Past Events at the Asian Institute

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October 2018

  • Monday, October 1st The Firebombing of Japan: Motivations, Morality and the Effect on the Japanese Surrender

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 1, 20184:00PM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The firebombing of Japan has been eclipsed in postwar writing by both the atomic bombings of Hiroshima/Nagasaki and the conventional bombing of Japanese cities. This is curious given (a) that the death toll – over 300,000 by conservative estimates – exceeded that of the atomic bombs and (b) the strategy relied on the same bombing techniques that caused so much controversy over Germany. The paper reviews the reasons behind the US switch from precision bombing (designed to minimize civilian casualties) to area bombing (designed to maximize them) and evaluates the effect of them on the outcome of the war. Simply put: did the killing hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians through conventional bombing help win the war?


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Speaker
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Takashi Fujitani
    Discussant
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies and Professor, Department of History

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Chair, Department of East Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 3rd Sensory Travels: Landscape and Maps from Early Modern India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 3, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    What kinds of representations of place and landscape did the colonial mapmaking project encounter when its great trigonometrical survey unfolded in early nineteenth century India? Exploring the sensory, affective, and epistemological aspects of place-making images, art historian Dipti Khera and historian of medieval and early modern India Samira Sheikh examine the interfaces between colonial cartography, eighteenth century courtly art, and precolonial revenue systems. The formal innovations generated at these interfaces both informed and exceeded colonial cartography, offering an intriguing historical key to understanding perceptions of landscape in India.


    Speakers

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Dipti Khera
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, New York University

    Samira Sheikh
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University

    Kajri Jain
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Civilizations

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 4th Translating Korean Literature: A Conversation and Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 4, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMCurrent Resource Centre, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    In partnership with the Centre for the Study of Korea, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library will be hosting an event to celebrate Dr. Janet Poole’s (University of Toronto) book launch, Dust and Other Stories. Dr. Poole will be joined by Dr. Samuel Perry (Brown University) where they will discuss and share their knowledge and experience on translating Korean literary works.

    Dr. Janet Poole is an associate professor of the East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto and her interests range from the colonial period in Korea to creative practice of translation. Prior to translating Dust and Other Stories, Poole also translated and published Yi T’ae-jun’s other works titled Eastern Sentiments. Yi T’ae-jun was not only a famous writer of his own right but a featuring writer of the important newspaper, “Chosŏn Chungang Ilbo”.

    Dr. Samuel Perry is an associate professor of the East Asian Studies at Brown University where he specializes in Japanese and Korean Studies. One of his most acclaimed work includes translating colonial Korean writer, Kang Kyŏng-ae’s From Wonso Pond.

    Reception to follow.

    Location Instructions: Please take the second floor public elevator at Robarts Library and get off on the 8th floor.

    Please register on the website below


    Speakers

    Dr. Samuel Perry
    Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, Brown University

    Dr. Janet Poole
    Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study Korea

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Cheng Yu Teng East Asian Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 5th State Highway 31: A Road Trip Through the Heart of Modern India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 5, 201812:30PM - 2:30PMAP246, Department of Anthropology, 19 Russel St.
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    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    Abstract:
    This talk follows the route of State Highway 31 through western Madhya Pradesh, central India. The research was part of a larger project looking at the ideas behind the production of infrastructure in South Asia. This journey takes us through landscapes of sex work and opium, some of the oldest nationalist networks in the country, and along the fault-lines of long-running tensions between local communities. The road was one of a series built as a public private partnership and, as such, speaks of the reconfiguration of state relations with private capital and business. Toll booths become places of company ethos, education and for the creation of new kinds of citizens. The nexus of government and private enterprise takes us on a dizzying journey through the world’s tax havens and onto the decks of luxury yachts. Exploring the broader political economy of the road and the organisation of institutions and travellers that sustain it encourages questions about the nature of governance and power in the country.

    Biography:
    Edward Simpson is a Social Anthropologist and Director of the South Asia Institute at SOAS University of London. He is currently interested in the relationship between infrastructure, automobility and the global-sustainability agenda. From previous research he wrote: The political biography of an earthquake: Aftermath and amnesia in Gujarat India (Hurst 2013). He is the Principal Investigator on a five-year project funded by the European Research Council looking at infrastructure across South Asia. This work is being undertaken in partnership with the Mumbai-based artists CAMP.

    Please register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScTGB1xzJrz9n2kAwsn99utOsELsBvlsc04LERQOHG3RhxgXA/viewform


    Speakers

    Edward Simpson
    Professor of Social Anthropology and Director, SOAS South Asian Institute School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London


    Sponsors

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 5th Spectrum of Migrant Exclusions: Contemporary Issues, Interdisciplinary Insights

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 5, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Scholars have long recognized social barriers and structural constraints that result in the “differential inclusion” and “segmented assimilation” of migrants. These concepts have been fruitfully applied to understanding the structural and persistent inequalities that immigrants face after entry into a nation-state’s territory. As Stephen Castles and Alastair Davidson observe, states frequently incorporate migrants “only within strict temporal and functional limits.” While migration studies have long attended to these issues, recent global shifts in immigration politics and temporary labour regimes have increased the urgency of attending to the rise of global and transnational regimes of exclusion.

    Challenging the idea of migration to settlement as normative, non-citizens are increasingly vulnerable to deportation and detention globally; temporary foreign workers are more likely to be ineligible for family reunification and permanent residency; children of refugees may not have full access to public education; and migrant contract workers are denied full and equal participation, rights and protections in the labour market. These mechanisms of exclusion illustrate the range of limitations inhibiting the inclusion of migrants, particularly those who are undocumented, refugees or temporary migrant workers. This panel offers insights from multiple disciplinary standpoints and situates migrant exclusion in current global political context.

    Reception to follow.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Welcoming Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Patricia Landolt
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jennifer Hyndman
    Panelist
    Professor, Social Science and Geography, York University

    Rhacel Parreñas
    Panelist
    Professor, Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Southern California

    Alison Mountz
    Panelist
    Professor, Canada Research Chair in Global Migration, Wilfrid Laurier University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dornsife College, University of Southern California

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    SSHRC Partnership Project, Gender, Migration and the Work of Care


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 12th Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies Distinguished Visitor Lecture: Trauma, Mourning, Witnessing: Photographing the Philippine Drug War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 12, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 1st floor, 170 St. George Street
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    Description

    Abstract:

    In this presentation, I inquire into one of the earliest responses to the recent Philippine war on drugs: the courageous work of photojournalists. In the context of the drug war, how does photojournalism become a kind of advocacy by becoming a mode of mourning? How is trauma and witnessing braided together in the experience of photographers covering war? What is the role of the camera and what are the ambivalent effects of the technical and aesthetic imaging of the dead and their survivors? What is the fate of photographic images once they travel beyond the control of the photographers? For example, converted into commodities, what happens to them when they circulate in the global mediascape and rendered into items for the daily consumption of anonymous viewers? And among families of the victims, how are the dead remembered in ways that elude photographic capture?

    Biography:

    Vicente L. Rafael is the Giovani and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor of History and Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is the author of several works on the cultural politics of the Philippines including Contracting Colonialism, White Love and Other Events in Filipino History, The Promise of the Foreign, and Motherless Tongues: the Insurgency of Language amid Wars of Translation (all from Duke Univ. Press). He also wrote the Introduction to a recent edition of Nick Joaquin’s stories, The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropic Gothic (Penguin Classics).

    Reception to follow.

    Event Poster

    View Event Poster

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Vicente L. Rafael
    Speaker
    Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor of History, University of Washington

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 16th Taking Roots: Coding & Design for Platform Co-Ops

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Before the 2018 Platform Coop Consortium (PCC platform.ccoop/2018, Sept. 28, 29) formal conference began, Huang SunQuan organized a two-day co-ops+hackathon (coopathon 2). Preceded by a series of panel discussions held in Taipei, Kaohsiung, Hangzhou, and Hong Kong, over forty interested programmers, artists, social innovators, and international tech organizations from greater China and other countries participated. The previous coopathon 1 was held in Shanghai in 2016. The aim of these coopathons is to figure out the collaborative possibilities of coders and cooperatives, addressing fundamental issues before more deeply thinking about the platform of cooperativerism, particularly in the Chinese context.

    A difference exists between coops and hacker geeks, which extends beyond the pursuit of economic equality to differences in cultural and political values. Cooperativism asks for the participation of all or nothing at all, while the hacker geek model mostly pursues individual, ‘genius’ achievement. Coops are threatened by privatization, while the latter is an updated neoliberal version of the Californian ideology of accelerationism and solutionism (1995, Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron). The former pursues economic justice—that is, better relations of production; the latter pursues efficiently productive forces. Hackers don’t like doors that can’t be opened, but cooperatives hope the door will always open.

    These two groups are more or less unaware of the commonalities they share. They both need a sustainable model, and they both rely on the results of sharing and mutual benefit. In this talk, Huang SunQuan will share some of his experiences of coopathons and some Chinese cooperatives which he deeply engaged in, discussing strategies for introducing a social aspect into coding and the design of platform coops.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Huang SunQuan (PhD, Building and Planning from National Taiwan University) is Professor at the China Academy of Art and Director of the Institute of Network Society, School of Inter-Media Art, CAA. He is an artivist engaging in architecture, media, social movements, and art, known for his long-term research and intervention in media, internet culture, and social activism.

    Huang SunQuan was the editor-in-chief of POTS Weekly (established in 1994) and the director of Cultural Express from 2007 to 2009. He organized the first anti-gentrification movement in Taiwan under the slogan “Against City Government’s Bulldozers” (1997) and made the documentary film Green Bulldozer: the Rise of Your New Homeland. In 2004, he created one of the most influential blogs in Taiwan (twblog.net) and the Taiwan Independent Media Center (tw.indymedia.org) as part of the network of Global Independent Media Center (indymedia.org).

    In recent years, he has undertaken a curatorial and artistic practice, running Monkey-Wrenching Art Center in the southern Taiwan. He has participated in the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture (2007, 2013), “Memoscape” at Cube Project Space, “Juke Box of Kaohsiung” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, and mounted a solo show, “U-topophilia”, at the Red Brick Art Museum, Beijing, among other projects. Curatorial projects include “Treasure Hill GAPP (Global Artivist Participation Plan)” (2003, 2004), “Lulu Shur-tzy Hou Solo Exhibition—Look toward the other side-Song of Asian Foreign Brides in Taiwan” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Arts (2010), and a migrant workers exhibition at Kaohsiung Labor Museum (2011-2012), etc.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Huang Sun-Quan
    Speaker
    Professor and Director of Institute of Network Society, China Academy of Art

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Director, Global Taiwan Studies Program


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Daniels Faculty University of Toronto, Master of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 19th Uncollecting India: Hidden Histories of a Museum

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 19, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, has the largest collection of Indian artefacts outside India, which was mostly acquired during colonial times. The V&A’s Indian collections can be used to track a history of the impulses and opportunities underlying colonial collecting: artefacts entered the collection as loot, as gifts, and as documentation of resources available in the colony.

    Alongside a history of collecting, however, there is a history of uncollecting, where collections are trimmed and refined through the removal of artefacts that are considered unimportant or irrelevant to the museum’s changing aims. The process of “de-accessioning” is one that museums seldom discuss in public, but the museum’s records keep traces of this less visible process.

    This talk will track the fate of four grand, architectural-scale Indian artefacts that were collected by the V&A in the 19th century but are no longer available to view. Each of these four artefacts was collected in response to different impulses; each was hailed in its time as an important acquisition and was prominently displayed; each fell out of favour and was removed from the galleries for a different reason and in a different way. By tracking the histories of these objects the talk will open the door to a hidden history of the museum.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Kavita Singh is Professor of Art History and is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she teaches courses on the history of Indian painting and the history and politics of museums. She has published essays on issues of colonial history, repatriation, secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialisation of difficult histories as they relate to museums in India and beyond. She has also published essays on aspects of Mughal painting.


    Speakers

    Kavita Singh
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th The Genealogies of Dalit Learning and Humanist Buddhism in 19th and 20th Century India

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 201810:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the modern historiography of Dalit learning in Southern India certain names stand out: Ayothee Thass Pandithar (1845-1914) and Bhimrao Ambedkar (1891-1956) being the most prominent. Much of the historiographical narrative of their scholarly achievements tends to be placed against the backdrop of colonial modernity and particularly tied to the emergence of “Buddhism” as the religion favoured by modernists in the colonial period. Though much recent work has been done on Ambedkarite Buddhism there is still much more that remains to be done on its local and vernacular iterations within specific Dalit regional locations and communities and how it has specifically comes to be used as a vehicle for new religious imaginaries and for an ethical and humanist approach to living. This one-day workshop plans to focus on the resonances of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its South Indian (Tamil and Maharashtrian) context to address some of these issues. It is the intention of this workshop to bring into conversation these two seemingly divergent strands of Dalit learning in showing how in their convergence on the issue of religious authority and “caste” and in their complex negotiation of these we might be able to not just perceive certain common genealogies but that these, in turn, might also to enable us to gain new perspectives on the nature of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its specifically South Indian iterations.

    Program:

    10am-11am: Lecture by Professor Rajangam
    11am-11:15am: Coffee Break
    11:15am-12:15pm: Discussion of Lecture

    2pm-3pm: Lecture by Professor Keune
    3pm-4pm: Discussion of Lecture


    Speakers

    Dr. Jon Keune
    Michigan State University

    Dr. Stalin Rajangam
    American College, Madurai


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    The Buddhist Education Foundation for Canada

    The Dr. Ho Centre for Buddhist Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th Asian-Canadian Futures

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    What does the future of Asian-Canadian relations hold? Ever-deepening connections with Asia are reshaping the ways that Canadians participate in global media, transnational business, international education, and cultural and historical production. This panel reflects on the influences of Asian-Canadian dynamics in transforming the speakers’ fields of expertise, including business and media, immigration politics, historical memory, curatorial and archival work, and university education.

    Reception to follow


    Speakers

    Professor Rachel Silvey
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Keynote
    President, The Justin Poy Agency

    Professor Emily Gilbert
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography & Planning and Director of the Canadian Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Dr. Emily Hertzman
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute, and Manager, Richard Charles Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Speaker
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Professor Lisa Mar
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2018

  • Friday, November 2nd “Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This research project examines the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry in South Korea to demonstrate how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested, negotiated, and reconstructed by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors, gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries. This study envisions reproductive ethics as part of a transnational feminist agenda by examining the ethical issues raised by the complicated relationships between intended parents and gamete donors/gestational surrogates. Drawing on three years of multi-sited ethnographic research conducted in South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine, this project disputes the unilateral understanding of ART, which is typically conceptualized as having a unidirectional flow from the “West” to Asia, by focusing on the complex relations between Korean intended parents and non-Korean gamete providers and gestational surrogates.

    Dr. Sunhye Kim is currently the Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow in Korean Studies at the Korea Institute, Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland in 2018. She received her B.A. and B.A in Sociology at Yonsei University, Seoul, and worked at the Korean Women’s Development Institute as a researcher. Sunhye’s research and teaching interests are related to the politics of human (re)production in transnational Asia; in particular, her research centers on the study of the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry as a site of interdisciplinary inquiry.


    Speakers

    Sunhye Kim
    Korea Institute, Harvard University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 6th Public Lecture by Taiwan’s Digital Minister Audrey Tang: Social Innovation and the Renovation of Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 6, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMRoom 100A, 1st floor, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Open, collective, experimental and sustainable. Taiwan’s first Digital Minister Audrey Tang’s talk will show what happens when people who grew up on the internet get their hands on the building blocks of government. As a self-described “conservative anarchist” and a so-called “white-hat hacker,” Audrey Tang will show how she works with her team to channel greater combinations of intelligence into policy-making decisions and public services delivery. She will also discuss “tech for good” and how Taiwan is “SDG indexing everything.” For more information, please view two recent articles on Apolitical (links below) which help elucidate Audrey and her philosophy.

    “Reprogramming power: Audrey Tang is bringing hacker culture to the state”

    “Meet the network tearing down walls between departments in Taiwan”

    Speaker’s Biography:

    Audrey Tang (唐鳳)
    Digital Minister, Taiwan

    Audrey is known for revitalizing the computer languages Perl and Haskell, as well as building the online spreadsheet system EtherCalc in collaboration with Dan Bricklin.

    In the public sector, Audrey serves on Taiwan National Development Council’s open data committee and K-12 curriculum committee; and led the country’s first e-Rulemaking project. Audrey joined the cabinet as Digital Minister on Oct 1st, 2016.

    In the private sector, Audrey works as a consultant with Apple on computational linguistics, with Oxford University Press on crowd lexicography, and with Socialtext on social interaction design.

    In the third sector, Audrey actively contributes to Taiwan’s g0v (“gov-zero”), a vibrant community focusing on creating tools for the civil society, with the call to “fork the government”.


    Speakers

    Audrey Tang
    Digital Minister of Taiwan


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th Taiwan's Transpacific Medical Modernity: Race and Disability in Wu Nien-Jen's Buddha Bless America (1996)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    EAS Speaker Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Recent scholarship from the US and Asia critiques how US historiographies of post-war development in Asia, shaped by Cold War liberalism, painted imperialism in Asia as largely benevolent, supporting the universal interests of humanism, democracy, and freedom. In this talk, I will look into Wu Nien-Jen’s film Buddha Bless America (1996) to offer critical reflections on the connection between militarism and the postcolonial development of nation building in its “authoritarian” forms, especially measured against the Western liberal language of rights, democracy and sovereignty. I examine how this cultural text renders imperialist violence visible in what is otherwise portrayed as unqualified medical humanitarianism and development, even as it reifies a liberal language of medical and scientific progress for national rehabilitation in the mutual co-constitution of US and Taiwan modernities from the 1960s onwards. Perceiving Buddha Bless America as a putatively post-Cold War cultural production that is integral to the historical reconstruction of Taiwanese liberal nationalism, my reading suggests that a post-authoritarian democratization – one that would be achieved by demanding rights and liberty via Western modernity – paradoxically obscures the process of re-militarization in a racialized biopolitical regime of organizing and managing life, labor, security, health, and dis/ability.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Professor Chien-Ting Lin teaches in the English Department of the National Central University of Chungli, Taiwan. He received his Ph.D. in literature and cultural studies from University of California, San Diego. He has published his research in Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Review of International American Studies, and Taiwan: A Radical Quarterly in Social Studies. His current book project tentatively entitled, Fugitive Subjects of “Secret Doctors”: Politics of Life and Labor in Taiwan’s Medical Modernity, investigates transpacific colonial and neocolonial formations of knowledge production and hierarchies of reproductive labor and life politics within different periods of Taiwan’s medical modernization.


    Speakers

    Chien-Ting Lin
    Associate Professor, Department of English, National Central University


    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th How Democratic Should Vietnam Be?: Anticommunist Nationalists and the Debate on the Constitutional Transition in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN), May-December 1955

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the eyes of many foreign observers, one of the most puzzling aspects of the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam) was the continual in-fighting among anticommunists. Most accounts depict these internal conflicts as simply a struggle for power, but I contend that they also constituted a battle of ideas. Specifically, the presentation examines the debate between Ngô Đình Diệm and rival anticommunist nationalists in the summer and fall of 1955. Virtually all anticommunists agreed that the regime should become a constitutional republic, and they unanimously called for a democracy. Yet the seeming consensus belied starkly different definitions of democratic government. Diệm’s faction and the political parties associated with the southern sects called for a hybrid regime, that is, a regime that combined elements of authoritarianism and democracy. The sect parties demanded greater pluralism than Diệm, though the difference was of degree rather than of kind. The debate took a decidedly more liberal direction under the influence of the émigré politician Phan Quang Đán. Đán advocated for a militant democracy, that is, a full-fledged democracy that minimally limited liberty only to protect itself from extremist forces seeking to subvert democracy. In the end, Diệm prevailed over his rivals because he and his followers controlled the government. By seriously examining the diversity of political ideas in the RVN, the presentation suggests that the regime’s seeming intractable factionalism arose from substantive disagreements rather than factional squabbling.


    Speakers

    Nu-Anh Tran
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 9th Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang: The Epistemological Stakes of Two Realisms in New Taiwan Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    If, as Umberto Eco has argued, a work of art can be read as an “epistemological metaphor,” then the fictional world created by a film can also be read as an analogical comment on the knowability of the “real” world. This paper explores two models of cinematic realism, one totalizing and one apophatic, the former represented by Edward Yang’s Yi Yi and the latter by the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien. The former raises the ideal of cinema as a means of revealing even the hidden aspects of reality and thereby providing increased epistemological certainty. In contrast, through techniques including editing ellipses and the mobilization of off-screen space, Hou’s realism paradoxically represents a reality that defies or exceeds representation and therefore can only be represented in a negative or subtractive manner. It will further be argued that the two modes of realism reflect opposing impulses in a central dialectic of modernity.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Jason McGrath is Associate Professor in Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota, with affiliations in Moving Image Studies and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. His current book project is entitled Inscribing the Real: Realism and Convention in Chinese Cinema from the Silent Era to the Digital Age.


    Speakers

    Jason McGrath
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 13th China “Going Global”: New Configurations of Chinese Overseas Investment

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 13, 201812:30PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The nature of Chinese investment abroad is changing. As China reaffirms its commitment to its “going global” strategy and the One Belt One Road initiative, China’s continued investment in regions such as Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia has caught the world’s attention. What are the implications of China’s shifting investment strategy for the global economy and the international system? To what extent are security and geopolitical concerns about Chinese investment abroad (both by the state and by the private sector) justified? How does China’s investment strategy reflect its shifting state and foreign policy challenges? How have these challenges changed the relationship between the Chinese government and the private sector, or transformed the Chinese approach to foreign investment? Please join us for this important dialogue with Professor Lynette Ong and Professor Howard Lin on November 13th, from 12:30pm-2pm. This event will take place in Room 108N, 1 Devonshire Place (North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy).

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Professor Lynette Ong
    Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Professor Howard Lin
    Global Management Studies, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th The Indo-Pacific: Security Governance for Peace

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMSchulich Executive Conference Center- Event Room, Ground Floor, Seymour Schulich Building, York University, 4700 Keele Street
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    Series

    Annual Forum Series on Ocean Frontiers

    Description

    Keynote (5-6pm)
    Security, Governance and Peace in the Indo-Pacific: A New Look at Sustainable Common Security
    Former Canadian Ambassador to the UN and President of the Rideau Institute, Hon. Mdm. Peggy Mason

    Panel Discussion (6-7pm)
    The Indo-Pacific: An Evolving Security Order?
    Eminent panelists include Embassy and Consulate Leads

    This forum brings together scholars and officials to discuss a range of trans-frontier security issues emerging from the Indo-Pacific region. Of critical importance is clarity on what the “Indo-Pacific” construct means and implies, both as an epistemic category of geostrategic vision and as a geophysical domain in the larger context of perilous maritime-space-nuclear nexus. This forum also aims to promote insights into international security governance norms, Canada’s role in Indo-Pacific security governance, and Canadian engagement in trans-pacific peace processes through ASEAN, NATO, and the U.N. The larger purpose is to foster critical thinking on geostrategic issues management, and promote discussions on peaceful ways of establishing global security governance mechanisms.

    Location: http://www.acc-schulichexecutiveconferencecentre.com/map–directions.html


    Speakers

    Hon. Mdm. Peggy Mason
    President, Rideau Institute and former Canadian Ambassador to the UN


    Sponsors

    Conference of Defence Associations Institute (CDAI)

    Science for Peace, Canada

    York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: This Shaking Keeps Me Steady

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The registration for this event is now CLOSED. Rush tickets will be available but entries are not guaranteed.

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave (entrance off of St. George Street)

    Pakistan 2017
    61:00
    Urdu with English subtitles
    14A • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Shehrezad Maher

    Official Selection
    2018 Montreal International Documentary Film Festival
    2017 Visions du Reel

    This visually reflective documentary by Shehrezad Maher attempts to reconstruct trauma — both of first responders in Karachi, confronted with death every day, and of the victims and survivors whose experiences are shown via televised re-enactments replayed for mass entertainment.

    Originating from a prompt to two ambulance drivers in Karachi to retell their recurring dreams, this film explores the permeable boundaries between memory and fiction, and between lived trauma, its recollection, and its re-enactment. First responders reflect on the aftermath of violent events, while television re-enactment actors audition for, and perform the gendered roles of victim, perpetrator, and witness in scenarios ranging from the banal to the tragic. Unfolding through rituals, preparations, dreams, and performance, we never see the tragic events themselves, but instead catch traces of the extent to which they have been internalized by a society. -KE

    Shehrezad Maher was born and grew up in Karachi, Pakistan (1988) and is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. She studied visual arts at Bennington College and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale University (2014). Her work has screened at institutions and festivals such as Visions du Réel (Nyon, Switzerland), RIDM (Montréal, Canada), the LA Film Forum (Los Angeles, CA), Anthology Film Archives (New York, NY), and Experiments in Cinema (Albuquerque, NM).

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Michelle Buckley, an urban and economic geographer whose research lies at the intersections of urbanization, work and employment, and labour migration.

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: A Time To Swim

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    The registration for this event is now CLOSED. Rush tickets will be available but entries are not guaranteed.

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave. (entrance off of St. George Street).

    Canada/Malaysia 2017
    82:00
    English, Malay with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Ashley Duong (in attendance)

    Cast
    Mutang Urud
    Noeli Urud
    Agan Urud
    Natasha Blanchet-Cohen

    Official Selection
    2018 CAAMFest
    2017 LA Asian Pacific Film Fest

    Much has changed in Sarawak, Malaysia since Mutang Urud was exiled to Montreal, Canada, more than 20 years ago. A renowned activist for Indigenous rights, Mutang has started a family and now lives as a stay-at-home dad. Filmmaker Ashley Duong follows Mutang as he travels with his family back to Borneo to reunite with his village relations, their travel visa contingent on Mutang staying away from the local politics.

    The remote village in Sarawak, however, is not like he remembers it. His cousins who once fought for the forest alongside him have joined forces with the logging companies that are destroying it. Despite the threat of a lingering arrest warrant, Mutang can’t deny his activism. A Time To Swim traces Mutang’s search for belonging in a village where everyone is related, yet the very idea of home and heritage seems to be slipping away. – KE

    Ashley Duong is a Montreal-based filmmaker and multimedia storyteller working to amplify marginalized voices. A Time to Swim is her feature-length directorial debut. She has also recently produced Land and Legends, an interactive podcast about the connection between the landscapes and myths of the Kelabit.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Images

    a man facing away from the camera stands on a small boat and casts a net towards the water.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 16th Living to Die, Living as the Dead: On Labor Power and Race in Hokkaido’s Settler Colonialism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 16, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    My talk advances consideration of the relations between the settler-colonial logic of elimination and the capitalist logic of exploitation through the prism of racism. The settler-colonial studies paradigm has convincingly established that its distinct mode of domination is the structure of elimination, not exploitation, and racism plays a decisive role in this eliminatory politics. But it rarely explores the way in which racism not only mediates but also shapes the relations between elimination and exploitation in the formation of capitalist society. This talk is an attempt to address this under-theorized terrain by taking the Ainu – indigenous people of present-day Hokkaidō, Sakhalin, and Kuril Islands – and their systematic dispossession by Meiji-era imperial Japan as a focal point of analysis.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Katsuya Hirano teaches history at UCLA. He is the author of The Politics of Dialogic Imagination: Power and Popular Culture in Early Modern Japan (U of Chicago Press). He has published numerous articles and book chapters on cultural and intellectual history of Japan, Fukushima nuclear disaster, settler colonialism, and critical theory, including “Thanatopolitics in the Making of Japan’s Hokkaido: Settler Colonialism and Primitive Accumulation” (Critical Historical Studies). His current book project examines the relation between racism and capitalism in the making of the imperial Japanese nation with a focus on the settler-colonization of the lands that once belonged to the indigenous Ainu.

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Katsuya Hirano
    Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 17th Community Film Screening of "Face, the Other Side"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 17, 20182:30PM - 5:30PMInnis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave
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    Description

    Film screening: 2:45 PM – 4:15 PM
    Discussion and Q&A with Director LEE Sun Hee: 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
    * Event is presented bilingually, in both English and Korean: film screening has Korean audio with English subtitles; Discussion/Q&A will have Korean/English interpretation

    Film Synopsis:
    The culture of men watching illegally filmed videos of sexual violence is becoming a huge problem in Korea. Videos of sexual intercourse filmed without the consent of women, are publicly shared on illegal sex violence video sites. Female victims of these videos are branded as ‘something-something girl’ and become content products that are bought without copyrights. These transactions have created a huge market. Women can’t help but live in constant fear of getting their exposed bodies or sexual intercourses filmed anywhere, anytime, by anyone. Yet, the police are tepid with investigations and punishments, and consequently female victims’ lives are destroyed psychologically, socially, and financially. Infuriated by reality, some ordinary women have turned into political feminist warriors. Getting by with part-time jobs, they voluntarily gather together, and spend countless hours trying to identify the faces of the consumers of illegal videos so that they can collect enough evidence to report to the police. They also erase the victims’ videos and help them restore their life. Face, the Other Side goes beyond investigative reporting rather than simply unearthing the criminal cartel that consumes, produces, and distributes sexual violence videos. The film is an empowering story of young women growing into feminists and activists to reclaim the control of their bodies. They are the ones who change the world. [CHO HyeYoung]

    Director Bio:
    LEE Sun Hee
    Femi-tator – it is a word that I coined, as well as a value, and an occupation. My job is to organize and systematize women’s indignation. I write, make speeches, and sometimes bring my camera around to make documentaries, and dream of a world where feminism is common sense.
    In a few years, I hope to see NAH Hye-suk, the protagonist of my screenplay, Draw the Light, from long ago, on the screen and saying the line, “Virginity isn’t my hobby.”


    Speakers

    Sun Hee LEE
    Film Director


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Women Initiate New Domains

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department at the University of Toronto

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Centre for Feminist Research at York University

    Cinema Studies Student Union

    McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 19th China and Europe: Prospects for Cooperation and the Future of Multilateralism

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 19, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The topic of this academic seminar is situated in the global shift of retreating American global leadership. America’s protectionist and isolationist tendencies have given rise to competing views about the world order, and contending emerging powers who may champion or restructure the liberal rules-based international system. China’s increasingly proactive foreign policy and the initiative of European states to uphold principles such as free trade hint at future prospects for further collaboration among like-minded partners, outside of traditional alliance networks. For example, in the area of global environmental governance, China’s growing portfolio in renewable energy investment and climate action is aligning it with the interests and positions of countries such as France and Germany. This raises the question of whether Europe and China should still be viewed in a East vs West dichotomy, or rather now as potential partners with shared policy priorities and collaborative approaches to global governance. Please join us – our speakers Professor Robert Austin, Dr. Anton Malkin, Mr. Bowen Yu and Mr. Asif Farooq will discuss China-EU relations, China’s role in the Balkans, Made in China 2025 and its implications for China-EU relations, and more!


    Speakers

    Mr. Bowen Yu
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Professor Robert Austin
    Associate Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Anton Malkin
    Research Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation

    Mr. Asif Farooq
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Association of Political Science Students

    European Studies Students' Association

    International Relations Society


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 20th Imaging the Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 20, 20189:00AM - 5:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor of Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Imaging The Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit has now been moved to the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, where the photo exhibit will be on display from October 24 to November 20, 2018.

    In 2012-2013 the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute envisioned a photo contest on the theme of “Imaging the Asia-Pacific,” and has presented it annually ever since. Open to all students at the University of Toronto, the contest has asked students to submit photographic representations of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The photos may have been taken in any location inside or outside the region (including Toronto), but they are expected to be of high artistic quality and to offer images that go beyond clichés. Not only has the contest helped to make students aware of learning opportunities in the Chu Program and the Asian Institute; it also encourages them to consider the possibilities of interdisciplinary and multimedia approaches to the study of the Asia-Pacific. This exhibit is made up of only a small sampling of some of the most unique, beautiful and thought-provoking works the contest has received over the years.

    We invite viewers to contemplate the photos, to appreciate the artistic and intellectual talent on display, and to join us in imagining the region, its pasts, and its futures through the medium of photography.

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 23rd Mahosadha’s Cunning and the Cretan Labyrinth

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 23, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    LECTURE IN THE ARTS, HISTORIES, LITERATURES, AND RELIGIONS OF BURMA

    One of the Buddha Gotama’s numerous epithets was opamma kusalo muni – sage skilled in parables, exemplified in his life as Mahosadha. The remains of an early second millennium Burmese kingdom, named after its ceremonial center, Pagan, preserve several visual narratives of the story. They incorporate a labyrinth image to represent the setting where medicine curing human ailments was dispensed, and riddles and judicial problems were resolved – antecedent of the Bodhimanda – site of Gotama’s Awakening. Sometime in the late 11th century an unknown artisan, guided by a learned though anonymous Buddhist monk, selected the labyrinth image to reference his society’s conception of the human predicament. That monk’s vastly better known Christian counterparts, a millennium earlier and in another part of the world, chose likewise. The lecture speculates on the reasons and significance of the monk’s choice in the Pagan context.

    Biography:

    Lilian Handlin is a historian. She received her doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she taught until 1977. She is the author and co-author of several books, including the four volume Liberty in America,1600 to the Present (New York, 1986 – 1995) as well as articles and reviews in American history. More recently, she began to publish articles concerned with Myanmar’s early history, grounded in the material culture surviving the kingdom of Pagan. One of her publications compares two Pagan era narratives of the Vessantara with its first Burmese vernacular version composed by an influential 18th century Burmese monk and commentator. The article was published in Steven Collins, ed., Readings in the Vessantara Jataka (New York, Columbia University Press, 2016). An examination of the myth of the Buddha’s eye teeth, in the Pagan context, appeared this summer in Cristophe Munier Gaillard, ed., Mural Art, Studies on Paintings in Asia (Bangkok 2018).


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Dr. Lilian Handlin
    Speaker
    Harvard University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia: Urgency, Knowledge & Innovation-Webinar

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 20188:30AM - 11:30AM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Climate change is an urgent universal crisis facing all human beings. The impacts of climate change are potentially catastrophic and are unevenly distributed among different cities and countries due to environmental, geographical, social, political, and economic factors, rooted in systemic inequalities. Building resilience to climate change is complex, particularly in rapidly growing cities of Southeast Asia. In response to climate change, globalization, and urbanization, many Southeast Asian cities are experiencing a dramatic transformation due to socioeconomic and environmental challenges, especially under China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ (OBOR) initiative.

    This symposium invites scholars and practitioners across different sectors to share the latest knowledge development in the field and explore cutting-edge approaches. It hopes to further strengthen links between a community of climate leaders connected to the ground; and generate opportunities for collaboration in future urban climate resilience governance.

    The symposium consists of two major sessions: a webinar (8:30-11:30 am) via Facebook Live and a panel discussion (2:00-4:00 pm).

    During the webinar, ten scholars and practitioners across the world with expertise in climate issues in Southeast Asia will present their work through Facebook Live (https://www.facebook.com/ucrsea/). Each invited speaker will make a 3-minute elevator pitch to address the most critical environmental/climate issue in the region by answering the following questions briefly:

    1. What is the most urgent environmental/climate issue in your city/country?
    2. Why is it important?
    3. What can we do?

    A 10-minute Q&A session will follow each elevator pitch.

    To register, please fill out a form found in https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeLnQjKQtoCTe9emvtUMrZeA_tET1SXfxXRWwZ0S8HEQQo4kg/viewform?vc=0&c=0&w=1.

    Contact

    Angie Agulto
    416-946-8983


    Speakers

    Ms. Cat Tuong Nguyen
    Project Manager CHANGEVN, Vietnam

    Dr. Indrajit Pal
    Assistant Professor, Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation, and Management Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand

    Ms. Ragene Andrea Palma
    Freelance Urban Planner, Blogger and Contributing Writer CNN Philippines

    Dr. Seak Sophat
    Vice Dean, Faculty of Development Studies Royal University of Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Mr. Win Myo Thu
    Director EcoDev Myanmar

    Ms. Ngoc Tran
    Department of Climate Change Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment, Vietnam



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia: Urgency, Knowledge & Innovation-Panel Discussion

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 20182:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Climate change is an urgent universal crisis facing all human beings. The impacts of climate change are potentially catastrophic and are unevenly distributed among different cities and countries due to environmental, geographical, social, political, and economic factors, rooted in systemic inequalities. Building resilience to climate change is complex, particularly in rapidly growing cities of Southeast Asia. In response to climate change, globalization, and urbanization, many Southeast Asian cities are experiencing a dramatic transformation due to socioeconomic and environmental challenges, especially under China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ (OBOR) initiative.

    This symposium invites scholars and practitioners across different sectors to share the latest knowledge development in the field and explore cutting-edge approaches. It hopes to further strengthen links between a community of climate leaders connected to the ground; and generate opportunities for collaboration in future urban climate resilience governance.

    The panel discussion is preceded by a virtual conference in the morning, 8:30-11:30 am in Room 108N. Five emerging scholars will share their current research work on urban climate resilience in Southeast Asia, followed by an interactive discussion with the audience.

    To register for this event, please fill out the form found in https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeLnQjKQtoCTe9emvtUMrZeA_tET1SXfxXRWwZ0S8HEQQo4kg/viewform?vc=0&c=0&w=1.

    Contact

    Angie Agulto
    416-946-8983


    Speakers

    Yanjun Cai, Ph.D.
    UCRSEA Postdoctoral Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Katherine Laycock
    Incoming UCRSEA Postdoctoral Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Furqan Asif
    Ph.D. Candidate, International Development, University of Ottawa

    Try Thuon
    UCRSEA Graduate Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Tu Nguyen
    UCRSEA Graduate Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 30th “English is so precise and Hindi can be so heavy!": Language Ideologies and Audience Imaginaries in a Mumbai Dubbing Studio

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 30, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Abstract:

    Since 1994, when Jurassic Park was dubbed into Hindi and enjoyed unparalleled commercial success for a Hollywood film in India, the number of Hollywood films dubbed into Hindi and released in the Indian market has been steadily increasing. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a dubbing studio in Mumbai observing Hollywood films being dubbed into Hindi, as well as participation in the dubbing of an original Netflix series from Hindi to English, this talk examines the language ideologies about Hindi and English that are articulated, performed, and manifest during the dubbing process. It describes the varied ways that voice artists and dubbing directors navigate and negotiate the complex act of rendering dialogue in Hindi when the original lines are written in English and vice versa. It illustrates how the production of dubbed media is a rich site to examine questions of legitimate language, socio-economic change, social imaginaries of difference, and ideas of belonging in contemporary India.

    Biography:

    Tejaswini Ganti is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and core faculty in its Program in Culture & Media at New York University. She is the author of Producing Bollywood: Inside the Contemporary Hindi Film Industry (Duke University Press 2012) and Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema (Routledge 2004; 2nd edition 2013). Her current research examines the politics of language and translation within the Hindi film industry and the formalization of film training through film schools in India.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Tejaswini Ganti
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, New York University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2018

  • Monday, December 10th Regional Integration Trends in Developing Asia & the Economic and Business Impacts of the Trans-Pacific Trade Conflict

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 10, 20185:00PM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    How has the trans-Pacific trade conflict impacted economics and business in Asia? What are the implications for Canada? Join us on December 10 as Bart W. Édes discusses these regional integration trends and more.

    Biography:

    Bart W. Édes has served as the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) Representative in North America since October 2, 2017. In this capacity, he mobilizes financing for ADB’s developing member countries; shares development knowledge and experience; establishes and deepens partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raises public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.

    His earlier ADB experience includes leading teams responsible for knowledge management, social development, gender equity, the social sectors, civil society engagement, ICT for Development, inclusive business, governance, and public sector management. He guided the formulation of ADB’s Public Communications Policy, which set a new global benchmark for transparency and information sharing among the international financial institutions. Mr. Édes has also served as Alternate Chairperson of ADB’s Appeals Committee, and Member of the ADB Integrity Oversight Committee.

    Between 1994 and 2000, Mr. Édes managed communications at SIGMA, a joint initiative of the European Union and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development providing support to public governance reform in Central and Eastern European countries. Mr. Édes has also worked as a journalist, researcher, policy analyst, and specialist on international trade and foreign direct investment.


    Speakers

    Bart W. Édes
    Speaker
    North American Representative, Asian Development Bank

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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