Reconceptualizing Nineteenth-Century Ukraine: Two Monographs on Intellectual, Political, and Social History

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Monday, November 5th, 2018

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Monday, November 5, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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Description

This event will celebrate two recently published books on the 19th century Ukraine: “Brothers or Enemies: The Ukrainian National Movement and Russia from the 1840s to the 1870s” by Johannes Remy (2016) and “Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905” by Serhiy Bilenky (2017).

Contrary to the prevailing opinion, the idea of Ukrainian independence did not emerge at the end of the nineteenth-century. In Brothers and Enemies, Johannes Remy reveals that the roots of Ukrainian independence were planted fifty years earlier. Remy contextualizes the Ukrainian national movement against the backdrop of the Russian Empire and its policy of oppression in the mid-nineteenth-century. Remy utilizes a wide range of unpublished archival sources to shed light on topics that are absent from current discourse including: Ilarion Vasilchikov’s alliance with Ukrainian activists in 1861, the forged revolutionary proclamation used to deport Pavlo Chubynsky (who is known today as the author of the Ukrainian national anthem), and the 1864 negotiations between Kyiv activists and the Polish National Government. Brothers and Enemies is the first systematic study of imperial censorship policies during the period and will be of interest to those who seek a better understanding of the current Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

In the nineteenth and early twentieth century Kyiv was an important city in the European part of the Russian empire, rivaling Warsaw in economic and strategic significance. It also held the unrivaled spiritual and ideological position as Russia’s own Jerusalem. In Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands, Serhiy Bilenky examines issues of space, urban planning, socio-spatial form, and the perceptions of change in imperial Kyiv. Combining cultural and social history with urban studies, Bilenky unearths a wide range of unpublished archival materials and argues that the changes experienced by the city prior to the revolution of 1917 were no less dramatic and traumatic than those of the Communist and post-Communist era. In fact, much of Kyiv’s contemporary urban form, architecture, and natural setting were shaped by imperial modernizers during the long nineteenth century. The author also explores a general culture of imperial urbanism in Eastern Europe. Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

Contact

Olga Kesarchuk
416-946-8938


Speakers

Serhiy Bilenky
Speaker
Research Fellow, University of Alberta

Johannes Remy
Speaker
Adjunct Professor at the Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki

Piotr Wrobel
Chair
Associate Professor of History; Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto


Main Sponsor

Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

Co-Sponsors

Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


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