Past Speakers 2009-2014

Past Speakers at CSUS

RECENT Past Event Archive (2015-Present)

2013-14

Wednesday, September 25, 6:30-8 pm
Hart House, Debates Room

DEBATE:

This House Welcomes the Decline of U.S. Hegemony

Organized by the Canadian International Council, Toronto Branch, and the Hart House Debates Committee; co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto.

The Second Annual Foreign Affairs University Cup featuring Ryerson University and University of Toronto students is presented by The Canadian International Council, Toronto Branch, and the Hart House Debates Committee. CIC-Toronto will open the event and introduce the speaker and judges, followed by the debate itself, and announcement of the winning team.


Thursday, September 26th, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Matthew Pratt Guterl

Homeland Security, the Neighbourhood Watch, and the Work of Racial Sightlines

Organized by the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

Matthew Pratt Guterl is Professor of Africana Studies and Chair of American Studies at Brown University. Guterl is the author of several books. His first, The Color of Race in America, 1900-1940, was published in 2001, and won a “Best Book” award from the American Political Science Association. It is a narrative of the shifting racial classifications in New York City. His second, American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation, was published in 2008, and received honourable mention in the competition for the 2009 Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis Award, given by the Caribbean Studies Association. It traces the rise and fall of Southern slaveholding against a hemispheric backdrop. A third book, Seeing Race in Modern America, is forthcoming in the fall of 2013 from the University of North Carolina Press, and considers the history of racial sight over the past two hundred years.


Friday, September 27th, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Rebecca Scott

An Incomplete Freedom: Social Facts, Legal Fictions, and the Law of Slavery 
in Antebellum Louisiana

Co-sponsored by the Department of History, University of Toronto

Was slavery in the 19th century Americas coterminous with the legal ownership of property in persons, or should we instead separate the exercise of the powers that attach to ownership from the state’s recognition of the person as a slave? Eulalie Oliveau was born to an enslaved mother during the period of Spanish colonial rule in Louisiana, released to live as a free woman around 1812, and then, forty years later, kidnapped and offered for sale in the New Orleans slave market. Along with her children and grandchildren she brought suit in district court, arguing for a right to freedom by “prescription” – based on her long years lived as free. She won her suit, but her captors appealed the decision to the state Supreme Court. The Louisiana Supreme Court in 1856 released the family from their captors, but ruled that disallowing a claim of property over a person on the grounds of “prescription” did not thereby confer free status. The court, in effect, would not confer a state-recognized freedom, even when no legal claim to ownership over her existed. When we look behind the decision at the attorney who insisted upon imposing this twilight civil status, we glimpse an ominous foreshadowing of the strategies of the white-supremacist bar in New Orleans that would later spearhead the post-Civil War legal assault on federal and state protection of the rights of freed people.

Rebecca J. Scott is the Charles Gibson Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan. She is co-author with Jean M. Hébrard of Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation (Harvard University Press, 2012), which won the 2013 Beveridge Award from the American Historical Association. She has recently been working on the legal history of slavery, and her essay “Paper Thin: Freedom and Re-enslavement in the Diaspora of the Haitian Revolution,” Law and History Review (November 2011), received the 2012 Surrency Prize from the American Society for Legal History. Her earlier books includeDegrees of Freedom: Louisiana and Cuba after Slavery (Harvard University Press, 2005), and Slave Emancipation in Cuba (Princeton University Press, 1985).


October 11 and 12, 9 am to 5 pm
York University
Founders College, Senior Commons Room

Conference:

New Directions in US Studies: Re-imagining the 1950s and 1960s

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

This conference brings together some of the most exciting recent scholarship on the US in the 1950s and 1960s.  The seven panels present thoughtful, cutting-edge research from the fields of history, political science, sociology, and literature, as well as from art, music, and film. A highlight of the conference is the keynote address by Professor Paul Buhle from Brown University. His talk, entitled “Culture as Politics: How Vernacular Arts Opened up US Studies...and why it needed opening so badly,” discusses the rise of graphic novels and other non-traditional literature, fiction and non-fiction. Buhle, an activist since his teen years, established a new left journal in the 1960s and a journal on popular culture in the 1970s. He has edited or written more than 40 books, including a three volume study of Jews and popular culture, an authorized biography of C.L.R. James, as well as graphic histories of the IWW, SDS, and Emma Goldman.

The conference helps launch York University’s new US Studies Program and showcases, along with the contributions of other distinguished scholars, York’s excellence in “American” studies.


For additional information , please go to the website at:
http://www.yorku.ca/uhistory/USConference/index


Friday, October 18, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Lisa Parks

Life in the Age of Drones

Co-sponsored by the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto

Since 2004, the CIA has conducted a secret drone war in the FATA region of Pakistan, a difficult to access rural region on the border of Afghanistan that is inhabited by Pashtun tribes, controlled by the Taliban, used by Al Qaeda operatives, and occupied by the Pakistani military. The CIA has shrouded this ongoing drone war in secrecy, waged war without declaring it as such, killed hundreds of Pakistani civilians, and violated international law in the process. This set of circumstances, yet another “US state of exception,” demands new ways of thinking about the power of images and networks, and imagining how transnational opposition to such state actions can be catalyzed and organized. Parks’ presentation begins with a contextual discussion of the US drone war in Pakistan, highlighting its endorsements from mainstream media, logistical challenges, legal controversies, and casualty counts. She then moves to a discussion of several examples of “drone media”–including drone attack scene photos, declassified aerial assault videos, and drone protest media that have circulated on the Internet. Drawing on the work of Michael Hardt & Antonio Negri, Tiziana Terranova, Derek Gregory, and others, she argues that these media: 1) draw attention to a vertical field of biopower—a ground to air domain of life, labour, histories, technologies, and mediation—that is increasingly integrated within the flows of network culture; 2) expose the logics of speculation and uncertainty that underpin drone warfare; and 3) make legible a new class of the disenfranchised which I refer to as “the targeted”— people who are the intentional or incidental victims of aerial violence.

Lisa Parks is Professor and former Department Chair of Film and Media Studies at the University of California-Santa Barbara, where she is currently the Director of the Center for Information Technology and Society. Parks has conducted research on uses of media and information technologies in various transnational contexts. Her work is highly interdisciplinary and engages with fields such as geography, communication, international relations, and art. Parks is the author of Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual (Duke UP, 2005), and Coverage: Aero-Orbital Media After 911 (forthcoming Routledge 2014), and is working on a third book entitled Mixed Signals: Media Infrastructures and Cultural Geographies. She is co-editor of: Down to Earth: Satellite Technologies, Industries and Cultures (Rutgers UP, 2012), Planet TV (NYU, 2003), Undead TV (Duke UP, 2007), and, Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures (U of Illinois, forthcoming). Parks has held visiting appointments at Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin, McGill University, University of Southern California, and the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania. She is currently a PI on two major research grants in the fields of ICT4D and Internet Freedom.


October 24, 2013, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Nayan Shah

Stranger Intimacy

Co-sponsored by the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

Please RSVP to Nicholas Feinig at: nick.feinig@mail.utoronto.ca, under the subject heading: “Shah seminar.” Space may be limited.

This is a seminar for University Faculty and Graduate Students only on Prof. Nayan Shah’s most recent book,Stranger Intimacy(UC Press, 2011). While all participants are asked to read as much of the book in advance as possible, and while the discussion will be open-ended, Prof. Shah has informed us that he would especially appreciate your attention to the “Introduction” and chapters 1, 2, and 6.

A Stranger Intimacy centres the experiences of South Asian migrants in collaboration with domestic and international migrants, and their struggles over social and intimate relations, in the first decades of the twentieth century in the United States and Canada. The book uniquely pairs the history of several hundred interracial marriages involving South Asian men in this period with original discovery research that documents more than a hundred cases of illicit sexual contact between South Asian men, white men, Chinese men, and Native American men. The resulting combination illuminates how the state and elites distribute protection and resources in ways that exacerbate the vulnerability of transience for most migrants, and enhance promises of settlement for only a select few. The multi-faceted significance of law, legal reasoning and rule of law governance provides both the evidence and scaffolding for the book’s arguments. Shah’s analysis of legal records of vagrancy, public indecency, seduction, sodomy, divorce, and marriage illustrates how insistently international and domestic migrants crafted alternative publics, communicated codes of honour and privilege, and defended erotic and social practices as they strategically remapped spaces and sensibilities labeled as deviant. The book’s trajectory from the local encounter to national citizenship vividly reevaluates the social, legal, and political process that drove the state’s presumption that social stability could be achieved through an invented normative family in the face of mass migration, and its non-normative sexual relations and domestic life.

Nayan B. Shah is Professor and Chair of the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California. A historian with expertise in U.S. and Canadian history, gender and sexuality studies, legal and medical history, and Asian American Studies, he is the author of two award-winning books – Stranger Intimacy: Contesting Race, Sexuality and the Law in the North American West (University of California Press, 2011), and Contagious Divides: Epidemics and Race in San Francisco’s Chinatown (University of California Press, 2001). Stranger Intimacy was awarded the Norris and Carol Hundley Prize by the American Historical Association Pacific Branch for the most distinguished book on any historical subject. Shah is also co-editor of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (Duke University Press), and the recipient of fellowships and grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, van Humboldt Foundation, and Freeman Foundation.


October 25 and 26
Innis Town Hall
Innis College, 2 Sussex Avenue

Richard Fung

Reorientations: A Retrospective on the Works of Richard Fung

Organized by the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States and the Asian Institute, University of Toronto.

Installations: October 23-30, OCAD Gallery
ReOrientations: A Retrospective on the Works of Richard Fung, October 25-26, Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Avenue, University of Toronto
Screening of Dal Puri Diaspora, October 26, 7-9 PM, Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

The Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies and its co-sponsors are thrilled to present a retrospective on the work of Richard Fung, the renowned Toronto-based video artist, writer, cultural theorist, activist, and educator. Fung’s videos have been screened and archived throughout the world, and he has been widely recognized with awards such as the Bell Canada Award for Lifetime Achievement in Video and the Toronto Arts Award for Media Art. In addition to his artistic work and writing, Fung teaches at OCAD University. Beginning in 1985 withOrientations—his pioneering video on queer sexuality and its intersections with race and class—Fung’s creative and often highly experimental works have questioned normative understandings of history and memory, temporality, sexuality, identity, colonialism, empires, racism, classism, labur, authenticity, diasporic communities, the body, illness, trauma, food, writing, and so much more. Tracing the diasporic movements, communities, and complex as well as constantly changing identities of Asians and others in places across the globe–most especially North America and the Caribbean—Fung’s works inspire us to “reorient” ourselves toward both the future and the past.


Wednesday, October 30, 12:00-2:00 pm
Room 200, Larkin Building
15 Devonshire Place

Peter J. Loewen

Empathy and Political Preferences

Organized by the Centre for Ethics, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

This talk is part of the Ethics at Noon lecture series.

Peter J. Loewen is the Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States, and Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto at Mississauga. His research focusses on political behaviour broadly conceived, but especially in the Anglo-American democracies. His work has been published in such journals as theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Electoral Studies, Political Psychology, and the Canadian Journal of Political Science. Peter received his PhD from the Université de Montréal, and completed post-doctoral fellowships at the University of British Columbia, and the University of California, San Diego. Loewen’s research is funded by SSHRC, the European Research Council, and by a Government of Ontario Early Researcher Award. Loewen has undertaken extensive public-facing work. He writes a regular column for the Ottawa Citizen, and has in the past contributed to The Globe and Mail, and the Toronto Star. He has engaged in past electoral engagement work with Vote Compass in partnership with the Wall Street Journal, CBC, and Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Loewen also engages in ongoing consulting work with various electoral management bodies.


Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 4-6 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, Room 208N

Kira Lussier

Testing Temperament at Work: Human Relations, Labour Relations, and Industrial Psychology in Interwar America

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto

Industrial psychologists in interwar America sought to convince corporate personnel departments that the insights of the human sciences, applied at work, would result in a more efficient, harmonious, and productive workforce. The defining methodology of these industrial psychologists was the pencil-and-paper psychological test, which they claimed could reveal a worker’s social and emotional disposition to predict behavior at work. One of the most widely-adopted tests of this kind was the Humm-Wadsworth Temperament Scale, first published in 1935; unlike other psychological instruments, this test was specifically created with industrial use in mind. Its creators—an industrial psychologist and a personnel manager — appealed to extant corporate concerns and drew on the ideology of “human relations,” to market their test as a scientific tool that would result in more harmonious labor relations. This paper argues that the legacy of this temperament testing was to forge a connection between workers’ affective disposition and the large-scale labor relations of the workplace: in selling their test to corporate clients, psychologists claimed that the psychological maladjustment of workers was one cause of labor unrest. These assumptions came under increasing attack by cultural critics like Daniel Bell, who identified personality tests as a particularly egregious management strategy to deflect attention from the broader socioeconomic structure of American capitalism. By unpacking this debate between the creators and critics of temperament testing, this paper explores the intersection of the politics of labor, the ideology of human relations and the practice of industrial psychology in interwar America.

Kira Lussier is a doctoral candidate at the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and a Junior Fellow at the Jackman Humanities Institute. With an undergraduate degree in History from McGill University, her research interests lie at the intersection of the history of the human sciences and American social history. Her dissertation traces the history of personality testing and its critics in North American workplaces from the First World War to the Cold War. She has presented her research at the International Congress for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine, and Cheiron: The International Society for the History of Behavioral and Social Sciences.


Thursday, October 31, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Samuel L. Popkin

Intraparty Conflicts and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

Co-sponsored by the Asian Institute and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Samuel L. Popkin is a Professor of Political Science at University of California, San Diego. He is an active participant as well as an academic analyst of presidential elections. Popkin has consulted on polling, targeting, and strategy in the presidential campaigns of Al Gore, Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, and George McGovern. The New York Times hailed Popkin’s book, The Candidate: What it Takes to Win—and Hold—the White House, as a “management bible for the business of presidential campaigning,” and The Financial Times compared it to Theodore H White’sThe Making of the President, 1960. His previous book, The Reasoning Voter, is widely cited in Washington as well as in academia. James Carville wrote, “If you’re preparing to run a presidential campaign and only have time to read one book, make sure you read Sam Popkin’s The Reasoning Voter. If you have time to read two books, readThe Reasoning Voter twice.”


Thursday, November 7, 5:00-7:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Matt Cohen

A Brief History of Books in Indigenous North America

Co-sponsored by the Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College, and the Toronto Centre for the Book, University of Toronto

The first Bible printed in North America was in a Native language. Many of the influential early printed works from New England presses were brought into being at the hands of Indian printers. For hundreds of years, American Indians and First Nations peoples have been publishing for international audiences, and for generations have been among the best-selling authors of fiction, poetry, and history. Yet the study of the history of books – their publication, circulation, marketing, collection in libraries, reception, and social meanings – in Indian country has just begun. Books have been a terror to indigenous communities, heralding invaders and justifying legalized theft, attempted cultural extermination, and systematic social deprecation. At the same time, books have been key to Native resistance, adaptation, collaboration, and spiritual revelation. This talk will sketch a synoptic history of books in indigenous North America, suggesting points of opportunity and potential conversation between book history and indigenous studies.

Matt Cohen is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin, and works in the fields of early American literature, digital archives, and the history of the book. He is the editor of a collection of letters by the creator of Tarzan, titled Brother Men: The Correspondence of Edgar Rice Burroughs and Herbert T. Weston (Duke UP, 2005), and the author of The Networked Wilderness: Communicating in Early New England (University of Minnesota Press, 2010). With Jeffrey Glover, he edited Early American Mediascapes: Communication and Colonization (forthcoming from the University of Nebraska Press); he is also a contributing editor at the online Walt Whitman Archive.

Listen to Prof. Cohen’s full talk here: http://www.torontoreviewofbooks.com/2013/11/podcast-brief-history-books-indigenous-north-america-matt-cohen/


Friday, November 8, 9:30-11:00 am
Jackman Humanities Building
Room 718, 170 St. George Street

Jacqueline Goldsby

Faculty and Graduate Student Seminar

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, University of Toronto

Jacqueline Goldsby is Professor of English and African American Studies at Yale University. She is the author of  the prizewinning A Spectacular Secret: Lynching in American Life and Literature (University of Chicago Press, 2006). From 2005-10, Goldsby directed the widely-acclaimed archival recovery project, “Mapping the Stacks: A Guide to Black Chicago’s Hidden Archives,” to support research for her next book, Birth of the Cool: African American Literary Culture of the 1940s and 1950s.


Friday, November 8, 1:00-3:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Jacqueline Goldsby

The Art of Being Difficult:The Turn to Abstraction in African American Poetry and Painting During the 1940s and 1950s

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, University of Toronto

Jacqueline Goldsby is Professor of English and African American Studies at Yale University. She is the author of  the prizewinning A Spectacular Secret: Lynching in American Life and Literature (University of Chicago Press, 2006). From 2005-10, Goldsby directed the widely-acclaimed archival recovery project, “Mapping the Stacks: A Guide to Black Chicago’s Hidden Archives,” to support research for her next book, Birth of the Cool: African American Literary Culture of the 1940s and 1950s.


Thursday, November 14, 4:00-6:00 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Sandra Harding

Objectivity and Diversity:Tensions for Feminist Postcolonial Research

Co-sponsored by the iSchool, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

For over four decades, feminists from the Global North and South have examined the tensions and contradictions in doing research that attempts to improve the conditions of women from the Global South. This has occurred in work critically focusing on, for example, colonialism and postcolonialism, modernization theory and its development projects, and international relations. This presentation will reflect on some of the major sites of such tensions and contradictions.

Sandra Harding is a philosopher who teaches in Education, Gender Studies, and Philosophy at the University of California Los Angeles. Harding taught for two decades at the University of Delaware before moving to UCLA in 1996. She directed the UCLA Center for the Study of Women from 1996-2000, and co-edited the journal Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society from 2000 to 2005. She is the author or editor of fifteen books on issues in epistemology, philosophy of science, and feminist and postcolonial theory. Her most recent books are Sciences From Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities (Duke 2008), and The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader (Duke 2011.). Objectivity and Diversity: Feminist, Postcolonial, and Science Studies Issues will be published next year by University of Chicago Press.


Friday, November 15, 10:00 – 11:45 am
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Sandra Harding

Faculty and Graduate Seminar

Co-sponsored by the iSchool, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

This is a workshop for Faculty members and Graduate Students only. To register for this workshop, please contact Patrick Keilty at: p.keilty@utoronto.ca.

For over four decades, feminists from the Global North and South have examined the tensions and contradictions in doing research that attempts to improve the conditions of women from the Global South. This has occurred in work critically focusing on, for example, colonialism and postcolonialism, modernization theory and its development projects, and international relations. This presentation will reflect on some of the major sites of such tensions and contradictions.

Sandra Harding is a philosopher who teaches in Education, Gender Studies, and Philosophy at the University of California Los Angeles. Harding taught for two decades at the University of Delaware before moving to UCLA in 1996. She directed the UCLA Center for the Study of Women from 1996-2000, and co-edited the journal Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society from 2000 to 2005. She is the author or editor of fifteen books on issues in epistemology, philosophy of science, and feminist and postcolonial theory. Her most recent books are Sciences From Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities (Duke 2008), and The Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies Reader (Duke 2011.). Objectivity and Diversity: Feminist, Postcolonial, and Science Studies Issues will be published next year by University of Chicago Press.


Friday, November 15, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Mathew Coleman

Retreat from social reproduction? Racial profiling and non-federal immigration enforcement in the U.S. South

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography, University of Toronto

Mathew Coleman (Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, 2005) is Associate Professor of Geography at Ohio State University. Coleman is a political geographer who works in the areas of critical geopolitics, law and geography, political economy, and particularly immigration law and policy. His research focuses on immigration enforcement in the U.S., and on the detention and deportation of mostly U.S.-bound undocumented labourers from the Western hemisphere. His current research, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, explores local-federal immigration policing partnerships in the U.S. South which allow sheriffs, among others, to enforce immigration violations for federal immigration authorities. Coleman teaches graduate seminars as well as undergraduate courses on political geography, economic geography, and geopolitics.


Wednesday, November 20, 2013, 4-6 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, room 208N

Jacob Hogan

Who is in Charge of this Mission?: The U.S. Ambassador, CIA Chief of Station, Embassy Intrigue, and Washington

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto

The September 12, 2012, murder of U.S. Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens in Benghazi should be a catalyst for increased focus on the organizational rules and hierarchies connecting the American Mission abroad and in Washington. Hogan’s paper argues that the CIA Chief of Station, rather than the U.S. Ambassador, represents the most powerful individual in any U.S. Embassy or Consulate system. This transformation occurred in three distinct periods, all associated with the rise of the intelligence establishment, beginning with the creation of the Office of Naval Intelligence in 1882. Next, the formation of the Office of Strategic Services in World War II presented an unprecedented challenge to the State Department’s unrivaled relationship with the White House. Finally, the CIA’s creation in 1947 elevated the Director of Central Intelligence over the Secretary of State in bureaucratic importance; a new paradigm that crystallized under Allen and John Foster Dulles during the Eisenhower administration. He will place emphasis on how presidents from Truman to Nixon have personally involved themselves in determining whether the CIA or Foggy Bottom possesses the supreme authority in the U.S. Embassy structure. Hogan’s paper will mainly draw from primary documentation found in the Foreign Relations of the U.S. series.

Having completed his B.A. and M.A. at the University of Ottawa, Jacob is a third year PhD candidate in History at the University of Toronto, and member of the Department’s graduate journal, Past Tense. Under the working title of Beyond Beijing, Bretton Woods, and New Bancor Order: The IMF, U.S., China, and the Genesis of Global Governance, 1965-1974, his dissertation will explore the rise of a supranational currency and Chinese power, alongside the economic decline of the U.S. during the Vietnam War era. Jacob is currently researching at the Munk School for his supervisor, Ronald Pruessen, focusing on the Obama administration’s policies toward the Near East and Arab Spring. Through this work concentrated on contemporary U.S. policies vis-à-vis Libya and FRUS research for his dissertation, he has become more interested in the historical organization of the U.S. Embassy.


Friday, November 22, 6:00-9:00 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Book Launch:
Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America
Randall Hansen and Desmond King
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013

Organized by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

Sterilized by the State is the first comprehensive analysis of eugenics in North America focused on the second half of the twentieth century. Based on new research, Randall Hansen and Desmond King show why eugenic sterilization policies persisted after the 1940s in the United States and Canada. Through extensive archival research, King and Hansen show how both superintendents at homes for the “feebleminded” and pro-sterilization advocates repositioned themselves after 1945 to avoid the taint of Nazi eugenics. Drawing on interviews with victims of sterilization and primary documents, this book traces the post-1940s development of eugenic policy and shows that both eugenic arguments and committed eugenicists informed population, welfare, and birth control policy in postwar America. Simply put, the anti-population growth movement, and the Great Society programs, and the early choice movements were shot through with eugenicists and eugenic arguments.

Speakers:
Randall Hansen, Director, CERES
Desmond King, Nuffield College
Melissa Williams, Dept. of Political Science, University of Toronto
Ian Dowbiggin, University of Prince Edward Island

The book launch will be followed by a reception.


Monday, November 25, 2013, 6:00-7:30 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs
Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place

U.S. Thanksgiving Social

Organized by the CSUS American Studies Students Society, University of Toronto

The CSUS American Studies Students Society has organized a Social to celebrate U.S. Thanksgiving this week. Attendance is by invitation only for American Studies Majors, Minors, and faculty members. To RSVP, please email: uoft.amstudies@gmail.com.


The Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts, the Cinema Studies Institute, Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, & Social Justice Education (OISE), and New College present:

Cinematic Translations: The Work of John Akomfrah

A University of Toronto tri-campus 3-day event, focusing on Artist-in-Residence John Akomfrah

Featuring:

STUDENT SALON with John Akomfrah and Opening Keynote Speaker Manthia Diawara
(New York University)

Screening of The Last Angel of History, with discussion following keynote
Nov. 27, Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave., 6:00-8:00 PM
Student reception 5:00-6:00 Innis Café

JOHN AKOMFRAH IN CONVERSATION with Cameron Bailey (Artistic Director of TIFF) and Manthia Diawara (NYU) following screening of Seven Songs For Malcolm X

Nov. 28, UTSC, MW 160, 6:00-8:00 PM)

SYMPOSIUM: Cinematic Translations: The Work of John Akomfrah               

Nov. 29, 1:00-6:30 PM
1:00-3:30 pm: Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

1:00-2:10 pm:

Chair: Ritu Birla (University of Toronto)
Panellists: Rinaldo Walcott, (OISE, University of Toronto), Kass Banning (University of Toronto)
Respondent: Malini Guha (Carleton University)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
2:20-3:30 pm 
Chair: Marieme Lo (University of Toronto)
Panellists: Aboubakar Sanogo (Carleton University), Pablo Idahosa (York University)
Respondent: Ato Quayson (University of Toronto)

CLOSING KEYNOTE CONVERSATION with John Akomfrah and Kobena Mercer (Yale University),
on The Stuart Hall Project

4:00-6:30 pm: Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave.

Co-sponsors: African Studies, Caribbean Studies, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, Centre for Comparative Literature, Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies (UTSC), Department of English (UTSC), Department of Arts, Culture and Media (UTSC), Department of Art, Department of English, Department of Visual Studies, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, Women and Gender Studies Institute.


Friday, November 29, 4:00-6:00 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Michael Brown

The Birth of the (Gay) Clinic

Organized by the Department of Geography, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, and the Comparative Program on Health and Society, University of Toronto.

Michael Brown is a Professor of Geography at the University of Washington. Most of his research explores issues related to governmentality and gay men’s health. His current research involves a collaboration with Larry Knopp, and is centred on the relationship between the gay and lesbian community and health promotion agencies in the pre-AIDS era. He is author of two books: Closet Space: Geographies of Metaphor from the Body to the Globe, andReplacing Citizenship: AIDS Activism and Radical Democracy. He is also co-editor of the book Seattle Geographies, and has written numerous journal articles. Brown is active in volunteer work, and teaches courses on urban, political, social, and cultural geography.


Monday, December 2, 4:00-6:00 pm
Department of History Conference Room
Sidney Smith Hall 2098
100 St. George Street

Peter L. Hahn

An Oasis or a Mirage?: The U.S. Vision for the Arab-Israeli Peace Process since the Cold War

Co-sponsored by the Canada Centre for Global Security Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

Peter L. Hahn is the Chair of the Department of History at Ohio State University. As a research scholar, Professor Hahn specializes in U.S. foreign relations in the Middle East since 1940. His publications include: Missions Accomplished?: The United States and Iraq since World War I (Oxford University Press, 2011); Historical Dictionary of U.S.-Middle East Relations (Rowman and Littlefield, 2007); Crisis and Crossfire: The United States and the Middle East since 1945 (Potomac Books, 2005); Caught in the Middle East: U.S. Policy Toward the Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1945-1961 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004); Empire and Revolution: The United States and the Third World Since 1945 (co-edited with Mary Ann Heiss, Ohio State University Press, 2001); and, The United States, Great Britain, and Egypt, 1945-1956: Strategy and Diplomacy in the Early Cold War (University of North Carolina Press, 1991). Since 2002, Hahn has served as Executive Director of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, a professional society of some 1,600 members in four dozen countries.


Friday, December 6, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Robin Kelsey

Stare Down: Confronting the Camera in mid-1960s America

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, University of Toronto

In mid-1960s America, the camera—whether recording for film, television, or still photography—came to be regarded as an aggressive machine at odds with the integrity of personal character, creative passion, sound judgment, and civic process. Time and again, American institutions imagined the cold stare of the camera as hostile to the fragile beauty of human ideals. A series of unsettling national encounters with mechanical reproduction, beginning in 1954 with the televised Army-McCarthy hearings, and extending through the coverage of the Kennedy-Nixon presidential debates and the media frenzy over the assassination of John F. Kennedy, led to a surge in concern in the mid 1960s regarding the effects of cameras on human subjects. In an effort to describe and understand this pervasive burst of anxiety, Kelsey will discuss the confrontation between camera and human subject in three instances drawn from radically different contexts: Andy Warhol’s so-called screen tests, made between 1964 and 1966 of various celebrities and pseudo-celebrities; Estes vs. Texas, a 1965 Supreme Court case that restricted the use of cameras in courtrooms; and the media events surrounding the alleged paranormal powers of Ted Serios, whose claims to impress images psychokinetically onto film by staring into Polaroid cameras brought him onto television and into the national press in the mid-1960s.

Robin Kelsey is Shirley Carter Burden Professor of Photography, and Chair of the History of Art and Architecture Department at Harvard University. He holds a PhD in art history from Harvard, and a JD from Yale Law School, and has practiced law in California. A specialist in the histories of photography, landscape, and American art, Professor Kelsey has received various awards for his scholarship and teaching, including the Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize for his work on the nineteenth-century survey photography of Timothy O’Sullivan. He is working on two books, one on photography and chance, and the other on photography in America during the Cold War era.


Wednesday, December 11, 4:00-5:30 pm
Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
Room 323, Victoria College
91 Charles St. West

Philip Mirowski

The Neoliberal Gameplan for Big Crises, like Global Warming and Economic Collapse

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, and the Department of Geography, University of Toronto

This talk outlines the generic Neoliberal political response to crises, first abstractly, then in the cases of global warming and the economic crisis. For Neoliberals, humans can never be trusted to know whether the economy or biosphere is in crisis or not, because both Nature and Society are dauntingly complex and evolving. The Neoliberal solution enlists the strong State to allow The Market to find its own way to the ultimate solution. The role of the strong Neoliberal State is threefold: to becalm and mollify the restive public who are provoked to constrain or neutralize The Market in response to problems; to reiterate and deploy the Neoliberal panacea such that the way to address any (falsely) perceived market failures is to introduce more markets; and finally, to facilitate The Market in discovering its own eventual transformations of Nature and Society which will transcend any economic or biosphere crisis.

Philip Mirowski is the Carl E. Koch Professor of Economics and Policy Studies, and the History and Philosophy of Science, University of Notre Dame. He is author of: Machine Dreams (2002), The Effortless Economy of Science?(2004), More Heat than Light (1989), Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste(2013), and ScienceMart: Privatizing American Science (2011). He is editor of Agreement on Demand (2006), The Road from Mont Pèlerin: the Making of the Neoliberal Thought Collective (2009), and Building Chicago Economics (2011), among other works. Outside of ongoing research on the history and analysis of the commercialization of science, he is also working on a computational complexity approach to the crisis, and a new book on the history of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economics, sometimes called the Nobel. He was awarded the Ludwig Fleck Prize from 4S in 2006, and has been visiting professor at Yale, Oxford, NYU, Duke, Paris, the University of Technology-Sydney, and the University of Amsterdam.


Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Cindy D. Kam

Disgust and Public Opinion

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Cindy D. Kam is Associate Chair, Director of Graduate Studies and Professor of Political Science and Psychology at Vanderbilt University.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2003. Her research focuses on political psychology, public opinion, political participation, and political methodology. In 2011, she was awarded the Emerging Scholar Award from the Elections, Voting Behavior, and Public Opinion Section of the American Political Science Association and the Erik H. Erikson Award from the International Society of Political Psychology. Kam is coauthor of Us Against Them: Ethnocentric Foundations of American Opinion and Modeling and Interpreting Interactive Hypotheses in Regression Analysis, and she has published articles in outlets such as the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Behavior, and Critical Review.


Thursday, January 16, 12 noon-1:30 pm
Room 3130, Sidney Smith Hall
100 St. George St., 3rd floor

Cindy D. Kam

Faculty and Graduate Student Workshop

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

This event is only open to Graduate Students and Faculty members.


Friday, January 17, 11:00 am-4:00 pm
Hart House, Music Room

Workshop:

Re-Imaging Area Studies

Co-sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States, African Studies, Latin American Studies, and Caribbean Studies.

This is a one-day workshop which provides the opportunity for enlightening conversations about the past and future of “area studies” as a frame of research and pedagogy. Participants are invited to consider, among other issues, the general state of areas studies in the North American academy since the 1980s; the relations between region-bounded area studies and interdisciplinary scholarship in social sciences and humanities, the institutional challenges to the continued vitality of area studies; promises and limitations of areas studies to understanding of translocal and transnational problems and processes pertaining of inequality, deprivation, social justice, etc.

Presenters:

Paul Zeleza, Vice-President of Academic Affairs and Professor of History, Quinnipiac
University
(http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/university-appoints-new-vice-president-for-academic-affairs/)

Roman de la Campa, Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages, University of Pennsylvania (http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/spanish/people/delacampa.html)

Ruby Tiffany-Patterson, Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies, Vanderbilt University
(http://as.vanderbilt.edu/history/bio/tiffany-patterson)


Friday, January 17, 12:00-2:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

James N. Druckman

Democratic Competition and Citizens’ Preferences: An Uneasy Tension

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

This talk will explore how competition in democratic governments can create challenges to what many consider to be “quality opinions.” Thus, there may be a fundamental tension between two democratic requisites: competition and preference formation/responsiveness.

James N. Druckman is the Payson S. Wild Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. He has published over 75 articles, been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2012. He currently is the co-PI on “Time Sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences.”


Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Hoang Vu Nguyen

Disaster, Settlement, and Belonging: Wavering Diaspora in Vietnamese New Orleans

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop.

Vietnamese Americans in New Orleans (approximately 7,000 people) have been praised as a successful case of resilience among other local ethnic minorities after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. By revisiting Hurricane Katrina, Nguyen’s research shows a need to reconsider the exaggerated claims for the success of the Vietnamese. In contrast to other scholars who argued for the close-knit nature of a diasporic community (Cohen 1997; Safran 1991), he points out the fluid identity of Vietnamese immigrants that played a role in struggling for recognition. Instead of taking the Vietnamese as a homogenous minority group, his research illustrates a divergence among Vietnamese generations on local incidents upon their return to New Orleans. Five years after Katrina, the explosion of Deepwater Horizon drilling rig of British Petroleum (BP) in the Gulf of Mexico has hit the local economy once again. By drawing attention to race, poverty, and religion, his research has examined a negotiation process in which Vietnamese Americans wavered between a diaspora and an ethnic group. The thesis not only contributes to the current debate on the fluidity of diaspora (Clifford 1994; Dorais 2010), but it also reveals a product of white institutional power in the BP compensation agenda.

Hoang Vu Nguyen received a Master’s Degree in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in 2007. For his Master’s thesis, he investigated the impact of the urbanization process on residents in Hanoi, Vietnam.  Hoang works at the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the Vietnam Museum of Ethnology (VME), specializing in Indonesia and East Timor. He has conducted several field trips to Indonesia, Brunei, and Laos to study and collect cultural artifacts for the Opening Exhibition of the Southeast Asian Building of the VME. He is now interested in studying overseas Vietnamese and their relations with the homeland, for which he is pursuing a PhD program in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto.


Friday, February 7, 4-6 pm
George Ignatieff Theatre
Trinity College
15 Devonshire Place

J. Jack Halberstam

The Wild: Notes on Anarchy

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs. Co-sponsored by the Women & Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto; and, the Department of English & Writing Studies, Western University.

Jack Halberstam is Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity Gender Studies and Comparative Literature at USC. Halberstam works in the areas of popular, visual, and queer culture with an emphasis on subcultures. Halberstam’s first book, Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (1995), was a study of popular gothic cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries and it stretched from Frankenstein to contemporary horror film. Her 1998 book, Female Masculinity (1998), made a ground breaking argument about non-male masculinity and tracked the impact of female masculinity upon hegemonic genders. Halberstam’s last book, In a Queer Time and Place: Transgender Bodies, Subcultural Lives (2005), described and theorized queer reconfigurations of time and space in relation to subcultural scenes and the emergence of transgender visibility. This book devotes several chapters to the topic of visual representation of gender ambiguity. Halberstam was also the co-author with Del LaGrace Volcano of a photo/essay book, The Drag King Book (1999), and with Ira Livingston of an anthology, Posthuman Bodies (1995). Halberstam regularly speaks on queer culture, gender studies and popular culture and publishes blogs at bullybloggers.com. Halberstam published a book in 2011 titled The Queer Art of Failure (Duke University Press), and Gaga Feminism: Sex, Gender and the End of Normal (Beacon Press, 2012). Halberstam is currently working on a project about queer anarchy tentatively titled: The Wild.

There will be publications for sale after the lecture.

Please Note:

Prof. Halberstam will also be giving a research seminar at the Women & Gender Studies Institute, on Wednesday, February 5, 3-5 pm, in the Jackman Humanities building, Room 100A. For additional information and to register for this seminar, please contact Prof. Sarah Trimble at: s.trimble@utoronto.ca.


The Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Toronto, sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Jackman Humanities Institute’s Program for the Arts on Translation and the Multiplicity of Languages, presents:

Nostos: Encounters with the Open Program

The Workcenter of Jerzy Grotowski and Thomas Richards, Pontedera, Italy

The Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies, Toronto
February 10-23, 2014

Main sponsor of the Workcenter is Fondazione Pontedera Teatro. Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

For the Allen Ginsberg text, Copyright C by the Allen Ginsberg Trust, and used with permission of The Wylie Agency LLC.

Schedule:

Performances – Canadian Premieres!
Electric Party Songs
Thursday, February 13 at 8:00 pm
The Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris St.

I Am America
Saturday, February 15 at 8:00 pm
The Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris St.

Electric Party Songs
Friday, February 21 at 8:00 pm
The Round, 152a Augusta Ave.

The Hidden Sayings
Saturday, February 22 at 8:00 pm
The Studio Theatre, 4 Glen Morris St.

Tickets are available through our box office.

Events (free admission):

Dinner and a Movie

Sponsored by the Hart House Good Ideas Fund
Tuesday Nights, 7:30 pm
The Robert Gill Theatre, 214 College St.
February 11 – Action in Aya Irini
February 18 – Dies Iræ: The Preposterous Theatrum Interioris Show

Chat with the Open Program
Friday, February 14, 2:00 pm
Performance Studio (Perf), 79 St. George St.

Symposium
Sunday, February 23, 4:00 pm
Performance Studio (Perf), 79 St. George St.

——

Box Office:
The Centre for Drama, Theatre & Performance Studies
3rd Floor, 214 College St. Toronto ON M5T 2Z9
To book your tickets, please call Rebecca Biason at the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies. 416-978-7987.

Tickets: $15-$25
Tickets can be purchased in person at the box office from Monday to Friday, 10-4,
by phone, Monday – Friday, 10 – 4,
by email, nostosencounters@gmail.com.
A limited number of tickets will be available at the door 30 minutes before the show. Cash only.
* Discounts for seeing more than one performance! Ticket prices become $10/$15 for returning patrons*
Group Rates/ Student Outreach/ Contact/ General Inquiries:
Please contact the Nostos team through our email address: nostosencounters@gmail.com

Program Registration: 
Please visit our website for a full schedule and to register for the event! http://nostosencounters.wordpress.com


Wednesday, February 26, 2014, 4-6 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, room 208N

Justin Morris

Robots in Cowboy Hats: Hollywood Sound Serials, and the Hinterland Audience

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop.

Though a great deal has been written on the status of the silent film serial as a highly popular form that helped to establish formative economic relationships between cinema and the newspaper industry, in relation to the growth of widespread fan cultures, the “golden age” of the Hollywood sound serial (encompassing a period of roughly 1935 to the late 1950s, and the advent of television) has largely mirrored the academic discussion of other “lower” film forms, such as the Hollywood B-film. Guy Barefoot indicates that film historians have only “made occasional references to

[...]

later film serials,” quoting Ben Singer as reductively asserting that the serials survived “as a low-budget ‘B’ product with limited distribution, and an appeal primarily to hyperactive children.” Though statements such as Singer’s move to suggest that sound serials were merely poorly produced cinematic hiccups that played without fanfare to small audiences, it is the status of this unique film form among the hinterland audience which establishes its importance to economic, exhibition, and movie-going histories. Drawing upon exhibitor reports found primarily within the “What The Picture Did For Me” section of the Motion Picture Herald, this paper will seek to trace the serial’s progression from mass to niche markets, from a vastly populated “adult” audience, to a hinterland audience frequently addressed (by Hollywood and local exhibitors alike) as juvenile. Ultimately, Morris’ paper strives to establish the Hollywood sound serial as a significant—rather than diminutive—phenomena, of Great Depression-era exhibition and movie-going practice.

Justin J. Morris is a first year PhD student at the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute. Justin completed his Bachelor’s degree in History and Film Studies at the University of Alberta in 2011, and his Master’s degree in Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto in 2012. His research interests include the depiction of Canada in Hollywood cinema, the phenomena of 1930s singing cowboys, and the nature of seriality in cinema. He is currently co-authoring a documentary on experimental artist Harry Smith and the Anthology of American Folk Music, to be broadcast on University of Victoria radio in the coming year.


Friday, February 28, 12-2 pm
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 3130
100 St. George Street

Dan Nexon

Undermining the Hegemon? The Politics of Public-Goods Substitution and ‘Soft Balancing’

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, and the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

This lecture is part of the “FIRST! Friday IR Seminar and Tea!” series. A light lunch will be served.

Dan Nexon is Associate Professor, Dept. of Political Science, Georgetown University. He has held fellowships at Stanford University’s Center for International Security and Cooperation and at the Ohio State University’s Mershon Center for International Studies. During 2009-2010, he worked in the U.S. Department of Defense as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow. Prof. Nexon specializes in the comparative-historical analysis of international politics, international-relations theory, and international security. His current research focuses on statecraft and instruments of power politics, particularly in the context of unequal inter-state relations. His work covers issues in international-relations theory, American foreign policy, power politics, the politics of religious contention, and the relationship between popular culture and world politics. He is the author of The Struggle for Power in Early Modern Europe: Religious Conflict, Dynastic Empires, and International Change (Princeton University Press, 2009), which won the International Security Studies Section (ISSS) Best Book Award for 2010. His articles have appeared in the American Political Science ReviewDialogue IOEuropean Journal of International RelationsInternational Studies Perspectives, International Studies ReviewInternational Studies QuarterlyReview of International Studies, and several other publications.


Thursday, March 6, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Matthew Levendusky

The Effect of “False” Polarization: Are Perceptions of Political Polarization
Self-Fulfilling Prophecies?

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

The past decade has witnessed an explosion of interest in the partisan polarization of the American electorate. Yet little research so far has considered the causes and consequences of perceptions of polarization. Does perceived polarization cause actual attitudinal polarization? Across multiple studies, we show that media coverage of polarization leads citizens to exaggerate the degree of polarization in the mass public, a phenomenon known as false polarization. We also find that false polarization causes voters to moderate their own issue positions but increases dislike of the opposing party. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings for understanding polarization in the mass public and the potential consequences of polarized media coverage.

Matthew Levendusky is currently Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, in the Department of Political Science, at the University of Pennsylvania. He was previously an assistant professor of Political Science at Penn (2007-2013), and a postdoctoral research associate at the Center for the Study of American Politics at Yale University (2006-2007). He obtained his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 2006, and his BA (with highest honors) from The Pennsylvania State University in 2001. He is the author of The Partisan Sort (Univeristy of Chicago Press, 2009), and How Partisan Media Polarize America (University of Chicago Press, 2013). His work has also appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and a variety of other outlets in political science. His research focuses on understanding how institutions and elites influence the political behaviour of ordinary citizens, including studies of mass polarization, the effects of partisan media, and various other topics.


Friday, March 7, 10:00-11:30 am
Room 1040, Jackman Humanities Building
170 St. George Street

Leigh E. Schmidt

Faculty and Graduate Student Workshop

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Leigh E. Schmidt is the Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He joined the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics in 2011. From 2009 to 2011, he was the Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America at Harvard University, and, from 1995 to 2009, he taught at Princeton University where he was the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion and served as chair of the Department of Religion. He has held research fellowships at Stanford and Princeton and also through the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Schmidt earned his undergraduate degree in history and religious studies from the University of California, Riverside, in 1983 and his PhD in religion from Princeton in 1987. Prof. Schmidt is the author of numerous books, including: Hearing Things: Religion, Illusion, and the American Enlightenment (Harvard University Press, 2000), which won the American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in Historical Studies and the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association; Restless Souls: The Making of American Spirituality (HarperOne, 2005), which appeared in an updated edition from the University of California Press in 2012; Consumer Rites: The Buying and Selling of American Holidays (Princeton University Press, 1995); and, Holy Fairs: Scottish Communions and American Revivals in the Early Modern Period (Princeton, 1989), which received the Brewer Prize from the American Society of Church History. In addition, Schmidt has served as co-editor with Sally Promey of American Religious Liberalism(Indiana University Press, 2012), co-editor with Laurie Maffly-Kipp and Mark Valeri of Practicing Protestants: Histories of the Christian Life in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), and co-author with Edwin Scott Gaustad of The Religious History of America (HarperOne, 2002). Schmidt’s latest book is Heaven’s Bride: The Unprintable Life of Ida C. Craddock, American Mystic, Scholar, Sexologist, Martyr, and Madwoman (Basic Books, 2010). His next book project is on how atheism and non-belief have fared historically in American public life.


Friday, March 7, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Leigh Schmidt

Public Atheism: An American History

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Leigh E. Schmidt is the Edward C. Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis. He joined the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics in 2011. From 2009 to 2011, he was the Charles Warren Professor of the History of Religion in America at Harvard University, and, from 1995 to 2009, he taught at Princeton University where he was the Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor of Religion and served as chair of the Department of Religion. He has held research fellowships at Stanford and Princeton and also through the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Schmidt earned his undergraduate degree in history and religious studies from the University of California, Riverside, in 1983 and his PhD in religion from Princeton in 1987.

Leigh Schmidt is the author of numerous books, including: Hearing Things: Religion, Illusion, and the American Enlightenment (Harvard University Press, 2000), which won the American Academy of Religion Award for Excellence in Historical Studies and the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association; Restless Souls: The Making of American Spirituality (HarperOne, 2005), which appeared in an updated edition from the University of California Press in 2012; Consumer Rites: The Buying and Selling of American Holidays (Princeton University Press, 1995); and, Holy Fairs: Scottish Communions and American Revivals in the Early Modern Period(Princeton, 1989), which received the Brewer Prize from the American Society of Church History. In addition, Schmidt has served as co-editor with Sally Promey of American Religious Liberalism (Indiana University Press, 2012), co-editor with Laurie Maffly-Kipp and Mark Valeri of Practicing Protestants: Histories of the Christian Life in America (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), and co-author with Edwin Scott Gaustad of The Religious History of America (HarperOne, 2002). Schmidt’s latest book is Heaven’s Bride: The Unprintable Life of Ida C. Craddock, American Mystic, Scholar, Sexologist, Martyr, and Madwoman (Basic Books, 2010). His next book project is on how atheism and non-belief have fared historically in American public life.

Registration is required for this event. To register, please go to:https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/events/


Friday, March 7, 4:00-6:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Vivek Bald

Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America

Co-sponsored by the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, and the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto.

Drawing from his recently published book, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America (Harvard University Press, 2013), Bald will explore the histories of two little-known groups of South Asian Muslim migrants who came the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The first was a group of small traders of embroidered silks who came to sell their goods on New Jersey’s beach boardwalks in the 1880s and then built a peddler network, rooted in New Orleans, that stretched throughout the U.S. South, the Caribbean and Central America. The second group were workers on British steamships, who began jumping ship in New York, Baltimore and Philadelphia during WWI to escape indenture-like conditions and access factory and restaurant jobs onshore. Bald will trace out these early histories, exploring the ways South Asian migrants navigated both British colonial power and U.S. racialization, segregation, and immigration restrictions – and the ways African American and Puerto Rican communities provided these men with shelter and possibility at the height of the Asian Exclusion era.

Vivek Bald is a writer, scholar, and documentary filmmaker whose work focuses on histories of the South Asian diaspora. He is the author of Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America (Harvard University Press, 2013) and a co-editor of the collection The Sun Never Sets: South Asian Migrants in an Age of U.S. Power (New York University Press, 2013). His films include Taxi-vala/Auto-biography (1994), Mutiny: Asians Storm British Music (2003), and In Search of Bengali Harlem (in production). He is Associate Professor in Comparative Media Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a member of MIT’s recently formed Open Documentary Lab.


Tuesday March 11, 2014, 3:30-5:00 pm
OISE Room 2211
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West

Andrew Hayes

A Simple Test of Moderated Mediation

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science and the Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, and the Department of Psychology, Ryerson University.

Methods for testing a hypothesis about “moderated mediation” that have become widely used in the behavioural science literature are piecemeal approaches that do not formally test whether the indirect effect in a mediation model is moderated. In this talk, Andrew Hayes introduces a formal test of moderated mediation based on a hypothesis test or interval estimate of the parameters of a function linking the indirect effect to values of a moderator. Real-data examples are provided for different forms of moderated mediation, and the implementation of the method is illustrated using software such as the PROCESS procedure for SPSS and SAS as well Mplus.

Andrew Hayes is a Professor of Quantitative Psychology at The Ohio State University. His research focuses on linear models, with an emphasis on resampling methods of inference. And he has emerged as a leading contributor to the recent literature on statistical approaches to assessing mediation and moderation. Specific areas of investigation and writing include statistical approaches to assessing mediation and moderation. His methodological work is published in Psychological MethodsMultivariate Behavioral Research, Behavior Research Methods, Psychological Science, British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, and the Journal of Statistical Computation and Simulation. His 2013, Introduction to Mediation, Moderation, and Conditional Process Analysis: A Regression-based Approach has become an instant best-seller at Guilford Press. Further information about Professor Hayes and his work is available at:http://www.afhayes.com/.


Tuesday, March 11, 5:00-7:00 pm
Jackman Humanities Building
Room 100, 170 St. George Street

Joshua Dubler

Bad Men, Poor Men, and the Ethnography of Religion and Prison

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Religion, and Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto.

Bad Men, Poor Men, and the Ethnography of Religion and Prison is a genealogical investigation of certain facets of contemporary common sense. Drawing on his recent book, Down in the Chapel (FSG, 2013), which is an ethnographic study of the chapel at Pennsylvania’s Graterford Prison, Dubler explores how dominant attitudes toward prisoners play off of dominant discourses about religion to produce two ideal types–“the bad man of religion” and the “poor man of religion.” With special attention paid to Graterford’s Muslim communities, Dubler shows how these two types inform both religious life at Graterford and the popular attitudes that sustain mass incarceration.

Joshua Dubler is Assistant Professor of Religion, at the University of Rochester. He received his PhD in Religion from Princeton University. His research and teaching focus on American religion and theory of religion. Along with Andrea Sun-Mee Jones, he is the author of <i>Bang! Thud: World Spirit</i>, from a Texas School Book Depository. Dubler has taught courses at Princeton University, Haverford College, Andover Newton Theological School, and in Villanova University’s program at Graterford Prison. He is currently teaching a course on the modern concept of “guilt.


Thursday, March 13, 4:00-6:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Brenna Wynn Greer

Making Image Matter: Reconsidering Civil Rights Work in the Post World War II United States

Co-sponsored by the Toronto Photography Seminar.

What happens when we consider how non-activists contributed to the civil rights struggle? The lecture dramatizes this question by examining the image-making activities of two black entrepreneurs—publisher John H. Johnson and public relations guru Moss H. Kendrix. Through their commercial image-making and image-management ventures in the post-World War II decade, these black capitalists produced mainstream media representations of black people and black life essential to African Americans’ campaigns for racial equality and national belonging. Appreciation of their “civil rights work,” however, requires recognizing civil rights activity that was not necessarily grassroots or progressive, or explicitly political, which is crucial to understanding the course and efficacy of mid-twentieth century black civil rights politics.

Brenna Wynn Greer is a historian of race, gender, and culture in the twentieth-century United States who works at the intersections of African American, business, and visual culture history. She is currently at work on a manuscript entitled “Image Rights: Black Representation Politics and Civil Rights Work in the Postwar United States,” which explores the relationship between African Americans civil rights politics and their acts of making media representations and black life from the New Deal era through the early Cold War years. As an assistant professor in history at Wellesley College, she teaches U.S. history courses in topics of consumerism, visual culture, fashion, and social movements.


Tuesday, March 18, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Jason Brennan

The Meaning of Markets: Against Semiotic Objections to Markets in Everything

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Many people are convinced that there are certain goods that–while it is permissible to have and give away these goods–should not be for sale. Inhis forthcoming book, Markets without Limits, Brennan argues there are no inherent limits to markets. Anything that you can give away you may sell, and anything you may take for free you may buy. In this talk, he focuses on “semiotic” objections to market, which hold that buying and selling certain things shows disrespect or contempt for people, places, or objects that deserve reverence. He argues all such semiotic objections fail. In fact, there is no essential meaning to market transactions. Whenever a market generates good outcomes but is seen as disrespectful, rather than this giving us reason to stop the market, it gives us reason to change our view of what counts as expressing disrespect.

Jason Brennan (Ph.D., 2007, University of Arizona) is Assistant Professor of Strategy, Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses in ethics, political economy, moral psychology, entrepreneurship, and public policy. He was formerly Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Research, at Brown University. He is the author of Why Not Capitalism? (Routledge Press, 2014), Compulsory Voting: For and Against, with Lisa Hill (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Libertarianism: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2012), The Ethics of Voting (Princeton University Press, 2011), and, with David Schmidtz, A Brief History of Liberty (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010). He is currently writing Markets without Limits for Routledge Press, andAgainst Politics for Princeton University Press.


Friday, March 21, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Leandra Zarnow

Bringing Protest Politics to Capitol Hill: Rethinking the 1970s Through the Career of Outsider Politician New York Representative Bella Abzug

Three decades before Hillary Rodham Clinton and Sarah Palin entered U.S. politics, New York Representative Bella Abzug imagined a day when “a woman schlemiel” could “get as quickly promoted as a male schlemiel.” A trailblazing politician for more than her feminist program, Congresswoman Abzug has been largely forgotten beyond the aforementioned sound bite featured during campaign season. Elected to represent Manhattan’s Nineteenth District in 1970, Abzug entered Congress as a Left Democrat who promised to “bring Congress back to the people.” Seen as “sister Bella” to some and “the conservative’s devil” to others, Abzug became America’s most recognizable political celebrity during her three short terms in Washington. Considering Abzug’s estimable challenge of Rush Limbaugh-esque Barry Farber in 1970, and her devastating loss to Daniel Patrick Moynihan in the 1976 Democratic Senate primary, as well as the space in between, tells us much about America’s changing political culture as the nation—and the Democratic Party—moved right. Most revealing is how much Abzug accomplished as a “maverick” politician who sought to bring the tenor and demands of 1960s social movements to Capitol Hill. Significantly, Abzug helped lead a period of policy experimentation in the areas of gender and racial civil rights, government ethics and privacy rights, urban renewal and environmentalism, which effectively made the U.S. political system more open, responsive, and accountable to a broader range of Americans. Historians have focused too narrowly on the malaise of the 1970s and the decline of the liberal state, discounting this key policy moment.

Leandra Zarnow is a Research Associate with the Centre for the Study of the United States during the 2013-2014 academic year. Zarnow comes to the Centre from Stanford University, where she was an American Council of Learned Societies New Faculty Fellow during 2011-2013. She received her PhD from University of California, Santa Barbara. Leandra is primarily interested in United States women’s and gender history, U.S. political, legal, and cultural development, and transnational rights movements.  She is currently completing her first book, Bella Abzug and the Promise and Peril of the American Left, to be published by Harvard University Press. Her articles have appeared in journals including Law and Social InquiryReviews in American HistoryFeminist Formations, and theJournal of Policy History.


Wednesday, March 26, 4-6 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, room 208N

Mathieu Vallières

‘...that’s malarkey, but it’s very important malarkey’: Unpacking the Nixon-Kissinger worldview and emotional community during the Vietnam War Moment, 1969-1973

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop.

Vallières’ dissertation investigates how President Richard Nixon and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger, and their French counterparts Presidents Charles de Gaulle and Georges Pompidou, responded to the defeat of American power in Vietnam, and the corresponding existential realization of American limits in the world. To this end, the Paris Peace Negotiations—which intended to bring the war to a close but also prompted, at once, great power competition, collision, and collusion—becomes an ideal setting for a comparative analysis of the respective, but overlapping “imperial imaginaries” of the United States and France. The paper focuses on how Nixon and Kissinger imagined—or failed to imagine—a revision of America’s role within the international order during this period of transition and transformation—or what I call the “Vietnam War Moment.” More specifically, it aims to show that because the period was fraught with challenges unfamiliar to America’s global empire, Nixon and Kissinger viewed this moment—and therefore responded to it—by relying on a set of familiar ideas made up of notions of exceptionalism, conservatism, and Cold War orthodoxies. What is more, as they grieved what seemed to be the end of the American empire (at least in Southeast Asia), they created an emotional community that privileged denial, bargaining, depression, and most importantly, applauded anger, but rarely, if ever, acceptance. Typically understood by historians as realists par excellence outside the narrative of empire (thanks in part to their own voluminous writings), the unpacking of Nixon and Kissinger’s imperial worldviews, and of their emotional community reveals that they should not only be reintegrated into the trajectory that intertwines U.S. foreign relations and imperialism, but also distanced from their purported unadulterated, rational policy-making.

Mathieu Vallières is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His current research is entitled The Paris Peace Negotiations ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Franco-American relations during America’s withdrawal from Vietnam, 1969-1973. It aims to set the American withdrawal from Vietnam within its layered historical, international, and imperial contexts while also accounting for its highly emotional character. Vallières completed his M.A. in History from the University of Toronto in 2008, and his B.A. (History) from the University of Ottawa in 2007.


Thursday, March 27, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Cheryl Boudreau

Wanting What is Fair: How Party Cues and Information about Income Inequality Affect Public Support for Taxes

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Income inequality has risen dramatically in the United States, and the federal government and states have tried to use tax policy to reduce it. What types of information affect public support for redistributive tax policies? We address this question by conducting survey experiments where citizens express opinions about tax policies under consideration in a real-world context. We manipulate whether they receive party cues, information about rising income inequality, both, or neither type of information. We find that when citizens are given information about rising income inequality, they connect it to their views on specific tax policies. We also find that inequality information can induce Republican citizens to support a tax increase that their party opposes. These results challenge the prominent view of citizens as too ignorant to connect information about inequality to specific taxes. They also suggest that efforts to inform the electorate about inequality can influence tax policy opinions.

Cheryl Boudreau is Associate Professor in the Political Science department at the University of California, Davis. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 2007. Boudreau’s research examines whether and when different types of political information help uninformed voters to make political decisions that improve their welfare. This information may come from trusted endorsers, encouraging citizens to vote for a particular candidate or initiative, or from politicians competing in a debate. Citizens may also rely on the statements their peers make during discussions, the opinions of the masses (as reflected in public opinion polls), or the detailed policy information contained in voter guides. Using laboratory and survey experiments, as well as observational studies, Boudreau’s research sheds light on when these different types of information help uninformed voters to behave as though they are more informed.


Monday, March 31, 2:00-4:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Inderjeet Parmar

Foundations of the American Century: The Ford, Carnegie, and Rockefeller Foundations in the Rise of American Power

Co-sponsored by the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology; and, the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

This lecture examines the complex interrelations, shared mindsets, and collaborative efforts of influential public and private organizations in the building of American hegemony over the past century. Focusing on the involvement of the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations in U.S. foreign affairs, Prof. Parmar traces the transformation of America from an “isolationist” nation into the world’s only superpower, all in the name of benevolent stewardship. Based on archival research over a period of fifteen years,he tries to show how a combination of American academics, think tanks, and policy makers institutionalized elitism, which then bled into the machinery of U.S. foreign policy, and became regarded as the essence of modernity. America, planning to replace Britain in the role of global hegemon, created the necessary political, ideological, military, and institutional capacity to do so. Far from being scientifically objective and politically-neutral, the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations played fundamental roles in transforming America’s role in world affairs, advancing U.S. interests at the expense of other nations. The lecture incorporates a number of case studies of American philanthropy, including in Nigeria, Chile, and Indonesia.

Inderjeet Parmar is Professor of International Politics at City University London, UK, Chair of the AHRC Obama Research Network, and Past President of the British International Studies Association. Between 1991-2012, he was at the University of Manchester. He is the author of several books and articles, including Think Tanks and Power in Foreign Policy: A Comparative Study of the Role and Influence of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Royal Institute of International Affairs, 1939–1945; and his latest, Foundations of the American Century (Columbia UP, 2012). He is currently a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeon University, writing a monograph, Race and Empire in Anglo-American Wars from Korea to the War on Terror.


Tuesday, April 22, 2-4 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, room 208N

Claire Bond Potter

Andrea Dworkin’s Queer Friendships: Anti-pornography Feminism and the Problem of Sexual Reputation

Co-sponsored by the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, and the JHI Working Group: Gender and Global Scholarship, University of Toronto.

Andrea Dworkin’s many critics have characterized her as, at best, an opponent of erotic freedom and, at worst, of giving feminist cover to the conservative culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. This criticism has caused her to be misrepresented, both as an intellectual and as a lesbian. As part of Claire Potter’s work on late twentieth century radical feminism in the United States, she reanimates Dworkin’s history by understanding her through networks of friendship that offer alternative readings of this extraordinary intellectual as a proponent of the ethical, loving intimacy that would be possible outside the violence that adhered to gender.

Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement, New York, since 2012. Prior to that, she worked at Wesleyan University. She received her Ph.D. in History from New York University. Potter is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender. She is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998), and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012). Since 2007, she has blogged at Tenured Radical, which moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011. With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, she edits a series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America (University of Georgia Press). Potter serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality, and is a co-director of OutHistory.org.


Wednesday, April 23, 4-6 pm
Munk School of Global Affairs, room 208N

Caleb Wellum

Ecology and the Politics of the Future in the 1970s

Organized by the CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto

The 1973 OPEC Oil Embargo against the United States triggered long lines at American gas stations, and signaled the end of cheap oil in the American and global economies. High crude oil prices riled American consumers and fuelled conspiracy theories, while exacerbating stagflation and the painful economic recessions of the 1970s. The potential for a more scarce energy future also ignited a heated debate about the nature and future of America’s energy system, and the potential for its disintegration. Economists and pundits feared the erosion of America’s domestic economy and political power abroad. This paper examines discourses of the energy future that used the language of ecology to predict socioeconomic catastrophe unless America abandoned the ideal of economic growth in favour of the massive social reorganization needed to support a steady state economy. Such ecological discourse relied on a politically and affectively potent politics of anticipation that demanded action now to save the future. By the end of the decade, however, neoliberal imaginaries of the energy future began to emerge that also adopted this anticipatory stance, but posited the unregulated free market as a panacea for America’s energy and economic woes. Exploring these conflicting discourses allows for a deeper understanding of the anticipatory and affective dimensions of neoliberalism, which is often reduced to a set of economic principles that cannot explain its political power on their own.

Caleb Wellum is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is entitled “Energizing the Right: Economy, Ecology, and Culture in the 1970s American Energy Crisis.” His research focuses on cultural history and the politics of anticipatory discourses. In particular, his work links the history of neoliberalism to debates about energy, ecology, and economy that surrounded the energy crises of the 1970s. This work is supported in part by a CSUS Graduate Research Grant and the Gerald Ford Presidential Library. Wellum has presented at NiCHE workshops, and the American Studies Association conference. Before coming to Toronto, he earned his BA (Hon.) and MA from McMaster University in Hamilton.


Friday, May 23, 10:30 am to 3:00 pm
Hart House, East Common Room

Margaret Randall

Radical Texts & Political Acts: Forty Years of Reading Margaret Randall

A Panel, Poetry Reading, and Film

Co-sponsored by the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, and the JHI Working Group: Gender and Global Scholarship, University of Toronto.

This event is part of “History on the Edge,” the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women.

Margaret Randall is a feminist poet, writer, photographer, and social activist. Her classic work of oral history,Cuban Women Now, was published in Toronto by Women’s Press in 1974. Since then she has published over a dozen other works of oral history, 35 books of poetry, and scores of edited anthologies, translations, and articles. Margaret lived among New York’s abstract expressionists in the 1950s and early ’60s, participated in the Mexican student movement of 1968, shared important years of the Cuban revolution (1969-1980), the first four years of Nicaragua’s Sandinista project (1980-1984), and visited North Vietnam during the last months of the U.S. war in that country. She has written about some of these experiences in her recent autobiography To Change the World: My Years in Cuba (Rutgers UP, 2009).

For more information on this event: <click here>. For information on the Berks conference, please visit the website at: http://berks2014.com/2013/10/04/registration/.


Friday, June 13th, 11:00 am to 12:30 pm
Room 208N North House
Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

CHRISTOPHER SANDS

North American Economic Integration

Co-sponsored by the Consulate General of the United States – Toronto

Christopher Sands is a Senior Fellow at Hudson Institute, in Washington, D.C. where he directs the Initiative on North American Competitiveness and concentrates on regional economic integration and policy coordination. Dr. Sands is also a professorial lecturer at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, and the G. Robert Ross Distinguished Professor of Canada-U.S. Business and Economic Relations at Western Washington University. He has taught at the American University School of Public Affairs, and has lectured at the Foreign Service Institute of the U.S. Department of State and for the US Department of Homeland Security. In 1999-2000, Dr. Sands was a Fulbright Scholar and visiting fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University in Ottawa. He has written extensively on policy conflict and coordination related to manufacturing, the automotive industry, energy, labour markets, regulation and border security.

Dr. Sands holds a B.A. in political science from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Canadian studies and international economics from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the American Political Science Association, the International Studies Association, and the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States. Dr. Sands currently serves as treasurer and a member of the executive committee for the Canadian Politics Section of the American Political Science Association, and is a member of the research advisory board of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute in Ottawa, and the advisory board of the Canada-United States Law Institute jointly established by the law schools of Case Western Reserve University and the University of Western Ontario.


PAST EVENTS 2012-13

Tuesday, September 11, 5-7 pm
Rooms 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Martin F. Manalansan IV

Queer Dwellings: Migrancy, Precarity, and Fabulosity

Co-sponsored by: Women and Gender Studies Institute; Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies; Humanities, Social Sciences, and Social Justice Education; Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies,
University of Toronto.

Martin F. Manalansan IV is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies and Conrad Professorial Humanities Scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is an affiliate faculty in the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, the Global Studies Program and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory. He is the author of Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (2003), which was awarded the Ruth Benedict Prize. He is editor/co-editor of two anthologies namely, Cultural Compass: Ethnographic Explorations of Asian America (2000), and Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism (2002), as well as a special issue of International Migration Review on gender and migration.

For the podcast of this event: <click here>.


Thursday, September 13, 12 noon-1:45 pm
George Ignatieff Theatre
Larkin Building, 15 Devonshire Place

Jacob S. Hacker

Economic Inequality and the 2012 U.S. Elections

Co-sponsored by the United States Consulate General, Toronto, and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Jacob S. Hacker is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science at Yale University and the Director of Yale’s Institution for Social and Policy Studies.  An expert on the politics of U.S. health and social policy, he has written numerous scholarly articles for publications ranging from the American Political Science Review tothe New England Journal of Medicine. He is the author or co-author of five books, most recently, Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer—And Turned Its Back on the Middle Class (September 2010; with Paul Pierson).


Friday, September 14, 2:30-4:30 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Sarah E. Igo

The Beginnings of the “End of Privacy” in the Modern United States

Co-sponsored by the Department of Psychology, York University; and The Technoscience Research Unit, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

Sarah E. Igo is an Associate Professor of History at Vanderbilt University who teaches and writes about modern American cultural and intellectual history. Her book, The Averaged American, was an Editor’s Choice selection ofThe New York Times and one of Slate’s Best Books of 2007. Igo has held fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Whiting Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Mellon Foundation. She also founded and co-directs the National Forum on the Future of Liberal Education, a national-level initiative to promote the liberal arts.


Monday, September 17, 4-5:30 pm
2nd floor lounge, North House
Munk School of Global Affairs

Launch and Reception:

American Studies Undergraduate Journal 

Edited by Emily McNally and Maia Muttoo

Design by Nigel Soederhuysen

This is a private event, by invitation only.


Wednesday, September 26, 4-6 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

Larry M. Bartels

The Elusive Mandate: Searching for Meaning in American Presidential Elections

Co-sponsored by the United States Consulate General, Toronto, and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Larry M. Bartels is the May Werthan Shayne Professor of Public Policy and Social Science at Vanderbilt University. He is the author of Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded AgePresidential Primaries and the Dynamics of Public Choice, and numerous scholarly articles and commentaries on American politics and democracy. He has served as vice president of the American Political Science Association and chair of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Political and Social Science.


Friday, September 28, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Sarah Banet-Weiser

Branding Consumer Citizens: Gender and the Emergence of Brand Culture

Co-sponsored by Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto

Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, and the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.  She is the author of The Most Beautiful Girl in the World: Beauty Pageants and National Identity (1999); Kids Rule! Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship(2007); and most recently, Authentic™: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture (2012).  She is the co-editor of Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting (2007), and Commodity Activism: Cultural Resistance in Neoliberal Times (2012).  Banet-Weiser is the editor of American Quarterly, and co-edits a book series at NYU Press, Critical Cultural Communication Studies.


Wednesday, October 3, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Sylvia Bashevkin

Motherhood as metaphor: US foreign policy leaders construct their gender identities, 1980-present

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Sylvia Bashevkin is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Women, Power, Politics: The Hidden Story of Canada’s Unfinished Democracy (2009); Tales of Two Cities: Women and Municipal Restructuring in London and Toronto (2006); Welfare Hot Buttons: Women, Work and Social Policy Reform (2002);Women on the Defensive: Living through Conservative Times (1998); True Patriot Love: The Politics of Canadian Nationalism (1991); and Toeing the Lines: Women and Party Politics in English Canada (1985, 1993). Bashevkin is also editor of Opening Doors Wider: Women’s Political Engagement in Canada (2009); Women’s Work is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Caregiving, Employment and Social Policy Reform (2002); Women and Politics in Western Europe (1985); and Canadian Political Behaviour (1985).


*NEW LOCATION*

Friday, October 12, 2-4 pm
Jackman Humanities building
St. George Street and Bloor St. West
main floor conference room, JHI 100

Lisa Lowe

The Intimacies of Four Continents

Co-sponsored by the Asian Institute, and Dr. David Chu Programme in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto

Lisa Lowe is currently Professor of European and American Studies in the Department of English at Tufts University. Lowe is the author of Critical Terrains: French and British Orientalisms, and Immigrant Acts: on Asian American Cultural Politics. She is the co-editor of The Politics of Culture in the Shadow of Capital, and a third book,Metaphors of Globalization, is forthcoming. Her current project, The Intimacies of Four Continents, is a study of the convergence of colonialisms in the early Americas as the conditions for modern humanism and humanistic knowledge. Lowe is the 2012-13 F. Ross Johnson Visiting Scholar in American Studies, Centre for the Study of the United States.


Tuesday, October 16, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Pauline Beange

A Canadian Looks at Campaign Finance in the 2012 U.S. Election

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Pauline Beange completed her dissertation in Political Science at the University of Toronto in 2012, investigating approaches to regulating campaign finance in Canada, the U.S., and U.K. She has presented her research in Canada and the United States, and has taught tutorial sections in Comparative Politics and Canadian Politics at the University of Toronto.


Wednesday, October 17, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Steve Herbert

Fear and Loathing in the San Juan Islands: Endangered Orcas and the Legitimacy of Environmental Law

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography, and the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

Steve Herbert is Professor of Geography and Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ) at the University of Washington; he currently serves as director of LSJ. His research focuses on the geographies of law and policing. He is the author of three books: “Policing Space” (Minnesota 1997), “Citizens, Cops, and Power” (Chicago, 2006), and (with Katherine Beckett) “Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America” (Oxford, 2009).  His current research examines the use of the Endangered Species Act to help preserve a group of orca whales who frequent the Pacific Northwest.


Thursday, October 18, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Kornel Chang

Managing Race and Empire: Asian Exclusion as Foundation for Anti-Radicalism in the Pacific Northwest Borderlands

Co-sponsored by: Asian Institute, Canadian Studies ProgrammeDr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders Program in Asia Pacific Studies, Centre for South Asian Studies

Kornel Chang is assistant professor of History and American Studies at Rutgers University-Newark. His research interests include modern U.S. history, international migration and border controls, Asian diaspora, and the United States in the Pacific world. His current book project is a study of the western U.S.-Canadian borderlands in the Pacific world, examining how the region arose from frontier expansion, the globalizing forces of capital and empire, and the territorializing process of state formation in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.


Friday, October 19, 2-4 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

Theda Skocpol

Obama, the Tea Party, and the Future of American Politics

Co-sponsored by the United States Consulate General, Toronto, and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Theda Skocpol is Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University. Her first book,States and Social Revolutions (1979), won two major scholarly awards. In 1985, she co-edited the influential collection Bringing the State Back In (1985). For the last fifteen years, her research has focused on US politics in comparative and historical perspective. Skocpol’s Protecting Soldiers and Mothers: The Political Origins of Social Policy in the United States (1992) won five scholarly awards. Her recent books focus on US health reform, civic engagement, the Tea Party movement, and the successes and failures of the Obama administration in changing the direction of US domestic policies.


Tuesday, October 23, 12 noon – 2 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

U.S. Ambassador David Jacobson

The U.S. Election: An Insider’s View from the Outside

Co-organized by the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Centre for the Study of the United States, and Fulbright Canada.

Ottawa, ON – As the world’s attention is focused on the Presidential Election in the United States, the U.S. Ambassador to Canada will be at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto to discuss the election, and its implications for Canada. On Tuesday, October 23, the Centre for the Study of the United States at the Munk School, and Fulbright Canada will present a public lecture featuring Ambassador David Jacobson, who will be delivering a lecture entitled, “The U.S. Election: An Insider’s View from the Outside”. The lecture will be held at 12:00 pm in the Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility.

Ambassador Jacobson will address differences between the Canadian and the U.S. election processes; historical trends; polling; key states and races; and the impact of the elections on the bilateral relationship.

The lecture is FREE and open to the public. However, as seating is limited, all guests, including those from the media, are required to RSVP to rsvp@fulbright.ca prior to the event.

Operating in over 150 countries worldwide, the Fulbright program has long been regarded as the world’s premiere academic exchange. With the support of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and the United States Department of State, Fulbright Canada is the gold standard for academic exchanges and intellectual opportunity.

For more information please visit www.fulbright.ca.

Housed in the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Centre for the Study of the United States (CSUS) represents the largest collection of U.S.-focused scholars in Canada, as well as the greatest concentration of U.S. expertise in Canada’s history. Drawing on the resources of the Munk School, and with over 66 faculty affiliates, it has an unprecedented strength in U.S. expertise and in American Studies, both institutionally and nationally. For more information about CSUS and the Munk School of Global Affairs please visit: www.munkschool.utoronto.ca.

For more information:

Graeme Cunningham
Fulbright Canada
(613) 688-5514,
gcunningham@fulbright.ca
www.fulbright.ca


Monday, October 29, 4-6 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

U.S. ELECTIONS FORECASTING PANEL

James E. Campbell, Douglas A. Hibbs, Jr., Christopher Wlezien, Peter Loewen

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Can we know the outcome of elections before they happen? For years, election forecasters have been making their prognostications before ballots are cast. Each forecaster has a different model and their predictions often differ. Who has the best model is a topic of great debate. This event will feature three premiere political forecasters. They will make their predictions and explain their methods. This event will be of interest to anyone looking for some insights to how the 2012 Presidential election could end, and why.

Speakers:

James E. Campbell is the UB Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Buffalo. He is also past President of Pi Sigma Alpha, The National Political Science Honor Society (2008-10), and Chair of the Political Forecasting Group, a Related Group of the APSA. He is a former APSA Congressional Fellow and a program director at the National Science Foundation. Campbell has publishedfour books, and more than sixty book chapters and articles in political science journals. His most recent book is the second edition of The American Campaign: U.S. Presidential Campaigns and the National Vote(Texas A&M University Press, 2008). He is also the author of Cheap Seats: The Democratic Party’s Advantage in U.S. House Elections and The Presidential Pulse of Congressional Elections. Prior to joining the UB faculty in 1998, he served on the faculties of the University of Georgia (1980-88) and Louisiana State University (1988-98).

Douglas A. Hibbs, Jr. is a career-long academic who retired from a chair as Professor of Economics at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden in 2005, although he maintained an affiliation with the university as a senior fellow at the CEFOS research institute until June 2011. He received his Ph.D. in 1971 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison,  but began working as an Instructor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970. He left MIT as an Associate Professor in 1978, to take a chair at Harvard University as a Professor of Government. At both Harvard and MIT, he specialized in macro-political economy and applied multivariate statistics and econometrics. In the mid-1980s, Hibbs was a Professor of Economics in Europe – mostly in Sweden. However, he frequently visited other European and American universities, including the University of Paris-Sorbonne, the University of Rome-La Sapienza, Central European University, Prague-Budapest, Aarhus University, the University of Copenhagen, University of Trondheim (NTNU), the University of California, Los Angeles, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Christopher Wlezien is Professor of Political Science at Temple University. He joined the faculty from Oxford University, where he was Reader of Comparative Government and a Fellow of Nuffield College. While at Oxford, he co-founded the ESRC-funded Oxford Spring School in Quantitative Methods for Social Research. Previously, he taught at the University of Houston, where he was founding director of the Institute for the Study of Political Economy. He holds or has held visiting positions at Columbia University, European University Institute (Florence), Instituto Empresa (Madrid), Juan March Institute (Madrid), McGill University (Montreal), Sciences Po (Paris), and the University of Manchester (UK). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1989.

Moderator: 

Peter Loewen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Loewen has published articles in Party PoliticsWest European PoliticsCanadian Journal of Political Science, and Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, as well as numerous chapters. Current research projects include a large survey of Americans matched against extensive genetic information, an experimental survey of legislators in Canada, and a series of experiments exploring behavioural differences between partisans in Canada and Britain. Loewens is currently a collaborator with the Canadian Election Study. He received his Ph.D. from the Université de Montréal.


Wednesday, October 31, 3-5 pm
JHB100a, main floor conference room
Jackman Humanities building, St. George and Bloor St. W.

Roderick Ferguson

Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization

Organized by the Women and Gender Studies Institute Research Semianr; co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

Roderick Ferguson is a Professor of American Studies, Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies, and African American & African Studies, at the University of Minnesota.

We ask all participants to read a chapter from Dr. Ferguson’s forthcoming book. A copy is available from Ashifa Rajwani at: ashifa.rajwani@utoronto.ca. To register to attend this event, please email Ashifa Rajwani.


Monday, November 5, 4-6 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Sergei Kapterev

The Uneven Balance: Soviet-American Contacts in the Sphere of Cinema in the 1960s – 1970s

Co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto.

Sergei Kapterev, (Ph.D., Cinema Studies, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University) is Senior Researcher at the Research Institute of Cinema Art in Moscow. He specializes in the stylistic, intellectual, and political interaction between American and Soviet cinema, and is presently writing a monograph on this topic.


Thursday, November 8, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Jennifer Evans

Queering the Gays/Gaze: sex, street, and subculture in 1970s queer erotic photography

Co-sponsored by the: Centre for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, the Department of History, Sexual Diversity Studies Program, University of Toronto; and the Toronto Photography Seminar.

Jennifer Evans is Associate Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa. Her book, Life Among the Ruins: Cityscape and Sexuality in Cold War Berlin (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) explores the rebirth of the city’s various subcultures in the aftermath of World War II. Her next two research projects are more contemporary in focus. “Hate 2.0: Combating Right-Wing Extremism in the Age of Social Technology” is a collaborative project that analyzes the role and potential of digital media in countering online hate.


Friday, November 9
1-3 pm Lecture/Demonstration in the Robert Gill Theatre (214 College St.: St George St. entrance, 3rd Floor);
7 pm Performance in the Studio Theatre (4 Glen Morris St.)
The evening event is by RSVP only:publicity.graddrama@utoronto.ca
Please note: the Glen Morris Studio Theatre is not wheelchair accessible. Both events are free admission.

Reverend Billy and Savitri D of the Church of Stop Shopping

THE SHOPOCALYPSE IS COMING!

Co-sponsored by Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough, and the Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies, University of Toronto

Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping is an interventionist, activist performance group based in New York City, which uses the form of an evangelistic revival meeting to preach about the perils of consumerism, and to advocate for economic justice and environmental sustainability.

For more information, see www.revbilly.com.


Tuesday, November 13, 4-6:30 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Geoffrey Hale

So Near Yet So Far: The Public and Hidden Worlds of Canada-US Relations

Geoffrey Hale is Professor of Political Science at the University of Lethbridge, where he has taught since 1999. Hale has published widely in the fields of public policy and Canada-U.S. relations. His most recent book, So Near Yet So Far: The Public and Hidden Worlds of Canada-U.S. Relations (2012) is an in-depth analysis of the politics and processes of Canada-U.S. relations. He is also author of Uneasy Partnership: The Politics of Business and Government in Canada (2006), and The Politics of Taxation in Canada (2001), and co-editor (with Monica Gattinger) of Borders and Bridges: Canada’s Policy Relations in North America (2010).

His recent book will be available for sale in the 2nd floor lounge, North House, after his lecture.


Thursday, November 15, 4-7 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

James Danky

Protest on the Page and the Future of Print, Lecture in Two Parts

Organized by the Toronto Centre for the Book, Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College, University of Toronto

James Danky founded the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1992, and was director until 2006. Today, Danky directs the Future of Print Project for the Center, and is on the faculty of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He is the author/editor of more than thirty books. His last book was Underground Classics: The Transformation of Comics into Comix. For 35 years, he was the Newspapers and Periodicals Librarian for the Wisconsin Historical Society where he developed national collections of alternative press titles.

There will be a reception following this talk in the 2nd floor lounge, North House.


Thursday, November 29, 10 am-12 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

Sanford Levinson

What does the recent election tell us about the importance of the United States and American state constitutions?

Co-sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Constitutionalism, Democracy, and Development, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

Sanford Levinson is W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood Jr. Centennial Chair in Law at the University of Texas Law School, and Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin.  He is a Visiting Professor at the Harvard Law School during Fall 2012.  He is the author of many books and articles on various aspects of American constitutionalism, most recently Framed: America’s 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance(Oxford U. Press, 2012). He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association in 2010.


Friday, November 30, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Daphne Brooks

“One of these mornings, you’re gonna rise up singing”: Black Feminist Futurity through “Porgy and Bess”

Co-sponsored by the Department of Theatre, and the Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts, York University.

Still hailed by many as “America’s greatest opera,” the Gershwins’ “Porgy and Bess” remains an albatross around the neck of many African American performers who have grappled with its complex racial formations. This talk seeks to illuminate the secret history of black feminist performative aesthetics emerging out of a persistently controversial work of American theatre.

Daphne A. Brooks is professor of English and African-American Studies at Princeton University where she teaches courses on African-American literature and culture, performance studies, critical gender studies, and popular music culture. She is the author of two books: Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850-1910 (Durham, NC: Duke UP), winner of the The Errol Hill Award for Outstanding Scholarship on African American Performance from ASTR, and Jeff Buckley’s Grace (New York: Continuum, 2005). Brooks is currently working on a new book entitled Subterranean Blues: Black Women and Sound Subcultures—From Minstrelsy through the New Millennium (Harvard University Press, forthcoming).  Brooks is also the author of the liner notes for The Complete Tammi Terrell (Universal A&R, 2010), winner of the 2011 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award for outstanding music writing, and Take a Look: Aretha Franklin Complete on Columbia (Sony, 2011).


Thursday, January 17, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Simon Jackman

The Unremarkable Re-election of Barack Obama

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Simon Jackman is Professor of Political Science and Statistics at Stanford University, and a Visiting Professor, United States Studies Centre, University of Sydney. He is currently one of the Principal Investigators of the American National Election Studies, the most authoritative and longest-running survey-based study of American political behaviour and public opinion. He is the author of Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences (2009), and numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals. Jackman is an associate editor of Annual Reviews of Political Science and Political Analysis, and a past-president and Fellow of the Society for Political Methodology.


Friday, January 18, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Jon Butler

God in Gotham? Apocalypse and Resurrection in the Capital of American Secularism, 1880-1920

Co-sponsored by the Department and Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Jon Butler is Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of American Studies, History, and Religious Studies at Yale University, and Adjunct Research Professor of History at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He earned his Ph.D. (1972) from the University of Minnesota, where in 2006 he received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science. His books include: Power, Authority, and the Origins of American Denominational Order (1978; 2009), The Huguenots in America: A Refugee People in New World Society (1983; Soloutos Prize and Chinard Prize); Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People (1990; Outler Prize, AHA Beveridge Award for Best Book in American History); Becoming America: The Revolution Before 1776 (2000); and Religion in American Life: A Short History, co-authored with Grant Wacker and Randall Balmer (2003; 2011). He taught at Yale University (1985-2012), where he served as Chair of the American Studies Program (1988-1993), Chair of the Department of History (1999-2004), Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (2004-2010), and Acting University Librarian (2010-2011). In 2010, he received the Byrnes-Sewall Prize for Teaching Excellence in Yale College, and the Edward Bouchet Leadership Award for Diversity and Equal Opportunity. Butler is writing a book about religion in Manhattan from the Gilded Age to the 1960 Kennedy election, God in Gotham.


Friday, January 25, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Alexander Nemerov

“Swimming”:  JFK, Thomas Eakins, and November 22, 1963

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, University of Toronto

Alexander Nemerov is the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Stanford University. He is the author of six books on American visual culture, including most recently, Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s (2012), To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America (2011), and Acting in the Night: “Macbeth” and the Places of the Civil War (2010).


Monday, January 28, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Eric Walther

But Could They Build? Secessionists and the Civil War

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto, and York University

Eric Walther, who is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Houston, is the author of three books, numerous articles and book reviews. Walther’s publication, Shattering of the Union: America in the 1850swon a Choice Magazine book award in 2004. His biography of the foremost leader of secession, William Lowndes Yancey and the Coming of the Civil War, was published by the University of North Carolina Press (2006), and has received the James Rawley Award from the Southern Historical Association and the Jefferson Davis Award from the Museum of the Confederacy.


Wednesday January 30, 2013, 4-6 pm
Room 208N

Laura J. Kwak

Asian-American Imperialism and the Crisis of Raciology

Organized by the Graduate Student Workshop, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs 

Two of the most scandalous American nationalist securitization measures in the last decade were architected by Asian Americans. Assistant Attorney General Viet D. Dinh was the chief architect of the US Patriot Act (2001) and Republican White House Attorney, John Yoo’s writings heavily shaped post-9/11 policies, including his “torture memos,” which illegally sanctioned the torture of prisoners at Abu Ghraib (2002). However, these figures have not been examined by Asian American Studies. The existence of racial conservatives attests to the crisis of “race” and raciology (Gilroy 2000), and the need for politics without guarantee (Hall 1997). The figures examined are not only prominent Asian Americans holding positions of power and influence in the U.S., they are also conservative intellectuals, pundits, and elected politicians. While it appears that they have suddenly emerged onto the political scene, this paper investigates how since the late 1950s, conservative Asian leaders have played key roles in the United States.

Laura J. Kwak is a PhD candidate in the department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education (SESE) at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation “Globalizing Racial Conservatism: The Making of Asian Conservative Political Figures” looks at the emergence of racial conservatism in Canada, the United States, and the UK, charting how Asian Canadian, American, and British political figures are embedded in shifting racial formations. She has recently won the Anita Affeldt Graduate Award from the Association of Asian American Studies (AAAS), and holds an Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS). She has presented her work in Canada, the US, and the UK.


Friday, February 1, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Theresa Runstedtler

Graduate Student Workshop
Fighting the Global Colour Line: Black Transnationalism in Unexpected Places

Co-sponsored by Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Social Justice Education, and Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies, OISE, University of Toronto

A former professional dancer/actress from Canada, Theresa Runstedtler chose to shift her passion for popular culture from the studio and stage to the classroom. She is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University at Buffalo (SUNY), and was recently a Mellon post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book, Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line (2012), explores Johnson’s worldwide legacy as a black sporting hero and anticolonial icon in places as far-flung as Sydney, London, Cape Town, Manila, Paris, Havana, and Mexico City. Her scholarly articles appear in numerous publications including the Radical History Review (Winter 2009), and the Journal of World History (Dec. 2010).

This workshop is open to all Graduate students and university Faculty members.


Friday, February 1, 5-7 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Theresa Runstedtler

Jack Johnson and the Fight against the Global Colour Line

Co-sponsored by Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Social Justice Education, and Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies, OISE, University of Toronto

A former professional dancer/actress from Canada, Theresa Runstedtler chose to shift her passion for popular culture from the studio and stage to the classroom. She is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University at Buffalo (SUNY), and was recently a Mellon post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book, Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line (2012), explores Johnson’s worldwide legacy as a black sporting hero and anticolonial icon in places as far-flung as Sydney, London, Cape Town, Manila, Paris, Havana, and Mexico City. Her scholarly articles appear in numerous publications including the Radical History Review (Winter 2009), and the Journal of World History (Dec. 2010).


Tuesday, February 5, 3-5 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Geoffrey White

Touring America’s Good War: From Pearl Harbor to D-Day

Co-sponsored by the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

Geoffrey White is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Hawai’i. His research in Solomon Islands and Hawai‘i on the politics of Pacific War memory—The Pacific Theater: Island Representations of World War II (co-edited, 1989), Island Encounters: Black and White Memories of the Pacific War (co-authored, 1990), and Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (co-edited, 2001)—now extends to American war tourism in France.


Friday, February 8, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Richard Grusin

Mediashock

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, and the Centre for the Study of Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Richard Grusin is a Professor of English and Director of the Center for 21st Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California–Berkeley. Grusin is the author of four books: Transcendentalist Hermeneutics: Institutional Authority and the Higher Criticism of the Bible (1991),Remediation: Understanding New Media (1999), co-authored with Jay David Bolter, Culture, Technology, and the Creation of America’s National Parks (2004), and Premediation: Affect and Mediality After 9/11 (2010).


Wed. February 27, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

David L. Leal

The Case of the Disappearing Latinos: The Consequences of (Non) Ethnic Identification for Understanding Latino Political Participation in the United States

Co-sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

David Leal is Associate Professor in the Department of Governmentand Director of the Irma Rangel Public Policy Institute, at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. Dr. Leal’s primary academic interest is Latino politics. His goal is to understand how Latino individuals and communities shape, and are shaped by, politics in the United States. Because these are complex and multifaceted dynamics, his research spans the fields of public policy, political behaviour, and public opinion. His recent publications include: The Politics of Latino Education (with Kenneth J. Meier), Eds. (New York: Teachers College Press, 2011); and “Religion in Latino Political and Civic Lives,” in Alan Wolfe and Ira Katznelson (Eds.), Religion and Democracy in the United States: Danger or Opportunity? (Princeton and New York: Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation, 2010).


Wednesday February 27, 2013, 4-6 pm
Room 208N

Alexander Eastwood

Ordinary Endurance: the Aesthetics of Settling in Gertrude Stein’s “Three Lives”

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States Graduate Student Workshop   

This paper examines the problem of dwelling in the early work of Gertrude Stein in order to critique, more broadly, the reductive association of modernism with cosmopolitan mobility and transgression. The early twentieth century, a time of great epistemological and social upheaval, has typically been affiliated with negativity. Reading against this grain, I posit that the problem of domestic endurance in Three Lives is refracted through sexuality into tropes of wandering and settling Uniting recent queer work on affect and temporality with criticism on the ordinary, the paper reveals how Three Lives is at once invested in exposing the suffocating relationship of working-poor women to the domestic, and yet also in privileging domestic attachment as a valuable mode through which modern subjects bind themselves to the social. Ultimately, the paper identifies modernism’s vexed relationship to American culture’s preoccupation with novelty and self-invention, and the exhaustion and displacement these traditions can produce.

Alexander Eastwood is a Doctoral Candidate in English and Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto, from which he also holds an Honours B.A. in English. His dissertation, entitled “Strange Dwellings: Sex and Settling in Modern American Literature,” examines the concept of home in American modernism, and the import of somatic experience to the need for privacy and refuge within everyday modern life. He is a Junior Fellow of Massey College, and a Graduate Associate at the Centre for Ethics.


Thursday, February 28, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Morag Kersel

Agent of Diplomacy: Archaeology as an element of the Foreign Relations Toolkit

Co-sponsored by The Archaeology Centre, University of Toronto

Archaeology and archaeologists are routinely deployed as “agents of the state”, acting as official and unofficial ambassadors on behalf of their countries of origin. As a result of coalition forces’ failure to protect cultural institutions in Iraq, unwanted operations in Afghanistan and Pakistan and recent inactivity in protecting the cultural resources and people in places like Mali and Syria, it is essential for the US to present a kinder, gentler, caring face. What better way to reconfigure negative perceptions than through archaeology and the conservation and investigation of the common history of humankind? Archaeology and archaeologists can and do play a vital role in furthering diplomatic goals and agendas in countries and areas of the world where an apolitical, non-military appearance is very desirable. Through an examination of various programs at the U.S. Department of State this discussion will assesses the interplay between archaeology and cultural diplomacy in shaping U.S. cultural heritage policy and diplomatic relations in the international arena.

Morag Kersel is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at DePaul University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge (2006). Her research interests include the consumption and presentation of archaeological artifacts from the Eastern Mediterranean. She has excavated and conducted field research in Canada, Greece, Israel, Jordan, Palestine, and the U.S. She currently co-directs archaeological excavations at the Chalcolithic site of Marj Rabba in the Lower Galilee, and the “Follow the Pots” project in the Dead Sea Plain of Jordan. Kersel (with Christina Luke) are the authors of the recently published US Cultural Diplomacy and Archaeology: Soft Power, Hard Heritage (2012).

Morag Kersel is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at DePaul University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Cambridge (2006). Her research interests include the consumption and presentation of archaeological artifacts from the Eastern Mediterranean. She has excavated and conducted field research in Canada, Greece, Israel, Jordan, Palestine, and the U.S. She currently co-directs archaeological excavations at the Chalcolithic site of Marj Rabba in the Lower Galilee, and the “Follow the Pots” project in the Dead Sea Plain of Jordan. Kersel (with Christina Luke) are the authors of the recently published US Cultural Diplomacy and Archaeology: Soft Power, Hard Heritage (2012).


Friday, March 1, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Kara Keeling

Electric Feel: Transduction, Errantry, and the Refrain

Co-sponsored by the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto 

This talk assesses what certain logics gleaned from selected popular music songs might offer to ongoing efforts to renegotiate bonds, institutions, and political possibilities shaped by the violences characteristic of capitalism, cisgender and white supremacy, neoliberal multiculturalism, and contemporary geopolitics. Making Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s concepts of “the Refrain,” and “music” available as heuristics and technologies to contribute to ongoing explorations of the role that sound plays and yet might play in contemporary Euro-American feminist cultural studies, this talk is animated by what might be called, following Édouard Glissant, a mode of “scholarly errantry.” If feminism were music and feminists musicians, it could be said that feminism’s histories, its preoccupations, its shifting and fluid subjects and debates, its styles, its canonical texts and concepts, are its refrains, the things to which it returns, its territory, the aspects of feminism that exert a force in the world. These have political indices as well as scholarly, creative ones. Insofar as academic feminism traverses disciplines and constitutes itself as such through reference to its narratives and the intellectual lineages that it claims as its own, it has carved out a terrain, a “field,” and a set of constituent, but nonetheless contested, organizations and their stated priorities, interests, and common senses. The present essay asks, what music might contemporary feminisms make when their existing refrains are placed under pressure? How might sound and music offer insightful support for generating and relating concepts to the rapidly changing present circumstances that queer anti-racist feminisms actively participate in shaping. What tales of errantry might such feminisms tell today?

Kara Keeling is Associate Professor of Critical Studies in the School of Cinematic Arts and of African American Studies in the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. She is author of The Witch’s Flight: The Cinematic, the Black Femme, and the Image of Common Sense (Duke University Press, 2007). She coedited (with Josh Kun) a selection of writings about sound and American Studies entitled Sound Clash: Listening to American Studies (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012), and (with Colin MacCabe and Cornel West) a selection of writings by the late James A. Snead entitled European Pedigrees/African Contagions: Racist Traces and Other Writing (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003). Keeling has also written several articles that have appeared in the journals GLQQui ParleThe Black ScholarWomen and Performance, and elsewhere.


Thursday, March 14, 4-6 pm
Room 119, Emmanuel College
75 Queen’s Park

Rita Felski

An Inspector Calls

Co-sponsored by the Law & Humanities Workshop, Faculty of Law; the Department of English; and the Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

A chapter from a book in progress on critique and the hermeneutics of suspicion. For related publications, see: “Suspicious Minds,” Poetics Today 32 (2011): 215-34; “Critique and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion,” M/C Journal 15 (2012). Pre-registration is encouraged, as Professor Felski will be circulating a draft in advance. To receive a copy, and for additional information, please contact please contact Stella Kyriakakis at csus@utoronto.ca.

Rita Felski is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of English at the University of Virginia. Her current research centres on questions of method and interpretation. Her recent manifesto “The Uses of Literature” is a neo-phenomenological investigation of aesthetic experiences such as recognition, enchantment, and shock. Her work in progress is a book on critique and the hermeneutics of suspicion. She also has longstanding interests in feminist theory, modernity and postmodernity, genre (especially tragedy), and cultural studies.

Registration is required to attend this event. To register: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/events/


Friday, March 15, 6:30 pm
William Doo Auditorium, 45 Willcocks Street

THE CONTEMPORARY URGENCIES OF AUDRE LORDE’S LEGACY

Film screening: “Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992”
(Directed by Dagmar Schultz)
Followed by 
panel discussion with: 
Dagmar Schultz, Marion Kraft, Gloria Wekker, M. Jacqui Alexander, Carol Allain, Farrah Khan

Co-sponsored by Women and Gender Studies, Principal’s Initiatives Fund at New College, Equity Studies, Caribbean Studies, Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education, OISE, Centre for the Study of the United States, Sexual Diversity Studies, Anti-Racism and Diversity, Status of Women, Cinema Studies, and Canadian Studies.

The year 2012 marked the 20th anniversary of Audre Lorde’s passing, the acclaimed Black lesbian feminist poet and activist. Audre Lorde – The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 explores a little-known chapter of the writer’s prolific life, a period in which she helped ignite the Afro-German Movement while she challenged white German women to acknowledge and constructively use their white privilege. Testimonies from Lorde’s colleagues, students and friends relate the beginnings of these political debates and document Lorde’s lasting legacy in Germany.

For additional information and to register:
http://www.audrelorde-theberlinyears.com/emails/orgs_english_short.html


Tuesday, March 19, 5-7 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Ethan Nadelmann

The Rise and Fall of the Global Drug Prohibition Regime

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Described by Rolling Stone as “the point man” for drug policy reform efforts, Ethan Nadelmann is widely regarded as the outstanding proponent of drug policy reform both in the United States and abroad. Ethan Nadelmann is the founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, the leading organization in the United States promoting alternatives to the war on drugs. Nadelmann received his JD and PhD from Harvard University. He then taught politics and public affairs at Princeton University (1987-1994), where his speaking and writings on drug policy attracted international attention. He authored Cops Across Borders, the first scholarly study of the internationalization of U.S. criminal law enforcement, and co-authored another book entitled Policing the Globe: Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations, (2006). His writings have appeared in numerous outlets such as The New York TimesWall Street JournalScience, and National Review, and he has appeared on TV and radio programs including Real Time with Bill Maher, the Colbert Report, ABC’s Nightline, a Ted Koppel Special Report, NBC’s Today Show, NBC Nightly News, CBS’s 48 Hours, CBS Morning News, and Larry King Live. In 1994, Nadelmann founded the Lindesmith Center, a drug policy institute created with the philanthropic support of George Soros. Read more about Ethan Nadelmann: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/13536/

We won’t win until the average parent believes drug reform protects kids better than the war on drugs.”
Ethan NadelmannTalk to the San Francisco Medical Society on July 25, 2001.

To register for this event, please go to <click here>.


Wednesday March 27, 2013, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Brett Story

Hiding in Plain Sight: Spatial Practices of Penal Isolation in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States Graduate Student Workshop

In the U.S. today, more people are sentenced to more time in more prisons and in greater isolation than at any other time in its history. My project investigates how isolation operates within the organization and reproduction of the contemporary American prison system: how it is produced, what effects it has, and the primary arenas or means by which it is contested or undermined. Specifically, I examine penal isolation and its contradictions at four main sites located in the contemporary landscape of the New York State penal system: in the immediate, architectural space of solitary confinement within the prison itself; in the increasingly remote siting of prisons far from prisoner families and communities; from the densely penalized space of the urban “million-dollar block”; and in the spaces of circulation between and within urban and prison space which emerge or persist as social rebuttals to the organization of penal isolation.

Brett Story is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Geography and Program in Planning. Her research focuses on the U.S. prison system, and the shifting relationship between urban and penal space. Brett has also worked extensively as an independent documentary filmmaker and freelance journalist, writing and producing video for publications such as The NationThe Montreal Mirror, and the Toronto Review of Books. Her latest film, Land of Destiny, is a portrait of a petrochemical town in paralysis in the wake of an epidemic of cancers.

To register for this event, please go to <click here>.


Thursday, March 28, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Anjali Arondekar

In the Absence of Reliable Ghosts: Sexuality, Historiography, South Asia

Co-sponsored by the Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders in Asia Pacific Studies, Women and Gender Studies Institute, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Anjali Arondekar is Associate Professor of Feminist Studies and Literature at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research engages the poetics and politics of sexuality, colonialism and historiography, with a focus on South Asia. She is the author of For the Record: On Sexuality and the Colonial Archive in India (2009), winner of the Alan Bray Memorial Book Award for best book in lesbian, gay, or queer studies in literature and cultural studies, Modern Language Association (MLA), 2010. Her second book-project, Margins of Desire: Sexuality, Historiography, South Asia, grows out of her interest in the figurations of sexuality, ethics and collectivity in colonial British and Portuguese India.

To register for this event, please go to <click here>.


Thursday, March 28, 5:15-7 pm
Room 616, Jackman Humanities Institute

Jerome Christensen

Disney Derives the Future: Cognitive Capitalism and Brand Realism

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Centre for Innovation Law and Policy, and the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto

Jerome Christensen is Professor of English at the University of California, Irvine where he teaches film studies and romantic literature. He is the author of four books on eighteenth and nineteenth century figures. His most recent book, America’s Corporate Art:  Studio Authorship of Hollywood Motion Pictures, was published by Stanford University Press in 2012. Versions of Christensen’s essay, “Delirious Warner Bros.: Studio Authorship and The Fountainhead,” which originally appeared in Velvet Light Trap, have been published in Auteurs and Authorship: A Film Reader, ed. Barry Grant, and Critical Visions in Film Theory, ed. Timothy Corrigan, et. al. He is currently at work on a study of post-millennial Hollywood, and the financialization of American culture.


Tuesday, April 2, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Jens Andermann and Kevin Coleman

Manuscript Workshop

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Centre for the Study of Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Jens Andermann is Professor of Professor of Ibero-Romance Literature, with particular emphasis on non-European literatures, at University of Zurich, Switzerland. He is the editor of the “Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies,” “Recent Publications: New Argentine Cinema” (Tauris, 2011), and “The Optic of the State: Visuality and Power in Argentina and Brazil” (Pittsburgh, 2007).

This workshop is open to university faculty members only. It is not open to students or the general public.


Wednesday, April 3, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Jens Andermann

Islands, Beaches, Rivers: Latin American Modernity and the Transitional Landscape

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Centre for the Study of Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Jens Andermann is Professor of Professor of Ibero-Romance Literature, with particular emphasis on non-European literatures, at University of Zurich, Switzerland. He is the editor of the “Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies,” “Recent Publications: New Argentine Cinema” (Tauris, 2011), and “The Optic of the State: Visuality and Power in Argentina and Brazil” (Pittsburgh, 2007).


Friday, April 5, 10:00 am to 12 noon
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Lawrence N. Powell

Freedom Papers in an Accidental City

Co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, and the Department of History, University of Toronto

Until his retirement in June 2012, Lawrence N. Powell held the James H. Clark Endowed Chair at Tulane University, where he also established and directed the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South. He has written and edited twelve books and numerous articles. His most recent contributions are The Accidental City: Improvising New Orleans (Harvard 2012), George Washington Cable’s New Orleans (LSU 2008), and Troubled Memory:  Anne Levy, the Holocaust, and David Duke’s Louisiana (UNC Press), which won the Lillian Smith Book Prize from the Southern Regional Council, and the Kemper and Leila Williams Prize from the Louisiana Historical Association, both in 2000.

Rebecca Scott’s talk has been postponed to September 27, 2013.


Wednesday April 24, 2013, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

David K. Seitz

Follow the Family?: The Cultural Politics of Neo-Liberalism in Scott Walker’s Wisconsin

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States Graduate Student Workshop

After mass protests against Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s union-busting measures garnered global attention in 2011, Walker cruised to a stunning recall election victory in 2012. Progressive-Left accounts of Walker’s win have focused on the glut of outside corporate campaign donations in his coffers, and Democrats’ failure to offer an alternative economic vision. While helpful, these “follow the money” explanations neglect neoliberalism’s local inflections and cultural dimensions at their analytical and political peril. Instead of offering a causal explanation of Walker’s victory, I explore mainstream labour activists’ startling use of the trope of “working Wisconsin families” in pro-union appeals. Building on Wendy Brown’s (2010) insight about neoliberalism not only as a mode of economic organization but a “way of making souls,” I then point to local Left inflections of family and collectivity that might disturb, or even offer glimmers of alternatives, to neoliberalism’s intimate incitements to make exclusive attestations of innocence.

David K. Seitz is a Ph.D. student in human geography at the University of Toronto, and participates in the collaborative programs in women and gender studies and sexual diversity studies. His dissertation research explores alternative urban, national and transnational geographies of belonging and critical political community at a predominantly LGBTQ Toronto church. Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and a graduate of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, David also has a longstanding research interest in the cultural politics of race, gender, sexuality and neoliberalism in the Midwestern U.S.


Friday, May 10, 2013
9:00 am – 5:30 pm
OISE, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St West, Toronto ON
Rm. 5-210 & 5-220*

Symposium:

Black Diaspora Conversations: Gender Sexuality and Queer Thought
Hosted by the Department of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Social Justice Education, OISE/University of Toronto

Co-sponsored by: Centre for the Study of United States (CSUS); Centre for Integrative Anti-racism (CIARS); Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies (CDTS); and Mark Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies (SDS).

*this venue is wheelchair accessible

LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED

https://www.facebook.com/events/149160875257104/

This is a one-day symposium that brings together scholars working at the interstices of gender, sexuality and queer theory in black diaspora studies. Black Diaspora Conversations foregrounds new positions in the debates on gender, sexuality and queer thought from multiple sites of blackness. These new positions attempt to reinvigorate the promise of queer theory, politics and positionalities through a rigorous engagement with black life, politics and culture. Four OISE University of Toronto doctoral students will be presenting work in progress from their dissertation projects, which sit at the interstices of gender, queer, black, diaspora and sexuality studies. As well two scholars working at the most exciting sites of queer thought will provide keynotes.


SPEAKER SERIES 2011-2012

FALL 2011


Tuesday, September 13, 5:30-7:00 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

“9/ll” – Ten Reflections after the Passage of Ten Years:
An Opportunity to Contemplate and Remember

Sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs and the Centre for the Study of the United States

The Munk School of Global Affairs and the Centre for the Study of the United States are marking the 10th anniversary of “9/11” by providing an opportunity to contemplate the impact of that day’s terrible events and their longer-range importance.

Brief reflections by ten speakers will capture a wide range of perspectives – aiming to enrich understanding and foster insights at a milestone moment.  The participants will include some of Canada’s and the University of Toronto’s most respected thinkers – including Michael Ignatieff, Margaret MacMillan, Bill Graham, Natalie Zemon Davis, Ron Diebert, Janice Gross Stein, Ron Levi, Louis Century, Elspeth Brown, and Ron Pruessen.

For additional information and to view the webcast of this event <click here>. To view the article inThe Bulletin, please <click here>.


Tuesday, September 20, 11:30-1pm
Jackman Humanities building, Room 617

Scott Herring

Material Deviance: Theorizing Queer Objecthood

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, University of Toronto

Scott Herring is Associate Professor of English, Indiana University. Herring specializes in modern American literature and queer American Studies. While he spends the majority of his time on sexual and social modernity, much of his first book, Queering the Underworld: Slumming, Literature, and the Undoing of Lesbian and Gay History (University of Chicago Press, 2007), tracked how modern artists and writers tweaked the standard formulas of “city mysteries” or “slumming” literatures to undermine the genre’s promise of subcultural revelation. Herring’s second book, Another Country: Queer Anti-Urbanism (New York University Press, 2010), winner of the 2011 Lambda Literary Award, tackles a complementary metropolitan narrative—the rural-to-urban flight to the city. It charts how U.S.-based artists use what he terms “rural stylistics” to fashion critiques against lesbian and gay metro norms.  Herring is currently crafting a queer theory of material culture entitled, The Hoarders: Material Deviance in Modern America, for the University of Chicago Press.


September 22nd, 5:00-6:30 pm
Second Floor Lounge, North House
Munk School of Global Affairs

The Centre for the Study of the United States and the United States Consulate General of Toronto are pleased to present:

Journal Launch:

University of Toronto Undergraduate Journal of American Studies, 2010-11.
Co-Editors: Emily Debono and Adam Rogers-Green

In attendance will be Scott Walker, Public Affairs Office, United States Consulate General of Toronto, to present the Certificates of Merit to the Editors.

This is a private reception, by invitation only. For additional information, please contact Stella Kyriakakis at: csus@utoronto.ca


Friday, September 23, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Erika Lee

Hemispheric and Transnational Histories of the Asian Americas

Co-sponsored by the Department of History, University of Toronto

Erika Lee is a Professor of History and the Director of the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of two award-winning books: At America’s Gates: Chinese Immigration during the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943, and Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America, as well as several articles on transnational Asian American Studies and the history of immigration law in the United States. She is currently working on a book project titled, Asian Americas: A Transnational History.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Thursday, September 29, 8 pm
Robert Gill Theatre
214 College Street, 3rd flr
(use St. George St. entrance)

Ashley Lucas

Doin’ Time: Through the Visiting Glass

Directed by Joseph Megel

Co-sponsored by Latin American Studies, and Graduate Centre for Study of Drama, University of Toronto

Doin’ Time is a one-person show about the impact of incarceration on families.

Ashley Lucas is Assistant Professor of Dramatic Art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the Producing Artistic Director of UNC’s Teatro Latina/o Series, which hosts lectures, readings, and performances by U.S. Latina/o theatre artists. Together with women’s studies scholar Jodie Lawston, she co-edited Razor Wire Women: Prisoners, Activists, Scholars, and Artists (SUNY Press, 2011), and maintains a blog by the same name:http://razorwirewomen.wordpress.com.


Admission is free of charge. Donations will be collected for Anishnawbe Health Toronto, which offers the Aboriginal community Traditional Healing within a multi-disciplinary health care model. http://www.aht.ca/ Please contact the Graduate Centre for Study of Drama for registration information; Box Office: 416-978-7986. Please contact the Graduate Centre for Study of Drama for registration information. Box Office: 416-978-7986.

Inside-Out got the lead editorial in the Toronto Star, published On Tuesday, December 27 2011:


Tuesday, October 11, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Alan Ackerman

Launch of two new publications:

Just Words: Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy, and the Failure of Public Conversation in America (Yale University Press, 2011); and

Seeing Things, from Shakespeare to Pixar (University of Toronto Press, 2011)

Alan Ackerman is associate professor of English, University of Toronto.  His books include Just Words: Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy, and the Failure of Public Conversation in AmericaSeeing Things, from Shakespeare to Pixar, and The Portable Theater: American Literature and the Nineteenth-Century Stage.  He is also editor of the journal Modern Drama.

Just Words: Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy, and the Failure of Public Conversation in America:

In an appearance on The Dick Cavett Show in 1980, the critic Mary McCarthy glibly remarked that every word author Lillian Hellman wrote was a lie, “including ‘and’ and ‘the.'” Hellman immediately filed a libel suit, charging that McCarthy’s comment was not a legitimate conversation on public issues but an attack on her reputation. This intriguing book offers a many-faceted examination of Hellman’s infamous suit and explores what it tells us about tensions between privacy and self-expression, freedom and restraint in public language, and what can and cannot be said in public in America.

Seeing Things, from Shakespeare to Pixar:

The storytelling media employed by Pixar Animation Studios, Samuel Beckett, and William Shakespeare differ greatly, yet these creators share a collective fascination with the nebulous boundary between material objects and our imaginative selves.  How do the acts of seeing and believing remain linked?  Seeing Things demonstrates that the airy nothings of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the Ghost in Hamlet, and soulless bodies in Beckett’s media experiments, alongside Pixar’s digitally animated toys, all serve to illustrate the modern problem of visualizing, as Hamlet put it, “that within which passes show.”  The book analyses such ghostly appearances and disappearances across cultural forms and contexts from the early modern period to the present.  Seeing Things provides a fresh cultural history through theatrical, verbal, pictorial, and cinematic representations.

This reception is open to faculty and students in the American Studies program and the Department of English only. Please RSVP to: csus@utoronto.ca by October 6th.


Thursday, October 27, 2-4 pm
Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
Odette Hall, Room 323
50 St. Joseph Street (at Bay St.)

Jeffrey L. Sammons
Yale University

Workshop on German-American Language Mixing

Co-sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States and American Studies Program, School of Graduate Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto.

Jeffrey L. Sammons is Leavenworth Professor Emeritus of German Language and Literature at Yale University. He is a leading expert of 19th century German literature whose recent work has focused on German-American exchanges.

If you need special accommodation for this event, or to register, please contactgerman@chass.utoronto.ca by October 24th.


Friday, October 28, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Dick Hebdige

HOLE... swimming... floating... sinking... drowning: face down in “Noir”

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, University of Toronto

Dick Hebdige is the current Director of the University of California Santa Barbara Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, while holding a joint faculty appointment in the Department of Art and Film Studies. He has published extensively on popular culture, media and critical theory, and contemporary art, music, and design. Hebdige has been teaching in art schools since the mid-1970s, having served as the Dean of Critical Studies and the Director of the experimental writing program at CalArts, before going to UCSB. He is the author of three seminal books on art and popular culture: Subculture: The Meaning of StyleCut’n’mix: Culture, Identity and Caribbean Music, andHiding in the Light: On Images and Things. He received his Master of Arts degree from the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, England.

To register for this event, please go to:


Tuesday, November 1, 3-5 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Regarding Queer Affects

Panel Discussion

Organized by the Women and Gender Studies Institute, and the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Speaker: T.L. Cowan, Assistant Professor (on leave), Women’s & Gender Studies Program,  Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture & Creativity, and Department of English, University of Saskatchewan
Title: “How it Feels to Hold Several Balls (in the air) at Once: The Dialectical Aesthetics of Feminist & Queer Cabaret”

Speaker: Jessica Fields, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, San Francisco State University
Title: “A Worried Lot: U.S. Voters and the Affective Grounds of Sex Education for Queer Youth”

Speaker: Trish Salah, Instructor, Women’s & Gender Studies Program, Interdisciplinary Centre for Culture & Creativity, and Department of English, University of Saskatchewan
Title: “Masculine Energy Entering the Room, or A Close Reading of What Trans Misogyny Feels Like”

Speaker: Aparna Mishra Tarc, Assistant Professor of Education, York University, Toronto
Title: “The Queer Character of Race Relations”

For additional information, please go to: http://www.wgsi.utoronto.ca/news-events/regarding-queer-affects. To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx.


Wednesday, November 9th, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Warwick Anderson

“Hybridity, race, and science: the voyage of the Zaca, 1934-35”

Co-sponsored by the Department of History, and Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

Warwick Anderson holds an appointment as Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of History and the Centre for Values, Ethics, and the Law in Medicine at the University of Sydney. Additionally, he has an affiliation with the Unit for History and Philosophy of Science at Sydney, and is a Professorial Fellow of the Centre for Health and Society at the University of Melbourne. Formerly, Dr. Anderson was Robert Turell Professor of Medical History and Population Health, Professor of the History of Science, and Chair of the Department of Medical History and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been awarded grants and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council (US), the Rockefeller Foundation, and a Fellow for the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation in 2007-08.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


*Please Note: Change in time.*

Friday, November 11, 12 noon-2 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Thomas Keenan

Mengele’s Skull: Human Rights and Forensic Aesthetics

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto, and the University of Western Ontario.

Thomas Keenan teaches literary and political theory, media and conflict, literature, and human rights at Bard College, New York, where he is Associate Professor of Ccomparative Literature and Director of the Human Rights Project.  He is the author of Fables of Responsibility: Aberrations and Predicaments in Ethics and Politics (1997), and co-editor of Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics (Fordham 2010), New Media, Old Media (Routledge 2005), The End(s) of the Museum (Fundació Antoni Tàpies 1996), Responses: on Paul de Man’s Wartime journalism (Nebraska 1989), and Paul de Man, Wartime Journalism (Nebraska 1988). Dr. Keenan has published widely with articles in PMLA, The New York Times, Wired, Aperture, Bidoun, and Political Theory,amongst many others. He has also served on the boards of WITNESS, the Soros Documentary Fund, and The Journal of Human Rights.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=10169


Thursday, November 17, 4:15-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs
Reception to follow, 2nd floor lounge, North House

Hester Blum

Polar Imprints

Organized by the Toronto Centre for the Book, Book History and Print Culture Program, University of Toronto

Hester Blum is an associate professor of English at Penn State University. She is the author of The View from the Masthead: Maritime Imagination and Antebellum American Sea Narratives (University of North Carolina Press, 2008), which won the John Gardner Maritime Research Award. She is also the editor of William Ray’s North African captivity narrative Horrors of Slavery, or, The American Tars in Tripoli (Rutgers University Press, 2008). A co-founder of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, Blum is currently at work on a new project entitled “Arctic and Antarctic Circles: The Print Culture of Polar Exploration.”

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Friday, November 18, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Fred Turner

“The Family of Man” and the Politics of Attention in Cold War America

Fred Turner is Associate Professor of Communication and Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society at Stanford University in California. He is the author of From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism, and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American MemoryBefore coming to Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and MIT’s Sloan School of Management. He also worked for ten years as a journalist, having written for newspapers and magazines ranging from the Boston Phoenix and the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine,to Nature. He is currently drafting a history of immersive media environments in the decades after World War II.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Friday, December 2, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Russ Castronovo

Ben Franklin and WikiLeaks

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, University of Toronto

Russ Castronovo is the Dorothy Draheim Professor of English and American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His most recent publications include: Beautiful Democracy: Aesthetics and Anarchy in a Global Era(Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2007); States of Emergency:  The Object of American Studies, co-edited with Susan Gillman(Chapel Hill:  University of North Carolina Press, 2009); Materializing Democracy: Toward a Revitalized Cultural Politics, co-edited with Dana Nelson (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002); Necro Citizenship: Death, Eroticism, and the Public Sphere in the Nineteenth-Century United States (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001); and Aesthetics and the End(s) of American Cultural Studies: Special Issue of American Literature, co-edited with Chris Castiglia. He is completing a book entitled Propaganda 1776.  Castronovo received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


WINTER 2012


Friday, January 13, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

RICK VALELLY

Veto-Proofing African-American Citizenship:  Judicial Review and the Strategic Origins of the U.S. Constitution’s Citizenship Clause

Rick Valelly is Claude C. Smith ’14 Professor of Political Science at Swarthmore College, a well-known U.S. liberal arts college located near Philadelphia. He is author of The Two Reconstructions:  The Struggle for Black Enfranchisement (University of Chicago Press, 2004), which won several professional awards.  He is very active in the American Political Science Association.  At Swarthmore, Valelly teaches courses on Congress, the U.S. Presidency, political parties, and elections.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


THURSDAY, JANUARY 26
DOORS AT 6:30 PM, EVENT STARTS AT 7:00PM
ISABEL BADER THEATRE
93 CHARLES ST WEST

War Child Presents:


The Future of 
Aid: Our Shared Responsibility

In partnership with the Canadian International Council and the Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Toronto, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto.

Join Dr. Samantha Nutt, Founder of War Child and author of Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies and Aidin conversation with leading experts in the fields of development and human rights as they discuss the future of aid in our conflicted world.

Featuring:
Dr. Samantha Nutt, Founder of War Child and author of Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies and Aid
Brian Stewart, Senior Correspondent for CBC and Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs
Biju Rao, Lead Economist in the Development Research Group of the World Bank
Ian Smillie, Author of Freedom From Want and Chair of the Diamond Development Initiative
Sasha Lezhnev, Policy Consultant, ENOUGH Project
George Roter, CEO and Co-Founder of Engineers Without Borders Canada

TICKETS:
Student  – $10 (with valid student ID)
General – $20More information can be found here:
http://wcc.r-esourcecenter.com/Event/index.asp?Event_Id=31
We encourage you to pre purchase your copy of Damned Nations which can be picked up at the door for only an additional $25. Dr. Samantha Nutt will be signing copies following the event.Proceeds from this event will support War Child. If you are unable to attend but would like to make a donationclick here.

* Please Note: This event has been relocated from Room 208N. *

Tuesday, January 31, 10 am-12 noon
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

Roundtable:

Trans Studies: State of the Field

Co-sponsored by the History Department, York University; Women and Gender Studies Institute, and Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Chair:
Elspeth Brown, Director, American Studies Program and Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

Speakers:
Susan Stryker, Director of the Institute for LGBT Studies, and Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Arizona.
Sheila Cavanagh, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, and Coordinator of the School of Women’s Studies and the Sexuality Studies Program, York University

Nick Matte, Adjunct Faculty, Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of History, and Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto.
Bobby Noble, Associate Professor, cross-appointed to the Departments of English and Sexuality Studies, York University.

To register for this event, please go to: http://www.munk.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=11586


Tuesday, January 31, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

SUSAN STRYKER

Cross-Dressing for Empire: Embodying White Masculinity Through Performance in San Francisco’s Bohemian Club, 1870s-1920s

Co-sponsored by the History Department, York University; Women and Gender Studies Institute, and Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Susan Stryker is Director of the Institute for LGBT Studies, and Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, at the University of Arizona. She earned her Ph.D. in United States History at U.C. Berkeley in 1992, held a post-doctoral fellowship in Sexuality Studies at Stanford University, and has been a visiting faculty member at Harvard University, U.C.-Santa Cruz, Simon Fraser University, and Macquarie University. She has written widely on queer and transgender topics, and co-edited the Lambda Literary Award-winning anthology The Transgender Studies Reader. Her Emmy Award-winning film Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, documents an episode of transgender collective resistance to police oppression in 1966. She is currently researching cross-dressing theatricals in San Francisco’s all-male Bohemian Club, and working on a new film about 1950s transsexual celebrity Christine Jorgensen, and continuing to promote the development of transgender studies.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx

To view an interview with Susan Stryker in Xtra!: <click here>.


February 1, 5:00 to 7:00 pm
University College, University of Toronto
15 King’s College Circle, Room 140

Panel:

Beyond the Border

Co-sponsored by University College Canadian Studies program, and the Centre for the Study of the United States at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

A group of leading University of Toronto experts in Canada-US relations will provide insight into the proposed border agreement between the two nations at Beyond the Border, a panel event taking place at University College on February 1 at 5:00 p.m.The new deal on bilateral trade and security has been called the most important of its kind since the North American Free Trade Agreement. Others describe the Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan, announced by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and US President Barack Obama on December 7, 2011, as “incremental and hypothetical.”Debating the implications of the deal for border relations, economic integration, and security are:
Stephen Clarkson, Professor of Political Economy, and author (with Matto Mildenberger), Dependent America? How Canada and Mexico Construct US Power;
Emily Gilbert, Professor of Geography, Director of Canadian Studies, and author, Borders and Security in North America;
John Kirton, Professor of Political Science and Director, G8 Research Group;
Audrey Macklin, Professor, Faculty of Law, and author, The State of Law’s Borders and the Law of States’ Borders;and
Kent Roach, Professor, Faculty of Law, and author, September 11: Consequences for Canada.
Elspeth Brown, Professor of History and Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, will moderate the discussion, which is open to the public.

For further information, please visit www.uc.utoronto.ca/beyondtheborder  or contact:Yvonne Palkowski
Communications Officer, University College, yvonne.palkowski@utoronto.ca   | (416) 978-3160.


Wednesday, February 1, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

RONALD NUMBERS

Creationism Goes Global

Co-sponsored by the Department of Religion, University of Toronto
Ron Numbers is an eminent scholar of the history of science, medicine, and religion in the United States. He is the author of numerous books, including Darwinisim Comes to America (Harvard, 1998); The Creationists(California 1992, and more recently, Harvard); Almost Persuaded: American Physicians and Compulsory Health Insurance, 1912-1920 (Hopkins 1978); as well as over ten edited volumes. Prof. Numbers has won numerous awards, including fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a John Simon Guggenheim felllowship. He wase President of the History of Science Society (200-2001) and the American Society of Church History (1999-2000). He will be in residence at CSUS in February-March, 2012.
To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx

** THIS EVENT HAS BEEN RELOCATED **

Friday, February 10, 2-4 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

JEFFREY DVORKIN

US and Canadian Public Broadcasting: Different Origins; Similar Threats

Co-sponsored by the Journalism Program, University of Toronto Scarborough

Jeffrey Dvorkin is a Lecturer and Director of the Journalism Program at the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus. He was Managing Editor and Chief Journalist at CBC Radio, and VP of News and Information at NPR in Washington, DC. He was NPR’s first news ombudsman, a position he held for more than six years. Dvorkin is also the Executive Director of the international Organization of News Ombudsmen.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


*** THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED. ***

Friday, February 17, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

TANYA ERZEN

Faith-Based Imprisonment and the Politics of Transformation

Co-sponsored by the Department and Centre for the Study of Religion, and the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto.

Tanya Erzen is Associate Professor of Religion and Comparative Studies and affiliate faculty of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the Ohio State University.  Her first book, Straight to Jesus: Sexual and Christian Conversions in the Ex-Gay Movement (California, 2006), received the Ruth Benedict Prize and the Gustave O Arlt award.  The recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the American Association of University Women, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute for Advanced Study, she is currently writing God in Captivity (Harvard University Press), an examination of forms of faith-based imprisonment in the U.S.


Monday, February 27, 4-6pm
Room 108, Munk School of Global Affairs

Fatima El-Tayeb

Postracial Europe? Minority Activism and the Queering of Ethnicity

Co-sponsored by: Centre for the Study of the United States, Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, Department of History, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies,  Centre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies, Joint Initiative in German and European Studies, and Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto.

Professor El-Tayeb received a Ph.D. in History. She is an Associate Professor of the Departments of Literature and Ethnic Studies and Associate Director for Critical Gender Studies Program at the University of California, San Diego. Her teaching and research interests include African and Comparative Diaspora Studies, Transnational Feminism, Migrant, Minority Cultures, and Muslim Communities in the West, Queer of Coluor Critique, Visual Cultural Studies, and Media Theory.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Friday, March 2, 2-5 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

PETER DECHERNEY AND STEFAN ANDRIOPOULOS

SYMPOSIUM ON LAW AND FILM

Co-Sponsored by the: Faculty of Law, Centre for the Study of the United States, Department of  English, Cinema Studies Institute, Centre for Comparative Literature, and Centre for Innovation & Law Policy, University of Toronto.

2:00 – 3:30 pm

Stefan Andriopoulos 

“The Terror of Reproduction: Early Cinema’s Ghostly Doubles and the Right to One’s Own Image”

Respondent:  James Leo Cahill, French and Cinema Studies, University of Toronto

Stefan Andriopoulos is chair of the Department of Germanic Languages at Columbia University. He is the author of Possessed: Hypnotic Crimes, Corporate Fiction, and the Invention of Cinema (University of Chicago Press, 2008; German version: Fink, 2000), which won the SLSA Michelle Kendrick award for best academic book on literature, science, and the arts. His new publication provisionally titled Ghostly Apparitions: German Idealism, the Gothic Novel, and Optical Media, is under contract with Zone Books. His previous work, published in German, includes a monograph on Accident and Crime: Configurations between Literary and Legal Discourse around 1900 (Centaurus, 1996).

James Leo Cahill teaches in the French Department and the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on early French cinema, documentary and experimental media, and critical theory, with a special interest in the relationships between scientific uses of cinema, cinematic uses of science, and film pedagogy. Cahill is also a co-editor of Discourse: Journal of Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture.

 

3:30 – 5:00 pm

Peter Decherney 

“Auteurism on Trial: Moral Rights and Films on Television”

Respondent: Simon Stern, Faculty of Law and Dept. of English

Peter Decherney is Associate Professor of Cinema Studies, English, and Communication and the Director of the Cinema Studies Program at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Hollywood’s Copyright Wars: from Edison to the Internet (Columbia, 2012), and Hollywood and the Culture Elite: How the Movies Became American(Columbia, 2005). He regularly testifies before the Copyright Office of the United States, and in 2011, he filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court Case of Golan v. Holder. Prof. Decherney has been an Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Scholar and a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies.

Simon Stern is Assistant Professor of Law and English at the University of Toronto. His research interests include the history of copyright law; legal, literary, and intellectual history in the 18th and 19th centuries; and methodology in interdisciplinary work involving law and the humanities. Stern’s work has been published, or is forthcoming, in the Yale Journal of Law & the HumanitiesLaw & LiteratureLaw & Social Inquiry, the Yale Law Journal, and ELH.

 

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Wednesday, March 14, 5:30 – 7:00 pm
208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

KEN WISSOKER

The Problem of the Second Book

Organized by the Asian Institute, and co-sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States, and Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies.

Ken Wissoker is the Editorial Director of Duke University Press, acquiring books in anthropology, cultural studies, and literary theory; globalization and post-colonial theory; Asian, African, and American studies; music, film and television; race, gender, and sexuality; and other areas in the humanities, social sciences, media, and the arts. He moved to Durham to join the Press as an Acquisitions Editor in 1991, and became Editor-in-Chief in 1997, before being named Editorial Director in 2005. Among the authors whose books he has published are: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Jane Gallop, Charles Taylor, Lisa Lowe, Lauren Berlant, Judith Halberstam, Brian Massumi, Ann Stoler, Aihwa Ong, Rey Chow, and Arjun Appadurai. He is especially proud of the number of first book prizes that have gone to Duke University Press authors—a sign that the Press continues to have its pulse not simply on current scholarship, but on the most promising new intellectual developments.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Thursday, March 22, 2012, 3-5 pm
Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100
170 St. George Street

SHARI HUHNDORF

Contested Images, Contested Lands: The Politics Of Space In Louise Erdrich’s “Tracks” And Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Sacred Water”

Co-sponsored by: the Jackman Humanities Institute, the Department of English, the Centre for Comparative Literature, the Women and Gender Studies Institute, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs.

Shari Huhndorf is Professor of Native American Studies in the Ethnic Studies Department at UC Berkeley. She is the author of two books, Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination (Cornell UP, 2001) andMapping the Americas:The Transnational Politics of Contemporary Native Culture (Cornell UP, 2009), and a co-editor of Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture (UBC Press, 2010). Another co-edited work,Sovereignty, Indigeneity, and the Law, a special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, recently won the 2011 award for best special issue from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. She is currently at work on a manuscript tentatively entitled “Indigeneity and the Politics of Space: The Gendered Geographies of Native Women’s Culture.”

No registration is required.


Thursday, March 22, 5-7 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

MICHAEL D. MARTINEZ

The 2012 US Presidential Election . . . through a Rearview Mirror and a Crystal Ball

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Michael D. Martinez is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Florida. He earned his PhD at the University of Michigan, and has had visiting appointments at Texas A&M, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Calgary (as a Fulbright Scholar). His research on ambivalence in public opinion, voter turnout, partisanship, and ideology in the United States and Canada has appeared in many scholarly journals, including Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, Canadian Journal of Political Science,Political Behavior, Political Psychology, Public Opinion Quarterly, and American Politics Research. He teaches graduate seminars and undergraduate courses in political behaviour, research methods, and American politics.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


** PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO ILLNESS. **

Friday, March 23, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk School of Global Affairs

STEVE HERBERT

Adrift in a Sea of Uncertainty:  Compliance, Coercion and Endangered Whales

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography, and the Centre for Criminology and Socio-legal Studies, University of Toronto

Steve Herbert is Professor of Geography and Law, Societies, and Justice at the University of Washington.  His research focuses on the geographies of law and policing. He is the author of three books: Policing Space(Minnesota 1997), Citizens, Cops, and Power (Chicago, 2006), and (with Katherine Beckett) Banished: The New Social Control in Urban America (Oxford, 2009). His current research examines the use of the Endangered Species Act to help preserve a group of orca whales who frequent the Pacific Northwest.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Monday, March 26, 2012 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Roundtable on Takashi Fujitani’s New Book:

Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans in WWII

Co-sponsored by the Asian Institute and the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

Takashi Fujitani 
Professor of History and the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto 
Moon-Ho Jung – Commentator, Associate Professor and Walker Family Endowed Professor of History, University of Washington 
Ken Kawashima – Commentator, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies University of Toronto 
Andre Schmid – Commentator, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies University of Toronto 
Elspeth Brown – Chair, Director, Centre for the Study of the United States and American Studies Program, and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

This book offers a major challenge to our understandings of nationalism, racism, colonialism and wartime mobilization during the Second World War. In parallel case studies – of Japanese Americans mobilized to serve in the United States Army and Koreans recruited or drafted into the Japanese military – T. Fujitani examines the U.S. and Japanese empires as they struggled to manage racialized populations while waging total war. Fujitani probes government policies and representations of these soldiers (including in film, in literature, and in archival documents) to reveal how characteristics of racism, nationalism, imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, gender politics, and the family changed on both sides of the Pacific, with repercussions that remain with us today. Writing against the grain of conventional historiography the author demonstrates that the U.S. and Japan became increasingly alike during the course of the war, perhaps most tellingly in their common attempts to disavow racism even as they reproduced it in new ways and forms.

To order the book online with a 20% discount, log on to www.ucpress.edu/9780520262232 and use discount code12M0402.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Tuesday, March 27, 2012 3:00 – 5:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

Moon-Ho Jung

Subversive Histories: Race, National Security, and Empire Across the Pacific

Co-sponsored by the Centre for South Asian Studies, Centre for the Study of the United States, Canada Centre for Global Security Studies, Department of History, University of Toronto

This lecture will critique standard narratives of Asian American and U.S. history that tend to treat Asian Americans as “immigrants” deserving or striving for inclusion (citizenship) in the U.S. nation-state. By exploring how Asians came to be radicalized and racialized subjects of the U.S. empire before World War II, I will seek to reframe our notions of movements across the Pacific. In particular, my talk will trace the historical origins of the national security state, the heart and soul of the U.S. empire, to a series of U.S. “foreign” and “domestic” policies targeting Asians on both sides of the Pacific. Moon-Ho Jung is Associate Professor and the Walker Endowed Family Professor of History at the University of Washington. He is the author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), which received the Merle Curti Award from the Organization of American Historians and the History Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


Thursday, March 29th, 4-6 pm
University College, Room 140
15 King’s College Circle

SUSIE BRIGHT

Big Sex, Little Death: Sexual Liberation, Erotic Forensics, and the Great Feminist Vanishing Act

Co-sponsored by: The Michael Lynch Distinguished Visitorship, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies; Women & Gender Studies Institute; and Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs; and Come As You Are.

Best-selling author, activist, and erotic forencist Susie Bright writes about sex and politics (almost) every day onsusiebright.blogs.com. Bright is the author of Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Seal Press, 2011). Her bestselling audio show, “In Bed With Susie Bright,” airs every week at audible.com/susie.

No registration is required.


Friday, March 30, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk School of Global Affairs

BRITTNEY COOPER

Black Women Public Intellectuals and the Discourse of American Peculiarity, 1892-1956

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

Brittney Cooper is Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Race Studies at the University of Alabama. She is a 2009 alumna of the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts at Emory University with a Ph.D. in American Studies. She is spending the 2011-2012 academic year as a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Race and Ethnicity at Rutgers University. Currently, Dr. Cooper is completing her first book project,Race Women: Gender and the Making of a Black Public Intellectual Tradition, 1892-Present. She has two forthcoming book chapters on the history of the Order of Eastern Star and the history of Black women’s fraternal and club activism in North Louisiana. She has published several book chapters and articles on representations of Black women in popular culture. Dr. Cooper has a forthcoming article on Sapphire’s Push as a hip hop novel. She is also co-founder along with Dr. Susana Morris of the Crunk Feminist Collective, a feminist of color scholar-activist group that runs a highly successful blog, and also does speaking tours, conducts workshops, and engages in a range of activist causes related to women’s issues. Professor Cooper blogs for the CFC as “Crunktastic.”

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


*** Please note change in date and time.***

Tuesday, April 10, 4-6 pm
Centre for Criminology and Socio-legal Studies
Room 150, Canadiana Gallery
14 Queen’s Park Cres. West

LAURA E. GÓMEZ

The Next Generation of Socio-legal Scholarship on Race and Racism: Connecting How We Operationalize “Race” to its Conceptualization as Social Construct

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Criminology & Socio-legal Studies, University of Toronto.

Laura E. Gómez rejoined the faculty of UCLA Law in 2011, after serving as professor of law and American studies at the University of New Mexico from 2005-10. Before joining the UNM faculty, she spent 12 years as professor of law at UCLA. She was a co-founder and the first co-director of UCLA’s Critical Race Studies Program. Gómez has lectured widely and has published numerous articles, book chapters, and op-ed commentaries, as well as two books. In her 2007 book, Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race, Professor Gómez examines how law and racial ideology intersected to create new racial groups and to re-structure the turn-of-the-twentieth century racial order in the US As an associate editor of the Law & Society Review, she produced a special issue on law and racial inequality (2010). She has held prestigious residential fellowships at the School for American Research in Santa Fe and the Stanford Humanities Center in Palo Alto.

To register for this event, please go to: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx


April 14 – May 12, 2012
Doris McCarthy Gallery
University of Toronto Scarborough
1265 Military Trail

Age of Consent

Masters of Visual Studies (Curatorial Studies)
Graduating Exhibition

Works by Sue de Beer, Wendy Coburn, Kyla Mallett, Leslie Peters, Rebecca Fin Simonetti, Tobias Yves Zintel
Curated by Talia Linz

Masters of Visual Studies (Curatorial Studies) Program, University of Toronto

Age of Consent brings together the media-rich work of six Canadian and international artists who look at adolescence in various forms, exploring experiences (real and projected), perceptions (internal and external), myths, dreams and desires connected to this demographic and this time in one’s life. Temporality is a central factor in considering ideas around adolescence, which is often framed as emblematic of the liminal, as a transitional phase to move through to achieve a more stable state of being. Many of the works in Age of Consentcelebrate wading in the uncomfortable unknowing of teenagedom, asking how this paradigmatic period shapes the formation of the self and continues to inform adult subjectivity.

Please call the Doris McCarthy Gallery for hours of operation or additional information: 416-287-7007, or go on their website: http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~dmg/html/exhibitions/upcoming.html

To see the exhibition listing in the U of T Bulletin, please <click here>.


Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, North House
Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

HANS NOEL

The Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street: The Role of Ideological Movements in the American Two-Party System

Organized by the United States Consulate General, Toronto, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto.

Hans Noel is Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Georgetown University, Washington, DC. Noel teaches on parties, elections, political history, and political methodology, His research is concerned with political coalitions, political parties and ideology, with a focus on the United States. He is the co-author of The Party Decides: Presidential Nominations Before and After Reform. He is working on a policy-centered general theory of political parties, and on the application of social network analysis to political coalitions and coordination, and is completing a book on the role of ideology in party politics. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan from 2008 to 2010, where he studied prohibition politics. Before coming to Georgetown, Noel was a fellow in the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. From 1994 to 1997, Noel worked for a daily newspaper in Virginia. He is the co-director/co-producer of the award-winning feature film, The Rest of Your Life. He received his Ph.D. in 2006 from UCLA. Link to additional information: http://bit.ly/hansnoel

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. This event is now full.

The Munk School of Global Affairs is a wheelchair-accessible building, with metered street parking on Devonshire Place.


Monday, July 9, 2012, 5:30-7:30 pm
Innis Town Hall
University of Toronto
2 Sussex Avenue (at St. George Street)

Lecture and Book Launch:
CHRIS HEDGES

DAYS OF DESTRUCTION 
DAYS OF REVOLT

Co-sponsored by Random House Canada.

TO VIEW THE WEBCAST RECORDING OF THIS LECTURE, PLEASE <CLICK HERE>.

In DAYS OF DESTRUCTION, DAYS OF REVOLT (Random House Canada; June 12, 2012), Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges and American Book Award-winning graphic artist Joe Sacco offer an illustrated exposé of how corporate greed and government indifference have unleashed unbridled socio-economic decay in the United States. With uncompromising portraits of the often forgotten underclass that subsists at the lowest rank of American life, Hedges and Sacco put forth a searing indictment of the human, ecological, and moral costs of the excesses of unregulated corporate capitalism. Turning its gaze to the still active Occupy movement, this stirring testament to the need for radical change provides an eye-opening, often shocking vision of the way we live now.

A blend of investigative reportage and graphic narrative, DAYS OF DESTRUCTION, DAYS OF REVOLT focuses on five disenfranchised segments of the American story. Unlike any other study of the current dilemma, DAYS OF DESTRUCTION, DAYS OF REVOLT takes a singular approach that is steeped in unimpeachable research and yet put a very human face on the problems that none of us should be permitted to ignore. The pain and despair that Hedges and Sacco capture in both word and image is a palpable reminder that we cannot continue on this road.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Chris Hedges, a senior fellow at the Nation Institute and Truthdig columnist, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist. His books include War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning, American Fascists, and Empire of Illusion. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Joe Sacco is one of the world’s foremost cartoonists and the creator of war-reportage comics. He is the author of a number of illustrated books including Palestine, which received the American Book Award, Fixer, Safe Area Gorazde, and Footnotes in Gaza, which won the Ridenhour Book Prize. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

ABOUT THE BOOK

DAYS OF DESTRUCTION, DAYS OF REVOLT
By Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco
Published by Random House Canada
Publication Date: June 12, 2012
$28.95C ∙ Trade Paperback ∙ 320 pages
www.daysofdestructiondaysofrevolt.com

For more information about this publication, please contact Sheila Kay, 416 957 1570, skay@randomhouse.com

 

 


SPEAKER SERIES 2010-2011

WINTER 2011


Thursday, January 20, 4:15-7:00 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Ann Komaromi

Samizdat: Material Texts and Extra-Gutenberg Publics

Organized by the Toronto Centre for the Book, University of Toronto, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States.


Ann Komaromi is Assistant Professor at the Centre for Comparative Literature. Komaromi’s interests include theavant-garde in literature and visual arts, the Russian novel, Soviet nonconformist art, and dissidence. A significant portion of her research has been focused on late Soviet writing and publishing, especially the Samizdat text and alternative textual culture. Her publications include an article on “The Material Existence of Soviet Samizdat” (Slavic Review, 2004), “The Unofficial Field of Late Soviet Culture” (Slavic Review, 2007), and “Samizdat as Extra-Gutenberg Phenomenon” (Poetics Today, 2009). Komaromi was awarded a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) grant in 2006 for the study of uncensored texts of the late Soviet period. This grant contributed to work on current projects, including a catalogue and history of Soviet Samizdat periodical editions. She is also working on a book manuscript about Samizdat and uncensored novels of the late Soviet period.


Friday, January 21, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Marc Stein

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Sexual Revolution? Sex, Marriage, and Reproduction from Griswold to Roe

Co-sponsored by Sexual Diversity Studies, and The Constitutional Roundtable, University of Toronto Faculty of Law.

Marc Stein is Associate Professor of History, Women’s Studies, and Sexuality Studies at York University, Toronto. He is the author of City of Sisterly and Brotherly Loves: Lesbian and Gay Philadelphia, 1945-1972 (University of Chicago Press, 2000); the editor-in-chief of the award-winning Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in America (Scribers, 2003); and the author of the new monograph, Sexual Injustice: Supreme Court Decisions from Griswold to Roe (University of North Carolina Press, 2010).

Copies of this publication will be available for sale following the lecture.


Friday, Jananuary 28, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Lane Relyea

CSI vs. DIY: Photography Between Aftermath and Aftermarket

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, University of Toronto.

Lane Relyea is a Professor of Art History, Northwestern University. Relyea received his Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin in 2004. Since 1983, his essays and reviews have appeared in numerous magazines including: Artforum, Parkett, Frieze, Art in America, and Flash Art. He has also written recent monographs on Polly Apfelbaum, Richard Artschwager, Jeremy Blake, Vija Celmins, Toba Khedoori, Monique Prieto, and Wolfgang Tillmans, among others, and contributed to such exhibition catalogues as Public Offerings, andHelter Skelter (both Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2001 and 1992, respectively). From 1987 to 1991, he served as editor of Artpaper, a monthly art magazine based in Minneapolis. After teaching for a decade at the California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, where he joined the faculty in 1991, he was appointed director of the Core Program and Art History at the Glassell School of Art in Houston, Texas, in the summer of 2001.


Friday, February 4, 2-4 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

Saidiya Hartman

The Seventh Ward and the Studio

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, and Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto.

Saidiya Hartman is Professor of English and Comparative Literature, and Women’s and Gender Studies at Columbia University. Professor Hartman’s major fields of interest are African-American and American literature and cultural history, slavery, law and literature, and performance studies. She is on the editorial board of Callaloo. She has been a Fulbright, Rockefeller, Whitney Oates, and University of California President’s Fellow. She is the author of: Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-making in Nineteenth Century America; and, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route. She has published essays on photography, film, and feminism, and is beginning a new project on photography and ethics.


Thursday, February 10, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Nan Enstad

American Dreamers and Global Cigarettes:
Seeing the Corporation as an Art Form

Nan Enstad is Associate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is the author of Ladies of Labor, Girls of Adventure: Working Women, Popular Culture and Labor Politics, and is currently writing a book tentatively titled, The Jim Crow Cigarette: Following Tobacco Road from North Carolina to China and Back.


Thursday, February 10, 4:10-6PM
Flavelle House, Room C (basement)
78 Queen’s Park Crescent

Ian Shapiro

On Non-Domination

Organized by the Department of Political Science, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto.

Ian Shapiro is Sterling Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he also serves as Henry R. Luce Director of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. He has written widely and influentially on democracy, justice, and the methods of social inquiry. A native of South Africa, he received his J.D. from the Yale Law School, and his Ph.D from the Yale Political Science Department where he has taught since 1984 and served as chair from 1999 to 2004. Shapiro is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a past fellow of the Carnegie Corporation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. His most recent books are: The Flight From Reality in the Human Sciences; Death by a Thousand Cuts: The Fight Over Taxing Inherited Wealth (with Michael Graetz); and Containment: Rebuilding a Strategy against Global Terror. His current research concerns the relations between democracy and the distribution of income and wealth.


Friday, February 11, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk


William Warner

Protocols of Liberty: Committees, Declarations, Networks,
and the American Revolution

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, University of Toronto.

William Warner is a Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has taught since 1997. He has also taught at the State University of New York, Buffalo. Prof. Warner received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1977. He is the author of Reading Clarissa: The Struggles of Interpretation(1979); Chance and the Text of Experience: Freud, Nietzsche and Shakespeare’s Hamlet (1986); and Licensing Entertainment: the Elevation of Novel Reading in Eighteenth Century Britain (1998). Professor Warner is currently at work on the Transcriptions Project, and has edited, with Clifford Siskin, This is Enlightenment, forthcoming in 2010 with U. of Chicago Press. He is a participant in the the UC Transliteracies Project, and is currently writing a book on the American Revolution.


Tuesday, February 15, 4:30-6:00 pm
Room UC140, University College

Matthew Brower

Developing Animals: Wildlife and Early American Photography

Co-sponsored by University of Toronto Art Centre, and the Faculty of Information.

Matthew Brower is a lecturer in Museum Studies in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, and the Curator of the University of Toronto Art Centre. As curator of UTAC, he has curated shows on Canadian painting, the conceptual furniture of Gord Peteran, and the video work of Mieke Bal. He co-curated The Brothel Without Walls, a primary exhibition for CONTACT 2010, which explored contemporary photography through the lens of Marshall McLuhan’s thought. He is currently co-curating an exhibition on the articulation of a feminist aesthetics of beauty in the work of Suzy Lake for 2011. His research explores the production and circulation of images in North American culture focusing on the question of how images function. He is particularly interested in images that occupy the intersections of art, science, and technology, and has largely pursued these interests through the representation of nature and the figure of the animal. He has published on twentieth-century Canadian art and visual culture, and 19th- and 20th-century American visual culture.

There will be a book launch following the talk, from 6-8 pm, in the University of Toronto Art Centre.


*Please Note: This event is completely sold out.*

Tuesday, February 15, 5:30-7:30 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs


In Conversation with Brian Stewart:

Part I – Canada and Afghanistan (Brigadier-General Jonathan Vance)
Part II – Obama Watch: Historians Review the Obama Foreign Policy Record

Co-sponsored by Canada Centre for Global Security Studies, University of Toronto.

Participants – Part I:
Brigadier-General Jonathan Vance (Chief of Staff Land Strategy, Canadian Armed Forces)

Brian Stewart (Former foreign affairs reporter and senior correspondent for CBC TV News, Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs.)

Participants – Part II:

John Milton Cooper (Professor-Emeritus, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison);
Robert Bothwell (May Gluskin Chair in Canadian History; Director of the International Relations Program, Professor of History, University of Toronto);
Ronald W. Pruessen (Deputy Director-International Partnerships, Munk School of Global Affairs, and Department of History, University of Toronto).

Moderator: Brian Stewart (Former foreign affairs reporter and senior correspondent for CBC TV News, Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs.)


Wednesday, February 16, 11 am-1:00 pm
Room 108N

John Milton Cooper

Woodrow Wilson:
The Intellectual in Politics — and the Political Intellectual in the Global Arena

Co-sponsored by Canada Centre for Global Security Studies.

John Milton Cooper, Jr., is a historianauthor, and Professor-Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His specialization is late 19th and early 20th century American history. He is the author of Breaking the Heart of the World: Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations and The Warrior and the Priest: Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt, among other books. His newest publication is “Woodrow Wilson: A Biography.” Cooper was recently a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.


Wednesday, March 2, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk


Joseph Masco

Atomic Cinema: The National Security Archive

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto.

Joseph Masco is an Associate Professor at the University of Chicago, where he teaches anthropology and science studies. He is the author of The Nuclear Borderlands: The Manhattan Project in Post-Cold War New Mexico (2006, Princeton University Press), which won the 2008 Rachel Carson Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science and was co-winner of the 2006 Robert Merton Prize from the American Sociology Association. Recent publications include:”Sensitive but Unclassified: Secrecy and the Counter-terrorist State” in Public Culture, “Bad Weather: On Planetary Crisis” in Social Studies of Science, and “Survival Is Your Business: Engineering Ruins and Affect in Nuclear America” in Cultural Anthropology.


Friday, March 4, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk

Neferti Tadiar

Citizen-Man: Medium of Democracy

Co-sponsored by Women and Gender Studies, and the Asian Institute, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto.

Neferti Tadiar is Professor and Chair of Women’s Studies at Barnard College. Her academic interests include transnational and third world feminisms; postcolonial theory; critical theories of race and subjectivity; literary and social theory; cultural studies of the Asia Pacific region; and Philippine studies. Her work concerns the role of cultural practice and social imagination in the production of wealth, power, marginality and liberatory movements in the context of global relations. While her research focuses on contemporary Philippine and Filipino cultures and their relation to political and economic change, she addresses, more broadly, questions of gender, race, and sexuality in discourses and material practices of nationalism, transnationalism, and globalization. She is currently working on a book-project entitled: Discourse on Empire: Living Under the Rule of Permanent War, and beginning a new research project entitled Schooling National Subjects: Experience and Education in US Colonial Philippines. Her books include: Things Fall Away: Philippine Literatures, Historical Experience and Tangential Makings of Globality ; Beyond the Frame: Women of Color and Visual Representation, co-edited with Angela Y. Davis; andFantasy-Production: Sexual Economies and Other Philippine Consequences for the New World Order. She is winner of the Philippine National Book Award (2005).


This is a private reception for University of Toronto Faculty members, American Studies and English department undergraduate and graduate students, and invited guests.

Wednesday, March 9, 4-5:30 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs

Sarah Wilson

Book Launch:
Melting-Pot Modernism

Between 1891 and 1920, more than eighteen million immigrants entered the United States. While many Americans responded to this influx by proposing immigration restriction or large-scale “Americanization” campaigns, a few others adopted the image of the melting pot to oppose such measures. These Progressives imagined assimilation as a multidirectional process, in which both native-born and immigrants contributed their cultural gifts to a communal fund. Melting-Pot Modernism reveals the richly aesthetic nature of assimilation at the turn of the twentieth century, focusing on questions of the individual’s relation to culture, the protection of vulnerable populations, the sharing of cultural heritages, and the far-reaching effects of free-market thinking. Exploring the depth and nuance of an earlier moment’s commitment to cultural inclusiveness, Melting-Pot Modernism gives new meaning to American struggles to imaginatively encompass difference—and to the central place of literary interpretation in understanding such struggles.

Sarah Wilson is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on American literature of the turn of the twentieth century, taking up the aesthetic and political questions posed by immigration, cosmopolitanism, and political reform.

Copies of the publication will be available for sale.


Wednesday, March 9, 5:30-7:30 pm
Jackman Humanities Institute, Room 100

Carol Mavor

Blue is the Colour of Impossible Mourning: a Bower, a Sweet, and a Crystal

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto.

Carol Mavor is Professor of Art History and Visual Studies at the University of Manchester, England. Mavor is the author of several books: Reading Boyishly: Roland Barthes, J. M. Barrie, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Marcel Proust, and D. W. Winnicott (Duke UP, 2007); Becoming: The Photographs of Clementina, Viscountess, Hawarden (Duke UP, 1999); Pleasures Taken: Performances of Sexuality and Loss in Victorian Photographs (Duke UP, 1995); andBlack and Blue: The Bruising of “Camera Lucida,” “La Jetée,” “Sans Soleil,” and “Hiroshima mon amour” is forthcoming from Duke UP (2011). Her essays have appeared in Cabinet Magazine. Art History, Photography and Culture, Photographies, as well as edited volumes, including Geoffrey Batchen’s Photography Degree Zero and Mary Sheriff’s Cultural Contact and the Making of European Art. Her most recent published essay is on the French child-poet Minou Drouet. Mavor’s writing has been widely reviewed in publications in the US and UK, including theTimes Literary Supplement, the Los Angeles Times, and The Village Voice. She has lectured broadly in the US and the UK, including The Photographers’ Gallery (London), University of Cambridge, Duke University, and the Royal College of Art. For 2010-2011, Mavor was named the Northrop Frye Chair in Literary Theory at the University of Toronto. Currently, Mavor is completing Blue Mythologies: A Study of the Hue of Blue (forthcoming from Reaktion in 2012).

This lecture is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.


Thursday, March 10, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Faye Ginsburg

Screening Disabilities: Visual Fields, Public Culture, and the Atypical Mind
in the 21st Century

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, and Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto.

Faye Ginsburg is David B. Kriser Professor of Anthropology at New York University. She is the director of the Center for Media, Culture, and History, and Co-Director of the NYU Council for the Study of Disabilities. Her work over the years as a filmmaker, writer, and curator has focused on movements for social transformation, and the key role played by cultural activists in these processes, from her multiple award-winning book, Contested Lives: The Abortion Debate in an American Community, to her several edited collections on reproduction and gender, to her groundbreaking collection, Media Worlds: Anthropology on New Terrain, to her forthcoming book, Mediating Culture: Indigenous Media in a Digital Age. Ginsburg is recipient of numerous grants including the MacArthur, Guggenheim, Spencer, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations, and the Pew Charitable Trusts.


Thursday, March 10, 5:30-7:30 pm
Jackman Humanities Institute, Room 100

Carol Mavor

Blue is a Colour Where it is Hard to Find Anything Missing: the Aran Islands, Venice, the Cyanotype, and Agnes Varda’s Le Bonheur

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto.

Carol Mavor is Professor of Art History and Visual Studies at the University of Manchester, England. Mavor is the author of several books: Reading Boyishly: Roland Barthes, J. M. Barrie, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Marcel Proust,and D. W. Winnicott (Duke UP, 2007); Becoming: The Photographs of Clementina, Viscountess, Hawarden (Duke UP, 1999); Pleasures Taken: Performances of Sexuality and Loss in Victorian Photographs (Duke UP, 1995); andBlack and Blue: The Bruising of “Camera Lucida,” “La Jetée,” “Sans Soleil,” and “Hiroshima mon amour” is forthcoming from Duke UP (2011). Her essays have appeared in Cabinet Magazine. Art History, Photography and Culture, Photographies, as well as edited volumes, including Geoffrey Batchen’s Photography Degree Zero and Mary Sheriff’s Cultural Contact and the Making of European Art. Her most recent published essay is on the French child-poet Minou Drouet. Mavor’s writing has been widely reviewed in publications in the US and UK, including theTimes Literary Supplement, the Los Angeles Times, and The Village Voice. She has lectured broadly in the US and the UK, including The Photographers’ Gallery (London), University of Cambridge, Duke University, and the Royal College of Art. For 2010-2011, Mavor was named the Northrop Frye Chair in Literary Theory at the University of Toronto. Currently, Mavor is completing Blue Mythologies: A Study of the Hue of Blue (forthcoming from Reaktion in 2012).

This lecture is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.


Thursday, March 10, 7-9 pm
Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave.

Film Screening:

Freedom Riders

Written, Directed, and Produced by Stanley Nelson

Co-sponsored by Caribbean Studies, New College; Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College; Sociology and Equity Studies; Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Department of History; and Canadian Studies, University College, at the University of Toronto.

Nominated for the 2011 American Writers Guild Award for Best Documentary Screenplay
Based in part on the book: Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, By Raymond Arsenault
Official Selection: Sundance Film Festival 2010; Full Frame Documentary Film Festival 2010.

Powerful and often harrowing, Freedom Riders dramatically captures the journey that changed America forever. In 1961, more than four hundred activists risked their lives by traveling together on buses and trains through the Deep South to end segregation. Filmmaker Stanley Nelson interviews many of the surviving riders whose non-violent beliefs were sorely tested by hostility, mob violence, and virulent racism. This ultimately triumphant story features testimony from the Riders themselves, state and federal government officials, and journalists who witnessed the rides firsthand.

Director Stanley Nelson will be in attendance.

For more information about Marcus Garvey & Freedom Riders, visit:
http://firelightmedia.org/about/our-team/stanley-nelson/stanley-nelson/


Friday, March 11, 6-8 pm
Sidney Smith Hall
100 St. George Street, Room 2102

Film Screening:

Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind
Directed by Stanley Nelson

Co-sponsored by Caribbean Studies, New College; Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College; Sociology and Equity Studies; Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Department of History; and Canadian Studies, University College, at the University of Toronto.

“In death, I shall be a terror to the foes of Negro liberty. Look for me in the whirlwind or the song of the storm; look for me all around you.” – Marcus Garvey

Marcus Garvey: Look for me in the Whirlwind uses a wealth of archival film, photographs, and documents to uncover the story of this Jamaican immigrant, who between 1916 and 1921 built the largest black mass movement in world history. It explores Garvey’s dramatic successes and failures before his fall into obscurity. Among the film’s most powerful sequences are interviews with people who were part of the Garvey movement decades ago. These interviews communicate the appeal of Garvey’s revolutionary ideas to a generation of African Americans, and reveal how he invested hundreds and thousands of black men and women with a newfound sense of pride.

Followed by a Panel Discussion with: 
Stanley Nelson, Director
Robert Hill, Professor of History, UCLA and Editor, The Marcus Garvey and UNIA Papers

For more information about Marcus Garvey & Freedom Riders, visit:
http://firelightmedia.org/about/our-team/stanley-nelson/stanley-nelson/


Friday, March 18, 9 am – 6 pm
Northrop Frye 003

7th Annual HAPSAT Conference:

The Regimen of Bodily Health: Nutrition and Natural Knowledge

Co-sponsored by: Institute for the History & Philosophy of Science & Technology; Science & Culture Working Group, Jackman Humanities Institute; Department of Philosophy; Dalla Lana School of Public Health Students’ Association; and the Graduate Student Union.


Keynote:
The Long History of Dietetics:Thinking about Food, Expertise, and the Self
Steven Shapin

Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University

Registration is required to attend this conference. To Register for this Conference please go to the website:

wwww.hps.utoronto.ca/hapsa


March 23, 2011, 7:00 pm
East Common Room, Hart House
7 Hart House Circle, University of Toronto

Paul Robeson: The Tallest Tree in Our Forest

Co-sponsored by Hart House, the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, and Access and Diversity Unit in Parks Forestry and Recreation (City of Toronto).

We must join with the tens of millions all over the world who see in peace our most sacred responsibility. In celebration of the UN Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Hart House, the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, and Access and Diversity Unit in Parks Forestry and Recreation (City of Toronto) present Paul Robeson: The Tallest Tree in Our Forest, Challenging Race and Class within Toronto’s Multicultural Framework.

Four panelists, each speaking from a different perspective, will address the importance of actor-turned-civil rights leader Paul Robeson’s work both locally and abroad and will relate these achievements within the context of Toronto.The panel discussion will focus on Robeson’s approach to race and class during the 1930s and 40s, and the relevance of his achievements around current dialogue on the limits of multiculturalism following the release of recent reports indicating that Toronto is becoming an increasingly segregated community along the lines of race, ethnicity, and class. A screening of the 8-minute film The Tallest Tree in Our Forest, chronicling the larger than life personality and relevance of Paul Robeson, will precede the panel discussion, along with the presentation of a proclamation signed by Mayor Rob Ford.

“Paul Robeson epitomizes the essence of diveristy yet he is largely misunderstood and not acknowdged and this has to be corrected. The City’s commitment to diversity and City Council’s official celebration of the date of Robeson’s birth is a strong indication that equity and diversity are major priorities for the City of Toronto,” says Ken Jeffers, City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation.

Panelists include: 
Ken Jeffers, City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation
Norm Kelly, Writer and Playwright
Lee Lorch, Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus
Rathika Sitsabaiesan, Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate

Cost: Free

For more information, please contact:
Zoe Dille, 416.978.5362 or zoe.dille@harthouse.ca


Friday, March 25, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Ruth Wilson Gilmore

“Gender Responsive” Prison Expansion, or Notes on a Rout and Hope for a Route

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography, University of Toronto.

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the City University of New York Graduate Center. She received a BA and MFA in Dramatic Literature and Criticism from Yale, and a PhD in Geography from Rutgers. In addition to Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (University of California Press, 2007), recent publications include “Race, Prisons, and War: Scenes from the History of U.S. Violence” (in Leo Panitch and Colin Leys, eds., Violence Today: Actually existing Barbarism, London: Merlin Press, 2009), and “Forgotten Places and the Seeds of Grassroots Planning” (in Charles R. Hale, ed.,Engaging Contradictions, University of California Press, 2008). At the University of Southern California as director of the program in American Studies and Ethnicity, she saw the unit through to departmentalization, serving as its first chair. A member of the board of the Economic Roundtable, Gilmore is also a founding member of the anti-prison groups California Prison Moratorium Project and Critical Resistance, and a founding member and past-president of the Central California Environmental Justice Network. Awards include an NEA Grant, a Soros Senior Justice Fellowship, the James Blaut Award for Critical Geography, the Ralph Santiago Abascal Award for Economic and Environmental Justice, a Mellon Award for Excellence in Mentoring Graduate Students, and the Lora Romero Best Book Prize. Gilmore is president of the American Studies Association.


NEW LOCATION:
Jackman Humanities Institute
170 St. George Street, Room 100A
(at Bloor St.)

Tim Dean

Obscene, On/Scene, the ‘Other Scene’: An Ethics of Looking at Pornography

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, University of Toronto, and Department of Visual Studies, UTM.

Tim Dean is Director of the Humanities Institute and Professor of English at the University at Buffalo. Tim Dean is the author of several books, including: Unlimited Intimacy: Reflections on the Subculture of Barebacking(University of Chicago, 2009); Beyond Sexuality (Chicago, 2000); the co-editor of Homosexuality and Psychoanalysis (with Christopher Lane, Chicago, 2001); and the forthcoming Porn Archives (with Steven Ruszczycky and David Squires, Duke, 2012).


Friday. April 1, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Odd Arne Westad

The Shock of the Global: The United States and the Origins of Globalisation

Co-Sponsored by the Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto.

Odd Arne Westad is Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and an expert on the history of the Cold War era and on contemporary international affairs. He co-directs LSE IDEAS, a centre for international affairs, diplomacy and strategy, is an editor of the journal Cold War History, and is an editor of the forthcoming three-volume Cambridge History of the Cold War. Professor Westad lectures widely on China’s foreign affairs, on Western interventions in Africa and Asia, and on foreign policy strategy. His most recent book, The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times, received the Bancroft Prize, the Michael Harrington Award, and the Akira Iriye International History Book Award, which has been translated into fourteen languages.  He is now working on a history of Chinese foreign affairs since 1750.


Thursday, April 7, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Lisa Lowe

Free Labour, Free Trade: Coolies, Opium, and the Intimacies of Four Continents

Co-sponsored by Diaspora and Transnational Studies, and the Asian Institute, University of Toronto.

Lisa Lowe is a noted scholar in the fields of comparative literature, American studies, Asian American studies, and the cultural politics of colonialism and migration. She is currently Visiting Professor of American Studies at Yale University. Lowe is the author of Critical Terrains: French and British Orientalisms, and Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics, in which she examines the historical, political, cultural and aesthetic meanings of immigration in relation to Asian Americans. She is coeditor of The Politics of Culture in the Shadow of Capital, a collection of essays on international cultural studies, and has published numerous articles and essays. A third book, Metaphors of Globalization, is forthcoming. Her current project, The Intimacies of Four Continents, is a study of the convergence of colonialisms in the early Americas as the conditions for modern humanism and humanistic knowledge. In her presentation, she will share a part of that project that examines the ‘forgetting’ of Asian indentured labour, native-descendant peoples, and African slavery within modern European liberal discourses of freedom, and its ‘return’ in gendered racial taxonomies that persist within the humanities today. Lowe studied European intellectual history at Stanford University, and French literature and critical theory at UC Santa Cruz.


All events are free and open to the public. Registration is encouraged viahttp://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx
(Please Note: registration does not guarantee a space, which is available on a “first come, first served” basis.)


FALL 2010


Friday, September 17, 2-4 pm
OISE, UT room 12-199

Karen Graves

‘And They were Wonderful Teachers’: Florida’s Purge of Gay and Lesbian Teachers

Organized by Sociology & Equity Studies in Education, OISE, and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto.

Professor Graves is the current Vice President of the History and Historiography Division of the American Educational Research Association and the incoming president of the History of Education Society. She is full Professor of Education and Women’s Studies at Denison University – a private, selective, liberal arts institution in central Ohio, USA. She is the author of “”Girls’ Schooling during the Progressive Era: From Female Scholar to Domesticated Citizen” (1998), and the co-editor of “Inexcusable Omissions: Clarence Karier and the Critical Tradition in History of Education Scholarship” (2001). Graves’ talk will be based on her latest book, “‘And They were Wonderful Teachers’: Florida’s Purge of Gay and Lesbian Teachers,” published by the University of Illinois Press last year. For more details on her book, feel free to check out the UIP website at:http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/56bwz3ba9780252034381.html.


Monday, September 20, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Simone Davis and Lori Pompa

Teaching an Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program Course:
Making the Walls Porous

“That wall isn’t there just to keep me in, but to keep you out.” —Tyrone W.

This information session will introduce interested faculty (from any field) to the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program. Inside-Out trained professors offer university courses behind bars to classes comprised equally of incarcerated (“inside”) students and college-enrolled students from the “outside.” In classes that are facilitated rather than taught, Inside-Out (I-O) students form a working community of equals based on collaboration and dialogue. I-O courses are taught in many disciplines, and many academic and correctional settings: a constant is that in the Inside-Out circle, all participants are invited to take leadership in addressing how crime is conceived, how justice might be enacted, and how violence can be understood and transcended. I-O steering committee member Simone Davis will join Inside-Out founder and director Lori Pompa. They will introduce the program and the weeklong intensive Teacher Training Institutes, and will be eager to discuss ways to launch Inside-Out in Ontario.

Lori Pompa, Founder and National Director, Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, has worked in jails and prisons in the Philadelphia region for twenty-five years as an educator, counselor, social worker, and advocate. She directed an alternatives to incarceration program at the Pennsylvania Prison Societyfor seven years, and serves on their Board of Directors. After teaching the first Inside-Out course in 1997, Lori was awarded a Soros Justice Senior Fellowship in 2003 for her creative approach to justice education, which launched Inside-Out’s national replication. A long-time member of the Criminal Justice Department at Temple University, Lori employs an experiential learning methodology in all of her teaching. She has taken more than 10,000 students to prisons, jails, and youth detention facilities.

Simone Weil Davis serves on the U.S. national steering committee for Inside-Out. A professor of American literature, American Studies and Gender Studies who has taught at Mount Holyoke College, New York University and Long Island University, Simone will be visiting faculty in the American Studies program at the University of Toronto during 2010-2011. While her first book, Living Up to the Ads: Gender Fictions of the 1920s (Duke UP 2000), treated the interplay between commodity culture and gendered subjectivity in the U.S., her work in progress, Raising the Jailhouse Roof: Women, Writing and Incarceration, looks not at commercial, but at carceral impacts on expressivity.


Thursday, September 23, 4:15 pm
George Ignatieff Theatre
Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue

Arnold Lehman

A Perspective on Artists’ Books at the Brooklyn Museum

Organized by the Centre for the Study of the Book, in association with the iSchool and the Centre for the Study of the United States.

When Arnold Lehman became director of the Brooklyn Museum – one of the nation’s largest and oldest art museums – in September 1997,  his first official act on his first day of work was to march in Brooklyn’s vibrant West Indian Labor Day parade. Since then, he has made the community’s engagement with the Museum and the Museum’s relevance to the community key priorities, through the presentation of exhibitions such as Hip-Hop Nation; Committed to the Image: Contemporary Black Photographers; Brooklyn Collects; Working in Brooklyn; Jean Michel Basquiat; Graffiti; Infinite Island: Caribbean Contemporary Art; © MURAKAMI; and Yinka Shonibare MBE, as well as through major reinstallations of the permanent collection and a widely diverse and highly successful public program. The design by the Polshek Partnership of a new front entrance and public plaza also reflects his commitment to making the Brooklyn Museum the most visitor-centered, accessible, and welcoming museum in New York City. Prior to leading Brooklyn, he was Director of the Baltimore Museum of Art for almost two decades, during which time he was Adjunct Professor of the History of Art at the Johns Hopkins University. Earlier in his career, which began in the 20th Century Department of the Metropolitan Museum, he served as Executive Director of the Parks Council of New York and Director of the Urban Improvements Program of the City of New York, a Ford Foundation program; and taught art history and issues of modernity at Yale, Hunter College, and the Cooper Union. Dr. Lehman received his Ph.D. in Art History from Yale University, where he was also awarded an M.Phil. He earned M.A. and B.A. degrees at Johns Hopkins University. He has organized innumerable exhibitions, written and lectured widely, and has served as the President of the Association of Art Museum Directors and on many Federal and local government panels and commissions. He is Chair of the Cultural Institutions Group (CIG) of New York City, a coalition of the 33 largest privately managed cultural institutions that operate in or on New York City-owned property and which receive capital and operating support from the City. He is also the immediate past Chair of Heart of Brooklyn, a collaborative partnership of six of Brooklyn’s most important cultural organizations.


Friday, October 1, 2-4 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Kristin Hoganson

Meat in the Middle: Converging Borderlands in the U.S. Midwest, 1865-1900

Co-sponsored by the International Relations Program, and the Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto.

Kristin Hoganson is a professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her first book,Fighting for American Manhood (Yale, 1998), joined cultural and foreign policy history in novel ways through its emphasis on manhood as a significant consideration in debates over military intervention. Her second book,Consumers’ Imperium (University of North Carolina, 2007), fuses cultural and international history by considering the politics of consuming imported goods between 1865 and 1920. Hoganson is currently writing a global history of the U.S. heartland. The constituent chapters turn local history inside out by focusing on far-flung connections rather than bounded communities.


Thursday, October 7, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Mark Crispin Miller

Ghost Democracy: The Disappearance of the Vote in the United States

Co-sponsored by the Ryerson News Lab and Guelph University.

Mark Crispin Miller is a Professor of Media Ecology at New York University, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. He received a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in1977. Miller’s research interests include: modern propaganda, history and tactics of advertising, American film, and media ownership. His publications include: Boxed In: The Culture of TVSeeing Through Movies, ed.; Mad Scientists: The Secret History of Modern PropagandaSpectacle: Operation Desert Storm and the Triumph of Illusion; and The Bush Dyslexicon. His newest book is entitled, Cruel and Unusual: Bush/Cheney’s New World Order.


*Please note change in time.*

Thursday, October 14, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Mary Lou Lobsinger

Circuits: Computation, Architecture, and the Research University

Co-sponsored by the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design

Mary Lou Lobsinger is Associate Professor in the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design, University of Toronto. Her scholarly work has appeared in Grey Room, Werk, Daidalos, Journal of Architecture Education, Thresholds, Architecture+Ideas, Journal of the Society of Architecture Historians, and in numerous anthologies including Architectural Periodicals in the 1960s and ‘70s (Institut Recherche en Histoire de l’Architecture, 2008), Docomomo: Import-Export: Postwar Modernism in an Expanding World, 1945-1975 (2008),Le Citta’ visibili (il Saggiatore, 2007), and Concrete Toronto: A Guidebook to Concrete Architecture from the Fifties to the Seventies (Coach House, 2007). She has held fellowships and research grants from the Canadian Centre for Architecture, the Graham Foundation, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the Canada Council for the Arts, the Toronto Arts Council, the Ontario Design Council, the Graduate School of Design, and Harvard University. Lobsinger recently completed the book manuscript The Realist Impulse: Aldo Rossi and Postwar Italian Architectural Discourse, and is currently working on a second book project on architectural avant-gardism and the politics of post-materialism. Prior to the scholarly turn she was engaged in creative practice. Realizations have included installations for multi-disciplinary performance projects, and published photograph-text based works.


Friday, October 15, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk

Heide Solbrig

A Liberal Vision:  Film and Middle Class Identity in Post-War Industrial Media

Co-sponsored by the University of Western Ontario, and Cinema Studies, Innis College, University of Toronto.

Heide Solbrig has a PhD is in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. She is an assistant professor of media and culture at Bentley College in Massachusetts. Solbrig’s research focuses on industrial film—a long-overlooked yet significant distribution point of economic and social-psychological discourse, and (its role in the production of) twentieth century economic subjectivity. Her current documentary film is an extension of her research. The Ocean We Swim In: The Work and Vision of Henry Strauss concerns the work of this pioneering industrial filmmaker, whose clients in the decades immediately following WWII included AT&T, GE, Pan Am, and a number of other major US corporations. Solbrig’s approach highlights this filmmaker’s role in establishing the post-war labour-management state accord through his incorporation of social science and communication research into industrial training and motivation film. The documentary features interview footage of the filmmaker, excerpts from his films, a wealth of other archival and historical material, and a compelling political-economic analysis.


Thursday, October 21, 7-9 pm
St. Michael’s College, Alumni Hall, Muzzo Family
121 St. Joseph Street, rm. 100

Jim Campbell

A Triumph for the Tea Party? A New Republican Revolution or Will the Democrats hold onto Congress?

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

*Please note new time and room*

Friday, October 22, 11 am – 12:30 pm
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 3037
100 St. George Street


Jim Campbell

The Economic Records of the Presidents: Party Differences and Inherited Economic Condition

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

James E. Campbell is the Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. He is also the President of Pi Sigma Alpha, and The National Political Science Honor Society. He is a former APSA Congressional Fellow, and a program director at the National Science Foundation. He has served on the editorial boards of six political science journals, and on the executive councils of seven political science organizations. Professor Campbell has published four books, and more than sixty book chapters and articles in major political science journals. His most recent book is the second edition of The American Campaign: U.S. Presidential Campaigns and the National Votepublished in 2008 by Texas A&M University Press. He is also the author of Cheap Seats: The Democratic Party’s Advantage in U.S. House Elections, and The Presidential Pulse of Congressional Elections. Prior to joining the UB faculty in 1998, he served on the faculties of the University of Georgia (1980-88), and Louisiana State University (1988-98).


Tuesday, October 26, 10 am to 12 noon
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
1 Devonshire Place, Munk School of Global Affairs

IN CONVERSATION WITH BRIAN STEWART:

Pulitzer-Prize Winning Journalist Christopher Hedges

Co-sponsored by the Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs

Join senior Canadian foreign affairs journalist and Munk School Distinguished Senior Fellow Brian Stewart in conversation with Christopher Hedges, Distinguished Visitor in the Centre for the Study of the United States, on topics ranging from the moral and political dimensions of modern war to the erosion of democracy in the contemporary U.S.

Brian Stewart is one of Canada’s most respected foreign correspondents. He reported for The National and hosted “CBC News: Our World.” Mr. Stewart received a Gemini Award as “Best Overall Broadcast Journalist” in 1996, and for “Best Information Segment” in 1994 for Rwanda: Autopsy of a Genocide. His documentary, The Somalia Affair, won top prize for investigative reporting at the Canadian Association of Journalists awards in 1993. He is the 2009 Ross Munro Media Award Recipient; awarded by the Conference of Defence Associations (CDA), in concert with the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, the Ross Munro Award recognizes Canadian journalists who have made a significant and extraordinary contribution to increasing public understanding of Canadian defence and security issues.

Christopher Hedges is the F. Ross Johnson-Connaught Distinguished Visitor in American Studies, at the Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto. Prof. Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton University. He is the author of War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning (2002) and Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle (2009). Prof. Hedges received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. His latest publication, The Death of the Liberal Class (2010), will be launched on November 4th at the Bahen Centre for Information Technology.


Thursday, October 28, 7:00 – 10 pm; (doors open 6:30 pm)
Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave.

Passage

Directed by John Walker

The film screening will be followed by a Roundtable discussion with: Kay Armatage, Cinema Studies; Heidi Bohaker, Department of History; and, Darrell Varga, Canada Research Chair, Contemporary Film & Media Studies.

Co-Sponsored by: Cinema Studies, Innis College, and Department of History, University of Toronto.

The film’s historical subject is Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition to discover the Northwest Passage. Passageis a truly remarkable piece of historical filmmaking, a lyrical model of how to construct a historical project while showcasing both the processes of making that history, as well as the changing political stakes of a specific historical narrative over time. For its unparalleled brilliance in showcasing the historical consequences of making choices in the production of historical narrative, Passage is exemplary for the “promotion of history,” a central criteria of the Erik Barnouw Award, which was awarded to John Walker in 2009.

John Walker is one of Canada’s finest directors/cinematographers working in the documentary genre, and his films have won international acclaim. From the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television he has received seventeen nominations andawards, including the coveted Donald Brittain Award for best social/political documentary—Utshimassits: Place of the Boss; best documentary director—The Hand of Stalin; and best feature documentary—Strand—Under the Dark Cloth, a personal portrait of his mentor. His film on the Cape Breton coal miners’ choir, Men of the Deeps, won three Gemini awards.

Darrell Varga is the Canada Research Chair, Contemporary Film & Media Studies, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax; Kay Armatage is a Professor of Cinema Studies and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto; and Heidi Bohaker is Assistant Professor in the Department of History, University of Toronto.


*Please note new time and room.*

Wednesday, November 3, 12 noon – 2 pm
Room 108N, Munk

Roundtable

From Containment to Control: Prisons in the Americas

Participants: Simone Davis (chair), Chris Hedges, Kevin O’Neill, Greg Rogers

Simone Weil Davis serves on the U.S. national steering committee for the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program and is coordinating the program’s international expansion initiative. A professor of American literature, American Studies and Gender Studies who has taught at Mount Holyoke College, New York University and Long Island University, Simone is visiting faculty in the American Studies program at the University of Toronto during 2010-2011. While her first book, Living Up to the Ads: Gender Fictions of the 1920s (Duke UP 2000), treated the interplay between commodity culture and gendered subjectivity in the U.S., her work in progress, Raising the Jailhouse Roof: Women, Writing and Incarceration, looks not at commercial, but at carceral impacts on expressivity.

Christopher Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton University. He is the author of War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning (2002), and Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle (2009). Hedges also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. He is the F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Visitor for th Centre for the Study of the United States in 2010.

Kevin O’Neill is an Assistant Professor, Department and Centre for the Study of Religion, Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies at the University of Toronto. He joined the Department in 2009, after two years at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he was an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies. Kevin’s research centres on the themes of responsibility and belonging, both their social construction and emotional texture at everyday levels of knowledge. These are themes that he approaches transnationally through the ethnographic study of Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity in and beyond Central America. His first book, City of God: Christian Citizenship in Postwar Guatemala (University of California Press, 2009), details neo-Pentecostalism’s growing influence on Guatemala’s postwar efforts at democratization. His second book, Two Ways Out: A Study of Death and Life, will explore the transnational gang circuit known as Mara Salvatrucha from the perspective of gang ministry.

Greg Rogers has been the Executive Director of the John Howard Society of Toronto since October 2005. Mr. Rogers has extensive experience in Aboriginal Economic Development, Adult Education, and Media Relations. Prior to moving to Toronto, Greg worked in Alberta, Nunavut, and Ottawa. He attended the University of New Brunswick and St. Francis Xavier University.


Registration is now closed. This event is full.

Thursday, November 4, 5-7:00 pm
The Bahen Centre for Information Technology
BA1160, 40 St. George Street

Chris Hedges

The Death of the Liberal Class

Co-Sponsored by the Department and Centre for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto.

Chris Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Princeton University. He is the author of War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning (2002), and Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle (2009). Hedges also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. He is the F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Visitor for th Centre for the Study of the United States in 2010.

We will be hosting a launch of Hedges’ new book entitled, The Death of the Liberal Class, following his talk.

TVO, “Big Ideas”:

Chris Hedges lecture from November 4th will be broadcast on TVO’s “Big Ideas” on January 22 at 5pm, and repeated the next day, same time. The video and audio podcast will go up on iTunes shortly before the broadcast, and on the www.tvo.org website on Monday, January 24th.

TVO, “The Agenda with Steve Paikin”:

To View Chris Hedges’ appearance on “The Agenda with Steve Paikin” on TVO, follow these links below:

http://www.tvo.org/cfmx/tvoorg/theagenda/index.cfm?page_id=7&bpn=779880&ts=2010-10-22%2020:00:00.0

The links are also on the TVO YouTube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/AgendaStevePaikin

CBC, “George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight”:

To View Chris Hedges’ appearance on “George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight”, follow the link below:

http://www.cbc.ca/strombo/videos.html?id=1633278884


Wednesday, November 10, 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM
208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs

David Jacobson, United States Ambassador to Canada

U.S. – CANADA RELATIONS FOLLOWING THE U.S. MID-TERM ELECTIONS

Co-sponsored by the United States Consulate General Toronto, Centre for International Studies, and Centre for the Study of the United States

CHAIR: Louis PaulyDirector, Centre for International Studies

David Jacobson was sworn in as U.S. Ambassador to Canada on September 25, 2009, having been nominated by the President and unanimously confirmed by the Senate.  On October 2, 2009, Ambassador Jacobson presented his credentials to the Governor General of Canada and became the 22nd U.S. Ambassador to Canada. Before coming to Ottawa, Ambassador Jacobson served as Special Assistant to the President for Presidential Personnel. Prior to serving in the White House, Ambassador Jacobson spent 30 years as a lawyer in Chicago gaining expertise in the areas of complex commercial, class action, securities, insurance and business litigation as a partner at the law firm Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal LLP. He has also gained extensive experience working with regulatory and administrative agencies and all levels of government. In addition to his litigation experience, Ambassador Jacobson has helped clients large and small to address the legal and business issues they confront as they adapt their business models to incorporate new technologies. Jacobson has written and spoken extensively on the importance of new technologies and the novel legal issues they present. While working as a partner at Sonnenschein, Ambassador Jacobson also founded AtomWorks, an organization to bring together corporate, civic and academic leaders in order to foster nanotechnology in the Midwest. He served as a member of CEOs for Cities, a national bipartisan alliance of 75 mayors, corporate executives, university presidents and nonprofit leaders organized to advance the economic competitiveness of cities. He has served on other boards, including the Legal Assistance Foundation of Chicago and the Better Boys Foundation. Ambassador Jacobson received a J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center and was the Administrative Editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. He received his B.S. from the Johns Hopkins University. Ambassador Jacobson and his wife, Julie, have two children, Wynne and Jeremy.

Register online at:
http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=9812


Thursday, November 11, 4-6 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

James Kloppenberg

Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition

The webcast can be found here:
http://hosting.epresence.tv/MUNK/1/watch/197.aspx

James Kloppenberg is the Charles Warren Professor of American History at Harvard University, specializing in American and European intellectual history. Kloppenberg was educated at Stanford (M.A., 1976, Ph.D., 1980). He has written about the rise and fall of social democracy in Europe and America; eighteenth-century American politics and ideas; the career of the American philosophy of pragmatism from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first century; European interpretations of American culture from Tocqueville through Weber; and the relation between contemporary critical theory and historical writing. He has been chair of the History of American Civilization program, and has addressed the direction of the field in “Transnational and Multi-Disciplinary: The New Goals of American Studies Programs,” American Studies Association Newsletter 28 (March 2005). His books includeThe Virtues of Liberalism (Oxford University Press, 1998), A Companion to American Thought (Blackwell, 1995), co-edited with Richard Wightman Fox; and Uncertain Victory: Social Democracy and Professivism in European and American Thought, 1870-1920 (Oxford University Press, 1986). He has held fellowships from the Danforth, Whiting, and Guggenheim foundations, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Kloppenberg has held the Pitt professorship at the University of Cambridge, and has taught at theEcole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. In recognition of his teaching, he has been named a Harvard College Professor, and awarded the Levinson Memorial Teaching Prize by the Harvard Undergraduate Council.

Copies of Prof. Kloppenberg’s new book will be available for sale following the lecture in the first floor lounge..

The webcast can be found here:
http://hosting.epresence.tv/MUNK/1/watch/197.aspx


Please Note: Registration for this conference is completely full.

Friday, November 12, Saturday, November 13,
Sunday, November 14
Campbell Conference Facility, Munk

Conference

DIY Citizenship: Critical Making and Social Media

Co-sponsored by the iSchool, and Knowledge Media Design, University of Toronto.

A renewed emphasis on participatory forms of digitally-mediated production is transforming our social landscape. “Making” has become the dominant metaphor for a variety of digital and digitally-mediated practices. The web is exploding with independently produced digital content such as: video diaries, conversations, stories, software, music, and video games, all of which are further transformed and morphed by “modders,” “hackers, artists, and activists who redeploy and repurpose corporately-produced content. Equally, communities of self-organized crafters, hackers, and enthusiasts are increasingly to be found online exchanging sewing and knitting patterns, technical guides, circuit layouts, detailed electronics tutorials, and other forms of instruction and support. Many of these individuals and collaborators understand their work to be socially interventionist. Through practices of design, development, and exchange they challenge traditional divides between production and consumption and to redress the power differentials built into technologically-mediated societies. “DIY Citizenship” invokes the participatory nature of these diverse “do-it-yourself” modes of engagement, community, networks, and tools, all of which arguably replace traditional with remediated notions of citizenship. The term “critical making” refers to the increasing role “making” plays in critical forms of social reflection and engagement. This interactive conference seeks to extend conversations about new modes of engaged DIY citizenship and politics evidenced by the exponential increase of DIY media, “user-generators,” “prosumers,” “hacktivists,” tactical media interventionists, and other “maker” identities.

Plenary speakers include:Anne Balsamo, Suzanne de Castell, Ron Deibert, Paul Dourish, Henry Jenkin, Jennifer Jenson, Natalie Jeremijenko, Steve Mann, and Trebor Scholz.

To view webcasts from the conference, please go to the Munk School of Global Affairs webcast site:
http://hosting.epresence.tv/MUNK


Friday, November 26, 2-4 pm
Room 108N, Munk


R. Tripp Evans

Paint Like a Man: Gender and Disguise in the Work of Grant Wood

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art, and Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto.

R. Tripp Evans is Professor of Art History at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Art at Yale University, and lives in Providence, Rhode Island. Grant Wood

[1891-1942]

was the first overnight sensation in the history of American art. From the moment his now-iconic American Gothic caught the nation’s attention in 1930, the artist and his work have become something of a blank canvas for audiences and critics – who tend to overlook the more uncanny elements of his striking compositions and accept his wholesome, “farmer-painter” persona at face value.  R. Tripp Evans’s groundbreaking new biography, Grant Wood: A Life(Alfred A. Knopf: 2010), challenges Wood’s public image as a simple country boy who promoted patriotic values.  In this lecture and reading, Evans explores how this deeply closeted artist both reinforced and subverted traditional gender expectations in his work, often at considerable risk to his own career.

Copies of his latest publication will be available for sale following the lecture.


Monday, November 29, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Noël Sturgeon

“Avatar” and Activism: Ecological Indians, Climate Justice, and Disabling Militarism

Co-sponsored by the Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto.

Noël Sturgeon is Professor of Women’s Studies and Graduate Faculty in American Studies at Washington State University. She is the author of Ecofeminist Natures: Race, Gender, Feminist Theory and Political Action (Routledge 1997), Environmentalism in Popular Culture: Gender, Race, Sexuality and the Politics of the Natural (University of Arizona, 2009) and numerous articles on environmentalist, antimilitarist, and feminist movements and theories. She has been a Rockefeller Fellow at the Center for the Critical Analysis of Contemporary Culture, Rutgers; a Visiting Scholar at Murdoch University, Australia; at the JFK Institute at the Frei Universitat in Berlin, and at the Center for Cultural Studies, UCSC; and a Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer at York University, Toronto.


Thursday, December 2, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

Mark Garrett Cooper

The Humanities after Hollywood

Co-sponsored by the Cinema Studies Institue, Innis College, University of Toronto.
Mark Garrett Cooper is Interim Director of Moving Image Research Collections, and Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies, in the Department of English, University of South Carolina. He has a Ph.D. from Brown University, 1998. Cooper’s research seeks to explain what it means that corporate institutions make movies, and, simultaneously, how movies have helped to define corporate institutions. He is currently researching a history of motion picture accounting that will consider bookkeeping’s participation in the artistic process. With John Marx, he is writing a reappraisal of twentieth-century humanities disciplines tentatively entitled, How Hollywood Invented the English Department. As interim director of Moving Image Research Collections, he engages multiple initiatives to generate alternative histories from archival motion pictures.

Friday, December 3, 10 am-12 noon
Room 208N, Munk

The Image and the Archive

A workshop exploring scholarly research into images and its relationship to archival resources. Research areas will include photography, documentary and avant-garde film, and Victorian visual culture.

Featuring:
Mark Garrett Cooper
(Department of English, University of South Carolina), Interim Director of Moving Image Research Collections
And
Elspeth Brown (Department of History, University of Toronto and Director, CSUS)
James Cahill (Department of French and CSI, University of Toronto)
Sophie Thomas (Department of English, Ryerson University)

Moderated by: Charlie Keil (Department of History and CSI, University of Toronto and JHI Faculty Fellow)


Friday, December 3, 2-4 pm
Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
Munk School of Global Affairs
1 Devonshire Place

Andrew DuBois

Roundtable:
The Anthology of Rap

Andrew DuBois is Associate Professor of English at the University of Toronto at Scarborough. He co-edited a collection of critical essays called Close Reading: The Reader (Duke UP, 2003), and is the author of Ashbery’s Forms of Attention (U of Alabama, 2006). A special issue of University of Toronto Quarterly called “The Song is You: Opera, Lyrics and Literary Study,” edited with Katherine Larson, is forthcoming in the Fall. The Anthology of Rap (Yale UP, 2010), co-edited with Adam Bradley of the University of Colorado, collects roughly 300 lyrics from thirty years of recorded rap, accompanied by historical essays that contextualize the poetic innovations that both characterize and help to define hip-hop as a domestic culture and global force.

The roundtable participants are:

Christian Campbell: Writer, Poet, Cultural Critic, and Assistant Professor of English (University of Toronto) specializing in Caribbean Literature, Black Diaspora Literatures and Cultures, and Poetics.

Karina Vernon: Writer, Publisher, and Assistant Professor of English (University of Toronto) specializing in Black Canadian Cultural Studies, Canadian Literature, and Diaspora Studies.

Del Cowie: Toronto-Based Music Journalist whose writing has appeared in VIBE, XXL, Eye Weekly and Sway, as well as online websites such as Amazon.com and AOL Canada. He is currently the hip-hop editor at national monthly music magazine Exclaim!

Angelica LeMinh: Reader, Writer, Blogger, and Performance Artist whose work appears in Pound and metro_textual.wordpress.com.

Masia One: Toronto-Based Rap Artist

Reflect: Toronto-Based Rap Artist

Copies of this publication will be available for sale following the lecture.


Monday, December 6, 4-6 pm
Room 208N, Munk

T.V. Reed

Music in the African American Civil Rights Movement: On Liberation Musicology

T.V. Reed is the Buchanan Distinguished Professor of English and American Studies at Washington State University. His areas of research and teaching include: interdisciplinary cultural theory, popular culture, digital cultures, environmental justice cultural studies, and social movement cultures. Reed also writes and manages the matrix, “Cultural Politics”

[culturalpolitics.net]

, with websites addressing each of these research areas. His bookThe Art of Protest: Culture and Activism from the Civil Rights Movement to the Streets of Seattle (U Minnesota Press, 2005) was nominated for the John Hope Franklin prize. He is also the author of Fifteen Jugglers, Five Believers: Literary Politics and the Poetics of Social Movements (U of California Press, 1992). Reed has two books in process, one on 30s radical novelist Robert Cantwell, the other an introduction to critical digital culture studies. Reed was elected in 2006 to the National Council of the American Studies Association. He has been a Mellon Fellow at Wesleyan University, a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the Freie Universitat in Berlin, Germany, a Scholar in Residence at the Center for Cultural Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a Visiting Lecturer at Yunnan University in China and ICU in Tokyo, Japan.


SPEAKER SERIES 2009-2010

FALL 2009

Edlie Wong

The Gender of Freedom before Dred Scott

Co-sponsored with the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, as part of the Law & Literature
Workshop Series 2009–2010.

Edlie Wong is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick. She is the author of Neither Fugitive nor Free: Atlantic Slavery, Freedom Suits, and the Legal Culture of Travel (NYU, 2009), and has published in American Literature, African American Review, American Quarterly, Prose Studies, and elsewhere.

Please note: This will be a discussion of a pre-circulated paper, which will be available 1-2 weeks in advance. To receive a copy, please email n.gulezko@utoronto.ca. A light lunch will be provided.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2009
12:30–2:00 pm
Falconer House Solarium, Faculty of Law
84 Queen’s Park West


Lori Brown

Politicizing the Female Body: Examining the Space of Abortion Clinics

Lori Brown is Associate Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University, as well as a practicing architect. Her design, speculative work, and teaching seek to broaden the discourse and involvement of architecture in our world. In 2008, Prof. Brown was awarded the American Institute of Architects Diversity Best Practice Honorable Mention, and a commendation for the Milka Bliznakov Prize for her travelling exhibition, feminist practices.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009
ROOM 108N, 2:00–4:00 pm


Sharon Zukin & Harvey Molotch

City Stuff: The Role of Artifats cin the Study of Urban Life and Form

Co-sponsored with the Department of Geography, as part of their Intersections lecture series.

Drawing on examples from the history of social science, including some of my own more recent work, I try to show how studying artifacts, both everyday and more specialized can further understandings of geographical place and accompanying social lives. Objects in question cover such diverse elements as art works, living room furniture, drug syringes and airport security gates.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2009
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 1069, 3:00–5:00 pm


Elspeth Brown

De Meyer and Dolores at Vogue: Commercializing Queer Affect in WWI-Era Fashion Photography

Elspeth H. Brown is Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States and Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto. She is the author of The Corporate Eye: Photography and the Rationalization of American Commercial Culture, 1884-1929 (Johns Hopkins, 2005), and co-editor of Cultures of Commerce: Representation and American Business Culture, 1877-1960 (Palgrave, 2006).

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2009
Room 208N, 4:00–6:00 pm


PLEASE NOTE CHANGE IN DATE/TIME AND LOCATION

Obama-Watch#1

The first in a series of roundtables, lectures, and workshops that explores the Obama administration’s approach to current policy questions.

Obama-Watch: Borders, North and South

Convened by Professor Ron Pruessen, Department of History

Speakers:

Matt Farish

Assistant Professor, Dept. of Geography and Planning

Emily Gilbert
Director, Canadian Studies Program, Graduate Program in Geography

Kevin O’Neill
Assistant Professor, Department and Centre for the Study of Religion,
Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2009
Room 208N, 12:00–2:00 pm


David L. Leal

The Latino Vote in U.S. Presidential Elections:
Past, Present, and Future

Co-sponsored by the Canada Research Chair in Immigration and& Governance, the Centre for the Study of the United States, and the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies.

David L. Leal is Associate Professor of Government, Faculty Associate of the Center for Mexican-American Studies, and Director of the Public Policy Institute at the University of Texas at Austin. His primary academic interest is Latino politics, and his work explores a variety of questions involving public opinion, political behaviour, and public policy. He has published over forty articles and book chapters on these and other topics. He is also the co-editor of Beyond the Barrio: Latinos and the 2008 Elections (forthcoming, University of Notre Dame Press), Immigration Policy and Security (2008, Routledge), and Latino Politics: Identity, Mobilization, and Representation (2007, University of Virginia Press). Dr. Leal is a member of the editorial boards of Social Science Quarterly, American Politics Research, and State Politics & Policy Quarterly, and was an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University in 1998.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29th
Room 108N, 5:00–7:00 pm


Rob King

The Art of Diddling: Slapstick, Science, and Antimodernism in the
Films of Charley Bowers

Rob King is Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute and the Department of History, where he researches and teaches early American film and popular culture, comedy in particular. He is the author of The Fun Factory: The Keystone Film Company and the Emergence of Mass Culture (UC, 2008), and co-editor of Slapstick Comedy (Routledge, forthcoming 2010). Prof. King is currently working on a history of short film comedies and Depression-era US culture.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2009
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Jason Hackworth

The Curious Durability of Faith in American Welfare

Jason Hackworth is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto. His research centres on urban and economic issues, primarily in North America. Prof. Hackworth is currently writing a book about religious welfare provision in the United States.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2009
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Rogers M. Smith

Understanding the American Symbiosis of Rights and Racism

Sponsored by the Department of Political Science; co-sponsored by The Faculty of Law and the Centre for the Study of the United States

Rogers M. Smith is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. His research concerns American constitutional law, American political thought, and modern legal and political theory, with special interests in questions of citizenship, race, ethnicity, and gender. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including: Stories of Peoplehood: The Politics and Morals of Political Memberships (Cambridge, 2003); The Unsteady March: The Rise and Decline of Racial Equality in America, with Philip A. Klinkner, (Chicago, 1999); and Civic Ideals: Conflicting Visions of Citizenship in U.S. History (Yale, 1997).

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2009
Sidney Smith Hall, Room 3130, 2:00–4:00 pm


Obama Watch#2

The second in a series of roundtables, lectures, and workshops that explores the Obama administration’s approach to current policy questions.

Obama’s Queer Agenda

Convened by Professor Ryan Hurl, Department of Political Science.

Speakers:

David Rayside, Department of Political Science and Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

Brenda Cossman, Director, Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies; Faculty of Law

Rinaldo Walcott, Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, OISE; Canada Research Chair for Social Justice and Cultural Studies

Elspeth Brown, Director, Centre for the Study of the United States and American Studies;
Department of History

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2009
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Kathryn Lofton

What is an Oprah? Celebrity and Spiritual Capitalism in Modern America

Co-sponsored with the Department and Centre for the Study of Religion, Centre for Diaspora
and Transnational Studies

Kathryn Lofton, formerly a long-term fellow at the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies at Yale University. The author of Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon (UC, forthcoming), Prof. Lofton is currently working on her second monograph, The Modernity in Mr. Shaw: Modernisms and Fundamentalisms in American Culture. That study examines the formation of sexual identity through the life of John Balcom Shaw (1860-1935), Presbyterian editor of The Fundamentals, who was remitted from the ministry following accusations of sodomy in 1918.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2009
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Derek Gregory

AnOther Order of Things: Military Imaginaries and the Middle East

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography, the Centre for the Study of the United States, the Centre for International Studies, the Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, and the Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, OISE.

Derek Gregory was a Lecturer in Geography at the University of Cambridge for 16 years, before moving to UBC as Professor of Geography in 1989. He is a Fellow of both the British Academy and the Royal Society of Canada, and in 2006, was awarded the Founder’s Medal of the Royal Geographical Society in London for his work on social theory and human geography. His most recent book is The Colonial Present: Afghanistan, Palestine, Iraq, described by the Los Angeles Times as “must-read heresy,” and his next book will be entitled, War Cultures.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2009
Room 108N, 5:00–7:00 pm


WINTER 2010


Marta Braun

Muybridge’s Models

Marta Braun teaches art history, photographic history, and film theory in the Ryerson School of Image Arts. She is an internationally renowned historian of art, film, and photography, and is a noted expert on E.J. Marey and Eadweard Muybridge. In 1994, her book Picturing Time: The Work of Etienne Jules Marey, was shortlisted for Britain’s Kraszna-Krausz Award, a prize given bi-annually for the best internationally published book on photography. She won this award in 1999, along with four other authors, for the collection of essays titled, Beauty of Another Order: Photography in Science. Professor Braun has lived and worked in France, and is thoroughly familiar with French language and culture. She was made a Knight of the Order of Academic Palms by the Government of France in 1996, in recognition of her contribution to the cause of French knowledge, culture, scientific progress, and education.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


In Conversation with Brian Stewart:
Afghanistan—2010 and Beyond

Part One:

Brigadier General Jonathan Vance on the Canadian Task Force Engagement

Part Two:

Barack Obama and Afghanistan

With:
Robert Bothwell, Director, International Relations Program
Carol Chin, Department of History
Ronald W. Pruessen, Department of History

Registration for this event is now full, and we are at maximum capacity with no waiting list. We cannot guarantee seating for latecomers.The event will be webcast live at: http://hosting.epresence.tv/MUNK/1.aspx. A video monitor will also be set up in the main lounge adjacent to the CCF, for those who wish to observe the event.

MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 2010
Campbell Conference Facility
South House, Munk Centre, 4:00–6:00 pm


David C. Engerman

Knowing the Cold War Enemy

Co-sponsored by the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States.

David C. Engerman is Associate Professor of History at Brandeis University, where he has taught since receiving his PhD from the University of California-Berkeley in 1998. His revised dissertation appeared as Modernization from the Other Shore: American Intellectuals and the Romance of Russian Development (Harvard, 2003). He also edited and introduced a new edition of The God That Failed (Columbia, 2001), and co-edited Staging Growth: Modernization, Development, and the Global Cold War (Massachusetts, 2003). Named the Stuart Bernath Lecturer by the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations for 2006, his lecture, “American Knowledge and Global Power,” then appeared in Diplomatic History; other articles have appeared in American Historical Review, Cahiers du Monde russe, Journal of Cold War Studies, Kritika, Modern Intellectual History, and the Cambridge History of the Cold War (Cambridge, 2009). His most recent book, Know Your Enemy: The Rise and Fall of America’s Russia Experts (Oxford, 2009), examined Russian/Soviet Studies in America since 1940. He is currently working on two projects at the intersection of intellectual and international history in the latter half of the twentieth century.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27
Victoria University, Room VC323, 4:00–6:00 pm


François Furstenberg

Atlantic Slavery, Atlantic Freedom: George
Washington, Slavery, and Abolitionism

Co-sponsored by the Collaborataive Program in Book History and Print Culture.

François Furstenberg teaches American history at the Université de Montréal. He is the author of In The Name of the Father: Washington’s Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation, published in 2006, and is now working on a project connecting French and U.S. history during the late eighteenth century. He is currently a fellow at the Cullman Center for Writers at Scholars at the New York Public Library.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Angela Blake

Fear, Freeways, and Citizens Band Radio in 1970s Los Angeles

Angela Blake is Associate Professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University, where she teaches U.S. and Urban History. She is the author of How New York Became American, 1890-1924 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), and is currently working on a book project about the post-1945 soundscapes of New York City and Los Angeles. Her talk is based on a chapter from that project.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00-6:00 pm


Caribbean Studies at the University of Toronto Presents:

Maximilian Forte

The Resurgence of the Caribs, and of Indigeneity, in Trinidad and Tobago

Co-Sponsored by:Aboriginal Studies, The Centre for the Study of the United States, Equity Studies, Latin American Studies and the Departments of English, History, Sociology, and Political Science at the University of Toronto.

Maximilian Forte is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal. He is the author of Ruins of Absence, Presence of Caribs: (Post) Colonial Representations of Aboriginality in Trinidad and Tobago (University of Florida Press, 2005).

In which ways can one speak of a “resurgence” of indigeneity in Trinidad? What does it mean to be Carib in Trinidad today? Does acknowledging a Carib presence alter mainstream theories of the historical and cultural development of Caribbean societies? How have Trinidadian self-perceptions and self-representations been altered by acknowledging the Carib presence? If there is Carib resurgence, why does it matter?

For more information please contact 416-978-4054
or melanie.newton@utoronto.cat.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2010
History Department Seminar Room, Sid Smith Hall, Room 2098,
100 St. George Street, 2:00–4:00 pm


Neal Dolan

“All the Way Down?” Emerson, Rawls, Puritan Preaching, and Liberal Values

Neal Dolan is Associate Professor of American Literature at University of Toronto, Scarborough. He earned a B.A. from Yale University in 1986, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1999. He is interested in the nature of liberal culture and the place of literature within it. His book on Emerson and liberal culture, entitled Emerson’s Liberalism, was published by University of Wisconsin Press in July 2009.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2010
Room 208N, 4:00–6:00 pm


PLEASE NOTE: EVENT CANCELLED

Obama Watch Roundtable #4

The fourth in a series of roundtables, lectures, and workshops that explores the Obama administration’s approach to current policy challenges

Convened by Professor Ryan Hurl, Department of Political Science.

FRIDAY, MARCH 5, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Roseanne Currarino

Reimagining Democracy in Turn-of-the-Century America

Rosanne Currarino is Associate Professor of History at Queen’s University, where she teaches nineteenth century history with a focus on economic and intellectual history. She is the author of the forthcoming book, The Labor Question in America: Economic Democracy in the Gilded Age, and has published articles in the Journal of American History, Labor History, and Men and Masculinities. She has begun work on a new project on economic imagination during the nineteenth century.

FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00 pm


PLEASE NOTE: EVENT POSTPONED UNTIL 2011

Regina Lee Blaszczyk

American Consumer Society: The Boomer Generation

An award-winning author and consultant, Regina Lee Blaszczyk has published extensively on corporations, marketing, innovation, design, and fashion. She launched her career as Cultural History Curator at the Smithsonian Institution, was a Professor of American Studies at Boston University, and worked in senior management at the Chemical Heritage Foundation. Blaszczyk has affiliations with the Hagley Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society, and the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of the History & Sociology of Science.


Davarian L. Baldwin

“Chicago could be the Vienna of American Fascism”: How Urban Studies Speaks to the Transnational Turn

Co-Sponsored by the Racial and Ethnic Identities in Transnational Histories (REIT) graduate discussion group, Department of History, University of Toronto.

This talk offers a critical geography of the Black internationalist politics and knowledge production of World War II-era Chicago to bring caution against a scholarly transnational discourse that may be going too far. In the focus on routes and flows, we may be losing sense of how the dimensions of situated nodal points augment the contours of global circuits. Here, an archival mapping of the “local/global continuum” is essential for thinking through our times, by demonstrating how and why urban studies must speak to the transnational turn.

Davarian L. Baldwin is the Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of American Studies at Trinity College, Hartford. He is a historian, cultural critic, and social theorist of urban America. Baldwin’s work largely examines the landscape of global cities through the lens of the Afro-Diasporic experience. Baldwin’s related interests include intellectual and mass culture, Black radical thought and transnational social movements, competing conceptions of modernity, the racial economy of heritage tourism, and universities and urban development. His teaching also brings together historical studies, cultural analysis, and social/political theory with special interest in exploring Western modernity(s) within a global frame. Baldwin is the author of Chicago’s New Negroes: Modernity, The Great Migration, and Black Urban Life (UNC, 2007). He is currently at work on two new projects, Land of Darkness: Race and the Making of Modern America, and UniverCities: How Knowledge Institutions are Transforming the Urban Landscape. Prior to joining Trinity College, Baldwin was Associate Professor of History and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College.

Monday, March 15, 2010
Room 108N, 2:00–4:00 pm


Gage Averill

Mainstreet USA: Nostalgia and the Unreal Estate at the Heart
of Barbershop Singing

Gage Averill is Vice-Principal Academic and Dean of the University of Toronto Mississauga. Formerly, he served as Dean of Music at the University of Toronto, and Chair of New York University’s Department of Music. He is currently President of the Society for Ethnomusicology. Averill is an ethnomusicologist, specializing in popular music of the Caribbean and North American vernacular music. His book on barbershop singing (Four Parts, No Waiting: A Social History of American Barbershop Harmony, Oxford 2003) won best book prizes from the Society for Ethnomusicology and the Society for American Music, and his book on Haitian popular music and power (A Day for the Hunter: A Day for the Prey: Popular Music and Power in Haiti, Chicago 1997) was awarded the best book prize in ethnic and folk research by the Association for Recorded Sound Collection.

FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 2010
Room 108N, 4:00–6:00pm


Martin Berger

In Black and White: Civil Rights Photography and the Politics of Race

Co-sponsored by the Toronto Photography Seminar and the Centre for the Study of the United States.

Martin Berger is Professor and Director of the Visual Studies graduate program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the author of two books: Man Made: Thomas Eakins and the Construction of Gilded Age Manhood (2000), and Sight Unseen: Whiteness and American Visual Culture (2005), the latter of which won the American Culture Association’s John C. Cawelti Award. His current book project on the photography of the black civil rights struggle will be published by the University of California Press in 2011.

Thursday, March 25, 2010
Room 208N, 4:00–6:00 pm


Dalia Kandiyoti

Latinidad and Sefarad: Connecting the Americas in Recent Latina Novels

Organized by the Latin American Studies Program, University of Toronto.

Dalia Kandiyoti teaches in the English Department of the City University of New York, College of Staten Island. Her book, Migrant Sites: America, Place, and Diaspora Literatures, was published in the fall, 2009. Kandiyoti’s presentation bridges U.S. Latina/o Studies, Jewish Studies, and Latin American Studies through the prism of Sephardism. Kandiyoti examines recent narratives by U.S. Latina authors who have claimed crypto-Jewish/converso identities and have written novels and poetry about the imagined experiences of secret Jewish identities in Cuba, Mexico, and New Mexico. Her paper reflects on this unprecedented interest by progressive and innovative writers primarily identified as Latinas based in the U.S. in engaging Sephardic identity and experience. Kandiyoti considers the implications of these authors’ creative assemblage of the Latina and Jewish worlds in the Americas in terms of “overlapping diasporas,” secrecy and knowledge, and alternative mestizajes.

Wednesday, March 31
Room 208N, Munk Centre, 12:00–2:00 pm


Book Launch

Daniel E. Bender

American Abyss: Savagery and Civilization in the Age of Industry

(Cornell University Press, 2009), 344 pages, cloth

At the beginning of the twentieth century, industrialization both dramatically altered everyday experiences and shaped debates about the effects of immigration, empire, and urbanization. In American Abyss, Daniel E. Bender examines an array of sources—eugenics theories, scientific studies of climate, socialist theory, and even popular novels about cavemen—to show how intellectuals and activists came to understand industrialization in racial and gendered terms as the product of evolution and as the highest expression of civilization. Their discussions, he notes, are echoed today by the use of such terms as the “developed” and “developing” worlds.

Daniel E. Bender is the Canada Research Chair in Cultural History and Analysis, and Associate Professor of History and Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He is also the author of Sweated Work, Weak Bodies: Anti-Sweatshop Campaigns and Languages of Labor (2004), and editor of Sweatshop USA: The American Sweatshop in Historical and Global Perspective (2003).

Tuesday, April 13
Main Lounge, South House, 4:00–6:00 pm


Book Launch

Shyon Baumann and Josée Johnston

Foodies: Democracy and Distinction in the Gourmet Foodscape

Routledge, December 2009, 280 pages, paperback

This important new and highly readable cultural analysis tells two stories about food. The first depicts good food as democratic. Foodies frequent ‘hole in the wall’ ethnic eateries, appreciate the pie found in working-class truck-stops, and reject the snobbery of fancy French restaurants with formal table-service. The second story describes how food operates as a source of status and distinction for economic and cultural elites, indirectly maintaining and reproducing social inequality. While the first storyline insists that anybody can be a foodie, the second story asks foodies to look in the mirror and think about their relative social and economic privilege. By simultaneously considering both of these stories, and studying how they operate in tension, a delicious sociology of food becomes available, perfect for teaching a broad range of cultural sociology courses.

Shyon Baumann is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. He studies the sociology of culture, the arts, and the media. He is the author of Hollywood Highbrow: From Entertainment to Art, and is currently studying the production and content of television advertising.

Josée Johnston is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her major area of research is the sociology of food. Her work ties together several research threads including globalization, political-ecology, culture and consumerism.

Thursday, April 22
Main Lounge, South House, 4:00–6:00 pm


EVENT POSTPONED DUE TO FLIGHT CANCELLATIONS.

Sharon Shalev

Solitary Confinement U.S. style: Why Supermax Prisons Do Not Work

Co-Sponsored by the Centre of Criminology and the Centre for the Study of the United States,
University of Toronto.

Dr Sharon Shalev is a human rights worker and a criminologist. She is a research fellow at the Mannheim Centre for Criminology at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and an Associate of the International Centre for Prison Studies at King’s College, London. She is the author of A Sourcebook on Solitary Confinement (2008), a guide for practitioners on the health effects of solitary confinement and human rights and professional standards relating to its use. Her latest book is titled, Supermax: controlling risk through solitary confinement (Cullompton: Willan Publishing, September 2009).

April 27, 2010, 12-2 pm
Centre For Criminology
14 Queen’s Park Crescent West, 2nd floor
(also known as the Canadian Building)


May 21-22, 2010

Victoria College, University of Toronto,
Room 304

The Construction of Social Science in Cold War America: Between Geo-Politics and Sites of Knowledge Production

Sponsors:
Canadian Social Science and Humanities Research Council
Centre for the Study of the United States
 (University of Toronto)
Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (University of Toronto)
Victoria University (University of Toronto)

Registration for this event is now full.



Our Next Events

Check back soon for more events.


Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.