Upcoming Events

Past Events Login

September 2019

  • Friday, September 20th Justice in an Age of Global Politics: The case of Unit 731 Medical Atrocities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMRobarts Library, Blackburn Room (4th floor), 130 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Unit 731 was the codename for the Japanese Imperial Army’s biochemical warfare experimentation center located in China during the Asia-Pacific War. As a part of the forgotten history of WWII in Asia, and often characterized as the “Auschwitz of the East,” Unit 731 was the site of countless medical atrocities including human experimentation and field experimentation of biochemical weapons. Unlike in postwar Germany, perpetrators escaped legal punishment in post-war trials. This panel will discuss crucial issues surrounding the history of Unit 731, the American government’s cover-up of Unit 731 war crimes after the war, and how politics and justice interacted to shape war memory during the Cold War and beyond.

    Programme:

    1. Historical Overview of Unit 731: History and the Human Experience
    Professor Yang Yanjun, Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    2. The Tokyo Trials and Medical Atrocities: Unit 731’s Postwar (In)Justice
    Professor Gong Zhiwei, Shanghai Jiaotong University, War Trials and World Peace Research Center

    3. Verification in Japan on “War and Medical Ethics”: Aiming for No More Unit 731
    Professor Nishiyama, Shiga University of Medicine, Japan

    4. Politics of Memory: Unit 731 at the Margins of Historical Memory
    Professor Takashi Fujitani, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Q & A session moderated by Sachiyo Tsukamoto

    Closing Remarks
    Looking to the Future: The Role of Education
    Gen-Ling Chang, ALPHA Education


    Speakers

    Professor Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute

    Professor Takashi Fujitani
    Panelist
    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Professor Yang Yanjun
    Panelist
    Director, Unit 731 Research Center in Harbin, China

    Dr. Gong Zhiwei
    Panelist
    Shanghai Jiaotong University, China

    Professor Katsuo Nishiyama
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan


    Sponsors

    ALPHA Education

    Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    Robarts Library, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, September 20th Literature, the Human, and Governmentality: Between Ideas and Experience

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This talk is interested in how Korean literary and cultural critics have defined the idea of literature and what roles the idea serves in their larger arguments about the human being and history. It focuses in particular on mid-century Korea, from the late Japanese colonial period until the 1950s. The intention behind this periodization is to recognize both continuity and discontinuity between “before and after liberation,” particularly in relation to concepts of the human and their intersection with imperial, colonial, and national politics. Through texts by Paek Ch’ŏl, Ch’oe Chaesŏ, Sŏ Insik, and An Hamgwang, published in the Japanese empire, South Korea, and North Korea, I will discuss how and why these critics conceived of literature as the most important mediation between transcendental concepts, including moral and political ideas, and the everyday experiences of modernity. This situating of literature between ideas and experience was connected to the figure of the human, the “empirico-transcendental doublet” of modernity (Foucault), and thereby to modes of governmentality between Japanese empire, US and Soviet occupation, and the Korean national population. This talk comes out of a current book project, a collection of translations titled Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism.

    Travis Workman is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He is the author of Imperial Genus: The Formation and Limits of the Human in Modern Korea and Japan (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016). He has published articles in journals such as PMLA and positions and book chapters in volumes such as The Korean Popular Culture Reader and Rediscovering Korean Cinema. He is currently working on a collection of translations, Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism and a book manuscript, Political Moods: Melodrama and the Cold War in Korean Film.


    Speakers

    Travis Workman
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

    Michelle Cho
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, September 20th Half a century of Swedish school reforms: trying to reform society through schools

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Inger Enkvist is professor em. of Spanish and Latin-American literature at Lund University, Sweden and also a well-know author of books on education published mainly in Spanish and Swedish. She has some 40 books published and more than 200 articles. In Spanish she has written on the Peruvian-Spanish writer Mario Vargas Llosa and the Spanish writer Juan Goytisolo. She has published on Spanish philosophers and Latin-American Icons. In education, she has published books on the Swedish education reforms and books on international comparison in education. Her current research focuses on new trends in teacher education and how to reform teacher education in Sweden.

    Sweden introduced the “comprehensive school” in 1962. Obligatory school up to the age of 16 was to lead to social harmony and equality, and there was to be no specific learning targets to be acquired in order to graduate. Reforms in 1969 and in 1976 put still more emphasis on a social and caring approach. In 1985, the teacher education was changed in order to prepare teachers for the new role that teachers were to adopt.This basic model was not changed in the 90s, but the 90s also saw a radical decentralization and the introduction of a kind of charter schools plus a new type of curriculum. In 2001 there was a reform that introduced a teacher education based on the basic equality between different kinds of teachers. A number of reforms 2010-2011 introduced some changes but did not touch the basic model neither for schools nor for teacher education.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Inger Enkvist
    Lund University, Sweden


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    CERLL/OISE, University of Toronto

    CIDEC/OISE, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, September 20th War in the Backyard: What Everyday Life in Eastern Ukraine Looks Like

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For nearly five years, the Minsk Agreements have been successful in sustaining violence in Ukraine at a low level. The public awareness of the conflict in which nothing really happens has also been steadily going down. And, when invoked, the war in Ukraine is usually discussed solely in geopolitical or military terms.

    Missing from this picture are six million people who live in the war zone in eastern Ukraine. Still dealing with the trauma of direct violence in 2014-2015, they are currently exposed to indirect consequences of war. Disrupted infrastructure, restrictions on movement, diseases, lack of access to basic services, unemployment, and shadow economy – these are the everyday realities of life in the vicinity of the war in Ukraine. At the same time, these factors shape a unique local culture of resilience. People come up with creative strategies of traveling, safety, parenting, entrepreneurship, and mutual assistance.

    Alisa Sopova is a journalist from Donetsk and currently an MA candidate in Regional Studies (Russia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia) program at Harvard University. Previously news editor for Donbass, the biggest newspaper in Donetsk Region of Ukraine, since 2014 she has been extensively covering the military conflict in the area for a number of media including the New York Times, Time magazine, and the Guardian. Alisa has joined Harvard as a first Nieman fellow from Ukraine and stayed to continue her research of everyday coping strategies employed by residents in the frontline communities.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Alisa Sopova
    Speaker
    MA candidate in Regional Studies (Russia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia) program, Harvard University

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Euopean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, September 26th Transformative Student Research at the Asian Institute

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 26, 201912:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Featuring presentations from the Asian Institute’s 2018-19 RICHARD CHARLES LEE INSIGHTS THROUGH ASIA CHALLENGE (ITAC) & BIG IDEAS COMPETITION: EXPLORING GLOBAL TAIWAN Student Research Awardees

    Event Program

    12:00-1:15PM
    Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) Presentations

    Yujuan (Emmy) Fu, Ethics, Society & Law; Literature & Critical Theory
    Jennifer Han, Peace, Conflict & Justice and Political Science
    Sites of (Un)belonging: Spaces/Faces of Honjok Youth in Seoul, South Korea

    Amrita Kumar-Ratta, MGA, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning
    Shades of Brown Girl: The Many Colours of Transnational South Asian Femininity

    Katie Kwang, Psychology; Economics
    Benita Leong, History; Political Science (UTM)
    Hui Wen Zheng, Contemporary Asian Studies; Peace, Conflict, and Justice
    Moving in and moving out: understanding the effects of social exclusion on the mental health of rural-urban migrants in Shenzhen

    Zixian Liu, PhD Candidate, Department of History
    Rural Land Marketization, the Displacement of the Urban Poor and the Neoliberalizing Developmental State in Beijing

    Habiba Maher
    Aliza Rahman
    Asian Modest Fashion in the Museum Space

    Minh Anh (Mia) Nguyen, Contemporary Asian Studies; Political Science
    Unwanted Children

    Man (Angela) Xu, Sociology Department
    The Invisible Hand of South-South Globalization: A Study of Chinese Migrants in Tehran

    1:15-1:45PM
    Lunch Break

    1:45-3:00PM
    Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan Presentations

    Adam Zivokinovic (“Zivo”) – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Ji Chen (Tony) Yin – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    The Referendum

    Anson Au, Department of Sociology; Department of Chinese Literature (Joint Appointment), National Sun Yat-Sen University
    The Everyday Politics of LGBTQ Minorities in Taiwan: Discrimination, Legalization, and Community

    Sabrina Teng-io Chung, PhD, East Asian Studies
    Exhibiting In-Justices: Human Rights Discourses in Taiwan’s Recent Redress Efforts

    Yiwei Jin, MA student, Department of Political Science
    Hsieh-Piao and the Politics of Personalization in Taiwan

    Niki C Yang, Criminology
    Celina B. Servanez, Criminology and Sociolegal Studies (graduate department)
    Sohrab Naderi, Political Science and Criminology
    Anti-Death Penalty Efforts in Taiwan

    3:00-4:00PM
    Reception

    About the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC)
    The Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) is an interdisciplinary experiential learning program at the Asian Institute that offers students the opportunity for an academically rooted, life-changing field research experience in Asia. On the vanguard of supporting the University’s wider goals of internationalization, redesigning undergraduate teaching, and increasing student mobility, ITAC supports students through the complete trajectory of their research, providing workshops on proposal writing, project management, research methods, ethical research practices, and data analysis as well as direct mentoring. Encouraging students to produce their research in various forms ranging from policy reports to documentary films or something else entirely, ITAC is open to undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines, across all three UofT campuses. Out of approximately 100 applications, five to seven research teams are awarded annually by an academic jury. More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/rcl-itac/

    About the Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan
    The Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan is a student research competition, which supports selected undergraduate and graduate student teams to conduct their outstanding research and creative projects in Taiwan. The Competition provides opportunities for student experience in Taiwan by combining research on issues connected to Taiwanese culture/society with travel, taking classroom learning into the field in order to develop academic research skills and self-confidence. The program is enthusiastically interdisciplinary, encouraging student-researchers across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences to collaborate with complementary skills and knowledge bases.

    Throughout the winter, awarded teams collectively participated in workshops on project management, research methods, ethical research practices, data analysis, and safety abroad. Teams work closely with an academic mentor and Asian Institute staff, rigorously developing their research projects before departing for field research in the summer semester. Spending up to a month immersed in local cultures, developing cultural fluencies, and conducting research, students return to write up final reports and produce their projects in the late summer.
    More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/global-taiwan-studies-program-big-ideas-competition/

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, September 30th Panel Discussion: Historical Atlas of Central Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 30, 20197:00PM - 9:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute
    620 Spadina Avenue
    (Spadina and Harbord)
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Panel discussion on the revised and expanded third edition of Historical Atlas of Central Europe by Prof. Paul Robert Magocsi

    Paul Robert Magocsi is professor of history and political science at the University of Toronto, where since 1980, he has held the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies.

    Professor Magocsi is a permanent fellow of the Royal Society of Canada—Canadian Academies of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences, and has been awarded honorary degrees from Prešov University in Slovakia (doctor honoris causa, 2013) and from Kamianets-Podilskyi National University in Ukraine (pochesnyi profesor, 2015).


    Speakers

    Paul Robert Magocsi
    Keynote
    John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    Rev. Peter Galadza
    Moderator
    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Robert Austin
    Panelist
    Brock University

    Gregor Kranjc
    Panelist
    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish Studies

    Piotr Wrobel
    Panelist



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

October 2019

  • Wednesday, October 2nd U of T – JSPS Forum 2019: Forging Research Collaborations with Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 2, 20191:30PM - 5:00PMHart House – Music Room, University of Toronto,
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The goal of this forum is to raise the awareness of science and research excellence in Japan by celebrating successful research collaborations between the two countries and increasing interest among U of T faculty and government partners. The forum will also serve as an opportunity to bring current and potential industry partners and facilitate engagement in collaborative research, as well as raise awareness of funding opportunities available through JSPS, NSERC and MITACS.

    October 2, 2019
    1:30 – 4 PM with reception from 4 – 5PM
    Hart House (Music Room)
    University of Toronto
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3

    RSVP by September 20, 2019 to tak.koguchi@utoronto.ca

    PROGRAM

    Opening Remarks (1:30 – 1:40 PM):
    • Professor Ted Sargent, Vice President, International, University of Toronto
    • Consul General Takako Ito, Consul General of Japan in Toronto
    • Kohji Hirata, Director of JSPS Washington Office

    Research Funding (1:40 – 2:10 PM):
    • Learn about funding opportunities for research with/in Japan with representatives from JSPS, MITACS, NSERC

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan (2:10 – 2:40 PM):
    • Professor Phillip Lipscy, Director of CSGJ presents on the Centre’s vision for collaborating with Japan

    Panel Discussion on Research Collaborations with Japan (2:40 – 3:50 PM):
    • Discussion with U of T faculty on collaborating with Japan. Panelists include:
    • Professor Charles Boone (Molecular Genetics)
    • Professor Wai Tung Ng (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
    • Professor Andre Sorensen (Human Geography)

    Moderated by Professor Chris Yip, Dean of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

    Closing Remarks (3:50 – 4 PM)

    Reception (4 – 5 PM)

    For more information, please visit this link.

    Sponsors

    Office of the Vice-President, International, University of Toronto

    Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, October 3rd Minds under Siege: Diaries of the Leningrad Blockade

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 3, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Drawing on 125 unpublished diaries from the Soviet archives, this lecture offers an intimate look at the Leningrad Blockade, one of the longest and deadliest sieges in history. The talk examines how Leningraders trapped inside the city came to intellectual grips with extreme starvation and isolation. In the process of contemplating the meaning of their suffering, they placed themselves, their city, and the Soviet experience under a critical microscope.

     

    Alexis Peri received her PhD in history from the University of California Berkeley, and is an Associate Professor of History at Boston University. The War Within: Diaries from the Siege of Leningrad, the book upon which the talk is based, was published by Harvard University Press in 2017 and won the Pushkin Book Prize, the University of Southern California Book Prize in Literary and Cultural Studies, and the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Book Prize for Cultural Studies. She is working on a new book project about Soviet and American pen-friendships during WWII and the Cold War. It is entitled Dear Unknown Friend: Soviet and American Women Discovered the Power of the Personal.


    Speakers

    Alexis Peri
    Boston University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, October 4th Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Jelena Subotic (PhD, Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007) is Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University in Atlanta, USA. She is the author of two books: Hijacked Justice: Dealing with the Past in the Balkans (Cornell University Press, 2009, Serbian translation 2010) and Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism (Cornell University Press, forthcoming, 2019). Professor Subotic is the author of more than twenty scholarly articles on international relations theory, memory politics, national identity, human rights, and the politics of the Western Balkans.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jelena Subotic
    Professor of Political Science, Georgia State University, Atlanta



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    King’s College London


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, October 7th The 7th Annual Frank W. Woods Lecture - Conflict, Inequality and Redistribution

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 7, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This lecture addresses an age-old question in political economy: does government spending on welfare ensure peace? This question was at the heart of the European Welfare State model of the early 20th century, and remains relevant today in face of rising inequalities and political conflict. Despite a longstanding historical relationship between peace, democracy and the welfare state, few empirical studies to date have analyzed the causal effect of social policies in preventing or reducing political violence, or the type of policies that may be used to mitigate social conflicts and prevent their escalation into widespread violence. We make use of a panel of 12 Latin American countries over the period between 1970 and 2010 to show that government welfare spending has led to substantial reductions in political conflict across the region. This effect is more pronounced when associated with reductions in inequality and increasing social and institutional trust. Similar results are obtained for India, the world’s largest democracy, using panel data collected between 1970 and 2011. This body of evidence suggests that, similarly to Europe at the turn of the 20th century, the implementation of adequate welfare programmes may have an important role to play in the establishment and maintenance of peace and stability in many other parts of the world.

    Speaker

    Professor Patricia Justino is a development economist who works at the interface between Development Economics and Political Science. She is a leading international expert on political violence and development and the co-founder and co-director of the Households in Conflict Network. She is currently a Senior Research Fellow at UNU-WIDER and Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) in Brighton, UK (on leave). Professor Justino’s research focuses on the relationship between political violence, institutional transformation, governance and development outcomes. She has led major research programmes funded by the European Commission, the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID). She is currently PI in a ESRC large grant on the relationship between inequality, social trust and governance outcomes. Professor Justino’s research has been published in leading international journals such as the Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Peace Research, and the World Bank Economic Review and is the lead author of A Micro-Level Perspective on the Dynamics of Conflict, Violence and Development (Oxford University Press). She has held several advisory positions in major international organisations, including Action Aid, DFID, FAO, UNDP, UNESCO, UNICEF, UN Women, USAID, and the World Bank. She was the director of the MICROCON research programme and deputy director of the TAMNEAC Initial Training Network. Professor Justino holds a MPhil in Economics from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in Economics from the University of London. She has held visiting positions at Harvard University (2007-2009) and the European University Institute, among others.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Professor Patricia Justino
    Senior Research Fellow, UNU-WIDER Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, October 9th Academic Januses: GPU-NKVD Secret Informants at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (1920s–1930s)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 9, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In 2015 the decommunization laws in Ukraine gave open access to the GPU-NKVD-KGB archives, and historians immediately seized the opportunity to study new types of secret police documents which had been inaccessible earlier. Among them were the almost unknown dela-formulyary, i.e. surveillance files on the Ukrainian scholars who worked at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in the 1920s–1930s.
    These files were prepared for many years and contained all information about researchers and their milieu. They consisted of several types of documents – track records, questionnaires, characteristics, references, secret police supervisory materials, copies of testimonies of the detainees, copies of opened and inspected correspondence, as well as numerous “bulletins” and “informational messages” from the secret informants.

    Despite the fact that there are practically no official archival materials on secret informants (their personal files were either obliterated or moved to Russia), it is very likely that their names can be identified. In her talk Oksana Yurkova will present her analysis of the surveillance files and discuss the problem of secret informants among Ukrainian scholars in the 1920s–1930s. Also she will present her research on deciphering of the academic secret informants’ nicknames.

    Dr. Oksana Yurkova is a Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, in Kyiv, Ukraine.
    She studies Ukrainian historiography of the 20th century, especially focusing on the interwar period (1920s–1930s), the Ukrainian historian Mykhailo Hrushevsky and his Kyiv historical school, as well as the activity of Ukrainian historical institutions of that period; iconography; anthropology of academic life; electronic information resources. In 2015, she initiated the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives which collects and presents all printed and archival materials dealing with this famous historian and political figure (http://hrushevsky.nbuv.gov.ua/ ).
    In 2019 the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies awarded her the Kolasky Visiting Research Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Law, Education, and Library Sciences 2019–2020. In Toronto she works on the project “Canadian Sources for the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives.” For more details see her web-page http://resource.history.org.ua/person/0000512

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oksana Yurkova
    Speaker
    Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, October 18th “We have borrowed also from the French, and they I think from the Spaniards": National Lessons from Navigation History

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Further information to follow


    Speakers

    Margaret Schotte
    York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 cases studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to secure the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, October 24th Internet Voting in Estonia, 2005-2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Internet voting in Estonia 2005-2019
    How Does It Work and Why Does 50% of the Population Vote Online?

    In 2005, Estonia was the first country in the world to offer universal remote internet voting in all national elections. Since then, the usage numbers have gradually grown in all e-enabled elections. A new milestone was reached in 2019 when close to 50% of all votes given were electronic. The lecture explores the uptake and usage patterns of internet voting, employing both survey and system log data on voter behavior. Specific attention is devoted to what drives usage growth given that every second vote in Estonia is now given online, but voter turnout has hardly changed over the course of 15 years of internet voting.

    Mihkel Solvak (PhD) is a senior research fellow in technology studies and head of institute at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies. His research interest include remote internet voting, electoral behavior, uptake and diffusion patterns of digital public services, data driven and machine learning enabled public services. He is affiliated with the Center of IT Impact Studies (CITIS), a research group that prototypes and builds digital public services for Estonian e-government.


    Speakers

    Mihkel Solvak, PhD
    Director, Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, University of Tartu, Estonia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, October 25th Not in Our Town“ – a case study of civic/youth engagement against intolerance and radicalism in Slovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Ivan Chorvát is Associate Professor at the Department of Social Studies and Ethnology, Faculty of Arts, Matej Bel University in Banská Bystrica (Slovakia) and at the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, The University of Trnava (Slovakia). He studied Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Charles University in Prague, Society and Politics at the Central European University in Prague (Czech Republic), and completed his doctoral studies at The Institute for Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava (1998). His main areas of research include the sociology of family, tourism, leisure and consumption, and the study of sociological theory. I. Chorvát is the author of monographs Man – Father in the Contemporary Family (1999), Travel and Tourism in the Mirror of Time (2007), Leisure in Slovakia from a Sociological Perspective (2011), Consumption and the Consumer Society (2015) and co-editor of Family in Slovakia in Theory and Research (2015) and Leisure, Culture and Society: Czech Republic and Slovakia (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ivan Chorvat



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, October 28th The Durability of Client Regimes: Foreign Sponsorship and Military Loyalty, 1946-2010

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Conventional wisdom suggests that great power patrons prop up client dictatorships. However, this is generally assumed rather than systematically analyzed. In this paper, I offer the first comprehensive analysis of the relationship between foreign sponsorship and authoritarian regime survival with the use of an original dataset of all autocratic client regimes in the postwar period. These results demonstrate that patronage from Western powers – the United States, France, and the United Kingdom – is not associated with client regime survival. Instead, only Soviet sponsorship reduces the risk of regime collapse. I explain this variation by considering the effects of foreign sponsorship on the likelihood of military coups d’etat. I argue that the Soviet Union directly aided its clients in imposing a series of highly effective coup prevention strategies. In contrast, the United States and its allies did not directly aid their clients in coup prevention which left regimes vulnerable to military overthrow.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Adam Casey
    Trudeau Centre Fellow Ph.D. Candidate & Course Instructor | Dept. of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

November 2019

  • Wednesday, November 13th The newest wave of Russian emigration and its implications for Russia and the West

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Dr. Sergei Erofeev is currently a lecturer at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He has been involved in the internationalization of universities in Russia since the early 1990s. Previously, Dr. Erofeev served as a vice rector for international affairs at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, the dean of international programs at the European University at Saint Petersburg, and the director of the Center for Sociology of Culture at Kazan Federal University in Russia. He has also been a Hubert H. Humphrey fellow at the University of Washington. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Erofeev was a concert pianist, and has worked in the area of the sociology of the arts.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sergei Erofeev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, November 15th Dangerous Liaisons: The Forbidden Love Affairs of French Prisoners of War and German Women in the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Tens of thousands of French prisoners of war (POWs) and German women had to stand trial in Nazi Germany for having engaged in a love relation with each other. The prisoner and the woman both faced severe punishment, and the woman had to suffer public shaming. What do the trials reveal about Franco-German relations in World War II? How did French POWs and German women perceive each other? How did German village and factory communities react to these international love relations? Why did the relations never become part of memory in either country? The project examines Franco-German collaboration and international relations from a new perspective grounded in the everyday life experience in wartime Nazi Germany.

    Raffael Scheck is Katz Distinguished Teaching Professor of Modern European History at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. He has published five books and 40 articles on German right-wing politics and on French colonial prisoners of war. His book on the German army massacres of black French prisoners in 1940 was translated into French and German. He has completed a book manuscript on forbidden love relations between western prisoners of war and German women in World War II and is beginning to write a book on the German campaign in the West in 1940.


    Speakers

    Raffael Scheck
    Colby College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, November 25th Central Europe's Repeating Troubles with Great Powers: the Role of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    China is a new great power entering a geopolitically tense region of Central Europe, where Russia, Western Europe, and the U.S. have competed throughout the 20th century for influence. China benefitted from growing scepticism towards the West after the 2008 crisis and was looked upon by many in the region as an alternative. At the same time, with most of the economic expectations of China remaining unfulfilled, the frustration of China has grown as well, aided also by the different outlooks of Communism and the general suspicions of great powers in the region. The presentation will look into political, economic, and social aspects of China-Central Europe relations and its implications for Europe, in general, to show that even though China has presented new challenges, it is unlikely to compete on equal footing with the established great powers in the region.

    Richard Q. Turcsányi is a Key Researcher at Palacky University Olomouc, Assistant Professor at Mendel University in Brno, and Program Director at the Central European Institute of Asian Studies (www.ceias.eu). He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations and further degrees in economy and political science. In past, he conducted long-term study and research stays at the University of Toronto, Peking University, National Chengchi University in Taipei, and the European Institute for Asian Studies in Brussels. His research interests include Chinese foreign policy, relations between China and (Central and Eastern) Europe, and international relations of Asia-Pacific.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Richard Turcsanyi


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    European Studies Students' Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

January 2020

  • Friday, January 10th The Czech Republic and Central-Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Velvet Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 10, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    MARK KRAMER is Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has taught as a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria, where he was the Panitza Distinguished Professor. Originally trained in mathematics at Stanford University, he was formerly an Academy Scholar in Harvard’s Academy of International and Area Studies and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He has written many books and articles on a wide range of topics, including Imposing Maintaining, and Tearing Open the Iron Curtain: East-Central Europe and the Cold War, 1945-1990, which was named by Foreign Policy as one of the ten best books published in the field of International Relations in 2014, and he has long served as editor of Harvard’s Cold War Studies Book Series and of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a prize-winning quarterly journal published by MIT Press. His latest book, on the Russian Chechen wars of 1994-1996 and 1999-2009, will be published in 2020.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Mark Kramer
    Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.