Degree Requirements

MA European and Russian AFFAIRS  (ERA)

MA ERA is a multidisciplinary program with two main objectives:

  • to provide a well-rounded competence in European, Russian, and Eurasian affairs to individuals who will pursue professional, non-academic careers in areas such as government and diplomacy, journalism, business, and teaching;
  • to enrich and broaden the base of knowledge of beginning graduate students considering eventual PhD-level study in an academic discipline with a specialization in Europe, Russia, and/or Eurasia.

Students in the program are required to complete a minimum of two years of full-time study, during which they will take six full credits (a full-year course equals one credit; a half-year course equals one-half credit). Of the six credits at least two must be taken in a discipline selected by students as their chosen primary discipline (examples: History or Political Science), one must be ERE2001H taken in the first semester of the program, and one must be ERE 2000Y which begins in the second semester of the first year and continues into the second year of the program. As part of ERE2000Y, each student must write a Master’s essay (Major Research Paper or MRP) of approximately 30-40 pages, based on original research. At least 0.5 FCE must be earned either in an approved program-related internship or in an approved academic exchange abroad. The remaining two full credits must be drawn from any discipline(s) relating to the student’s course of study other than the chosen primary discipline.  Students can take courses in any department with the approval of the instructor and the graduate coordinator provided that the student submits course work related to the region. There is no European and Russian (ERE) major as such; the courses listed under ERE (other than 2001 and 2000) count toward program requirements in the disciplines such as history and political science. Some of the work in the program is based on the study of original texts and presupposes a reading knowledge of one or more languages of the region. For the language requirement, please refer to Foreign Language Requirement.

All ERA MA students are required to spend a minimum of 10 weeks (either the summer between the first and second years or the fall semester of the second year) in the region. This can take the form of approved language study, an approved internship, which must focus on Europe, Russia or Eurasia, or a formal exchange with a partner university. Students are required to spend a minimum of three semesters at CERES.

ALL ERE MA students are required to maintain a minimum of B+ average to remain in “good standing” in the graduate program.

You are in good standing when you maintain the requirement of minimum grade performance in course work among other degree requirements. Your eligibility for funding and registration in the program may be affected if you do not remain in good standing or if you do not make satisfactory progress, so it is important to meet with your adviser regularly and ask for feedback on your progress.

Combined MA (ERA) / JD Program

In 1998, the Faculty of Law and CERES inaugurated a new program of study which allows students to prepare for a legal career with special expertise in Eastern Europe and Russia, and to complete the three-year JD and the two-year CERES MA in four years instead of five years needed to complete the two programs separately. Candidates must apply to and be accepted separately by CERES and the Faculty of Law. Students who have completed a year at CERES or the first year of the JD degree are eligible for admission with advanced standing.

Requirements:

  1. In the first year of the program students complete all first year courses at the Faculty of Law.
  2. In the following three years of combined study, students:
    a. Take 45 credits in the Faculty of Law
    b. Satisfy the compulsory requirements of the JD, including the moot, an International/ Comparative/Transnational Perspective (ICT) course and a Perspective Course – see JD Degree Requirements in the Academic Handbook;
    c. Take 10 half courses at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES)
    d. Take one of:
    i. 2 further half courses in CERES, or
    ii. 6 credits in law, or
    iii. a combination of 1 half course in CERES and 3 credits in law
  3. During the second year students take at least 4 half courses at CERES.
  4. Take the CERES research seminar (ERE 2000).
  5. Reading competence must be demonstrated before the beginning of the final year in one of the region’s languages, pertinent to the research undertaken by the student for the major research paper in ERE2000Y.

Students will also be encouraged to spend a summer working in a country of the region as CERES Summer Interns.

Students in years 2 – 4 of the program must submit their course selections to the program co-ordinators from law and CERES for approval.

Students enrolled in joint programs MUST complete the requirements of both programs in order to graduate in a joint program. No diplomas will be awarded until all the requirements for a joint program are fulfilled.

 

Collaborative Graduate SPECIALIZATION in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies

As of the academic year 2003/04, CERES is a member of the Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies. Students in the specialization must apply to and register with CERES and must follow a program of studies acceptable to both CERES and the Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Specialization. Upon successful completion of the requirements, students receive the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies” on their transcripts, in addition to the MA in Russian and East European Studies.

Program requirements:

  • two half-courses in ethnicity from two different disciplines;
  • the half-year coordinating seminar in ethnicity (JTH 3000H: Ethnic Relations Theory, Research, and Policy);
  • it is understood that the MRP required by CERES will be in an area of ethnic studies.
  • For more information please visit https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ethnicstudies/graduate-program/ 

Collaborative SPECIALIZATION in Jewish Studies

The Centre for Jewish Studies offers collaborative graduate degrees at the MA and PhD levels. The purpose of the collaborative degree is to institutionalize, enhance, and ensure the provision of a well-rounded training in Jewish Studies. Both in the MA and PhD collaborative specializations, an effective balance is struck between the need for disciplinary depth and the need for interdisciplinary breadth. Upon successful completion, students receive, in addition to the degree in their home department, the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Jewish Studies.”
For more information please visit http://cjs.utoronto.ca/graduate/graduate-admission

Foreign Language Requirement and Testing

Reading competence in one of the region’s languages must be demonstrated by no later than the beginning of the second year of the program. Students are urged to take the proficiency test immediately on arrival. They should contact the Graduate Coordinators in the following departments to obtain language proficiency test schedules:

  • Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures: Julia Mikhailova julia.mikhailova@utoronto.ca
  • German Department: Professor Markus Stock at markus.stock@utoronto.ca
  • Italian Department: italian.grad@utoronto.ca
  • Spanish and Portuguese Department: Professor Nestor Rodriguez at spanish.graduate@utoronto.ca
  • French Department:
    The Department of French no longer offers the French reading exam. MA students interested in taking French in the French Department should plan ahead and register in the language courses offered and available to all University of Toronto students by following the procedures in place. The decision concerning the level of proficiency students need to attain in order to fulfill their language requirement rests with their home department.
  • All other European/Eurasian languages: Please see the Graduate Coordinator for information on proficiency testing.

Tuition Fees and Registration

Registration

For complete information on registration, please visit the SGS webpage on registration and enrolment.

Tuition Fees

Please consult your application package, the School of Graduate Studies webpage on graduate fees, and the SGS Calendar carefully. While CERES and SGS endeavour to assist students financially, it is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all applicable course fees and incidental fees are paid on time.

EnrolLment

Your program of courses consists of courses offered directly by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (ERE courses) and courses offered through the affiliated Departments.  You will be automatically enrolled in the two required core courses (ERE2001H and ERE2000Y).  You can register yourself in any other ERE courses two weeks before classes begin. Students should consult with the Program and Internship Coordinator, before enrolling in courses.  To make an appointment, please email: larysa.iarovenko@utoronto.ca.

All non-ERE courses, with a few exceptions, are NOT available for registration before September 9, 2019.  To register for a non-ERE course, students must complete the ADD/DROP form and obtain the necessary signatures.  Please note that in some courses spaces have been reserved for CERES MA students. In other courses affiliated Departments normally wait until their own students have enrolled before enrolling ERA students.

NOTE: Students must be aware that although they may have requested, and been admitted to, classes offered in other departments, they will automatically be DROPPED from the course unless the ADD/DROP form has been properly completed, signed, and submitted.

Students may make changes to their course selection until late September. All changes must be approved by the Graduate Program Coordinator.

Course selection should be made in consideration of the student’s chosen major and minor fields. Two kinds of exceptions will be considered upon petition by the student:

  • A student may be permitted to take one course or the equivalent which is in his/her major discipline but not in the European, Russian, or Eurasian area. For example, a course on international relations or economic planning may be permitted. This course will be in addition to the two ‘major’ courses, or the equivalent, which deal with Europe, Russia, or Eurasia. This option may be of particular appeal to students intending to go on to PhD study in the given discipline.
  • Students may be allowed to take one course or the equivalent in the form of an approved undergraduate course at the advanced level, i.e., with a 300 or 400 Faculty of Arts and Sciences number. This option is reserved for students requiring basic preparation in their chosen subject.

It is the student’s responsibility to ensure there are no time conflicts between courses and consult all relevant departments directly before finalizing her/his study program.

Course Descriptions

Students in the Master of Arts program in European and Russian Affairs may, in addition to their required courses (ERE2001H and ERE2000Y), select from a wide array of courses offered through other departments at the University of Toronto.  Please see the section below, Departmental Course Offerings.

Students are advised to consult departmental listings to confirm course offerings. ADD/DROP forms are required for non-ERE courses. *An asterisk indicates courses outside CERES for which places have been reserved for CERES students—these do NOT require the ADD/DROP form, but are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

All course selections must be approved by the Graduate Coordinator or Graduate Program Advisor.

Courses with a “Y” suffix are full-year, full-credit courses, which run from September to April. Half-year and half-credit courses with an “F” suffix are taught in the fall term (September to December), those with an “S” suffix in spring (January to April).

For courses with a dual undergraduate/graduate code, you must enroll using the graduate code.  Failure to do so will result in loss of credit for the course.

FALL SEMESTER COURSES BEGIN THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 9, 2019.

WINTER/SPRING COURSES BEGIN THE WEEK OF JANUARY 6, 2020.

 

Courses offered through CERES

ERE1151H1S   Border Crossings: A Journey into Hungarian and Central European Culture

This course pursues the theme of border crossings on various planes. It investigates the main features and key elements of Hungarian and Central European cultures, with a special emphasis on the connections between various areas of culture, such as literature, film, painting, photography and music, taking into consideration their historical and social context. We will look into the question of nation, nationalities and multi-nationality, comparing their development and characteristic features in Hungary and Central Europe to their manifestation in Canada. Intellectual migration and literary representations of actual border crossings will also be examined. Last but not least we will reflect on the border crossings we all must make, intentionally or unintentionally, in order to understand and interpret works of art.

Tuesday  4 – 6 pm
Location: OISE, Room 4418, 252 Bloor Street
Instructor:
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1162H1S   Topics in the Caucasus NOT OFFERED in 2019-2020 ACADEMIC YEAR

The Caucasus is a fascinating region that is relatively little known in the West, despite its rich history and current geopolitical sensitivity.  The course will examine selected topics in the history and contemporary politics of the Caucasus region.  The topics we will cover break down approximately as follows:  pre-Russian, imperial, and Soviet history; post-Soviet state formation, ethnic conflict, and interstate wars; and domestic politics, development, and social change.  The goal is to give students a basic introduction to the contemporary Caucasus that will enable them to embark on further advanced study, research, or work in the region.  The class will be taught in seminar format and students will be expected to play an active role in presenting and discussing each week’s reading assignment.  While there are no formal prerequisites, some prior training in Soviet history and post-Soviet politics will be helpful.

Wednesday TBA
Location: Room TBD
Instructor: Light
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1165H1(Summer or Fall) International Internship

ERE1186H1F The Past as Prologue: East Central and Southeastern Europe in the Interwar Period

Coming to grips with the multivalent instrumentalization of the “Past” is a major historical problem for the study of the successor states of the Habsburg and Ottoman Empires. The emergence of these states began for some in the nineteenth century, but was completed only with the disruption of the First World War. The turbulent decades that ended with the Second World War present a condensed moment of aspiration that welded nation-building projects to social experimentation, political innovation, economic realignment, and cultural transformations. Unpacking the meaning of this moment of experimentation therefore has resonance not only for the understanding of this period, but also informs long term historical representations of these states and societies into the present.

While this course is not a conventional survey, it will offer thematic explorations of aspects of Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Romania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia and other countries that will situate their development in a broader narrative. These thematic explorations will, in turn, open possibilities for analytical and historiographic analyses that will familiarize students with notions of legacies, empires, theories of nationalism, social transformation, revolution and rupture, continuity and tradition, cultural symbolism. Finally, the course will explore the formative but also entangled relationship of these regions with Europe, and will suggest an augmentation of the standard practice of Area Studies with a subaltern move to “provincialize Europe” from within.

Wednesday 10 am -12 pm
Location: OISE, Room 4418, 252 Bloor Street
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

ERE1195H1S    Topics in Ukraine

Thursday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: Halavach
Instructor:
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1997H1Y Independent Reading Course 

ERE1998H1S  Modern Greece in the Balkans and the European Union

OPEN BY APPLICATION ONLY:

This course is part of CERES’s new initiative in Hellenic Studies and is made possible with support from the Hellenic Heritage Foundation and the wider Greek-Canadian Community. The course will cover: Historical Introduction – Greece in the 20th Century (2 weeks); Greece, Turkey and Cyprus (2 weeks); Greece and Albania; Greece and FYROM/ROM; Greece and the EU (2 weeks); Greece and the United States; Financial Crisis and its aftermath; Greece, Populism and the far Right; Greece, Immigration/Migration. As this is a limited enrollment course, with up to 6 places for graduate students, interested students will need to apply to participate.  This course includes research trip to Athens and takes place in May 2020 (costs for transportation and accommodation as well as most meals will be covered). Priority will be given to students who will carry on to their exchange or internship placement upon completion of the trip. Only one airfare to the region will be covered. Priority will also be given to students who have not taken part in the Hungary field course.

Interested students are asked to submit a one-page research proposal for the field-work component in Greece. You will be writing a research essay based on the topics noted above for the class that will include a field-work component. In the proposal you are expected to identify a research question and provide a key list of a minimum of 5 potential stakeholders in Greece who will be interviewed.  Questions will be designed prior to departure. During the stay in Athens, Greece, students will conduct interviews with their selected stakeholders and attend lectures and seminars. The interviews/seminars will then be integrated into the final research essay for the course. The research essay, which is expected to be 20 pages in length, will be due at the end of May 2019.

Proposal deadline:  9 am– January 6, 2020 to robert.austin@utoronto.ca

Day and time: TBA
Location: TBA
Instructor: Austin
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

ERE1998H1S  Independent Reading Course

ERE1999H(F) Independent Reading Course

ERE2000Y1  (Required course, begins January of the first year) Core Interdisciplinary Research Seminar

Wednesdays 2 – 4 pm
Location:SK (Faculty of Social Work)  Room 348, 246 Bloor Street
Instructor: Austin
Term: starts in the Spring semester, continues into second year
Credit: 1.0

ERE2001H1F  (Required course for first year) Gateway Proseminar in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Mondays 10 am – 12 pm
Location: Claude T. Bissel Building, Rom 113, 140 St. George St
Instructor:  Way
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 

COURSES OFFERED JOINTLY WITH CERES (limited spaces reserved for CERES STUDENts – NO aDD/dROP FORM REQUIRED)

COURSE ENROLLMENT OPEN SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

JRA2321H1S State and Society in Central Asia

More than 25 years after Soviet collapse, Central Asia (and its neighbour Afghanistan) continue to see vexed relations between state and society. In this course, we ask: 1) What impact did Soviet-style modernization have and what are the legacies of that modernization project? 2) How have relations between society and state changed since 1991? 3) How do individuals and groups relate to the state? 4) What role do religion and ethnicity play in political and social life? 5) How do the experiences of these six states (Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) vary? Although this is a political science course, about half of our readings are by anthropologists, historians, sociologists, and others.

Thursday, 10 am-12 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: E. Schatz
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JRA2337H1F Government, Law, and Politics in Russia

Law in the governance of Russia, in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, including constitutional development, courts, business disputes, crime and criminal justice, corruption, cultural obstacles to legal order, and legal transition in comparative perspective. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies)

Wednesday 12 noon-2 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: P. Solomon
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS (Add/drop forms required)

IMPORTANT: ALWAYS CHECK WITH THE OFFERING DEPARTMENT FOR UPDATED TIMES/LOCATIONS/ETC.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

A number of courses offered at the graduate level in Anthropology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings in Anthropology, please view the department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

 


COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

A number of courses offered at the Centre for Comparative Literature may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Centre for Comparative Literature, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

JGC1855H CRITICAL THEORY – THE FRENCH-GERMAN CONNECTION

This course examines central theoretical issues in Critical Theory with particular attention to the role that the “Frankfurt School” and its affiliates such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Horkheimer, Adorno, and others play in the context of modern German social and cultural thought. In France, thinkers like Foucault and Derrida respond to this tradition and enrich it. The course explores in which way the continuing dialogue between these thinkers informs current critical approaches to rethinking issues and concerns such as theorizing modernity, culture, secularization, multiculturalism, difference, and alterity.

Wednesday, 3-5 pm
Location: Seminar Room 319, 3rd floor, Centre for Comparative Literature 
Instructor: W. Goetschel
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

JLV5134H THEORIES OF THE NOVEL

This course examines the development of theories of the novel in Europe and North America throughout the twentieth century. Why has the novel been such a central object of study for so many different theoretical traditions? What is at stake in these theoretical traditions that centre on the novel? Just as novel theorists historicize the novelistic form, we will historicize those theories, interrogating and deconstructing their conflicting assumptions. Organized chronologically and thematically, covering theorists from Russia, France, Central Europe and North America, the course will include topics such as: the historicization of form; novelistic narrative; the search for masterplots and master narratives; time and space; the novel and the self; the place of the novel in theories of world literature; close reading and distant reading. Readings include Shklovsky, Tynianov, Bakhtin, Lukacs, Frye, Barthes, Robert, Girard, Genette, Booth, Brooks, Jameson, Miller, Moretti, Cohn, as well as Balzac, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Flaubert and others.

Friday 11 am -1 pm
Location: Seminar Room 319, 3rd floor, Centre for Comparative Literature 
Instructor: K. Holland
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

COL5047H THE TWO AVANT-GARDES

Peter Burger described the avant-garde in terms of the destruction of bourgeois aestheticism and the attempt to bring art into life for a radical transformation of society. What do Burger and other theoreticians have to say about the survival of the avant-garde impulse after its heroic historical moment in the early 20th century? How did artists and writers then and later pioneer radically new ways of representing the world and engaging the audience? We will consider the historical positions and sustaining contradictions of work dubbed “avant-garde” through landmark developments including Abstraction, Conceptualism, Constructivism and Surrealism. Seminar discussions will engage the work of major figures in the history of the avant-garde, such as Malevich and Maiakovskii, Picasso and Duchamp, Breton, Cage, Pollack and Prigov.
Participants will be encouraged to consider the usefulness of translating analysis associated with the avant-garde to contexts beyond the one defined by Burger.

Thursday, 11 am -1 pm
Location: Seminar Room 319, 3rd floor, Centre for Comparative Literature 
Instructor: A. Komaromi
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JHL1282HS COMPARATIVE TOTALITARIAN CULTURE

The purpose of the course is to historicize and theorize the concept of totalitarian culture by discussing traditional approaches of “totalitarianism” and more recent theories and histories in the context of various cultural manifestations of National-Socialist Germany and Stalinist Russia.
A key theme of the course is the relation between propaganda, entertainment, and mass culture, in the context of how both Germany and Soviet Russia related to the Hollywood type of entertainment.
The primary materials to be considered are American, German, and Soviet films of the 1930s and 1940s.
Additional material includes diaries, memoirs, illustrative material on art and architecture, and scholarly works.
The viewing and discussion of these films are integral parts of course requirements. Some of the films are available online; others will have to be watched at Media Commons.

Tuesday, 1-3 pm
Location: Seminar Room 319, 3rd floor, Centre for Comparative Literature 
Instructor: T.Lahusen
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIOLEGAL STUDIES

A number of courses offered at the graduate level by the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

CRI3220HF  Organized Crime and Corruption

The course will examine selected topics in organized crime (OC) and corruption, including the definition of OC and corruption; related phenomena, including white collar crime, the informal economy, and transnational organized crime; the origins and development of “mafias”; characteristics of OC organizational structure and violence; political and police corruption; and policies to combat corruption and OC.

Thursday   2 – 4 pm
Location: CG265
Instructor: M. Light
Term: Winter
Credit: 0.5

CRI3130HS  Policing

Police will be examined as one of the state institutions providing normative regulation and social order in connection with other institutions like politics, economy, and culture. The course will include three main parts: i) Police: origin, structure and functioning, ii) Police in changing social environment and iii) Police: continuous change and innovation. Students will receive knowledge on the origin and short history of the police, its structure and operation as well as about major challenges, organized crime, and terrorism. Last developments such as community, private and problem-oriented policing, a problem of reforming also will be examining. Additionally to Canadian police during this course police of some other well-established, developing and transition countries will be studied with the focus on comparative policing.

Monday   2 – 4 pm
Location: CG265
Instructor: L. Kosals
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

A number of courses offered at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

GER1771H F Remaking the Movies
Frequently rejected out of hand by scholars, the remake has been a quintessentially ‘bad object’ of film criticism. Yet the remake is as old as the cinematic medium itself. In many ways film is ‘repetition’ – the recycling of other films and literature. Films are forms of repetition in series, different cuts or versions (as the result of censorship, synchronization, restoration, etc). In fact the very first film by the Lumière brothers, La sortie de l’usine Lumière à Lyon’ (1895), exists simultaneously in three variations. And films are structured by repetitions in the form of intertextual associations, processes of cultural flow and exchange, visual and aural quotes, homages, etc. The course will explore the remake phenomenon in its historical, industrial, transnational and theoretical dimensions with a focus on films that intersect with German contexts – from remakes of Weimar classics, to Hollywood reprises of German films, to self-conscious meditations on the nature of the remake itself.

Tuesday 2 – 6 pm
Location: OH323
Instructor: Soldovieri
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GER1661H F Modernism in Context
This course will examine the major writers of German and Austro-Hungarian modernism in the context of their age. We will pay particular attention to literary modernism’s relation—sometimes contentious, sometimes symbiotic—to philosophy and psychoanalysis (Marx, Nietzsche, Freud). Authors discussed could include Gerhart Hauptmann, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Robert Musil, Bertolt Brecht, Arthur Schnitzler, Hermann Hesse, etc.

Wednesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: OH323
Instructor: Zilcosky
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GER1880H S Gottfried Keller: Poetic Realism in a Minor Key
This course addresses a glaring absence in the Department’s course offering of a dedicated 19th century literature course and one of the central aspects of German 19th century literary programs, poetic realism. The course examines the particular styles and forms of poetic realism in Gottfried Keller’s writing. Keller is one of the most subtle authors of poetic realism. Questions to be examined will be Keller’s literary politics to voice difference, dissent, and critique. Targets of Keller’s critical engagement are the emerging Zurich bourgeoisie, colonial fantasies and the problematic way the traces of colonialism shape Swiss society, but also literary canons and canonicity amid the marginalization of German language texts by Swiss writers in the face of German nationalism.

Monday  3 – 5 pm
Location: OH323
Instructor: Goetschel
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GER1780H S Topics in German Visual Culture: Affect and Material Culture in German and European Cinemas

This seminar engages the ‘affective turn’ in film/media and cultural studies–a movement devoting renewed attention to the role of material conditions, including the visceral, lived experience of the body and the intensities that traverse it, as well as the continuum of the object-world we inhabit. While affect –as distinguished from emotion or feeling—has been theorized as a pre-personal and pre-linguistic phenomenon, this has not inhibited scholars and students alike from striving to put into words what exactly transpires before and between cognition and speech. Indeed, since affects are said to circulate publicly, or even transmit contagiously, they may also serve as a portal to further understanding how cultural production refracts and enacts historical and emergent social and political configurations at the scale of both the individual and of collective bodies such as that of the nation. This course uses contemporary German and European cinema as a point of departure for such an investigation. Our weekly readings, our class discussions, and our writing will facilitate a collective striving to think, write and implement the concept of affect, using the curated screenings as a vehicle for both discerning its palpable implications in textual narrative and, at times, perhaps also analyzing own responses to the same.

Wednesday 4 – 8 pm
Location: IN223
Instructor: Fenner
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JGC1855H S  Critical Theory in Context: The French-German Connection
This course examines central theoretical issues in contemporary thought with particular attention to the role that the “Frankfurt School” and its affiliates such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas and others play in the context of modern German social and cultural thought. In France, thinkers like Levinas, Foucault, and Derrida respond to this tradition and enrich it. The course explores in which way the continuing dialogue between these thinkers informs current critical approaches to rethinking issues and concerns such as theorizing modernity, culture, secularization, multiculturalism, and the vital role of cultural difference.

Wednesday  2- 4 pm
Location: Seminar Room 319, 3rd floor, Centre for Comparative Literature 
Instructor: Goetschel
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GER6000H F Reading German for Graduate Students
In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

Wednesday 2-4 pm
Location: TF102
Instructor: Boran
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GER6000H S Reading German for Graduate Students
In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

Wednesday  2-4 pm
Location: TF2
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses:

A select number of MGA elective courses have a certain number of spaces open to non-departmental students if the course is not full. The enrollment period for these spaces will run from September 17-21, 2018. No enrollment will be considered before the 17th or after the 21st. Enrollment is not guaranteed and is at the discretion of the MGA program and the course instructor. Priority for enrolment will be given to Year Two CERES students doing the Global Affairs option. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office from September 17th to 21st. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful.

The SGS ADD/DROP course form must be completed and submitted to the MGA program office. Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions: mga@utoronto.ca

 

GLA2014H F Innovation and Economic Development

This course focuses on economic development globally, regionally, and locally, and attends to regional competitiveness within a global economy. In so doing, the course focuses global affairs students to the importance of economic development policy, the role of national and regional innovation systems, and the work of economic development agencies. Topics to be covered will include the role of global cities, industrial districts, universities, high technology, and the creative class.

Wednesday 2 –  4 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GLA2093H F Topics in Global Affairs IV: Government Relations

As Government continues to play a key role in the global economy, firms need to engage public officials and ensure that their business interests are taken into account by policymakers. This course examines the practice of government relations in Canada and in other jurisdictions such as the US, the EU and China. Through case studies in international trade, taxation and regulatory affairs, students will learn about the process of lobbying and strategically communicating with governments. Students will also draft advocacy plans and develop the ability to make clear and robust policy recommendations to C-suite executives and members of the board of directors. An interest in politics, public policy and an aptitude for cross-cultural fluency will be helpful for this class.

Tuesday 7 – 9 pm
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Rm B019
Instructor: Dupont
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

 

GLA2092H F Topics in Global Affairs III: The Populist Radical Right in Europe

A comparative examination of the emergence and upsurge of populist radical right parties in contemporary Europe. The course will begin with historical context, definitions and typologies, before exploring topics including ideology and issues; leaders, members and voters; political parties, organizations and subcultures; transnational influences and networking; patterns of response by mainstream parties and radical right parties in public office. This course will analyze several country cases in detail, including France, Austria, the Netherlands, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, Finland and Estonia. A basic knowledge of recent European history and comparative politics is required.

*Please note this course has 15 spots for MGA students and 15 spots for CERES students.

Tuesday 10 am -12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: Kasekamp
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

GLA2090H S Topics in Global Affairs I: Global Journalism

Journalism is an increasingly vital, but underused skill in a wide range of global professions. Development professionals need to train journalists to support emerging civil society. Leaders of global businesses, NGOs and government agencies are increasingly creating proprietary news organizations to raise the profile of issues central to their work. Advocates use the tools of journalism to advance their causes. And, of course, specialists of any type need journalism skills to tell untold stories in their disciplines. Many global professionals will deploy a combination of these skills in their careers. This course will help second year MGAs gain a professional edge by introducing them to journalism tools they can integrate into their careers. Students will learn frameworks for training media in emerging civil society, and for developing proprietary news organizations in business and agency settings. They will also learn essential skills for their own journalism and advocacy. The course will be highly practical and geared towards students’ own career goals.

Robert Steiner is Director of the Fellowships in Global Journalism at the Munk School. He is a former foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, where he won two Overseas Press Club awards and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has also held senior executive positions in media, communications strategy and Canadian federal politics. Steiner received his MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

Thursday 10 am -12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: Steiner
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

GLA2096H S Global Migration Governance: State Sovereignty, Geopolitics, and Migrant Rights

This course takes an in-depth look at the quest for global migration governance: an issue area that has eschewed attempts to build international regimes and is often characterized by zero-sum state policies and reactive migration controls. Our seminar will ask when and how states with often competing and conflicting interests can cooperate over international migration, unpack the connections between domestic politics and interstate behavior, and ask how the seemingly inherent tensions between state interests and the need for global migration governance affect normative commitments to the rights of migrants, and vice versa. Substantively, we will examine the politics of the international refugee regime, regional migration regimes, human smuggling and trafficking, externalized and securitized migration controls, the negotiation of the Global Refugee and Migration Compacts as a means of addressing the global refugee crisis, and the nexuses between migration and development, security, and terrorism. The course will include guest lectures from policymakers and service-providers. Students should be prepared to lead discussions, produce a substantive research project with policy recommendations, and deliver their recommendations in a final presentation.

Wednesday  10 am -12 noon
Location: Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor St. West, Transit House
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

 


HISTORY

A number of courses offered at the Department of History may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of History, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

HIS1032H1S Modernity and Its Visual Cultures

This seminar examines the concept of “modernity” and its expression in visual form and cultural practice. We will focus on developments in visual culture beginning in the second half of the nineteenth century in order to explore a range of transformations in subjective and social experience and economic and cultural practice that scholars from across the humanities and social sciences have described within the rubric of modernity and modernism. By studying both the primary theoretical texts underpinning this concept – including Baudelaire, Marx, Freud, and Benjamin – and key secondary literature, we will attempt to define modernity and capture the nuances of its many competing definitions. We will ground this pursuit in the history of Western visual culture. Key topics will include: technological change (from photography and film to color and printing); the centrality of urban space; theories of vision; ideas about temporality, history, and the archive; emergent practices of collecting and display; travel and colonialism; and consumerism and the mass press. In what ways, we will ask, have changes in visual culture been central to the concept, experience, and origins of modernity? And how does focusing on the visual aspects of modernity help us better understand its broader social, political, economic, scientific, and technological developments?

Tuesday 6 – 8 pm
Location: TBD
Instructor: Jacobson
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

HIS1268H1F The Holocaust: History and Historiography

This course introduces graduate students to major issues in the study of the Holocaust and World War II. The focus is on connections between these interrelated events. Readings include classic as well as recent works from a range of disciplines and methodological approaches. Special attention will be paid to different national, political, and historiographical contexts in which the Holocaust and the war have been examined by scholars, beginning in the 1940s and up to the present. We will also investigate the postwar confrontation with the Third Reich, comparing social, cultural and judicial responses to Nazism in West and East Germany. This course will therefore provide an overview of Nazi Germany between 1933-45, an in-depth examination of the genesis of the Holocaust, and reflections on Nazism’s lingering presence in the two Germanys. Readings will include, among others, works by Hannah Arendt, Saul Friedlander, Gerhard Weinberg, Istvan Deac, Jan Gross, Omer Bartov, Christopher Browning, Zygmunt Bauman, Mark Roseman and Goetz Aly.  Oral presentations and the long paper (which may be either a study based on research in primary sources or an historiographical survey) will give students an opportunity to explore areas of particular interest to them.

Thursday 1 – 3 pm
Location: TBD
Instructor: Bergen
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1275H1S Imperial Germany 1871-1918

This research seminar will focus on recent controversies concerning social, cultural, and political change in the time of Bismarck and Wilhelm II. Among the topics to be considered are state- and nation-building after 1866, regional identities, antisemitism, gender and sexuality, religion, radical nationalism, popular culture, workers’ protest, electoral chicanery, murder in a small town, and everyday life on the home front in 1914-18. A combination of secondary literature and primary documents (all in translation and many online) will be discussed each week, beginning with a short student presentation. In the second term, students will concentrate on their research papers. Among the required texts will be James Retallack (ed.), Imperial Germany 1871-1918. The Short Oxford History of Germany (2008).  The course will conclude with a viewing of the 1951 East German film adapted from Heinrich Mann’s biting satire, The Loyal Subject (1918).

Wednesday 11 am – 1 pm
Location:TBD
Instructor: Retallack
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

HIS1278H1S The Two Germanies and the Cold War, 1949-1990

This course is designed to further the preparation of students for examination fields in twentieth-century German and European history. We will read major (new) works on the century’s central period and events — the two world wars, the Holocaust, the rise of fascism, the Cold War and the reconstruction of Europe, colonialism and decolonisation — as well as exploring the larger processes of transformation that span the century as a whole. These include the development of the modern social welfare state and the growth of a mass consumer society, the legacies of war and violence, ethnic nationalism and its discontents, and the strength and weaknesses of democratic political culture (with an emphasis on histories of gender and sexuality). Particular attention will be paid to Germany within Europe. We will also examine works which attempt to connect the two halves of the century – the histories of war and violence with those emphasizing democracy and reconstruction. These works seek to establish an overarching paradigm for the twentieth century, whether it be territoriality and the rise and fall of the nation state or the creation and destruction of political community.

Monday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: TBA
Instructor: Jenkins
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

HIS1279H F World War II in Eastern and East Central Europe 

World War II was much more destructive and traumatic in East Central Europe than in Western Europe. The difference was caused by many reasons, among which the Nazi and Soviet plans and policies were the most important. Yet, there were also numerous East Central European phenomena that contributed to the cruelty of World War II in the East. This seminar will explore the external and internal factors that defined the war in the discussed region. Students will analyze the military, political, economic, and cultural activities of Germany, the Soviet Union, and their allies and enemies. Following sessions will concentrate on the fall of the Versailles systems, diplomatic and military activities throughout the war, on occupational policies of the invaders, economic exploration of the invaded, on collaboration, accommodation, resistance, genocide, the “liberation” and sovietization of East Central Europe after 1944. All the secondary and primary sources used in class are English.

Thursday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: BL 312
Instructor: Wrobel
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1289H F  The Cold War through its Archives

The course reviews the history of the Cold War in light of formerly-secret archival documents.  Examples include the US White House Tapes and Venona decrypts; massive declassification of records in the ex-Soviet bloc; and parallel developments in China, Cuba, and other Communist states.  Archival discoveries have cast new light, not just on individual episodes (e.g., Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979) but on the origins, strategies, and driving forces of this 45-year conflict.  The focus will be mainly on the superpowers and their alliance systems.

Monday 10 am – 12 noon
Location: UC 44
Instructor: Sayle
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1296H F Stalinism

A historiographical survey of the political, cultural and social history of the Soviet Union during Stalin’s years in power. Major emphasis of the course is on historiography, interpretation, and an introduction to sources. Key topics covered include collectivization, the Great Terror, the gulag, WWII, the Holocaust and postwar Stalinism. This course serves as basic preparation for a minor field in Twentieth-Century Russian history.

Tuesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: UC B203
Instructor: Viola
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1301H F: History of Food and Drink

The field of food studies has emerged in the past few decades as a rich source of interdisciplinary research that also speaks to a broad audience beyond the academy. This class will introduce students to a wide range of approaches to the field from history and allied disciplines. Readings will cover all chronological periods from prehistory to the present and geographical areas from around the world. Because many scholars also teach classes on food, even if they research in other fields, we will also discuss teaching methods. Writing assignments will include weekly reviews and a historiographical term paper. Students should consider this class an opportunity to practice the art of writing clear, compelling prose, even if they adopt different styles in other venues. A part of each seminar will be devoted to “workshopping” student essays and practicing editing skills.

Wednesday 12 noon – 2 pm
Location: SS 2114
Instructor: Pilcher
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

HIS1435H S: Victorian Culture

Consideration of some of the major themes in Victorian social and cultural history, with emphasis on the most recent secondary literature. Among the topics considered are popular culture, gender and social class.

Tuesday 4 – 6 pm
Location: SS 2114
Instructor: Loeb
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


 POLITICAL SCIENCE

A number of courses offered at the Department of Political Science may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Political Science, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

POL2207H1S Topics in International Politics III: Global Politics of State Formation

This intensive seminar will examine the history of state formation through the prism of international forces like imperialism, globalization, and hegemonic war.

Thursday 12 – 2 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Gunitsky
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2207H1S Topics in International Politics III: Theories of International Organization

Since the end of World War II, there has been an explosion in the number, scope, and complexity of international organizations. International organizations, such as the United Nations, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and World Bank now play critical roles across a wide range of policy issues. Why have international organizations proliferated and expanded since the mid-20th century? How do these organizations shape the international system? Why do states sometimes conduct foreign policy through international organizations, while other times preferring traditional means? Why do some international organizations evolve over time, while others resist change? What are some of the pathologies and problems of contemporary international organizations? We will examine these questions by reviewing advanced theoretical and empirical scholarship on international organizations.

Tuesday 10 am -2 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2212H1F Human Rights and International Relations

The major theme for the course is the relationship between international developments in human rights and domestic applications of those developments. We will examine the evolution of the international human rights regime, mostly from the post-World War II era, and understand how the radical steps forward in international law affect domestic lawmakers and leaders. We will also look at how domestic efforts shift the international debate, and how non-state actors engage in building the lingua franca of the 21st century.

Wednesday  12-2 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Wong
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2216Y1Y The Military Instrument of Foreign Policy

This course analyses the relationship of military force to politics: nuclear war and deterrence, conventional war, revolutionary war, terrorism and counter insurgency are examined from the perspectives of the US, Russia and other contemporary military powers.

Monday 10 am – 12 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Braun
Term: Fall/Winter
Credit: 1.0

POL2226H1F Ethics and International Relations

The seminar explores the possibilities for and requirements of ethical action in international affairs. It is common to study international relations in terms of interests and power, but in actual practice, important actors invoke normative language all the time in their international interactions. This has not gone unnoticed, with investigations of ethics in the international arena multiplying in recent years. Drawing on readings from normative international relations theory and political philosophy, the course takes up ethical dilemmas encountered in world affairs in the context of debates about human rights, intervention, development, and international institutions. Students are expected to write a major research paper on an approved topic related to the course.

Thursday 12 – 2 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Bertoldi
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2240H1S Geopolitics of Cyberspace

The Geopolitics of ICTs course is an intensive examination of the ways in which states and non-state actors are contesting the newly evolving terrain of global digital-electronic-telecommunications. Topics covered include Internet censorship and surveillance, information warfare, computer network attacks, cyber espionage and disinformation. The course is organized as a series of intensive modules around the research of the Citizen Lab (https://citizenlab.ca/) which the professor directs.

Tuesday 2 – 4 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Deibert
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2256Y1Y The G8, G20 and Global Governance

The development, operation, and participants of the Group of Seven (G7), Group of Eight (G8) and Group of Twenty (G20) of institutions, their growth and performance as centres of global governance, and their relationship with the United Nations and Bretton Woods galaxy in providing public goods in economic, social, environmental and security realms.

Thursday 10 am -12 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Kirton
Term: Fall/Spring
Credit: 1.0

POL2301H1S     Political Parties in Comparative Perspective

This course provides an overview of the literature on political parties from a comparative perspective. Our goal is to explore the main questions, puzzles and theories on the origins, nature and effects of parties and party systems. Why do parties arise? How do institutions, societal cleavages and strategic action shape parties and party systems? Why do some countries have more parties than others? What explains differences in ideology and party organization? We will also study the impact of parties on policy, and the role of parties in transitions to democracy and in non-democratic regimes. Finally, we take a look at specific issues of party change, party system collapse, party competition, and party institutionalization in developed and developing democracies including the role of ethnic parties, the relationship between parties and clientelism, and the role of dominant parties.

Thursday 2 – 4 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: de Miguel Moyer
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2321H1S     Topics in Comparative Politics I: Political Economy of Europe

This course surveys major theoretical and empirical contributions on the political economy of Western Europe. The course explores the political sources of how and why European societies have adopted different economic institutions and policies in the global economy. We analyze theories of the welfare state, growth models and capitalist diversity, business-labor relations, and financial markets. The course then examines the deeper processes of European integration that have shaped European economies, with a particular focus on monetary integration. Finally, we discuss contemporary issues that define economies in Western Europe today — the eurozone crisis, Brexit, and populism.

Wednesday  4- 6 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Reisenbichler
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

POL2326H1F     Democracy and Dictatorship    

This course provides an in-depth introduction to theories of the origins of democracy and dictatorship. We examine a range of structural and voluntarist approaches. In the final weeks of the course, we explore the extent to which these theories help us to understand regime transitions in China, Chile, Iran, and Weimar, Germany.

Monday 2 – 4 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Way
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2335H1S Business and Politics: Power in a Global World

This seminar course explores the political power of business from an international and comparative perspective. We examine the ways that business acquires and exerts political power and the ways politics shapes business power. We draw from international and comparative political economy, global governance studies, and related disciplines such as management and sociology. Topics of discussion include the role of public authority in governing business behaviour, the formation of business interests, business’ instrumental, structural and discursive power, civil society activism toward business, corporate social responsibility, transnational private governance and economic crises.

Tuesday 12 – 2 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Renckens
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

JHP2351Y1Y  The People from Nowhere

This course traces from earliest times to the present the evolution of a people called Carpatho-Rusyns and their historic homeland Carpathian Rus’, located in the heart of Europe. The seminar will deal with political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments, all the while testing the hypothesis that nationalities are imagined communities. (Given by the Departments of Political Science and History) Third-year students may be considered at the discretion of the instructor.

Wednesday 3 – 5 pm
Location:  TBA
Instructor: Magosci
Term: Fall /Spring
Credit: 1.0

POL2391H1F     Topics in Comparative Politics III: Politics and Policy in the Nordic Region

This course on the Nordic region (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark and Iceland, and other Nordic territories) looks in detail at some of the political institutions and policies presented in POL300H1F Topics in Comparative Politics (Introduction to the Politics and Society of Northern Europe). We will review first the main political parties, trade unions and social movements in the Nordic countries, including the recent surge of populism. Then we will look at the politics of the welfare state, labour markets and income equality. The last part of the course will be devoted to migration and integration aspects, foreign policy and relations with the European Union, and other important challenges to the sustainability of the Nordic political model.

Thursday 6 – 8 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Bertran
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

POL2391H1S     Topics in Comparative Politics III: Culture and Society of the Nordic Region

This course examines the relationship between what the public wants and what policies get enacted in contemporary European democracies. We will explore the roles of political parties, interest groups, local and regional governments, and the European Union. When asking how policy responds to the public, we will also ask which parts of the public are most influential. Do the wealthy have more influence than the poor? Do the opinions of ethnic majorities have a greater impact than those of minorities? How do different institutional setups shape these relationships?

Thursday 6 – 8 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

 


SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

A number of courses offered at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

SLA 1215H – STUDIES IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND CRITICISM IN THE 18TH CENTURY

This course studies the prose, poetry and dramaturgy of the most prominent Russian literary figures of the eighteenth century: such as N. Karamzin, V. Tretiakovsky, M. Lomonsov, D. Fonvizin, G. Derzhavin, A. Radishchev and I. Krylov.  Aspects of literature during the reign of Peter the First, as well as of literature and satirical journalism during the reign of Catherine the Second and of the era of Russian classicism and sentimentalism, will be examined.
This course is taught in Russian. Readings in Russian.

Tuesday, 2-5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Smolyarova
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

SLA 1231H – RUSSIAN MODERNISM

Russian poetry, prose, and literary criticism from the late 1880s until 1940. Topics include: Russia’s fin-de-siècle culture in its European context; the main aesthetic and philosophical trends informing the modernist field and the current theoretical problems in the study of the modernist period; the modernist renewal of Russian poetry, including a survey of the period’s representative figures and texts; experiments with narrative and genre in the prose of the 1910s-30s, in Russia and in emigration; conservative reactions to modernism, from L. Tolstoi to Socialist Realism; the modernist strategies of survival (metanarratives, children’s literature, internal and external exile, literature of the absurd). Readings may include: Chekhov, Solov’ev, Bunin, Z. Gippius, Sologub, Rozanov, Annenskii, Blok, Belyi, Kuzmin, Babel’, Esenin, Zamiatin, Pasternak, Mandel’shtam, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Tsvetaeva, Kharms, A. Tolstoi, Nabokov, Bulgakov, Khodasevich. Taught in Russian. Readings in Russian and English.

Monday 2-4 pm, Wednesday 12-2 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Livak
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

SLA1304H Transgressions: Drama, Theater, Performance

What has happened to the relationship between performance and religion? Has the Enlightenment project successfully secularized Western civilization and our thinking about a human subject in light of its most important horizon – the finitude of existence? Or can we still decipher religious thinking in the works of theatre artists whose practice, like that of the leading Western philosophers, such as Walter Benjamin, Emmanuel Lévinas, and Jacque Derrida, still bear traces of theological underpinnings when dealing with this finitude? These questions, among others, lead our investigation into transgressive cryptotheologies at the crossroads of performance, philosophy and religion in the Western theatre of the 20 th and 21 st centuries.

Thursday, 2-4 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Trojanowska
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

TBA Russian Literature in the Age of Empire

Thursday, 2-5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Koznarsky
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA1207H – THE IMAGINARY JEW

This course examines the genesis and evolution of the image of “the jews,” central to all European cultures, from the theology and psychology of Christian anti-Judaism to their reflection in European arts and folklore, and to the survival of the “jewish” vocabulary of difference in secular forms in post-Christian cultures. Special attention is given to “the jews” of East European imagination and in Russian literature.

Monday, 1-4 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Livak
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA 1228H – THEMES IN RUSSIAN REALISM

What is distinctive about Russian realism? The course will examine nineteenth century Russian realist fiction in relation to various theoretical approaches from Erich Auerbach to Roman Jakobson, and will read contemporary works of criticism or thought from Russia and Europe that may have influenced it. Readings will be in English, although students who know Russian or other relevant languages may do their reading in these.

Wednesday, 2-5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Orwin
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

SLA1411H Synthesis of Arts in the Late Russian Empire-Early Soviet Union

Painting, literature, and film from 1890-1930s. New revolutionary paths for the advancement of man and society through art. Symbolism, neoprimitivism, futurism, suprematism, and constructivism. Chekhov, Kandinsky, Bely, Stravinsky, Goncharova, Malevich, Tatlin, Eisenstein, and many others.

Tuesday, 2-5 pm
Location: TBA
Instructor: Koznarsky
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5


SOCIOLOGY

A number of courses offered at the Department of Sociology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Sociology, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

 

ENROLLING IN COurses in other DEPARTMENTS

Students interested in enrolling in courses offered by other departments cannot (unless the registration system allows them) enroll themselves but must seek permission of the instructor or graduate secretary of the department first and then complete an “Add/Drop” form indicating the course name and session, and the course meeting section. It must be signed in the following order by:

  • the student
  • the CERES graduate coordinator
  • the professor teaching the course
  • the graduate coordinator of the department which offers the course

The Add/Drop Forms can be found on http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/inform/stuforms.htm. Completed Add/Drop forms should be submitted to the CERES Graduate Coordinator.

Please note that some seminars, especially in History, are heavily enrolled. It is important that you contact the professor (via sponsoring department) in the course before or at the very beginning of the registration period and express your interest in taking her/his course. It is not possible for participating departments to guarantee places in their seminars for CERES students who enroll late in the registration period.

 

Financial Support

Students must familiarize themselves with the kinds of financial aid available and policies governing these awards. The Centre’s staff will recommend sources of financial support, but it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that applications are completed to meet the requirements and deadlines set by the granting organizations.

Funding Available through CERES

All students applying for admission to the MA program at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies are automatically considered for financial aid, PROVIDED THEIR APPLICATIONS ARE RECEIVED BY JANUARY 31.  Scholarship funding is provided on the basis of academic ranking by the Centre’s funding committee.  Students offered funding for their first year must maintain their academic standing to receive their second-year funding.

For special funds to handle unanticipated expenses students should apply to the bursary program of the School of Graduate Studies through the Centre’s office.

OGS and SSHRC APPLICATIONS

Students who meet the eligibility criteria are required to submit applications for funding from OGS and SSHRC. Eligibility notification will be given by mid-September. Deadlines usually fall early in the Fall semester. The Centre reserves the right to revise funding schedules based on the success of these applications.

Scholarship Opportunities Available to Non-CERES Students

Both CERES and non-CERES graduate students may be eligible to apply for funding from the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, to support study related to Germany.  Please visit the JIGES web page (http://projects.chass.utoronto.ca/jiges/funding.html) for further information about these funding competitions. Other scholarship opportunities may become available from time to time. Check back on the web site for new information.

Laszlo T. Duska Memorial Fellowship

Awarded by the Council of the Faculty of Arts and Science to academically excellent graduate students who have taken at least one course related to Hungarian studies. Eligible students will be drawn from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures or other graduate units where research is focussed on Hungarian studies. Application not required. Value: annual income.

Connaught Scholarships

When you apply for admission to a graduate program for full-time studies at the University of Toronto by February 1, you are automatically considered for a Connaught Scholarship, valued at $12,000 plus academic fees.

There is no citizenship requirement for the Connaught Scholarship. All awards are allocated on the basis of academic excellence. Nominations are made by the department to the School of Graduate Studies and formal notification of awards is sent to successful applicants starting on or about April 1. No special fellowship application is required for this award. However, your application for admission should be complete with all supporting documentation (academic records, letters of reference, etc.). Students who apply for admission after February 1 may still be considered for this award provided funds are available at the time of admission.

The following scholarships are part of the Ontario Student Opportunity Trust Fund (OSOTF) Award

Ivan Bodnarchuk Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

The Chair of the Ukrainian Studies Foundation has established a fund, the income of which provides an annual award to a graduate student enrolled in a program of courses in Ukrainian studies. The recipient must demonstrate financial need and academic merit. Apply to the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Awards Selection Committee by April 15 for the upcoming fall/winter session and by October 15 for the upcoming spring/summer session.

Robert Franklin Clark Graduate Fellowship in Ukrainian Language and Literature

The Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies has endowed funds for a fellowship for award to one or more students who are pursuing studies in the field of Ukrainian language and literature. Value: annual income.

Dmytro and Natalia Haluszka Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

The Chair of the Ukrainian Studies Foundation has established a fund, the income of which provides an annual award to a graduate student enrolled in a program of courses in Ukrainian studies. The recipient must demonstrate financial need and academic merit. Apply to the Faculty of Arts and Science Student Awards Selection Committee by April 15 for the upcoming fall/winter session and by October 15 for the upcoming spring/summer session.

Hungarian Helicon Foundation (Ontario) Graduate Award

Awarded to a graduate student pursuing advanced studies in any aspect of Hungarian studies. Recipient is selected on the basis of academic excellence and financial need. Application consists of a nomination from the student’s graduate unit, a letter of recommendation, transcripts, a research proposal from the applicant, and an OSOTF financial needs assessment form. Deadline: end of April. Value: annual income.

Dr. Roman Turko and Yaroslawa Turko Scholarship in Ukrainian Studies

Funds from the estate of Yaroslawa Turko have been used to establish a fellowship for award to undergraduate or graduate students studying courses related to the Ukraine. The award is based on financial need; however, academic merit will also be considered. Value: annual income.

Endowments at CERES

Our generous of donors have endowed a number of fellowships and awards to provide sources of financial support in addition to University-awarded scholarships.  The endowment fellowships are available only to CERES MA students.

Marija Aukstaite Graduate Student Award

Established by A. Franks Hylands. It is awarded to graduate students whose projects relate to Lithuania in whole or in part.

George Babits Fellowship in Hungarian Studies

Established by Mr. George A. Babits and matched by GSEF. It is awarded to a graduate student(s) in the Hungarian Studies Program in the Department of Slavic Language and Literature, and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES), on the basis of academic merit.

Karel and Ellen Buzek Fellowship

Established by the Karel Buzek Czech Cultural Organization and matched by OSOTF and EAF. It is awarded to graduate students studying at CERES on the basis of financial need, where academic merit will also be considered. OSOTF

Rudolf and Rosalie Cermak Graduate Fellowship

Established by Josef Cermak and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES, who are pursuing advanced study of the Czech Republic. Awards will be made on the basis of financial need and academic merit.

Daniel and Elizabeth Damov Graduate Fellowship

Established by Daniel and Elizabeth Damov and matched by EAF, It is awarded to a graduate student(s) affiliated with CERES, with a preference given to students studying Bulgaria and the Balkan region.

Ilona Diener Fund

Established by the Diener Family
It is awarded to a graduate students participating in the University of Toronto Central European University Graduate Student Exchange Program.

Veneta and James Elieff Fellowship

Established by Mrs. Veneta Elieff
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES studying for/or conducting research on Bulgaria, on the basis of academic merit.

Veneta Elieff and Danny Filipovic Fellowships in Balkan Studies

Established by Danny Filipovic
It is awarded to CERES MA students pursuing an internship, exchange, or research activities in the Balkans.

Rudolf and Viera Frastacky Graduate Fellowship

Established by the family and friends of Rudolf and Viera Frastacky and matched by OSOTF and EAF. It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES. Awards will be made on the basis of financial need, where academic merit will also be considered.

Hungarian Chamber of Commerce Graduate Exchange Fund

Established through the generous donations by Various Donors. It is awarded to graduate students participating in an exchange program between the University of Toronto and Central European University, on the basis of academic merit.

Husky Energy Graduate Student Award in Hungarian Studies

Established by Husky Energy Inc. and matched by GSEF
It is awarded to a graduate student(s) in the Hungarian Studies Program in the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES), on the basis of academic merit.

Petro Jacyk Graduate Scholarships in Ukrainian Studies

Established by Petro Jacyk. It is awarded to graduate students studying Ukrainian Studies at CERES.

Karel Kukula and Family Graduate Award

Established by Mrs. Vlasta Scheybal and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to a graduate student, Master’s or PhD, undertaking research on Czech history, society and culture. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Irma and John Papesh Graduate Award

Established by Mrs. Irma Papesh
It is awarded to graduate students whose research focus includes Slavic studies, with a preference for Czech and Slovak studies. Academic merit and financial need will be considered. OSOTF

H. Gordon Skilling Fund

Established through the generous donations of Various Donors and the Mellon Foundation and matched by OSOTF and EAF
It is awarded to graduate students affiliated with CERES, who are pursuing advanced study of a country of the region covered by the Centre’s mandate. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Jan and Georgina Steinsky Sehnoutka Graduate Award in Czech Studies

Established by Jan and Georgina Steinsky and matched by OSOTF
It is awarded to a graduate student whose research focuses on the Czech Republic, where financial need will be considered.

George and Helen Vari Fund

Established by the George and Helen Vari Foundation
It is awarded to graduate students participating in the University of Toronto Central European University Graduate Student Exchange Program.

Graduate Awards Office of the School of Graduate Studies/Government Funding

Financial support is available to highly qualified graduate students from a variety of sources at the University of Toronto and through federal and provincial government programs, although support cannot be guaranteed to all graduate students who apply. Advice may be obtained from the Fellowships & Loans Officer, School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto, tel: (416) 978-2379, fax: (416) 978-2864, email: graduate.awards@utoronto.ca.

Please visit the website of the SGS Awards Office at http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money.htm.

Awards

Ontario Graduate Scholarships
Financial support is available from the provincial government through Ontario Graduate Scholarships, valued at $15,000. Deadline for submission of application to CERES is October 17. Sixty of these awards are available to visa students. Students entering the first or second year of graduate studies must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from Jana Oldfield (room 125N) and may also be downloaded from the OGS website:
http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/provincial.htm
Toll free number: 1-807-343-7247.

SSHRC Master’s Scholarships
Financial support is available from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council through Master’s Scholarships, valued at $17,500. Deadline for submission of application to CERES is November 14. You must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada. Students entering the first or second year of graduate studies must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from the SSHRC website: http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/federal/sshrc.htm.

SSHRC Doctoral Scholarships
If you are in the second year of the CERES MA program and are considering pursuing a PhD at a Canadian university, you may apply for an SSHRC Doctoral Scholarship valued at $19,000 through CERES. Deadline is October 17. You must be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada. Students must have an average of at least A- (or the equivalent) on the last 20 one-term/semester courses or the last two full years of study. Application forms are available from the SSHRC website: http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/informationfor/students/money/support/federal/sshrc.htm.

International Scholarships: Government of Canada
“Canada is committed to participation in international study and research partnerships that build understanding among peoples, develop global citizens and leaders, and contribute to the development of nations.” Please visit http://www.scholarships-bourses.gc.ca/scholarships-bourses/index.aspx/gca/nc_GCAMEX-en.html. Additional information may be obtained at the appropriate Canadian Embassy.

Undergraduate Scholarships: Hungarian Studies

The Hungarian Studies Program has a number of scholarships available to students taking courses in Hungarian Studies. Interested students should consult with the Hungarian Studies Program Coordinator about the application process.

Dr. Zoltan Mester Scholarship
• Established through the generous donations from the family and friends of Zoltan Mester.
• (For Any Year) – Student in Hungarian Studies on the basis of need and ability.

Husky Energy Hungarian Student Exchange Program
• Established through a generous donation from Husky Energy Inc.
• (For Any Year) – To support the travel and tuition costs of undergraduate and/or graduate students in the Hungarian Studies Program wishing to take advantage of exchange and/or study abroad opportunities. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.

Karoly Szel Undergraduate Scholarship in Hungarian Studies
• Established by Marcella Szel and supported through donations of friends.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of academic merit and financial need.

Rakoczi Prize in Hungarian
• Established by the Rakoczi Foundation.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to outstanding students in any year, either full-time or part-time, who have achieved an A average and who obtain the highest standing in the Hungarian course(s).

Szechenyi Society Inc. Undergraduate Scholarships in Hungarian Studies
• Established through a generous donation from the Széchenyi Society Inc.
• (For Any Year) – Awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of financial need and academic merit.

Funds for Undergraduate Students coming from the Czech Republic

Maria and George Hanus Scholarship
To be awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Ladislav and Maria Kroupa Scholarship
Awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Martina and Milan Plch Scholarship in Czech Studies
Awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto in the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.

Students interested in these scholarships must be formally nominated by either Charles University or Masaryk University to take part in an exchange at the University of Toronto.

Loan Programs

Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP)
The federal and provincial governments provide financial support to qualified students who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents of Ontario through Canada Student Loans and/or Ontario Student Loans. Residents of other provinces are eligible for Canada Student Loans through their home province. Application forms are available online at osap.gov.on.ca. For further information and assistance, please contact the Admissions and Awards Office, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A3; tel: (416) 978-2190; email: osap@adm.utoronto.ca.

U.S. Student Loans
Permanent residents and citizens of the United States can obtain information and applications for the USA Federal Direct Loan Program, http://www.adm.utoronto.ca/adm-awards/html/financial%20aid/government/usapp.htm. For further information and assistance, please contact e.lennox@utoronto.ca.

FAQ and SGS Important links

  • Enrolment

  • MRP

  • Awards

  • Language requirement

  • Internships and Professional Development

  • Exchanges

  • Graduation

  • General Information

  • School of Graduate Studies Important Links

Course Enrollment

Q: Why do we need to use Add/Drop forms?

A: According to SGS procedures you need to sign paper Add/Drop Forms for all non-ERE courses. The e-Add/Drop forms system will be implemented in the near future.

Q: I would like to take more courses then required and in disciplines not related to CERES? Can I do this?

A: As a graduate student at UofT you can register in as many courses as you would like to.

Q: Can I take undergraduate courses while at CERES?

A: Yes, you can. When taking undergraduate courses and any other non-graduate courses for graduate students, graduate grading scale will apply. Any grade below 70% will be converted to FZ (failure).   Graduate students taking undergrad courses must follow the undergraduate deadline to drop a course (not the SGS deadline).Undergraduate credits do not count towards your CERES MA degree requirements.

MRP

Q: What is MRP?

A: Major Research Paper or MRP is your Master’s essay and a part of ERE2000Y, a required course which you will start at in the second semester of your first year in CERES. Is based on original, primary, and secondary research, and draws on sources in the original language/s.

Q: How long should be my MRP?

A: Your MRP should be between 30-50 pages in 11 point font and double spaced in length excluding references. It should conform to all standards of an article in a refereed academic journal with respect to citations, bibliography, etc.

Q: When is the deadline to submit my MRP?

A: For example, if you want to graduate in the June 2020 convocation, you need to have the final version of the paper in by 1 April 2020. If you plan to graduate in the November 2020 convocation, the final version of the paper must be turned in by 31 August 2020.

Q: When do I have to submit my proposal?

A: You need to submit your signed ERE2000Y Paper Research Proposal Form along with your research proposal by the beginning of October at the very latest. The proposal should be approximately 7-10 pages in length, excluding bibliography.

Q: How do I choose my supervisor?

A: You can start identifying potential supervisors by looking into their publications and CV/profiles on their graduate program’s web site; taking classes with them beforehand; and asking for an advise of the Graduate Coordinator.  Choose someone you feel comfortable with and who you think you would work with best. The professor must then agree to supervise you. Once this process is complete you will have them sign the ERE2000Y Paper Research Proposal Form.

Q: By when do I have to select my supervisor?

A: You should approach your supervisor   during the second term of your first year. During September of your second year you should have your supervisor selected and the proposal form signed. In consultation with your supervisor, you should establish a regular schedule of meetings to discuss progress and review drafts.

QHow many regional (non-English) language sources do I need?

A: It depends on the topic. Please discuss this with your supervisor early on in the project.

AWARDS

Q: When I will receive my CERES graduate funding?

A: If you were offered graduate funding by CERES, you will receive it in two equal installments. The first installment will be paid out in September (any time during the month), the second part will be paid out during the month of January.

Q: Will I receive my award through a cheque or through a direct deposit?

A: If you have provided your banking information in ACORN, you will receive your award via a direct deposit. Otherwise, it will be sent as a cheque to your current address.

Language requirement

Q: In what cases the language requirement could be waived?

A: It could be waived if

  • you have taken your foreign language at the 200 level and have a passing grade;
  • you can provide an original language certificate (such as DELF LEVEL B2 or equivalent) ) from a recognized institution such as Alliance France, Goethe Institute, Cervantes Institute;
  • You have passed a proficiency test within UofT. For scheduling the test please contact:
  • Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures: Julia Mikhailova mikhailova@utoronto.ca
  • German Department: Professor Markus Stock at stock@utoronto.ca
  • Hungarian: Dr. Eva Tomory at eva.tomory@utoronto.ca
  • Italian Department: grad@utoronto.ca
  • Spanish and Portuguese Department: Professor Nestor Rodriguez at graduate@utoronto.ca
  • Modern Greek: Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas (themis.aravossitas@utoronto.ca)
  • The Department of French no longer offers placement tests or proficiency exams. MA students interested in taking French in the French Department must be enrolled in the FSL6000H Reading French for Graduate Students http://www.french.utoronto.ca/courses/154 via ACORN. If you think you do not need to take the course, you can opt for FSL6000 for exam only option. Please send your request along with any past evidence of language knowledge to André Tremblay, Graduate Counsellor, at gradcounsellor@utoronto.ca. You will need to register via ACORN  in FSL6000H Exam-Only option. Once enrolled, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to find out the date, time, room number and tools allowed for the final exam.

Q: When should the language requirement be fulfilled?

A:  It must be fulfilled by the beginning of the first semester of the second year.

Q: I have previous knowledge of a foreign language but no certificate. Whom should I contact before registering in a language course?

A: Please contact a relevant language department to schedule a placement test. Your placement will depend on the test results and the instructor’s recommendation.

Q: I would like to start learning a new European language while at CERES? Is it still possible to fulfil the language requirement?

A: Yes, it’s possible. For example, you can start your first year with taking Russian on 100 Level and continue with Russian 200 level during your second year. Please note, taking a language course cannot be counted towards 6 full course credits requirement for graduation.

Internships and Professional Development

Q: Where do I get a list of CERES internship placements?

A: You will be given CERES Internship Handbook at the first internship orientation session.

Q: Does CERES offer any opportunities for professional development and networking?

A: While at CERES you will be offered three mandatory professional development workshops in your first year as well as various opportunities to network with former alumni/professionals in an official setting. Please use your time wisely: attend events, come prepared with your questions and follow up to build relationships.

Exchanges

Q: I want to go on an exchange/summer school at the UofT’s partnering institution. Where should I start?

A: Please check exchange opportunities and the deadlines to apply at https://learningabroad.utoronto.ca/graduate/. Please attend an orientation session with Safety Abroad Office and Centre for International Experience in October. If you have further questions, please contact Laura Morello, Learning Abroad Advisor & Manager, Centre for International Experience at  <laura.morello@utoronto.ca>.

Graduation

Q: What do I have to do to graduate?

A: You must complete six full credits of coursework, 10-week regional placement (internship and/or exchange) and fulfill the language requirement.

Q: When can I graduate?

A: As soon as you have met the requirements stated above. Most students complete the program within two years. Maximum length to complete the degree is 3 years. Many CERES students opt for graduation in November as it allows more time to work on their MRPs. For more information about convocation and graduation please visit http://www.sgs.utoronto.ca/currentstudents/Pages/Graduation-and-Convocation.aspx

General Information

Q: Will I have space to study at CERES?

A: Yes. You will have access to shared students space at the Centre. Submit a key deposit and you will receive the keys shortly after the orientation in September.

Q: I am going on internship or exchange and will be gone from Toronto for a while. Should I return my keys after my first year?

A: No. Keep your keys and return them after your second year.

Q: I am struggling with academic writing/speaking? Who can help?

A: The Graduate Centre for Academic Communication (GCAC) offers five types of support designed to target the needs of both native and non-native speakers of English: non-credit courses, single-session workshops, individual writing consultations, writing intensives, and a list of additional resources for academic writing and speaking. All of GCAC programs are free. While the workshops function on a drop-in basis, writing centre consultations require an appointment, and courses and writing intensives require registration. You can also consider joining Graduate Writing Group, that offers small, informal and encouraging atmosphere for you to focus on your work and discuss your writing goals.

Q: I require medical help/counselling? Where should I turn for help at UofT?

A: For general and mental health issues please contact Health and Wellness Centre. If you require disability documentation to obtain academic accommodations, visit the Accessibility Services website. 

Q: Who can I contact if I have questions?

A: Larysa Iarovenko, Program and Internship Coordinator. She will either be able to answer your questions and/or put you in contact with someone who can. Her e-mail address is:  Larysa.iarovenko@utoronto.ca or phone 416 946 89 62.

School of Graduate Studies Important links

Internships and Exchange Programs

Internships

CERES offers summer internship placements at the partnering institutions in Europe. A list of organizations will be provided to the current students during the first internship orientation session. Some of the recent placements include:

  • Carnegie Europe, Brussels, Belgium
  • IOM, Budapest
  • Caucasus Resource Research Center (CRRC), Tbilisi, Georgia
  • The Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Budapest, Hungary
  • Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies (IRES), Uppsala, Sweden
  • Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, Oslo, Norway
  • Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe

Exchange Programs

The Centre for International Experience at UofT offers numerous opportunities for learning abroad. For the list of participating institutions, application process and deadlines please consult  https://learningabroad.utoronto.ca/graduate/.

Please note: for all international experiences you need to fulfill all Safety Abroad requirements! https://www.studentlife.utoronto.ca/cie/sao.

CERES managed opportunities:

Ukraine: The University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv

This exchange is open to MA and PhD students in all fields who have a record of academic excellence. The successful candidate will spend one semester (September-December or January-May) studying at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. The level of financial support varies and may include the cost of travel, a living and housing stipend, and overseas health insurance.

Established in the 17th century by the Metropolitan Petro Mohyla, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy became a widely respected educational institution and a centre for the development of Ukraine’s first national political, cultural, and government elite.

The Academy was closed in 1817 by the Russian tsarist government. In 1992, after a 175-year hiatus, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy was reinstated as a secular teaching institution, becoming a symbol of the rebirth of independent Ukraine. The Academy was granted the status of “National University” in 1994.

Widely regarded as the principal school in Ukraine for the social sciences and humanities, the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy is also a leading centre for social and political research. Some 3000 students from across Ukraine and abroad receive their education from leading Ukrainian and western scholars. The Academy has become a centre for the promotion of democratic values in Ukraine, and its students are actively involved in the political life of the country.

The Kyiv-Mohyla Academy is a bilingual institution: courses are taught in Ukrainian and English. Approximately 40 per cent of the library holdings are in foreign languages, primarily in English. Exchange students can also take advantage of being in the capital of Ukraine, the site of major government and legislative bodies, non-governmental organizations, and the richest state libraries and archives.

Visit Kyiv-Mohyla Academy website: http://www.ukma.edu.ua/

How to Apply

To apply for the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy exchange, please send: a Statement of Purpose (up to 750 words) which details your research interests and reasons study at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy;

2 letters of reference from individuals who are qualified to judge your academic achievements; all university transcripts. Letters of reference and transcripts should be sent directly from the referee and institution to CERES.

DEADLINE: Applications should be received in full at CERES by February 14. Applications received after this date will not be considered.

Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine
Munk School of Global Affairs
University of Toronto
1 Devonshire Place
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3K7
Canada

Nancy Park Travel Scholarship to Russia

Nancy Park was an outstanding student who graduated from the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1994. She died suddenly in 1998, and her friends and family established the Park Fellowship to keep her memory alive. The fellowship will be awarded to graduate students or advanced undergraduates whose program includes at least one joint graduate/undergraduate course. The recipient must have completed or be currently enrolled in a third year Russian language course or equivalent, and be registered in one of the following disciplines: Russian language and literature, history, law, music, women’s studies, art or art history. The recipient must undertake an internship in Russia, for a minimum of eight weeks, with a total stay in Russia of at least ten weeks, with a governmental or non-governmental, not-for-profit organization whose mandate is aimed at improving the daily lives of Russian people or making Russia a more just society.

Apply to the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures by January 15. Applications should include a detailed statement of intentions, including a work plan of activities to be carried out in Russia; two letters of reference, including one from a recent Russian language professor; commitment to organize an oral presentation of the results of the trip to the University community within four months of the return to Canada; commitment to prepare a short report on the internship to be used by future interns.

Nancy Park Travel Scholarship
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures
University of Toronto
Alumni Hall, 4th floor
121 St. Joseph Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J4
Canada

 

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