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January 2020

  • Friday, January 17th A Transnational History of Victimhood Nationalisms: On the Global Memory Space of East Asia, Eastern Europe, and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 17, 20204:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture will be followed by a reception, 6:00 – 7:00 PM.

    Professor Jie-Hyun Lim’s book project of “victimhood nationalism” aims to illustrate competing memories of victimhood in the postwar Vergangenheitsbewältigung in the global memory space across East and West. Throughout this book, he explores the dialectical interplay of global and national memory with a critical inquiry of the dichotomy of: perpetrators vs. victims, collective guilt vs. innocence, national vs. cosmopolitan memory, historical actors vs. passive objects, over-contextualization vs. de-contextualization, historical conformism vs. presentism, etc. With the emergence of global memory space, unconnected historical actors and memory activists are linked mnemonically a posteriori in the global mnemoscape and memories of victimhood have become more contested. With the histoire croisée as the methodological background, he will trace the global history of victimhood nationalism by drawing entangled memories between victimizers and victimized.

    Jie-Hyun Lim is Professor of Transnational History and director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul. He is also a principal investigator of the research project on the “Mnemonic Solidarity: colonialism, war, and genocide in the global memory space” and the series editor of “Entangled Memories in the Global South” at Palgrave. His most recent book is Memory War: How Could Perpetrators Become Victims? (2019).


    Speakers

    Robert Austin
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies; Associate Professor, CERES

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jie-Hyun Lim
    Speaker
    Professor of Transnational History; Director of the Critical Global Studies Institute at Sogang University, Seoul

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 20th David Peterson Public Leadership Program Lecture:
    Modern Leadership: Policy and Politics
    A Conversation with Jane Philpott, Lisa Raitt & Megan Leslie

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 20, 20206:00PM - 7:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street W
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    Join us for an indepth and interactive discussion with

    Jane Philpott
    Former Minister of Indigenous Services, Government of Canada
    Former President of the Treasury Board, Government of Canada
    Former MP for Markham-Stouffville

    Lisa Raitt
    Former Deputy Leader, Conservative Party of Canada
    Former MP for Milton and Halton

    Megan Leslie
    President & CEO, World Wild Life Fund Canada
    Former Deputy Leader, New Democratic Party
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    moderated by

    Paul Wells
    Journalist/Senior Writer, Maclean’s


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 22nd The Global Governance of Migration and Asylum: Risk, Uncertainty and Mess Management

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 22, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    What is the global governance of migration? Why is it emerging? Which are the major institutions and actors involved? Can we distinguish between the global governance of migration and that of asylum? And is there such a thing as an orderly, safe and regular migration? My talk will comment on why and how the global governance of migration-and-asylum (hyphenated on purpose) is emerging today under a blueprint that emphasizes orderly, safe, regular flows when the reality is that most flows are disorderly, unsafe, and partly regular or indeed largely unauthorized. I will discuss how the global governance of migration and asylum is inscribed in the paradigm of risk society and why we need to go beyond this paradigm acknowledging uncertainty and rethinking migration and asylum governance as ‘mess management’.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Anna Triandafyllidou
    Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration, Ryerson University, Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    CRC in Global Migration


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 23rd Making Caucasians Black: Street Trade and Racism on the Streets of Soviet Moscow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 23, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Stalin and other early Soviet leaders saw the Caucasus as the USSR’s fruit and vegetable basket, reshaping agricultural practices and altering the natural landscape to favor “export” agriculture. Such beliefs only became realized much later, however, and hardly in the way these leaders envisioned. As the USSR became a consumer society, centered on major Russian cities, Caucasus—and, later, Central Asian—growers realized the money that could be made selling their products directly to northern customers. Municipal officials in Moscow and elsewhere realized the value of this trade to their citizens, who believed in the better quality of fresh fruits, vegetables and even flowers from the Soviet south. Existing in a “gray zone” between first and second economies, this long-distance movement of fresh food and flowers proliferated in the Soviet Union’s last two decades. Images of the time, which still dominate characterizations of the late USSR, showed mostly-empty grocery stores shelves and long queues for food. I argue however that these beliefs of the Soviet Union as a land of scarcity miss the dynamic, and quite capitalist, nature of food sales in the late USSR. This movement—of people and goods—had varied consequences on everything from natural environments in the Soviet south to family life among traders as well as the health of the Russian population. Racism was one significant outgrowth of this trade. Southern traders, denigrated as “blacks” were seen to befoul as well as benefit Moscow with their unofficial and ostensibly exploitative practices. The host Russian population’s racist stereotypes towards these traders began to apply more broadly to Soviet citizens of the Caucasus and Central Asia. In memories, nonetheless, these long-distance food traders believed that the USSR offered them a chance to overcome mundane lives in southern villages and succeed at its very center.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jeff Sahadeo
    Carleton University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 23rd Watery Environments and Fluid Borders

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 23, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is delighted to host a roundtable discussion on the history and prospects of the International Joint Commission. Since its creation in 1909, the IJC has been the main mechanism through which Canada and the US have managed their shared border waters and environments.

    Join leading experts from Canada and the US in exploring its rich past and uncertain future:
    *Meredith Denning (Georgetown)
    *Dan Macfarlane (Western Michigan University)
    *Kim Richard Nossal (Queen’s)
    and many more...

    This event celebrates the publication of the new edited collection, The First Century of the International Joint Commission (University of Calgary Press).

    Reception to Follow.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Retrospect and Prospect of Hong Kong Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 202012:30PM - 2:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Diving into the historical development of Postwar Hong Kong film culture reveals complexity beyond our understandings of the typical “rise and fall” narrative. Any investigation into Postwar Hong Kong cinema must entail an examination of Hong Kong’s colonial history and its changing sociopolitical conditions as well. During the 1960s, Hong Kong was the site for numerous ideological struggles between Britain, China, and Hong Kong, and it is this intersection of culture and politics that this symposium hopes to emphasize.

    Dr. Jing Jing Chang will be speaking on her new book Screening Communities, an exciting new analysis that situates Hong Kong cinema within the city’s colonial past. An incredible historical narrative on shaping a local community through film narrative.

    Dr. Jessica Li will be presenting her paper “Eileen Chang: Hong Kong Screenplays in the 1960s.” An insightful research tracing the trajectory of Shanghai writer Eileen Chang who had brought together the cultural interflows between Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Jing Jing Chang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Jessica Tsui-Yan Li
    Speaker
    Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Chinese Language and Literature, York University

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies & Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of East Asian Studies

    Bart Testa
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    China Studies Workshop

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20201:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This is a book panel on George Anderson & Sujit Choudhry’s recently published edited volume, Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions (Oxford University Press, 2019). This edited volume, and an accompanying policy paper, are the major outputs of the “Territory and Power” project, a 5-year, thematic, collaborative, global research initiative led by the Center for Constitutional Transitions, the Forum of Federations, and International IDEA, that brought together 24 experts from 13 countries. The research question is how territorial claims relate to constitution-making processes and constitutional design during periods of intense political engagement over constitutional reform or “constitutional moments”. The book includes 17 case studies. Anderson & Choudhry will present the main findings of Territory and Power, followed by commentary by Jacques Bertrand & Lucan Way, who were in participants in this project and contributed chapters.

    Sujit Choudhry (WZB Berlin Social Science Research Centre) is one of the world’s leading scholars of comparative constitutional law. His edited volumes include The Migration of Constitutional Ideas (CUP), Constitutional Design for Divided Societies (OUP), the Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution (OUP), Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions(OUP), and Security Sector Reform in Constitutional Transitions (OUP). He is currently working on the public law theory of political parties. He has advised constitutional processes in Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Myanmar, Nepal, South Africa, Tunisia, Ukraine and Yemen.

    George Anderson has been a federal deputy minister, president of the Forum of Federations, and member of the UN’s stand-by team of mediation experts. He is a fellow at Queen’s University’s Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity. In addition to his extensive work internationally, he is author of the widely translated Federalism: An Introduction and Fiscal Federallsim: A Comparative Introduction, as well as editor of volumes on oil and gas, water, and internal markets in federal systems.

    Lucan Ahmad Way is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (2015) and co-author of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes After the Cold War (2010). Together with Steven Levitsky, he is completing a book on the durability of autocracies founded in violent social revolution.

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Filiz Kahraman is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and an affiliate faculty member at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of the Munk School at the University of Toronto. Her research investigates law and politics from international and comparative perspectives. She is currently working on a book manuscript examining why labor activists in Europe pursue human rights law as a new mobilization strategy and how international law has affected the lives of aggrieved workers on the ground.


    Speakers

    Sujit Choudhry
    Speaker

    George Anderson
    Speaker

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Speaker

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker

    Filiz Kahraman
    Chair


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th New France’s Louis XIV

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    After he asserted direct control of New France in the 1660s, Louis XIV’s authority was largely unrestricted. As scholars of his reign have pointed out in relation to the political legitimacy of his regime in France itself, the manufactured symbols of Louis XIV’s kingship finessed the contradictions between his centralization of authority and his continued reliance on local elites. In the case of an overseas colony, there was no possibility that the king would ever favour his distant subjects with his presence. The monarch could be nothing but representation. This paper looks at the representations of monarchical authority in various media: paintings and prints, a statue in Lower Town Québec, currency and medals, and the legal system. The distance of the colony meant in some cases relying on expedients to govern the French population.

    Dr. Colin Coates teaches Canadian Studies and History at Glendon College, York University. He has published on the history of rural society in the St Lawrence Valley (The Metamorphosis of Landscape and Community in Early French Canada) and on the history of commemoration (Heroines and History: Representations of Madeleine de Verchères and Laura Secord, with Cecilia Morgan). He is currently working on studies of political culture in Louis XIV’s New France and the environmental history of Québec. He recently co-edited The Nature of Canada, with Graeme Wynn.


    Speakers

    Colin Coates
    Glendon College, York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Hong Kong: Global China’s Restive Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Post-1997 Hong Kong has become the restive frontier of global China – it is the place where the major strategies of global Chinese power are in full display, and where these have provoked the strongest popular resistance yet to Chinese domination. In this talk, I will first analyze Hong Kong as the testing ground for China’s power playbook around the world – (1) economic statecraft (2) patron-clientelism (3) symbolic violence. How do these mechanisms play out in Hong Kong? Second, I will trace the trajectory of countermovements in Hong Kong to generate lessons about the limits and effectiveness of global China.

    Ching Kwan Lee is Dr. Chung Sze-yuen Professor of Social Science at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Professor of Sociology at UCLA. Her latest books include The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor and Foreign Investment in Africa (Chicago 2017) and Take Back Our Future: An Eventful Sociology of the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement (Cornell 2019).

    RELATED EVENT: “Stand with Hong Kong Journalists” Photo Exhibit
    DATES: December 2, 2019 – January 6, 2020
    HOURS: please click here for regular and winter holidays hours
    LOCATION: Hart House, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle
    Please click here for more information
    PRESENTING PARTNERS:
    Hart House, University of Toronto 
    Stand With Hong Kong Journalists (SWHKJ)
    The International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law 


    Speakers

    Ching Kwan Lee
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 27th The Archive Thief: The Man Who Salvaged French Jewish History in the Wake of the Holocaust

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 27, 20203:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Zosa Szajkowski, a Polish-born Jewish historian, took tens of thousands of Jewish documents from Europe in the 1940s and ‘50s and moved them, illicitly, to New York. He eventually sold them to Jewish research libraries in the United States and Israel. Was this a heroic act of salvage, or simply theft?

    Join us for a lecture by Lisa Leff, author of The Archive Thief, Professor of History at American University, and Director of the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

    The event will be moderated by Doris Bergen, with responses by Eric Jennings and Sara R. Horowitz.

    A reception will precede the event, starting at 3:30 pm.

    Sponsors

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    Faculty of Arts & Science

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Ed and Fran Sonshine Lecture Fund

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone

    Faculty of Information (iSchool)

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Immigration, Religion, and Civic Participation

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    As immigrants in Canada settle and integrate into society, most eventually become citizens. Citizenship is more than just a legal status, it comes with expectations of social participation and civic engagement. On one hand, religion promotes bonds of fellowship and social cooperation that help to enrich civic participation; however, in some cases it can also reinforce social divisions of “us” and “them”. In what ways, and under what conditions, does religion help or hinder this process of civic participation for newcomers to Canada? What can be done to strengthen the participation of newcomers in Canadian society in a way that does not enforce a rigid or closed secularism? How should religious groups structure inter-faith dialogue differently to promote greater civic engagement? What other spaces exist for this conversation to develop?

    Seminar Series on Religion and Migration in Canada

    This seminar series explores the role of religion in migration to Canada, with regard to settlement and integration, accommodation and reaction, and citizenship and participation. Each seminar brings together scholars and practitioners to discuss the ways in which religious belief and practice, religious community life, and religious institutions influence migrant pathways to participation in Canadian life and society. This seminar series is organized in partnership with the Global Migration Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Baha’i Community of Canada and the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Baha’i Community of Canada

    University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Out of the Closet—Onto the Stage: Queer Theatre in Putin’s Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk comes to grips with LGBTQ discourse in Russia outside of the familiar political and social narratives of oppression and violence that have been prevalent since the 2013 “anti-gay-propaganda” legislation. It turns instead to the cultural sphere and challenges its widely held perception as an arena for exclusively heteronormative discourse by revealing queerness as an increasingly popular object of artistic exploration and a recurrent performative strategy within the Russian performing arts and dramatic writing of the 21st century. I zoom into the stories of drag queens, transgender persons, gays, lesbians, and multiple queer selves and others to unveil the unique combination of linguistic, performative, and visual means that shape queerness as a Russian cultural imaginary. Apart from discussing the portrayals of queerness that emerge on stage and in dramatic texts, I will also focus on the institutional context in which these images are produced, paying attention, among other things, to the geographical determinants of the possibilities of individual narratives.

    Tatiana Klepikova is a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is working on her postdoctoral project about contemporary Russian queer theater and drama. She defended her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany, in 2019, after obtaining degrees in Teaching Foreign Languages (English and Spanish) in Yaroslavl (Russia), and Russian and East-Central European Studies in Passau. She is co-editor of several collections of interdisciplinary essays on privacy, including Outside the “Comfort Zone”: Private and Public Spheres in Late Socialist Europe (forthcoming in 2020 by De Gruyter). Her broader research interests include Soviet and contemporary Russian history and culture, political art, cultural privacy studies, queer studies, performance studies, and histories and cultures of LGBT communities in Eastern Europe.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Tatiana Klepikova
    Postdoctoral Researcher Women & Gender Studies Institute University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Panel Discussion on Taiwan Presidential Election 2020: The outcomes and implications

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Taiwan will hold its 7th direct Presidential election on January 11, 2020. The incumbent candidate, President Tsai Ing-wen (Democratic Progressive Party – DPP) will face off the opposition candidates, the Kaohsiung mayor of Han Kuo-yu (Chinese Nationalist Party – KMT), and the People First Party (PFP) candidate, James Soong. After suffering a huge defeat in the 2018 local elections, polls suggest Tsai Ing-wen in the lead. The two key election issues this time are China, particularly in light of Hong Kong protests, and Taiwan’s economy.

    We will bring together a distinguished group of Taiwan specialists to discuss and help us understand the election outcomes and their implications for Taiwan, Canada, global economy and international relations.

    Please join us for the Panel Discussion followed by reception.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Sida Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Speaker
    Vice Provost, International Studies Experiences, Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Catherine Y. M. Hsu
    Speaker
    Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, Department of Sociology, and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto (TAAT)

    Global Taiwan Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 30th DAY ONE - 13th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 30, 20209:30AM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    9:45-10:00 Registration for Day One
    10:00-10:05: Opening remarks
    10:05-11:25 SESSION 1: “Canadian Urban Integration”
    12:25-13:45 SESSION 2: “Borders”
    14:00-16:00 Keynote Lecture: “Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers” by David FitzGerald (University of California San Diego). Separate registration required.

    Register for Day 2 conference.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 30th 2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity: "Refuge beyond Reach: How Rich Democracies Repel Asylum Seekers"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 30, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Media pundits, politicians, and the public are often skeptical or ambivalent about granting asylum. They fear that asylum-seekers will impose economic and cultural costs and pose security threats to nationals. Consequently, governments of rich, democratic countries attempt to limit who can approach their borders, which often leads to refugees breaking immigration laws.

    In Refuge beyond Reach, David Scott FitzGerald traces how rich democracies have deliberately and systematically shut down most legal paths to safety. Drawing on official government documents, information obtained via WikiLeaks, and interviews with asylum seekers, he finds that for ninety-nine percent of refugees, the only way to find safety in one of the prosperous democracies of the Global North is to reach its territory and then ask for asylum. FitzGerald shows how the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia comply with the letter of law while violating the spirit of those laws through a range of deterrence methods — first designed to keep out Jews fleeing the Nazis — that have now evolved into a pervasive global system of “remote control.”
    While some of the most draconian remote control practices continue in secret, FitzGerald identifies some pressure points and finds that a diffuse humanitarian obligation to help those in need is more difficult for governments to evade than the law alone.

    Refuge beyond Reach addresses one of the world’s most pressing challenges — how to manage flows of refugees and other types of migrants — and helps to identify the conditions under which individuals can access the protection of their universal rights.

    David FitzGerald is Theodore E. Gildred Chair in U.S.-Mexican Relations, Professor of Sociology, and Co-Director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His research analyzes policies regulating migration and asylum in countries of origin, transit, and destination. FitzGerald’s books include Culling the Masses: The Democratic Origins of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas, which won the American Sociological Association’s Distinguished Scholarly Book Award, and A Nation of Emigrants: How Mexico Manages its Migration.

    Register for Day 1 Conference
    Register for Day 2 Conference


    Speakers

    David FitzGerald
    University of California San Diego



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 30th Toxic Regimes: Agent Orange, Science, and Pollution in Ontario, 1960s-1990s.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 30, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Toxic Regimes: Agent Orange, Science, and Pollution in Ontario, 1960s-1990s.

    In late 1989, chemical tests in Elmira, Ontario revealed the presence of dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), a common by-product of rubber, organic chemical and other manufacturing processes, in the local water supply. Local government officials immediately shut down two town wells upon this discovery, and closed the remainder of the wells the following year. While NDMA posed a potential threat to human and environmental health, a longer legacy of equally, if not more, potentially dangerous chemical contaminants already existed in this small industrial town. Some of the most pertinent chemicals manufactured in Elmira as early as the 1950s were 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T — two herbicides which, when combined, constituted the chemical munition commonly known as Agent Orange. Indeed, one of the corporations based in Elmira supplied Agent Orange to the US Department of Defense during the 1960s, as the US military advanced its mass use of chemical weapons in the Vietnam War. In this talk, I discuss how the production, waste, and scientific knowledge of Agent Orange in Elmira was indelibly bound to an emergent local water and environmental crisis in the latter half of the twentieth century, as well as a greater network of Cold War technology and exposures.

    Biography
    Rohini is a PhD student in the History department. Her research focuses on the intersections of the history of science, environmental history, labour history, and Cold War politics in the North American and transnational context. She has an undergraduate degree in engineering and a Masters in modern history.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 31st DAY TWO - 13th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 31, 202010:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    10:00-10:15 Registration for Day Two
    10:15-11:45 SESSION 3 “Health”
    12:45-14:15 SESSION 4 “Segregation/Incarceration”
    14:30-16:00 SESSION 5 “Representation”

    Register for DAY 1 conference
    Register for the keynote lecture on DAY 1


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 31st Would Japanese Voters Support Non-Japanese Candidates? Voting Experiments in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 31, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    An unprecedented number of candidates who identify as ethnic minorities ran in the 2019 Canadian Federal election. Globally, many other democratic states are experiencing a similar increase in the number of ethnic minority candidates running in elections, due to the growth of their ethnically diverse populations over the past few decades. In contrast to this trend, few ethnic minority candidates have run for office in Japan to date. Given that Japan has already accepted some, and may accept more immigrants in the future, Japanese people are likely to see more ethnic non-Japanese candidates in the near future. If these candidates run for election at the national level, would Japanese voters support them? Which voters would be more or less likely to vote for these candidates and why? Studying these counterfactual questions presents important implications not just for understanding Japanese voters, but for the electoral democracy of many countries worldwide.

    To discuss these questions, Professor Go Murakami will present the major results of three online voting experiments he conducted in Japan between 2011 and 2019. In these experiments, he showed several hypothetical candidate profiles to participants and asked them to vote for one. In the study, one of the candidates’ ethnicity was randomly altered to be either Japanese, Korean or Chinese. The study showed that a significant proportion of Japanese voters avoided supporting the non-ethnic minority candidate, an effect that depended largely on voters’ partisanship, ethnic group attitudes, and relevant policy preference. During this presentation, Professor Murakami will discuss the implications of these findings for future Japanese elections.

    Biography:

    Go Murakami is an Associate Professor in the College of Law at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, Mississauga. He received a PhD in Political Science from the University of British Columbia. Professor Murakami studies political psychology and behaviour, with special interests in race, ethnicity and immigration. His recent publication includes “Effects of Candidates’ Ethnicity on Vote Choice in Japan: An Experimental Approach” (Ritsumeikan Law Review, 2019) and “Survey Experiment on Majority Building” In Yoichi Hizen, ed., Experimental Politics (with Kiichiro Arai and Masaru Kohno, 2016 [in Japanese]).


    Speakers

    Go Murakami
    Associate Professor, College of Law, Ritsumeikan University, Japan


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Japan Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 31st – Saturday, February 1st 14th Annual PCJ Student Conference: The Future of Reconciliation: Indigenous Rights in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 31, 20205:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Saturday, February 1, 202010:00AM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The 2020 PCJ Student Conference serves as a platform for discussions on the modern challenges and opportunities for Indigenous communities in Canada.

    The PCJ Student Conference is an annual student-organized event that brings together the PCJ community outside of the classroom for an opportunity to learn about and engage with an issue pertinent to discussions of peace, conflict and justice.

    This year, the conference serves as a platform for Indigenous academics, practitioners, community leaders, Elders and traditional knowledge keepers to guide discussions on the modern challenges and opportunities for Indigenous communities in Canada. This theme serves to provide a domestic context to issues of peace, conflict and justice that are often overshadowed by international events.

    The two-day conference will take place at the Campbell Conference Facility at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy with the following schedule of events:

    Friday, January 31

    5:00 PM ─ Opening Remarks and Land Acknowledgement
    5:30 PM ─ Keynote Address (Professor Brenda Wastasecoot)
    6:30 PM ─ Networking Event

    Saturday, February 1

    9:30 AM ─ Opening Remarks and Land Acknowledgment
    10:00 AM ─ Session 1: Land and Environmental (TBA)
    11:00 AM ─ Session 2: Legal and Treaty (Delbert Wapass)

    12:00 PM ─ Lunch

    1:00 PM ─ Session 3: Language and Culture (Debby Danard)
    2:00 PM ─ Session 4: MMIWG (Lee Maracle and Jennifer Brant)
    3:00 PM ─ Session 5: Economic Empowerment (Tabatha Bull)

    4:00 PM ─ Final Remarks and Closing

    Please Note: Registration is separate for each day of the conference via Eventbrite. We highly encourage attendance on both the Friday and Saturday for the most comprehensive and impactful experience.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Monday, February 3rd Terror Capitalism: Turkic Muslim Dispossession in Northwest China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Description

    A new system of control, made up of a multi-billion dollar industry of computer-vision technologies, militarized policing, and the mass mobilization of civil servants and private industrialists, is attempting to transform Uyghur and Kazakh native societies in Northwest China. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this talk describes the history which produced these forms of surveillance and demonstrates the quotidian experience of their effects on Turkic Muslim social institutions. It argues that this system of “reeducation” is, in fact, a social engineering system that works in concert with a Chinese form of illiberal capitalism to produce forms of family separation and economic production. As it is implemented, it has the effect of partitioning and radically disempowering women and men who are already marginalized within national and international systems.

    Darren Byler is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. His book project titled Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City focuses on the effects of digital cultural production and surveillance industries in the lives of Uyghur and Han male migrants in the city of Ürümchi, Xinjiang.


    Speakers

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History and Global Asia Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Vincent Wong
    Discussant
    William C. Graham Research Associate at the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 6th Transformative Politics of the Wild: The Power of Solutions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 6, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are among the greatest challenges humanity has ever faced. But it’s 2020. We know this already. WWF-Canada president and CEO Megan Leslie will discuss why we should stop rehashing the problems and start working on the solutions. 

    When we only focus on what’s wrong, we’re disheartening and disempowering people — and that includes policymakers. Instead, we need to talk about what’s right, or what could be right, and show the successes of past environmental solutions, from banning plastic microbeads to signing the Montreal Protocol. 

    Climate change and biodiversity loss are so great that they have many potential solutions community groups, government and industry can collaborate on. But they share one where WWF-Canada can really contribute: nature-based solutions. Indigenous-led habitat protection and restoration can shield at-risk species, sequester carbon and help safeguard the future for nature and people.

    Megan Leslie began as President and CEO of World Wildlife Fund Canada in December of 2017 after nearly two years at the organization, first as a consultant on ocean governance, then as head of ocean conservation. Before joining WWF, Megan was a Member of Parliament representing Halifax for two terms during which she was deputy leader of the Official Opposition, environment critic and vice-chair of the government committee on environment and sustainable development. In Parliament, Megan introduced a motion to ban plastic microbeads; this motion passed unanimously, leading to a ban on the Canadian manufacture, sale and importation of these products. She also expedited the creation of Sable Island National Park Reserve.


    Speakers

    Megan Leslie
    President and CEO World Wildlife Fund-Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Environmental Governance Lab

    Sponsors

    The School of the Environment, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Between Human, Non-Human, and Woman: An Actress Theorizes Exhaustion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1940, at the height of her stardom, the star-actress Shanta Apte wrote a harsh polemic against the Bombay film industry. I interrogate this curious text – Should I Join the Movies? – by placing it at the intersection of female stardom, the corporeality of cinematic labor, and techno-scientific interest in industrial fatigue. The weariness of the actress, her capacity for “being spent,” is an experiential category that pushes us to think embodiment as production experience. This essay positions Apte’s text as theory from the South that helps us rethink the meanings of gender, embodiment, affective labor, inequality, and human-machine relations at a critical phase in the career of cinema in India. In dialogue with Apte, I think through the materiality of the off-screen world of film work and parse her insistence on embodiment as the grounds for refusal and resistance.

    Debashree Mukherjee is Assistant Professor of film and media in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University. Her first book, Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City (forthcoming from Columbia University Press) brings together insights from film and media studies, feminist cultural studies, new materialisms, and technology studies to narrate the history of Bombay cinema as a history of material practice.


    Speakers

    Debashree Mukherjee
    Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Munk One Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Planning your first year at U of T, and want to find out more about Munk One? Join us on February 12 for an opportunity to meet Munk One professors, students, and staff who will tell you about this unique first year opportunity for students interested in global affairs.

    To make the most of your time with us, we ask that you arrive promptly at 6:00pm. During the first hour, Professor Donald Kingsbury, Interim Director of Munk One, will present a brief overview of the program. Then, students and staff will talk about specific aspects of the program like its seminar class format, labs, research opportunities, case competitions, international opportunities and more. You will also have plenty of time to ask questions.

    Meet us in the Boardroom and Library of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, 315 Bloor Street West.

    We look forward to seeing you there!

    In the meantime, you can find out more about the program, by visiting our website and following us on Instagram:

    https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/one/ | @mymunkone


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Political correctness and language of the media – before 1989 and nowadays

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMAlumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Address: Alumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400.

    Elena Krejčová is Associate Professor at the Department of Slavic studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia). She studied Czech Studies, Bulgarian Studies, English and American Studies at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski (Bulgaria), and completed her doctoral studies at Masaryk university in Brno (1999). Her main areas of research include political linguistics, sociolinguistics, contrastive linguistics of Slavic languages, theory of translation. Elena Krejčová is the author of monographs Slavonic Babylon (2016), Quo Vadis, Philologia? (2017), The Power of Public Speech (2017) and author of dictionaries Czech- Bulgarian Law Dictionary (2015) and Czech-Bulgarian Specialized Dictionary of Legal, Economic and Socio-political Terminology (2016).

    Political correctness as a way of forming the principles of communication and in particular the verbal behaviour is very strongly connected with the period of totalitarianism in the countries of the former socialist block (including Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.). The idea of “right” and “wrong”, i.e. unacceptable speaking, thinking, behavior that is treated as a crime, the battle of ideas and ideologies is well presented in media as a tool of propaganda before 1989, this close relation between communication and political systems was a part of the state policy. What happened after 1989 – did we finally gain freedom of speech? Media after the “Velvet revolution” changed a lot – from the feeling of freedom with no restrictions that ended up to vulgarization of language to the new requirements in society to treat people without prejudice and discrimination.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Elena Krejčová
    Associate professor, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 20th What does open science entail?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 20, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Open science has momentum. It is much discussed, though most often by advocates or product suppliers. The idea entails shifts in research practice with substantial implications for resource use in support of research. To understand these implications and to make informed choices about the future of the research enterprise, we must fully understand what is being proposed and consider any empirical evidence on the effects. To this end, this talk will explore the origin, meaning, implications and current status of open science. Aligned with the most recent National Academies report on the topic, open science will be defined as encompassing the following: open access publishing, open data, open software, reproducible research, open evaluation, public engagement and policy.


    Speakers

    Diana Hicks
    Professor, the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20201:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 15. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Matthew Walton
    Chair
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Diana Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th May ’68 at Fifty: Exhibiting les événements in Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Few events in the French twentieth century have been as richly commemorated as May ’68. May’s fiftieth anniversary in 2018 provoked a veritable commemorative frenzy, with five major exhibitions in the Paris region alone. These shows were accompanied by new books by leading French scholars, re-editions of classic texts, commemorative magazines, an online exhibit at the Nanterre campus of the Université de Paris, and two outdoor poster displays in central Paris. This illustrated talk examines the capital’s fiftieth anniversary exhibitions on May ‘68 in the context of recent scholarship on the event and its commemorative history, as well as on 1960s youth. It pays particular attention to the shows mounted by the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Archives nationales, and the municipality of Paris, the last of which aestheticized the events and ended by funneling visitors into a shop selling May-themed souvenirs, including commemorative paving stones priced at 280 or 380 euros.

    Susan Whitney is Associate Professor of History at Carleton University, where she also served as Associate Dean (Undergraduate Affairs) in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences from 2008 to 2011 and 2015 to 2017.  An historian of youth, she is the author of Mobilizing Youth: Communists and Catholics in Interwar France (Duke, 2009).  She is preparing a chapter on 1960s youth culture for the Routledge Handbook of French History and has a chapter in A Cultural History of Youth in the Modern Age (Bloomsbury, forthcoming). In 2018, Professor Whitney received Carleton’s Graduate Mentoring Award for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.


    Speakers

    Susan Whitney
    Carleton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2020

  • Friday, March 13th Richard J. Samuels' Book Talk: Special Duty - A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 13, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Professor Richard J. Samuels of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will visit the Munk School of Global Affairs on March 13, 2020, to talk about his new book, Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community (Cornell University Press, 2019). There will be book sales and signing by the author following the talk. A foremost expert on Japanese politics and foreign policy, Professor Samuels is the Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies at MIT.

    Description of Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community

    The prewar history of the Japanese intelligence community demonstrates how having power over much, but insight into little, can have devastating consequences. Its postwar history―one of limited Japanese power despite growing insight―has also been problematic for national security.

    In Special Duty, Richard J. Samuels dissects the fascinating history of the intelligence community in Japan. Looking at the impact of shifts in the strategic environment, technological change, and past failures, he probes the reasons why Japan has endured such a roller-coaster ride when it comes to intelligence gathering and analysis, and concludes that the ups and downs of the past century―combined with growing uncertainties in the regional security environment―have convinced Japanese leaders of the critical importance of striking balance between power and insight.

    Using examples of excessive hubris and debilitating bureaucratic competition before the Asia-Pacific War, the unavoidable dependence on US assets and popular sensitivity to security issues after World War II, and the tardy adoption of image-processing and cyber technologies, Samuels’ bold book highlights the century-long history of Japan’s struggles to develop a fully functioning and effective intelligence capability, and makes clear that Japanese leaders have begun to reinvent their nation’s intelligence community.

    Reviews:

    “With deep mastery of Japanese and American archival material and a raft of interviews with key players, Professor Samuels has captured in a single, valuable volume the successes and failures of Japanese intelligence since 1895 and, above all, the political cross-currents and unique restraints under which its agencies have operated since 1945.” – Joel Brenner, former head of US counterintelligence, Office of the Director of National Intelligence and former Inspector General of the National Security Agency

    “Special Duty is a timely book, and a suitable next installment in Richard Samuels’ influential oeuvre on modern Japanese security policy.” – Michael Green, Georgetown University, author of Arming Japan

    “This book is a masterpiece that incisively analyzes the Japanese intelligence community and its activities. I learned a lot from this book. I think that Japan wants to overcome the various problems facing its intelligence and become a part of the Five Eyes as soon as possible.” -Satoshi Morimoto, Former Minister of Defense, Japan

    “This is a truly wonderful book written by a leading and highly respected scholar in the field of Japanese security and politics. It offers much needed insight to academics and policymakers alike as they seek to understand the changes in Japan’s security choices.” -Sheila Smith, Council on Foreign Relations, author of Intimate Rivals

    “Focusing on intelligence gathering by the modern Japanese state from 1895, the author’s insights into pre-war “hubris and debilitating bureaucratic competition” and postwar reliance on the U.S. will attract fans of both geopolitical and military history.” -Japan Times

    “This engrossing history of Japanese intelligence demonstrates how such changes have made Japan a better security partner for the United States while preparing the country to stand on its own if the U.S. security guarantee loses its credibility.” -Foreign Affairs


    Speakers

    Richard J. Samuels
    Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Prof. Cameron’s talk, which is based upon recent book, The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan (Cornell University Press, 2018), examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this crisis, a quarter of Soviet Kazakhstan’s population, and the disaster transformed a territory the size of western Europe.
    Drawing upon a wide range of sources in Russian and in Kazakh, her talk brings this largely unknown story to light, revealing its devastating consequences for Kazakh society. It finds that through the most violent means the Kazakh famine created Soviet Kazakhstan and forged a new Kazakh national identity. But the nature of this transformation was uneven. Neither Kazakhstan nor Kazakhs themselves became integrated into the Soviet system in precisely the ways that Moscow had originally hoped. More broadly, she shows how the case of the Kazakh famine overturns several assumptions about violence, modernization, and nation-making under Stalin.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic **BILINGUAL EVENT**

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This event will be conducted partially in English and partially in French.

    De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the End of the Old Regime

    Après un doctorat en médecine vétérinaire (DMV) obtenu en 1992 à l’Université de Montréal,Swann Paradis a exercé la médecine vétérinaire (animaux de compagnie) au Québec pendant plusde 15 ans, parallèlement à ses études littéraires. Ses champs d’intérêt incluent l’histoire naturelleau XVIIIe siècle (littérature, philosophie et sciences), de même que le « roman terrifiant » et le« Romantisme noir », la poésie québécoise et franco-ontarienne contemporaine et l’écriturepoétique. Il prépare actuellement une monographie qui devrait paraître quelque part au XXIe sièclechez Hermann, dont le titre provisoire est : Le sixième sens de la taupe. Buffon dans la fabriquedes quadrupèdes. Il travaille actuellement sur un projet de recherche ayant reçu l’appui d’une« Subvention Savoir » du CRSH (2016-2020), pour le projet intitulé : « De la ménagerie du Princed’Orange au Jardin du Roi : Arnout Vosmaer (1720-1799) dans l’ombre de Buffon (1707-1788) ».


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Collège Glendon


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Everyday functioning of the centrally planned economy in Czechoslovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Libor Žídek, Associate Professor, has lectured at the Faculty of Economics and Administration at Masaryk University, Czech Republic, since 1997. He specializes in economic transformation with a particular focus on the Czech economy. He also has a keen interest in planned economy, particularly in Czechoslovakia and generally in economic history. His doctoral thesis focused on the impact of globalization on economic policy and his habilitation thesis on the transformation process in the Czech Republic. He teaches courses on World Economic History, Economic Transformation and Macroeconomics. He has lectured on the topics of central planning and transformation in a number of countries, including the USA, Canada, Japan, Germany, the UK, Poland, Finland, Ukraine, and Jamaica. He has presented at conferences and published several books and a number of chapters and journal papers.

    The main goal of the talk is to give an idea about everyday economic reality in the socialist totalitarian system. It is partially based on results of our unique research – interviews with top-managers from the 1970s and 1980s. It generally breaks the common view that individual companies (at the bottom of the hierarchical pyramid) without hesitation followed the orders of the centre. The everyday reality was more complicated and foremost full of paradoxes, pretence and negotiations. The practice was far remote from textbook theory dealing with central planning.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Libor Zidek
    Masaryk University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2020

  • Thursday, April 9th Japan’s Changing Defense Posture under Abe: Radical Transformation or Evolutionary Shift?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    From North Korea’s nuclear/missile programs to China’s rapidly expanding military and a possible “gray-zone” crisis in the East China Sea, Japan faces a rapidly changing and increasingly threatening regional security environment. To address these challenges, since 2012 Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has accelerated efforts to “normalize” Japan’s defense planning and capabilities, reinterpret/revise Japan’s 1947 “Peace Constitution” to loosen constraints on its Self-defense Forces, and significantly strengthen the U.S.-Japan alliance. This talk will examine the drivers of recent changes to Japan’s national security policy and evaluate their significance for its defense posture, regional peace and stability, and the U.S.-Japan alliance.

    Contact

    Seung Hyok Lee
    (647) 894-5126


    Speakers

    Adam P. Liff
    Assistant Professor of East Asian International Relations, EALC Director, 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative (21JPSI) Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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