreign Policy. He has traveled widely in the region and in the country, visiting every Chinese province, autonomous region, and municipality.

    His views on international affairs have been widely quoted, including in MSNBC, ABC, NPR, CBS, CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Slate, The Guardian, the BBC, the Sydney Morning Herald, Talking Points Memo, and Al-Jazeera, among others; and in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese media. Besides publishing in Foreign Policy, Stone Fish’s articles have also appeared in The New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Slate, The New Republic, Politico Magazine, The Daily Beast, Time, and the Los Angeles Times. While in Beijing, he served on the board of the Foreign Correspondent’s Club of China, and, when the sky wasn’t the color of glue, was an avid runner.

    Stone Fish is a graduate of Columbia University, where he studied Chinese literature. He is also a Truman National Security Project fellow, a non-resident senior fellow at the University of Nottingham’s China Policy Institute, and an alumnus of the World Economic Forum Global Shaper’s program.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Andre Schmid
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of East Asian Studies Collaborative Master's Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies, Asian Institute

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute

    Isaac Stone Fish
    Speaker
    Journalist and a senior fellow at the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations in New York City


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 17th "Tell them we’re human" What Canada and the world can do about the Rohingya crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 17, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bob Rae, Prime Minister’s Special Envoy to Myanmar, discusses his report on the humanitarian crisis in Bangladesh and Myanmar. Rae engaged in extensive research, travel and meetings with key interlocutors from October 2017 to March 2018 to assess the violent events of August 2017 and afterward that led more than 671,000 Rohingya to flee their homes in Rakhine State, Myanmar, and seek refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.

    His report focuses on four themes: the need to combine principle and pragmatism in responding to the serious humanitarian crisis in both Myanmar and Bangladesh; the ongoing political challenges in Myanmar; the strong signals that crimes against humanity were committed in the forcible and violent displacement of more than 671,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State in Myanmar; and the clear need for more effective coordination of both domestic and international efforts.*

    Jacques Bertrand, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Specialization in CESEAS, will chair and discuss the report. He is leading a new collaborative project on ethnic minorities and decentralisation in Myanmar, funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). This project follows a previous, four-year research initiative on federalism, democratization and ethnic minorities in Myanmar, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

    *-Text adapted from:
    http://international.gc.ca/world-monde/issues_development-enjeux_developpement/response_conflict-reponse_conflits/crisis-crises/rep_sem-rap_esm.aspx?lang=eng#a3

    Event Announcement

     

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    The Honourable Bob Rae
    Speaker
    Prime Minister’s Special Envoy to Myanmar

    Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Jacques Bertrand
    Chair
    Director, Collaborative Master's Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
    Professor of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 22nd ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH CONCERT AND ARTS SHOWCASE

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 22, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FESTIVAL 2018
    PRESENTED BY CANADIAN FOUNDATION FOR ASIAN CULTURE (CENTRAL ONTARIO) INC.

    Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada
    Asian Heritage Month Concert and Arts Showcase

    MASTER OF CEREMONY: Vania Chan

    OPENING ADDRESS: Mr. Justin Poy, Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI

    “GOLDEN FISH FROM THE MONKIEST KING” BY ALICE PING YEE HO
    Vania Chan, soprano| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| text by Marjorie Chan
    Alice Ping Yee Ho’s New Opera with Canadian Children’s Opera THE MONKIEST KING will open on May 26th.
    We are honoured to have a beautiful preview of this new opera.

    “JOURNEY TO THE WEST”
    Chi‐Ping Dance Group | Dancers of Chinese Collective Arts Association

    The Chinese Legend Dance Drama “Journey to the West” depicts the Monk “Tang Sanzang” with his disciples: Monkey King, Pigsy and Sand travel through disasters, fight demons and overcome obstacles during their journey to the West. Finally, they are able to obtain the Buddist Scriptures.
    Four parts of this short dance drama:

    1. Flower Valley – baby monkeys and monkey King
    2. Pigsy and Sand followed Tang as disciples to travel to the West.
    3. Fight demons – In Spider Cave
    4. Finale

    CANASIAN FUSION—Theme Song of the Virtual Museum of Asian Canadian cultural Heritage (VMACCH) BY DAVID KEANE
    Photographs by Tam Kam Chiu and Stephen Siu| Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano| Chan Ka Nin, guitar

    SHOWCASE OF WORKS FROM THE CANADA 150 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS
    Slideshow prepared by Philip Chan and Linda Lai.

    “from line” by Daryl Jamieson
    Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano
    Chan Ka Nin, guitar

    “PAST AND PRESENT” by Chan Ka Nin
    Mushtari Afroz, dancer| Aba Amuquandoh, theatre actor| Vania Chan, soprano| Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano| Chan Ka Nin, guitar| text by Mark Brownell.

    TEN TEN DUO (Japanese music)
    Kiyoshi Nagata, taiko | Aki Takahashi, shamisen, vocal

    SHOWCASE OF WORKS FROM STORYTELLING AND FILM WORKSHOPS
    Video “Halloween PSA” by “Samantha’s Group”
    Poem by Erma Pandeling
    “Haru no Umi” by Michio Miyagi, arranged by Josef Molnar
    Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp | Stephen Tam, flute
    Facilitators | Lien Chao, Arlene Chan

    “”Emerged: যখন বসন্ত এলো”–A KATHAK BANDI Celebration of Spring” by Mushtari Afroz
    CONCEPT, CHOREOGRAPHY & DANCE
    Mushtari Afroz
    MUSIC
    Hindustani Vocal – Shirshendu Mukherjee
    Tabla – Ahilan Kathirgamathamby
    GRAPHIC DESIGN
    Swathika Anandan
    AUDIO/VIDEO
    Dewan Karim & John Martin

    RECEPTION FOLLOWS (sponsored by Mr. Justin Poy)

    Tuesday May 22, 2018, 7 pm (Please be seated by 6.45 pm)

    Innis College Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Map at http://townhall.innis.utoronto.ca/contact/ (St. George Stn)

    Co-organizers
    Asian Heritage Month—Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University; Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library, Social Services Network; York Centre for Asian Research, York University; Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Acknowledgements
    Mr. Justin Poy for sponsoring the Reception
    Steinway Piano sponsored by Steinway Piano Gallery, Toronto

    FREE ADMISSION

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, May 27th Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada | Film Festival

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, May 27, 20181:30PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    FREE ADMISSION:
    Asian Heritage Month–Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc., Social Services Network in partnership with Reelworld Film Festival present:

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FILM FESTIVAL
    CANADA 150 | Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada

    Asian Heritage Month-Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.
    In partnership with Reelworld Film Festival (www.reelworld.ca)
    Programmed by Tonya Williams, Executive and Creative Director, Reelworld Film Festival

    SHORT FILM FUSION
    Canada 150|Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada
    Short Films made by Students from Toronto Catholic District School Board and Toronto District School Board in Celebration of Canada 150

    INTRODUCTION BY REELWORLD CHAIR OF THE BOARD MOE JIWAN

    SHORT FILM SHOWCASE
    Audience Q&A moderated by Reelworld Chair Moe Jiwan with filmmakers Simu Liu, Lulu Wei, Supinder Wraich and Farid Yazdani

    1. Meeting Mommy| Director Tricia Lee
    Zoe can only see her Mom once a year on her birthday. On the day that she turns six, Zoe has some hard questions for her father to answer.
    Director: Tricia Lee- Director of award-winning films SILENT RETREAT (Best Canadian Feature -Toronto After Dark) and CLEAN BREAK (Best Drama Feature – Atlanta Horror Film Festival), Tricia has just completed her third feature BLOOD HUNTERS. Http://www.reelworld.ca/meeting-mommy

    2. Silver | Director Simu Liu

    During the vampire outbreak, millions either lost their lives or were turned. The world erupted into chaos. Then, a ray of hope – scientists were able to synthesize a blood substitute without the addictive and maddening qualities of human blood. The synthetic blood was mass-produced and distributed amongst the vampire population. Thus, vampires and humans came to co-exist together.

    3. A Bicycle Lesson | Director: Renuka Jeyapalan |Starring: Supinder Wraich

    A dramatic short film focusing on the relationship between a 2nd generation daughter and her mother. When a young woman teaches her mother how to ride a bicycle she discovers a secret that has the potential to mend their fractured relationship.
    Renuka Jeyapalan is a Toronto-based filmmaker and a graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Director’s Lab. Her short film Big Girl premiered at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival and has screened at over thirty-five film festivals around the world. In 2010, Renuka was awarded the Kodak New Vision Mentorship Award by Women in Film and Television-Toronto and was mentored by director Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight, Thirteen). Renuka recently wrote and directed the short film Arranged for TMN, Movie Central, and the Harold Greenberg Fund and is currently developing her first feature film, How to go to a Wedding Alone with Gearshift Films.
    Supinder Wraich is an actress and filmmaker born in Chandigarh, India and raised in Toronto, Canada. She is a graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Actor’s conservatory, holds a BA in Communications from Ottawa University and is also a Sheridan College, Advanced Film & Television program alumni. Wraich plays the lead in the CTV Emmy Award winning series “Guidestones,” for which she earned a Canadian Screen Award. She has also appeared in numerous film and television productions including: Hunter’s Moon, Textuality, CBC’s “The Border,” CTV’s “Degrassi: The Next Generation” and “Saving Hope,” CBC’s “Combat Hospital,” Global’s “Rookie Blue,” BBC’s “Copper,” Syfy’s “Haven,” CW’s “Backpackers,” Comedy’s “The Beaverton,” Syfy’s “Incorporated,” and FX’s “The Strain.”

    4. P6HUT | Web format, Supinder Wraich (director, writer), Matt Power (producer), Ontario, partner: Reelworld Film Festival
    One of projects selected under the Telefilm Canada and the Talent Fund Talent Fund-supported Micro-Budget Production Program.
    It’s the Hipster ‘Legally Blonde’ meets the Sopranos... P6HUT is a good girl gone bad story with a South Asian Female Anti-Hero at its center. Ashamed of her cultural heritage SURPREET DEOL aka ‘SURI’, a 27-year-old Indo-Canadian/ Instagram ‘It girl’, who has successfully separated herself from her roots is forced to return to Brampton/‘BrownTown’ after her father mysteriously disappears.
    Uncovering his involvement as the head of a cross-border drug cartel Suri is forced to replace her father as the interim leader. In doing so, she begins embracing the culture she thought she escaped and her inner bad girl.

    5. There’s no place like this place, Anyplace | Filmmaker selected to participate in the Doc Accelerator Emerging Filmmaker lab. 2018 Doc Accelerator Fellows Supported by Netflix.
    Director: Lulu Wei | Toronto, Ontario (https://www.hotdocs.ca/i/accelerator)
    A filmmaker sets out to document the redevelopment of the historic Honest Ed’s block she calls home, as a way to pay homage to its cultural heritage, and to understand the problems of development and gentrification in Toronto—problems that end up hitting closer to home than expected.
    This is a feature documentary about the redevelopment of the historic Honest Ed’s and Mirvish Village block. In
    Toronto at the intersection of two main streets, Bloor and Bathurst, sits the iconic Toronto landmark Honest Ed’s. In 2013, Honest Ed’s and the surrounding buildings that comprise Mirvish Village were sold to be redeveloped into luxury rental towers.

    6. Day Players| Up for Best Short at Canadian Comedy Awards, a Day Players is a short film created and produced by Farid Yazdani
    Day Players is about six amateur actors taking the world’s most bizarre acting class together. Think Community meets Inside the Actor’s Studio. Day Players takes place in the modern day, real world. However, it’s showcased through an over produced hyper-reality. Juxtaposing the melodrama is a postmodern sensibility, which is supported by cutaway gags, flashbacks, and pop culture references.
    Audience Q&A moderated by Reelworld Chair Moe Jiwan with filmmakers Simu Liu, Lulu Wei, Supinder Wraich and Farid Yazdani

    FEATURE FILM: FINDING SAMUEL LOWE: FROM HARLEM TO CHINA
    Introduction:

    Moe Jiwan will introduce Keith Lowe who will introduce the Feature Film Finding Samuel Lowe
    Moderated conversation
    Q&A with Keith Lowe and Jeanette Kong moderated by Reelworld Chair of the Board Moe Jiwan

    Feature Length Film: Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China
    Director: Jeanette Kong
    An Afro-Chinese-Jamaican Harlem family seeks their Chinese grandfather who was forever separated from their mother – his 3-year-old half-Chinese, half-Jamaican daughter – in 1920. Samuel Lowe returned to China in 1933 with a Chinese wife and 6 children. After a 91-year separation, his Black Chinese grandchildren journey to China where they find Samuel Lowe’s 300 Chinese descendants and the entire clan in reunited. The film takes viewers to Harlem, Toronto, Martha’s Vineyard, three cities in Jamaica and two cities in China to see these families of different races become One.

    Jeanette Kong is a documentary filmmaker from Jamaica based in Toronto, Canada. She has more than 17 years of media experience in Canadian television formerly at TVO and as an independent producer and director.She specializes in short-form videos and documentaries including Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China, The Chiney Shop and Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son.

    Kong directed and produced Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China in 2012 for Jamaican-American media entrepreneur Paula Williams Madison. The feature-length documentary traces Madison’s search for her Chinese grandfather. It was shortlisted for Best Diaspora Documentary at the Africa Movie Academy Awards 2014 and has screened at the Reelworld Film Festival, Pan African Film Festival, the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival, the UrbanWorld Film Festival, the San Diego Black Film Festival, the Honolulu African-American Film Festival, and the Garifuna Film Festival, among others. In 2015, the ReelWorld Film Festival selected Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China as its Opening Night Gala film. The film won both the ReelWorld Film Festival 2015’s ReelChoice Audience Award and ReelWorld Film Festival 2015’s Markham ReelChoice Audience Award.

    In 2011, Kong taught Journalism in the Media Foundation Program at Humber College. She has a Master of Arts in Media Production from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Journalism degree from Carleton University.

    Closing remarks – Reelworld

    Organizers: Asian Heritage Month–Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc., Social Services Network in partnership with Reelworld Film Festival Co-Organizers: Asian Heritage Month—Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Reelworld Film Festival; Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library, University of Toronto; Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairrs, University of Toronto; Social Services Network

    Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2018

  • Friday, June 1st Creating New Worlds: Multilingualism, Visual Arts, the Poetic Imagination

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 1, 20189:00AM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Tamil Studies Conference in Memory of Chelva Kanaganayakam

    Description

    This conference explores the role of creativity across literary and visual media in Tamil worlds. Our current situation is one that is profoundly shaped by dynamics of translation across worlds and languages, as Prof. Kanaganayakam argued through his work and life. In this context, how might we open the larger history of Tamil aesthetics from a perspective that values multiplicity as foundational to creativity itself? How are hybrid pasts recruited to speak to questions of endurance and resistance in the present? Spanning over a millennium of artistic production and aesthetic reflections, from ancient India to contemporary Sri Lanka, the research presented here will address these questions and focus on modalities of creative practice that engage with multiplicities, internal and external, as the grounds upon which new worlds in Tamil are made.

    Coffee, Pastries, and Welcome: 9:00-9:45 am
    Welcome Remarks 9:45-10:00 am

    Session 1: Multilingualism in Tamil Literary Worlds, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

    Anne Monius (Harvard University)
    Multilingualism in the Tamil Grammatical Tradition

    Giovanni Ciotti (Universität Hamburg)
    On the Use of the Linguistic Label ‘Maṇipravālam’ in Some Palm-leaf Manuscripts from Tamil Nadu

    Manasicha Akepiyapornchai (Cornell University)
    Vedāntadeśika’s Multilingualism: Tamil and Sanskrit Verses in the Maṇipravāḷam Rahasyatrayasāram

    Suganya Anandakichenin (École Française d’Êxtreme Orient, Pondicherry)
    Juggling with Two Languages: The Techniques of Explanation and Interpretation in Aḻakiya Maṇavāḷa Cīyar’s Paṉṉīrāyirappaṭi Commentary on the Tiruvāymoḻi.

    12:00-1:00 pm Lunch

    Session 2: Multilingualism in Tamil Literary Worlds, 1:00-2:30 pm

    Krissy Roghan (University of Toronto)
    Charting Courses of Tamiḻ Pulamai in Colonial South India

    Christoph Emmrich (University of Toronto)
    Tamil Jainism and the Multilingual Jain

    Srilata Raman (University of Toronto)
    Discussant

    2:30 -3:00 break

    Session 3: Art as World Making, 3:00-4:30 pm

    S. Jeyasankar (Vipulananda Institute of Aesthetic Studies, Batticaloa)
    Scarecrows: Activist Art of the People and By the People

    Vasuki Jeyasankar (Artist, Batticaloa)
    Art for Social Change: Experiences of a Feminist Artist

    Nedra Rodrigo (York University)
    Panel Chair and Discussion Facilitator

    4:30-5:00 tea break and remarks

    Session 4: Embodiment, Territoriality, Translation and Culture, 5:00-6:30 pm

    P. Ahilan (University of Jaffna)
    Embodiment: Territories and territorialities of the poetry of 1980’s Jaffna

    Geetha Sukumaran (York University)
    Saramakavikal: Ahilan’s poetry and its Translation

    Nergis Canefe (York University)
    Panel Chair and Discussion Facilitator

    Conference Organizers: Darshan Ambalavanar, Francis Cody, Christoph Emmrich, Srilata Raman
    With Special Support from: Kirubhalini Giruparajah, Neerajah Vignarajah, Bhavani Raman, Kuruparan Selvarajah

    Event Announcement

     

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 11th The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks In China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 11, 20185:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    How can think tanks contribute to policy-making and intellectual exchange in an authoritarian state? Join author, Dr. Cheng Li, for a timely and compelling discussion on the growing role of think tanks in Xi Jinping’s China.

    Dr. Cheng Li is director of the John L. Thornton China Center and a senior fellow in the Foreign Policyprogram at Brookings. He is also a director of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. Li focuses on the transformation of political leaders, generational change and technological development in China.
    Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985 he came to the United States, where he received a master’s in Asian studies from the University of California, Berkeley and a doctorate in political science from Princeton University. From 1993 to 1995, he worked in China as a fellow sponsored by the Institute of Current World Affairs in the U.S., observing grassroots changes in his native country. Based on this experience, he published a nationally acclaimed book, “Rediscovering China: Dynamics and Dilemmas of Reform” (1997).
    Li is also the author or the editor of numerous books, including “China’s Leaders: The New Generation” (2001), “Bridging Minds Across the Pacific: The Sino-U.S. Educational Exchange 1978-2003” (2005), “China’s Changing Political Landscape: Prospects for Democracy” (2008), “China’s Emerging Middle Class: Beyond Economic Transformation” (2010), “The Road to Zhongnanhai: High-Level Leadership Groups on the Eve of the 18th Party Congress” (in Chinese, 2012), “The Political Mapping of China’s Tobacco Industry and Anti-Smoking Campaign” (2012), “China’s Political Development: Chinese and American Perspectives” (2014), “Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership” (2016), and “The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks in China”. He is currently completing a book manuscript with the working title “Middle Class Shanghai: Pioneering China’s Global Integration.” He is the principal editor of the Thornton Center Chinese Thinkers Series published by the Brookings Institution Press.

    “The Power of Ideas” will be available for sale and author will be available for signing.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

    Dr.Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director of the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings Institution


    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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« January 2018 - March 2018 April 2018 - Present

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