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September 2021

  • Friday, September 24th Orientations Toward the Future: The Affects and Temporalities of Infrastructure Development in Lapchi

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 24, 20215:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pathbreakers: New Postdoctoral Research on South Asia at U of T

    Description

    Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork carried out in the Lapchi region of northern Nepal, this talk explores how cross-border pastoral communities reassess their expectations of the future within the current moment of state-driven infrastructure development and securitization across the Nepal-China borderland. People in Lapchi are dependent on access to grasslands and markets in neighboring China, but increasing restrictions on trade and movement across the border, exacerbated by the global Covid-19 pandemic, are causing plausible fear of economic precarity. In this uncertain present, a planned hydropower project and road produce significant affects for the local community. People hope that these development programs will bring alternative opportunities and new mobilities by opening the region up to trekking and tourism industries. As the anticipation of possible infrastructural futures shapes unprecedented socio-economic logics in the present, a historically mobile pastoral community is paradoxically transforming into more sedentary ways of life.

    Nadine Plachta is a FAS Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Geography and Planning. Her work focuses on social and cultural transformations in contemporary Nepal and, in particular, the use of citizenship and belonging as a resource for governance and economic development. She has explored this theme in the context of infrastructural politics, natural resource conflicts, landscape transformation, and the construction of local ecological knowledge. Her most recent research explores how borderland communities reassess their expectations of the future within recurring situations of disaster and crisis. Her scholarship is based on long-term ethnographic engagement in South Asia and, especially, in Nepal where she lived and worked for Heidelberg University’s South Asia Institute for five years (2014–2019). Nadine is also Editorial Team Member of Roadsides, as well as Book Reviews Editor of Himalaya, the Journal of the Association for Nepal and Himalayan Studies.


    Speakers

    Nadine Plachta
    Speaker
    FAS Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T

    Katharine Rankin
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, U of T


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2021

  • Friday, October 15th The Persistence and Transformation of Pre-Buddhist Religious Practices in Rural Bhutan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 15, 20215:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pathbreakers: New Postdoctoral Research on South Asia at U of T

    Description

    The pre-Buddhist Bon has been looked down on by Buddhists for centuries, yet it continues to exist and to exert its influence on people’s everyday lives down to the present day. The ordinary villagers, including part-time lay Buddhist practitioners and educated people identify themselves as Buddhists, but they have no problem in propitiating the local Bon gods and deities, or having recourse to Bon rites after or prior to the Buddhist rituals and biomedical therapies. In this talk, I will present an overview of my book project which examines the persistence and transformation of the pre-Buddhist Bon religious practices in Buddhist Bhutan. It takes the relationship between great and little traditions as its starting point for the interplay of Buddhism and Bon underpinned by the local conception of two forms of religion: mundane or worldly god’s religion and supramundane or Buddha’s religion, discusses the mutual accommodation and syncretism between Buddhism and Bon, and offers new perspectives on the central distinguishing features of great and little traditions.

    Kelzang Tashi is a Research Associate at the Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto and a Visiting Fellow at the Department of Anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).


    Speakers

    Kelzang Tashi
    Speaker
    Research Associate at the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Christoph Emmrich
    Discussant
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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CSAS programming bridges academic and public discussion. To support our work and projects, please donate to the “South Asian Studies Development Fund” through the Asian Institute at the Faculty of Arts and Science.

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