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March 2021

  • Thursday, March 4th Voting with their feet? Emigration from Greece in the 2010s

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 4, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Greece (and other southern European countries) have experienced in the early 2010s an unprecedented economic and financial crisis which has led many people to emigrate. Those leaving were generally highly educated and they mainly headed towards EU countries as they had the right to free movement as EU citizens. Our research results though suggested that while important, economic reasons were far from being the exclusive, or even the predominant driver of highly skilled emigration from Greece. The desire to improve one’s training and career perspective, to increase employability and derive individual satisfaction from occupation, was mentioned by more than half of our respondents in a survey conducted in 2013 in all southern European countries (Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece). The strongest emigration potential was to be found among those who were dissatisfied with the quality of life and their job prospects at the home country, and who refuses to renounce what they thought they could/should achieve in terms of life style and overall satisfaction. These findings will be the starting point of a reflection on what shapes highly skilled emigration from Greece today. Perhaps the lessons learnt from the financial and Eurozone crisis of the early 2010s can serve as a compass for navigating the post-pandemic downturn and recovery.

    Anna Triandafyllidou holds the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University in Toronto. She is an internationally recognized sociologist and migration policy expert whose interdisciplinary research focuses on the governance of migration and asylum; the management of cultural diversity, nationalism and identity issues; and overall, the contemporary challenges of migration and integration across different world regions. Prior to her CERC at Ryerson University, Triandafyllidou was based in Florence, Italy, where she held a Robert Schuman Chair at the European University Institute and directed the Cultural Pluralism Research Area as part of the European University Institute’s Global Governance Programme.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Hungarian Foreign Policy between the World Wars

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Miklós Zeidler (b. 1967), historian, studied History (M.A. at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, 1994) and International Relations (M.Sc. at Budapest University of Economics, 1994). In 1998, he joined the Department of Modern and Contemporary History of Hungary at the Eötvös Loránd University. After his Ph.D. (2001) and his habilitation (2011) he was promoted to associate professor in 2014. In the same year he joined the Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences as a part-time senior researcher. Meanwile, he was a guest lecturer at the College of Hospitality Managament (Budapest), the Budapest University of Economics and the University of Theatre and Film Arts (Budapest). He specializes in inter-war international relations and 19th and 20th century sport history of Hungary. He did archival research in Geneva, London, Madrid, Oxford, Paris and Rome and gave lectures in several countries including the United Kingdom and the United States of America. He published a great number of studies and books, including Ideas on Territorial Revision in Hungary 1920–1945 (2007).

    His paper provides an overview of Hungarian foreign policy between the World Wars. Defeated in the Great War and subsequently partitioned yet regaining its full independence, Hungary started a revisionist foreign policy aiming to upset the Peace Treaty of Trianon and recover at least some but preferably or all of her lost territories. Seeking wide-ranging political partnership during the 1920s – including her former enemies France, the British Empire and the US as well – Hungary began to narrow down her scope of potential allies to the Axis Powers in the 1930s. With some initial hopes towards the League Nations to protect the Hungarian national minorities in the neighbouring states and to raise the question of treaty revision, the Hungarian government finally followed the example of Germany and Italy and left the Geneva-based organization in 1939. After the Axis-assisted restoration of about half of her lost territories between 1938 and 1941, Hungary reluctantly entered World War II, and was defeated again in 1945 by the Allied and Associated Powers. The huge loss of life and material as well as of the temporarily regained territories combined with the subsequent Soviet occupation and political influence left Hungary in an arguably worse situation than she had been after the Great War.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Miklós Zeidler
    Speaker
    The Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Associate Director, CERES


    Main Sponsor

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Asian Research in the Fog of Pandemic

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    ASIA-PACIFIC CONVERSATIONS

    In recent years, researchers have highlighted the importance of using “Asia” as a site to develop new research tools and methods to rethink the global world. The outbreak of Covid-19, in many ways, has only heightened this call. Beyond the Asian stories of “failures” and “successes” in dealing with the ongoing public health crisis, the pandemic has exacerbated the existing geopolitical tensions, dispossession, as well as state violence against minorities and political dissidents, all against the backdrop of a series of ever-growing planetary crises.

    With the pandemic still evolving, how should specialists of Asia begin to examine their “field” when the field itself is mutating, and when there is no clear sense of how to go about documenting and knowing the unknown? In this conversation, distinguished Asia scholars working from a variety of interdisciplinary contexts, including anthropology, cultural studies, history, and media studies, will reflect on the challenges of conducting research into the unknown in a politicized, racialized, sensationalized, and emotion-laden environment.
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    MICHAEL BERRY is a translator and author who is Professor of Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies and Director of the Center for Chinese Studies at UCLA. He has written and edited eight books on Chinese literature and cinema, including Speaking in Images: Interviews with Contemporary Chinese Filmmakers (2006) and A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (2008). He has served as a film consultant and a juror for numerous film festivals, including the Golden Horse (Taiwan) and the Fresh Wave (Hong Kong). A two time National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellow, Berry’s book-length translations include The Song of Everlasting Sorrow: A Novel of Shanghai (2008) by Wang Anyi, shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize, To Live (2004) by Yu Hua, a selection in the National Endowment for the Arts Big Read library, and Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from a Quarantined City (2020) by Fang Fang.

    BISHNUPRIYA GHOSH is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she teaches environmental media and global postcolonial studies. Much of her early scholarly work interrogated the relations between the global and the postcolonial; area studies and transnational cultural studies; popular, mass, and elite cultures. Apart from works that address global mediascapes, in the last decade, Ghosh turned to risk distributions and their relationship to media. She has written several essays on the subject and has co-edited collection (with Bhaskar Sarkar), The Routledge Companion to Media and Risk (2020). She is completing a single-authored , The Virus Touch: Theorizing Epidemic Media which considers how mediatic processes detect and compose epidemics as crises events.

    RALPH LITZINGER is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. He is the author of Other Chinas: the Yao and the Politics of National Belonging (Duke University Press, 2000), and, more recently, with Carlos Rojas, Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China (Duke University Press, 2016). He has published in leading cultural anthropology and Asian studies journals. He directed Duke’s Asia/Pacific Studies Institute from 2001-2007, and the Duke Engage Migrant Education Project from 2008-2015. His new research concerns questions of planetary futures, digital labor and platform capitalism, human and post-human techno-imaginaries. His most recent publication, with Fan Yang, is “Eco-Media Events in China: From Yellow Eco-Peril to Media Materialism,” Environmental Humanities, May 2020.


    Speakers

    Michael Berry
    Speaker
    Professor of Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies, Department of Asian Languages & Cultures; Director, Center for Chinese Studies, UCLA

    Bishnupriya Ghosh
    Speaker
    Professor of English and Global Studies, UC Santa Barbara

    Ralph Litzinger
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto; Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #2: Hands-on Learning in the Classroom

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Being a part of the Munk One program is so much more than just readings and lectures.

    Join us for this interactive session to discover the unique hands-on learning opportunities that make up the classroom experience.

    You’ll learn about our ethnography practicums in the city, how students conduct interviews with organizations working on projects to address persistent global problems, “devastating facts” video assignments, Munk One debates, small seminar discussions, and developing real interventions of your own to advance the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 8th Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 8, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us to learn about studying at the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Meet our program staff, faculty and student ambassadors to find out what the Peace, Conflict and Justice programs have to offer, the application process, student life, and have any of your questions answered.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 8th Looking Back and Looking Forward: A Conversation on Japan and Canada’s Ageing Societies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 8, 20217:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Global Japan will be welcoming Prof. Hiroko Akiyama to present her research on the ageing society. Prof. Akiyama will be joined by Prof. Margarita Estevez-Abe and Prof. Michelle Silver for discussions following the presentation. This webinar will be moderated by Prof. Ito Peng.

    Presenter:
    Hiroko Akiyama
    Visiting Professor, Institute of Gerontology and Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo
    Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo

    Hiroko Akiyama, a gerontologist, is professor of emeritus at the University of Tokyo and the former vice president of Science Council of Japan. Professor Akiyama has conducted a number of cross-national surveys and is widely recognized as an expert on issues of global aging. She is known for the long-running research on the elderly in Japan—tracking the aging patterns of approximately 6,000 Japanese elderly over 30 years. She also initiated social experiment projects that pioneer to re-design communities to meet the needs of the highly aged society, and more recently Kamakura Living Lab, a platform for open innovation by co-creation among users, industry, government and academia. She started the Institute of Gerontology at University of Tokyo in 2006. Professor Akiyama received Ph.D. in psychology from University of Illinois, the United States.

    Panelists:
    Margarita Estevez-Abe
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Syracuse University

    Margarita Estevez-Abe teaches political science at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. She works in the sub-field of political science called comparative political economy of advanced industrial countries. She is interested in how political and economic institutions are constructed differently across countries and in their varying effects on politics and ordinary people’s lives. Her work so far has dealt with Japanese political economy, the Varieties of Capitalism, and comparative political economy of gender.

    Michelle Silver
    Acting Chair, Department of Health and Society and Associate Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Michelle Silver is an Associate Professor of Gerontology at the University of Toronto where she holds appointments in the Department of Health and Society, Sociology, and Public Health. Her book, Retirement and Its Discontents, was published in 2018 by Columbia University Press. Her work has been featured in Forbes, the Times Literary Supplement, Zoomer, Next Avenue, The Globe and Mail, Global News, and other popular media sources. She received a BA, BS, and MPP from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Chicago. She is currently chair of the Department of Health and Society at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

    Ito Peng
    Professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy and Director, Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto (Moderator)

    Professor Ito Peng is a Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. She is an expert in global social policy, specializing in gender, migration and care policies. She has written extensively on social policies and political economy of care in Asia Pacific. Her teaching and research focus on comparative social policy, and family, gender, employment and migration policies. She just completed an international partnership research project entitled Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care (http://cgsp.ca/), and is now engaged in two research projects: The Care Economy: Gender-sensitive Macroeconomic Models for Policy Analysis, and Care Economies in Context: Towards Sustainable Social and Economic Development.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Hiroko Akiyama
    Speaker
    Visiting Professor, Institute of Gerontology and Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo and Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo

    Margarita Estevez-Abe
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Syracuse University

    Michelle Silver
    Panelist
    Acting Chair, Department of Health and Society and Associate Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy and Director, Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 10th Book Discussion: The Art of Sharing

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 10, 202112:30PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Graham Centre presents a discussion of The Art of Sharing: The Richer versus the Poorer Provinces since Confederation, by Toronto-based journalist and historian Mary Janigan. This book studies the history of Canada’s path toward Equalization, with comparisons between Canadian and Australian approaches.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 10th Taking Flight: The Role of Airports in Thriving City Regions

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 10, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Pearson International Airport is an indispensable hub for mobility, goods movement, and employment in the Greater Toronto Area. COVID-19 has significantly affected airports around the world, however, and it remains unclear how quickly they will recover once the crisis is over.

    What role do airports play in ensuring thriving and prosperous city regions? How will that change following the COVID-19 crisis? How can governments at all levels work together to make sure airports are fully integrated within their regions and continue to succeed as economic hubs?

    On March 10, Jean-Paul Addie, Assistant Professor at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, will examine what we can learn from other city-regions on these questions. A group of local experts will then join him for a panel discussion on the implications of his findings for Pearson and the region.

    Speaker
    Jean-Paul Addie is an Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University. He is an urban geographer working on issues of urban and regional governance with a focus on the politics of infrastructure. Questions of city-regionalism are at the heart of Jean-Paul’s research. He has investigated the politics and practices of city-region formation through the geography of higher education, the experiences of infrastructural regionalism, and the multi-scalar dynamics of urban transportation – including the development of ‘aero-regions’.

    Panelists
    Lloyd A. McCoomb was President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) from 2007 until 2012. Prior to that, he served as Vice President, Airport Planning and Development, in which capacity he was responsible for the planning and construction of the GTAA’s four billion-dollar facility restoration and expansion program. He most recently has served as Chair of the Board of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority and is currently the Chair of the Advisory Panel of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute.

    Pamela Blais is an urban planner and Principal of Metropole Consultants, a Toronto-based planning practice. In her twenty-plus-year career as an urban planning consultant, her work has included reurbanization strategies; long-term regional growth planning; municipal economic development strategies; innovative land use policies; and urban regeneration strategies. She recently completed Planning the Next Greater Golden Horseshoe, a report that explains a shifting economic landscape in the Toronto region and its implications for planning.

    Josh Neubauer is a Principal at Urban Strategies. Josh plays a key role in Urban Strategies’ airport planning practice. Josh has helped develop the vision for a new transit hub at Pearson airport, evaluated the pros and cons of expanding passenger volumes at Billy Bishop Airport, articulated the need for regional air planning with the Southern Ontario Airport Network, and reviewed the regional and local benefits of a new airport in the east GTA.

    Moderator
    Matti Siemiatycki is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, Canada Research Chair in Infrastructure Planning and Finance, and Interim Director of the School of Cities at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on large-scale infrastructure projects, public-private partnerships, and the effective integration of infrastructure into the fabric of cities. He has undertaken studies on major cities in Canada and around the world including Vancouver, London, Los Angeles, Sydney, Bilbao, and Delhi.

    Contact

    Piali Roy
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Jean-Paul Addie
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University

    Lloyd A. McCoomb
    Panelist
    Former President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) and current Chair of the Advisory Panel of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute.

    Pamela Blais
    Panelist
    Urban planner and Principal of Metropole Consultants, a Toronto-based planning practice

    Josh Neubauer
    Panelist
    Principal at Urban Strategies with a key role in Urban Strategies’ airport planning practice

    Matti Siemiatycki
    Moderator
    Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, Canada Research Chair in Infrastructure Planning and Finance, and Interim Director of the School of Cities at the University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 11th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 1: “The Indian Question in the United States”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 11, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 1 Theme: Racisms in the United States

    Title of Presentation: “The Indian Question in the United States”

    Abstract:
    Making the radical argument that the nation-state was born of colonialism, this talk calls us to rethink political violence and reimagine political community beyond majorities and minorities. Dr. Mamdani argues that the nation-state and the colonial state created each other. In case after case around the globe—from the New World to South Africa, Israel to Germany to Sudan—the colonial state and the nation-state have been mutually constructed through the politicization of a religious or ethnic majority at the expense of an equally manufactured minority. The model emerged in North America, where genocide and internment on reservations created both a permanent native underclass and the physical and ideological spaces in which new immigrant identities crystallized as a settler nation. In Europe, this template would be used by the Nazis to address the Jewish Question, and after the fall of the Third Reich, by the Allies to redraw the boundaries of Eastern Europe’s nation-states, cleansing them of their minorities. After Nuremberg the template was used to preserve the idea of the Jews as a separate nation. By establishing Israel through the minoritization of Palestinian Arabs, Zionist settlers followed the North American example. The result has been another cycle of violence.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University. He received his PhD from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of African history and politics. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. He has authored several ground-breaking books including Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror, and Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War and the Roots of Terror. His new book, from Harvard University Press, is titled Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Mahmood Mamdani
    Speaker
    Herbert Lehman Professor of Government, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Czech Geopolitical Identity and Its Impacts on Today's Chechia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Although the geographical position of Czechia is in the very centre of Europe, its geopolitical identity has been contested many times in its history. The internal and external influences in political struggles over the country’s political and geographical “soul” have resulted in a unique character of thinking about Czechia itself and its relationship to the rest of Europe and the world – the “Czech archive” of geopolitical imaginations. Such an archive of geopolitical knowledge plays a vital role in the state’s current foreign politics, especially towards its neighbours, the EU, and the world. The lecture shows a still changing and complex nature of thinking about the Czech geopolitical identity and its impacts on today’s Chechia.

    Tomáš Drobík, Ph.D., holds a PhD in political science with a specialization in Political geography. He works at the Department of Human Geography and Regional Development as an assistant professor and at the Faculty of Science holds the position of vice-Dean for Internal and External Relations. He focuses primarily on political geography theories and geopolitics with territorial specialization in Central Europe and the Middle East. In the area of critical geopolitics, he predominantly focuses on the popular geopolitics of Czechia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Why has Japan’s immigration policy remained so restrictive, especially in light of economic, demographic, and international political forces that are pushing Japan to admit more immigrants? Michael Strausz will answer this question by drawing on insights from nearly two years of intensive field research in Japan. In addition to answering this question by outlining the central argument of his 2019 book, Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan, this presentation provide context to recent developments in Japanese immigration policy – particularly the December 2018 decision to admit more than 300,000 low skilled foreign laborers as well as the immigration policy response to the COVID pandemic.

    Speaker Bio:
    Michael Strausz is an Associate Professor of Political Science and the Director of Asian Studies at Texas Christian University. He earned his PhD from the University of Washington. He is currently editing a collection of essays by an interdisciplinary group of scholars tentatively titled _The Past and Future of Immigration in Japan_ which aims to put recent immigration reforms into context. His book _Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan_ was published in 2019 with SUNY Press.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Michael Strausz
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies, Texas Christian University

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing's Koreatown

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    The Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University and the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at the University of Toronto are inviting you to the presentation by Prof. Sharon J. Yoon (University of Notre Dame) based on her recently published book on March 12, 2021 (Friday), 3 to 4:30 pm (EST).

    In the past ten years, China has rapidly emerged as South Korea’s most important economic partner. With the surge of goods and resources between the two countries, large waves of Korean migrants have opened small ethnic firms in Beijing’s Koreatown, turning a once barren wasteland into the largest Korean enclave in the world. The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing’s Koreatown fills a critical gap in East Asian and migration studies through an investigation of how the rise of transnationalism has impacted the social and economic lives of South Koreans searching for wealth and stability in China. Based off in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, this book studies the tensions, relationships, and perceptions in the ethnic enclave of Wangjing between Korean Chinese cultural brokers and South Koreans starting out as entrepreneurs.

    Speaker Bio:
    Prof. Sharon J. Yoon is Assistant Professor in the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She received her Ph.D. in sociology at Princeton University. Her research focuses on the Korean diaspora in China and Japan. She is the author of The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing’s Koreatown (Oxford University Press, 2020).

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto) and is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean studies, and the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca || https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    Sharon J. Yoon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor in the Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame

    Hyun Ok Park
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Film Screening of "Our Youth in Taiwan" and Q&A Discussion with Dr. Michelle Cho

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: To register for the Q&A discussion, please click the “Register” button above. To receive the link for the asynchronous film screening of Our Youth in Taiwan, please register on the Eventrbrite (see the link below).

    The year 2021 marks the tenth anniversary of Taiwan’s introduction of degree-pursuing Mainland Chinese students (lusheng) to its higher education institutions. However, this landmark moment also witnesses the demise of lusheng policies across the Taiwan Strait. China’s Ministry of Education has suspended lusheng enrollment in Taiwanese colleges beginning this fall. How might we address the shifting political economy which shapes and contests lusheng policies? How have the lived experiences of lusheng brought new meanings to the geopolitical terrains under which these policies came into being? In what ways have the recent COVID-19 pandemic intensified the political and personal conundrums facing lusheng? This film screening and Q&A event seeks to understand the mounting geopolitical tension between Taiwan and China by directing focus on the stories of lusheng in Taiwan.

    Professor Michelle Cho is an assistant professor of East Asian Popular Cultures in the Department of East Asian Studies, and graduate faculty in Cinema Studies, University of Toronto. Her research interests include East Asian cinema, television, video, and pop music, genre cinemas, social media platforms, and Korean-wave pop culture fandoms.

    FILM SYNOPSIS:

    Our Youth In Taiwan (dir. Fu Yue) is a story of resistance, collaboration, and frustration between three protagonists: Cai Boyi, a politically engaged mainland Chinese student in Taiwan; Chen Wei-ting, a student leader of Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement; and Fu Yue, the documentary filmmaker. As their interwoven narratives unfold, the meanings of democracy, national belonging, social movement, political engagement, sexuality, and even filmmaking are called into question.

    The film won the Best Documentary at the 2018 Taipei Golden Horse Awards. In her award acceptance speech, director Fu Yue advocated for the recognition of Taiwan as an “independent entity.”
    ____________________________________

    Based in the Global Taiwan Studies Program at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto, The Taiwan Gazette is a student-run online platform that aims to introduce Chinese-language sources about Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China to a wider readership across the English-speaking world. It also features Taiwan-related student research and introduces scholarly works which approach Taiwan in critical perspectives and methods.
    ____________________________________

    FILM SCREENING: March 8 (12 pm) to March 14 (11:59 pm EST)

    ***To receive the link for the film screening, please register on the Eventbrite below***


    Speakers

    Michelle Cho
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Cultures in the Department of East Asian Studies, and graduate faculty in Cinema Studies, University of Toronto

    Yu-Han Huang
    Moderator
    Managing Editor, Taiwan Gazette

    Sabrina Chung
    Moderator
    Managing Editor, Taiwan Gazette


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Taiwan Gazette

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Women Breaking Ceilings

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20215:00PM - 6:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On Friday, March 12th, 2021 from 5 – 6:30 PM EST the Munk School will be hosting an online panel event in the spirit of the International Women Day celebration. The event is titled “Women Breaking Ceilings”. The panel will be composed of high-ranking women in government and in the private sector that will shed light on how they overcame barriers to access and navigate professional spaces often deemed inaccessible to many women. Moreover, this event aims to showcase trailblazing women in our economy and government to hopefully inspire and encourage women at the Munk School and beyond.

    Bios:

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard is the first African Nova Scotian woman to be appointed to the Senate of Canada, representing the province of Nova Scotia and her hometown of East Preston. Senator Bernard champions issues impacting African Canadians and people living with disabilities. She is particularly invested in human rights, employment equity, and mental health. Through her involvement in community projects, her social work career, her time with Dalhousie School of Social Work, and now her work in the Senate and as Deputy Chair of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, Senator Bernard has maintained a deep dedication to social justice and racial justice. Senator Bernard advocates for reparations for the historic and continued anti-Black racism impacting the lives of African Canadians in her work.

    Dr. Sarah Saska

    Dr. Sarah Saska (She, Her, Hers) is the Co-founder and CEO of Feminuity, a global strategy firm that partners with leading technology startups through Fortune 500 companies to build diverse teams, equitable systems, and inclusive products and company cultures. Before co-founding Feminuity, Sarah led pioneering doctoral research at the intersection of equity, technology, and innovation. Her research highlighted the need for companies in the technology and innovation sector to centre ethical and equitable design and became the inspiration for Feminuity. Since then, Sarah has twice been named amongst the Women’s Executive Network’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women in Canada and on Culture Amp’s list of “Diversity and Inclusion Leaders You Should Know.” She is a powerful TEDx speaker, and she has been featured on CBC’s The National and Fast Company for her straightforward and actionable approach to the work.

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond is the CEO of the Delmore “Buddy” Daye Learning Institute. Her work in education and the community is rooted in core Africentric Principles. She has a successful history of collaboration with the communities and stakeholders with whom she has worked. Through her extensive public sector involvement, Ms. Parris-Drummond has gained a deep understanding and appreciation for what it takes to conduct policy analysis, oversee publishing projects, and develop and implement education product and develop anti-racism and social equity transformation programs. Known for getting things done in a thoughtful, respectful and engaging way, she has been actively involved across a broad range of community initiatives and organizations such as Akoma Family Centre and Holdings, FEEDNS, the NS Early Childhood Intervention Services, the Black Business Initiative Community Investment Fund and the NS Mass Choir. She has worked for both municipal (Halifax Regional Municipality) and provincial governments (Departments of Education and Justice) as well as the Nova Scotia Community College. Sylvia is proud that during her time at provincial government she founded and was supported by sistahs to develop the African Canadian Women in the Public Service (ACWPS). Ms. Parris-Drummond holds a Masters of Arts in Life Long Learning – Africentricity, a Masters of Education – Curriculum, and a Bachelor of Science, Home Economics / Education.

    An-Noûra Compaoré

    An-Noûra Compaoré is passionate about changes and movements focused on long-term development, auto-sufficiency of developing nations, women equality. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Upon her arrival in Vancouver from Burkina Faso, she introduced innovative foreign policy ideas, development analysis plans, and arts. Her passion for developing countries led her to present her research about the effects of foreign aid and foreign direct investments on corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa. This earned her the UBC Undergraduate Research Award. Compaoré is currently pursuing her Master of Public Policy at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto. She is one of the co-founders and co-president of the Munk School Black Student Association. She was a pro-bono consultant at the Public Good Initiative and Equity Diversity Public Policy Initiative. Her love for women uplifting led her to organize one of the first International Women Day celebrations at UBC and International Women Day inspired panel event at the Munk School.


    Speakers

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard
    Speaker
    Senator – Nova Scotia (East Preston)

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond
    Speaker
    CEO of Buddy Daye Learning Institute

    Dr. Sarah Saska
    Speaker
    Co-founder and CEO of Feminuity

    An-Noûra Compaoré
    Moderator
    Master of Public Policy Candidate 2021, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 15th The Business Reinvention of Japan – Why it Matters for Global Business and Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 15, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Over the past 20 years, Japan’s leading companies have seen their former competitiveness in the mass-manufacturing of high-quality consumer products competed away, first by Korea and Taiwan, and the China. A complete pivot has become necessary to compete not through size and output volume of consumer gadgets, but nimble specialization and technology leadership in input components. The goal is to anchor Asian supply chains and stay ahead of China by occupying critical deep-tech niches. As Japanese companies have gone on a refocusing diet, they have attracted foreign capital and reorganized internal processes of innovation. This conversation will lay out these changes and show why we should pay attention to what they mean for global business and politics.

    Speaker Bio:
    Ulrike Schaede is Professor of Japanese Business at the University of California, San Diego, School of Global Policy and Strategy. She is the Director of JFIT (Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology) where she organizes a weekly “Japan Zoominar” on current issues on Japan. Schaede works on Japan’s changing corporate strategies, including business culture, change management, employment practices, the rise of private equity, corporate governance, and manufacturing and innovation under the digital transformation. She has written extensively on Japanese business organization, and is the author of The Business Reinvention of Japan: How to Make Sense of the New Japan (Stanford University Press, 2020) as well as Choose and Focus: Japanese Business Strategies for the 21st Century (Cornell UP, 2008). She holds a PhD in Japan Studies and Economics from Marburg University, Germany, and has been invited to visiting professor and scholar positions at UC Berkeley, Harvard Business School, Stanford University in the U.S., as well as Hitotsubashi University and the research institutes of The Bank of Japan, various Ministries, and the Development Bank of Japan. All told, Schaede has spent over nine years of research in Tokyo and is an advisor to two startup incubators in Japan. See more at www.TheJapanologist.com.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Ulrike Schaede
    Speaker
    Professor of Japanese Business, School of Global Policy and Strategy, UC San Diego and Director, Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology (JFIT)

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 16th Book Launch: The Frontlines of Peace: An Insider's Guide to Changing the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 16, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Graham Centre is pleased to sponsor a virtual launch of The Frontlines of Peace: An Insider’s Guide to Changing the World, by Severine Autesserre, Professor of Political Science, Barnard College, Columbia University. This book takes the reader behind the scenes of contemporary peacebuilding efforts and has been praised by Nobel Laureates and the editor of Foreign Affairs.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 18th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 2: “Survival of Indigenous and Communities of Color in Los Angeles During a Global Pandemic and Ongoing Racial Violence”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 18, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 2 Theme: Racisms in Public Health: What Pandemics Teach About Racial Disparities

    Title of Presentation: “Indigenous and Communities of Color Survival in Los Angeles in the Times of a Global Pandemic and in the Wake of Ongoing Racial Violence”

    Abstract:
    In the U.S., the COVID-19 pandemic has made the disproportionate outcomes of health isparities among Indigenous and communities of color clear. To be Indigenous, Black, and Latinx marks you for death twice as much than that of whites. In Los Angeles County, one of the most populated counties in the US, it has now been ten months since city officials first declared quarantine on March 29, 2020. Nine months have passed since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. We have witnessed how people themselves have re-organized, strategized, copped, and suffered loved ones losses at an incredible rate never seen in recent times. The lack of affordable healthcare and cultural awareness of medical professionals, especially towards Indigenous Oaxacans, puts them at a higher risk of exposure, contracting, re-occurance, or dying from COVID at an alarming scale. Making matters worse, on Christmas Day, South LA and its major hospital were declared “on the edge of catastrophe” as it streams with patients (New York Times 2020). How is one of the most populated neighborhoods, in the most populous states, where Indigenous, Black, and Latina/os together make up an overwhelming 95% facing the challenges? This talk considers how Indigenous and communities of color, have been affected by the pandemic, and how they have collectively responded to each other when the US settler state continues to fail them.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Brenda Nicolas (Zapotec) received her PhD in Chicana/o and Central American Studies from UCLA. Her work looks at the transborder communal experiences of Zapotec diasporas in Los Angeles. Specifically, she looks at women’s and adult children of migrants’ participation in community sociocultural and political organizing to contest settler colonial logics of Indigenous erasure. Dr. Nicolas is the recipient of several fellowships. She was born and raised in Los Angeles. Her book project is titled Transborder Comunalidad: Gendering Practices of Belonging and Identity Across Settler Colonial Borders.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Brenda Nicolas
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, Loyola Marymount University

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 23rd IP and Entrepreneurship in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 23, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Entrepreneurship is an important part of growing one’s economy. Studies show that entrepreneurship can be learned, it is a skill. In Canada, one of the things that has been holding our entrepreneurs back is intellectual property and data protection. This webinar will focus on the importance of IP protection for entrepreneurship. In particular, we will discuss the intellectual property environment in Canada and existing support for firms.

    Panelists will discuss issues relating to their firm’s ability to secure IP especially as it relates to IP education and the role of government in supporting IP protection.


    Speakers

    Seray Çiçek
    Speaker
    Co-Founder & CEO, LSK Technologies Inc.

    Ryan Hubbard
    Speaker
    Senior Counsel, IP Litigation, Shopify

    Graeme Moffat
    Speaker
    Chief Scientist and Co-Founder, System 2 Neurotechnology and Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Shiri Breznitz
    Moderator
    Director, Master of Global Affairs Program and Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 24th How Demography Challenges Are Shaping Democracies in Eastern Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 24, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Annual Daniel and Elisabeth Damov Lecture in European Affairs

    Description

    In a democracy numbers matter. Demography may not be destiny but it shapes political power in the way that water shapes rock. Put simply, when populations change, power changes hands. This lecture is about how shrinking ethnic and racial majorities in Western democracies are trying to adjust to a future in which their declining numbers threaten their majority status. It’s not about how people elect their governments, but rather how different governments select their people. This occurs by re-designing citizenship criteria and electoral law, by crafting new immigration regimes, by employing practices like gerrymandering and voter suppression, and by changing national narratives. The central argument is that today’s clash between liberalism and illiberalism is at root a contest between two contrasting ideals of the “people”. Liberalism is a vote for an inclusive body politic, representing the diversity of modern society, in which the only majority that matters is the one born on election day. Illiberalism, by contrast, is a belief that the political and national community should be aligned. It’s an effort to try and preserve the indigenous character of national democracies at a time of dramatic change in ethnic, racial or generational composition.

    Short bio: Ivan Krastev is the chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences, IWM Vienna. He is a founding board member of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board of Trustees of The International Crisis Group and is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. He is the author of “Is it Tomorrow, Yet? How the Pandemic Changes Europe” ( Penguin, 2020); The Light that Failed: A Reckoning (Allen Lane, 2019), co-authored with Stephen Holmes – won the 30th Annual Lionel Gelber Prize; “After Europe” (UPenn Press, 2017); “Democracy Disrupted. The Global Politics on Protest” (UPenn Press, 2014) and “In Mistrust We Trust: Can Democracy Survive When We Don’t Trust Our Leaders?” (TED Books, 2013). Ivan Krastev is the winner of the Jean Améry Prize for European Essay Writing 2020.


    Speakers

    Ivan Krastev
    Speaker
    The chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences, IWM Vienna

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Associate Director and Professor, CERES


    Sponsors

    Mr. Daniel Damov


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 25th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 3: “The Interconnected Histories of South African and American Sociology: Knowledge in the Service of Colonial Violence"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 25, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 3 Theme: How Racisms Work Together in the United States and Abroad

    Title of Presentation: “The Interconnected Histories of South African and American Sociology: Knowledge in the Service of Colonial Violence”

    Abstract:
    South African sociology is a colonial discipline. As such, it was not born out of a desire to add to the general store of knowledge about human nature and social relations. Rather, its raison d’être was to produce knowledge in the service of apartheid. Therefore, the matrix of ideas and understandings that coalesced around the concept of ‘culture’ in South African sociology cannot readily be separated from the issue of cultural violence. Indeed, to review the history of South African sociology is to review the history of an idea—culture—deployed in the service of colonial violence. But where did the ideas about culture that were so central to the apartheid episteme come from? The genealogical exploration of South African sociology I undertake below argues that the ideas about culture that were the bedrock of the South African apartheid policy of ‘separate development’ took the shape that they did because of the strength of the connection between ‘scientific sociology’ in South Africa and the apartheid regime. South African sociology was not, however, a sui generis phenomenon. As an imperial episteme it traced its roots and borrowed many of its concepts about culture from American sociology,
    which was, itself, a product of American slavery. The goal of this essay, therefore, is to explain how the concept of ‘cultural difference’ in American sociology, which evolved out of the practical needs of transforming industrial and agrarian labor relations in the period following emancipation, captured the hearts and minds of the first generation of South African sociologists.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Zine Magubane received her PhD from Harvard University. Her work has dealt with two major geographic areas of the world, the United States and Southern Africa. Her choice of research topics reflects a deliberate effort to make an innovative contribution in the following four sociological sub-fields: the sociology of knowledge, the sociology of culture, social stratification, and historical sociology. In addition to several influential books and articles, she is the author of Bringing the Empire Home: Race, Class, and Gender in Britain and Colonial South Africa, which explores colonial conceptions of blackness across England and South Africa and how these representations continue to influence ideas of race, gender, and class today.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Zine Magubane
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Sociology, Boston College

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 31st Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #3: Beyond the Classroom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 31, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    University life isn’t confined to a classroom — and neither is the Munk One Program.

    Join us for this interactive session to learn about opportunities for travel, field work, course-based research abroad, and the many opportunities to continue taking part in labs and programs in the Munk School – beyond your first year of University .

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2021

  • Tuesday, April 6th Pope Francis and the Future of Work

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 6, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    A recent report by a network of Catholic-inspired institutions, titled “Care is Work, Work is Care”. They asks the questions: “What is the meaning of decent work in today’s world?” or “How can we achieve the goal of proving decent work to all in todays’ world?” or “Every worker in the world has a right to decent work: how can we ensure it is respected?” By examining global challenges connected to building a world that is both socially and environmentally just, the report identifies practices and processes that can help direct the future of work towards sustainable and inclusive outcomes.

    In this webinar, panelists will discuss the role of innovation in building a future of work that responds to the call to care for our common home.


    Speakers

    Paolo Foglizzo
    Editoral Board Aggiornamenti Sociali, Milan

    Fr. Clete Kiley
    Senior Advisor, UNITEHERE International Union. Chaplain, Chicago Federation of Labor

    Joe McCartin
    Executive Director, Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, Georgetown University

    Sarah Prenger
    International President, Young Christian Workers, Brussels

    Peter Warrian
    Distinguished Research Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 20th Canada's Quantum Internet: Prospects and Perils

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 20, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Quantum information science harnesses the strange properties of quantum physics to perform new kinds of communication and computation. A future internet that uses quantum networks and quantum computers has the potential to enable many new applications for governments and civil society. Canada has emerged as a leader in quantum information science, and academic and commercial labs are actively experimenting with quantum networks. Yet with any great technological promise there is also danger. Architects of the classical internet did not anticipate the crises of disinformation, cybersecurity, and surveillance that plague global networks. As we look toward a possible future quantum internet, what risks and challenges should we anticipate? How can Canada best position itself to take advantage of its own potential for innovation in quantum technology?

    This panel brings together experts to discuss the political, economic, and scientific implications of quantum communications, for Canada and the world.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Francesco Bova
    Associate Professor, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Anne Broadbent
    Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Ottawa

    Jon Lindsay
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Christoph Simon
    Professor and Associate Head, Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 23rd Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #4: Student Life at Munk One

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 23, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Community is at the heart of the Munk One Program.

    The smallest of the One programs, learn how Munk One students benefit from small class sizes, a dynamic student life, mentorship opportunities, and a close connection to the Munk School community including graduate students, faculty and distinguished fellows who come from public service, private firms and the non-profit world.

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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