Upcoming Events at the Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies

Past Events Login

January 2020

  • Jan 30

    DAY ONE - 13th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research

    9:45-10:00 Registration for Day One
    10:00-10:05: Opening remarks
    10:05-11:25 SESSION 1: “Canadian Urban Integration”
    12:25-13:45 SESSION 2: “Borders”
    14:00-16:00 Keynote Lecture: “Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers” by David FitzGerald (University of California San Diego). Separate registration required.

    Register for Day 2 conference.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 30, 20209:30AM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783

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    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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  • Jan 30

    2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity: "Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers"

    Media pundits, politicians, and the public are often skeptical or ambivalent about granting asylum. They fear that asylum-seekers will impose economic and cultural costs and pose security threats to nationals. Consequently, governments of rich, democratic countries attempt to limit who can approach their borders, which often leads to refugees breaking immigration laws.

    In Refuge beyond Reach, David Scott FitzGerald traces how rich democracies have deliberately and systematically shut down most legal paths to safety. Drawing on official government documents, information obtained via WikiLeaks, and interviews with asylum seekers, he finds that for ninety-nine percent of refugees, the only way to find safety in one of the prosperous democracies of the Global North is to reach its territory and then ask for asylum. FitzGerald shows how the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia comply with the letter of law while violating the spirit of those laws through a range of deterrence methods — first designed to keep out Jews fleeing the Nazis — that have now evolved into a pervasive global system of “remote control.”
    While some of the most draconian remote control practices continue in secret, FitzGerald identifies some pressure points and finds that a diffuse humanitarian obligation to help those in need is more difficult for governments to evade than the law alone.

    Refuge beyond Reach addresses one of the world’s most pressing challenges — how to manage flows of refugees and other types of migrants — and helps to identify the conditions under which individuals can access the protection of their universal rights.

    David FitzGerald is Theodore E. Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations, Professor of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His research analyzes policies regulating migration and asylum in countries of origin, transit, and destination. FitzGerald’s books include Culling the Masses: The Democratic Origins of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas, which won the American Sociological Association’s Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, and A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its Migration.

    This event is co-funded by the DAAD with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office.

    Register for Day 1 Conference
    Register for Day 2 Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 30, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7

    Speaker(s)

    David FitzGerald
    University of California San Diego

    Main Sponsor

    Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    The Canada Research Chair for Global Migration

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    The Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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  • Jan 31

    DAY TWO - 13th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research

    10:00-10:15 Registration for Day Two
    10:15-11:45 SESSION 3 “Health”
    12:45-14:15 SESSION 4 “Segregation/Incarceration”
    14:30-16:00 SESSION 5 “Representation”

    Register for DAY 1 conference
    Register for the keynote lecture on DAY 1

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 31, 202010:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783

    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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February 2020

  • Feb 25

    2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity "The Case for Open Borders"

    Abstract: Countries have a moral obligation to liberalize their immigration policies. Immigration restrictions violate people’s freedom of movement and deprive them of opportunities to become dramatically richer. Moreover, none of the standard objections to open borders–the potential economic costs, special obligations to fellow citizens, states’ rights of self-determination, and so on–are successful. The talk concludes with a discussion of the relevance of immigration policy to issues like climate change and poverty relief.

    Christopher Freiman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA. His first book, Unequivocal Justice, was published in 2017 and his second book, Why It’s OK to Ignore Politics, is forthcoming with Routledge Press. Chris is the author of over two dozen articles and chapters on topics including democratic theory, distributive justice, and immigration.
    His work has appeared in venues such as the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Utilitas, The Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, Politics, Philosophy, and Economics, and The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. His writing has also been featured in a variety of popular outlets, including Reason Magazine, Aeon, and Inside Higher Education. Chris received a William & Mary Alumni Fellowship Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016. His website is www.cfreiman.com and he blogs at www.BleedingHeartLibertarians.com.

    Commentary to be offered by Joe Carens (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto), whose book The Ethics of Immigration (Oxford UP, 2013) was recipient of the David Easton Award of the American Political Science Association. Randall Hansen (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto) will chair the event.

    This event is co-sponsored by The Institute for Liberal Studies, a non-partisan public affairs venue based in Ottawa.

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 25, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783

    Speaker(s)

    Christopher Freiman
    Speaker
    Philosophy, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

    Joe Carens
    Commentator
    Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Political Science, University of Toroto

    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.

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