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May 2021

  • Monday, May 10th – Wednesday, May 12th Summer Institute: Advancing Anti-Corruption, Accountability and Transparency in the Global Pharmaceutical System

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 10, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, May 11, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, May 12, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Background

    There is growing evidence about how corruption in the pharmaceutical system creates inequitable barriers to access to medicines through wastage, diversion, and exclusion. The pharmaceutical system is particularly prone to corruption given that it is a complex system with multiple decision points and stakeholders, and it is characterized by many market and government failures. As the global community seeks to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including achieving SDG #3 – Good Health and Well-being, addressing corruption in the pharmaceutical system is essential. The COVID-19 pandemic has also shown how corruption threatens equity of access to health services and products.

    The Summer Institute: Advancing Anti-Corruption, Accountability and Transparency in the Global Pharmaceutical System provides a unique opportunity to learn from an array of multidisciplinary global experts in areas related to corruption risks in the pharmaceutical system. Attendees will also have the opportunity to apply their learning by working on case studies in small groups.

    Who Should Attend?

    Researchers, policy makers and any students interested in learning about how to identify and manage corruption risks related to the pharmaceutical system. No prior knowledge or experience on this topic is required.

    Time Commitment

    3 hours each day – May 10th, May 11th, and May 12th, 2021. Each session is from 9AM-12PM EST.

    Schedule **Coming Soon**

    We have an exciting list of instructors, topics, and activities lined up. Information is forthcoming.

    Please note that Zoom information will be directly emailed 24 hours before the first session (May 10th).

    Contact

    Gul Saeed


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 11th Property taxes: Effective, But Regressive? A Review of the Evidence

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 11, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Property taxes account for about 3% of GDP in Canada and the United States, yet our understanding of who bears the burden of the tax is unclear. There are two economic theories of the incidence of the property tax – one that leads to the conclusion that it is a regressive tax (one that falls disproportionately on low-income households) and another that suggests that it is a progressive tax (falling more heavily on those with higher incomes).

    This presentation by IMFG Graduate Fellow, Devin Bissky Dziadyk, will review the decades of research on the property tax, and provide new estimates of the incidence of the tax in Canada. Most estimates suggest that the property tax is regressive. If so, what does the regressivity of the property tax imply for cities, and do we need to reform the property tax to make it fairer?

    Speaker:

    Devin Bissky Dziadyk is the recipient of the 2020-21 Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. He is a PhD student at the University of Toronto in the Department of Economics. He previously worked with Finances of the Nation, a project to assemble Canadian public finance data and make it more accessible. Devin has also worked in the tech industry in Toronto, and in particle physics research. Prior to his PhD studies, Devin completed an MA in Economics at the University of Toronto, and a BSc in Physics and Economics at McGill University. His research focusses on the incidence of the property tax, and tax schemes designed to improve the equity of property taxes.

    Contact

    Piali Roy
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Devin Bissky Dziadyk
    Devin Bissky Dziadyk is the recipient of the 2020-21 Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 18th Envisioning Asian Canadian Futures: Film Studies as Anti-Racist Pedagogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 18, 20217:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University College and the University of Toronto Libraries Proudly Co-Present

    Envisioning Asian Canadian Futures: Film Studies as Anti-Racist Pedagogy

    A panel discussion about teaching through film in the context of #StopTheHate and transnational anti-racist activism. Speakers will reflect on the distinct pedagogical possibilities of film for the future of teaching against racism in all its forms with specific attention to Asian Canadian Studies. Drawing on examples from their own work, panelists will discuss the politics of race and the potential of emerging visions of anti-racist solidarity enabled through visual studies.

    * Please RSVP by May 13, 2021 *


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Panelist
    Dr. David Chu Professor of Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor of History, U of T

    Tong Lam
    Panelist
    Acting Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School; Associate Professor of History, U of T and visual artist

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and Graduate Faculty at the Cinema Studies Institute; Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, U of T

    Rachel Silvey
    Moderator
    Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, Professor in the Department of Geography & Planning, U of T


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    University College

    University of Toronto Libraries


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 20th Hungarian Jews Trapped in the Issue of Citizenship after the Great War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 20, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    „Papers! Half of Jew’s life is consumed by the futile battle with papers.”- wrote Joseph Roth in his masterful work The Wandering Jews published in 1927. Roth’s statement is the motto of my presentation which tells how national elites exploited citizenship laws to create masses of „alien” Jews.
    An anti-Semitic wave swept across East-Central Europe at the end of the First World War. The “Jewish question” became one of the prioritized issues of the new countries. The new political elite in Hungary, in Romania and in Poland, referring to itself as national and Christian, in general did not consider Jewry as part of the “nation”. The solution national elites proposed to the “Jewish question” was, on the one hand, to oust Jews from economic and cultural life, and on the other, to expel the “aliens”. For this reason state authorities were busy creating legal basis for expatriation of the “alien Jews”.
    On the other hand the victorious great powers forced the governments of the new East-Central European countries to sign peace treaties and minority treaties which granted citizenship for each citizen living in the territory of the given state.
    In my talk, I wish to explore in detail how national governments violated their international commitments and made masses of Jews stateless and vulnerable. Since Hungary is the focus of my talk, I would like to present which members of the Hungarian Jewry were considered aliens by the main actors of public life, what sort of plans were formulated to ensure their elimination, and what specific steps were taken by the successive Hungarian governments to question their citizenship and to expel them. What makes this question especially important is that in both Hungary and Romania, the “alien” Jews became the first victims of the Holocaust. In summer of 1941 they were deported to the occupied territories of the Soviet Union and massacred there.

    Tamás Stark received his PhD from the Eötvös Loránd University, Faculty of Humanities in 1993. From 1983 he was a researcher at the Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and in 2000 he was appointed a senior research fellow. His specialization is forced population movement in East-Central Europe in the period 1938-56, with special regard to the history of the Holocaust, the fate of prisoners of war and civilian internees, and the postwar migration. In 2014 he was Fulbright visiting professor at the Nazareth College, in Rochester USA. His main publications include Hungary’s Human Losses in World War II (Uppsala, 1995), Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust and after the Second World War, 1939-1949: A Statistical Review (Boulder, CO, 2000), Magyar foglyok a Szovjetunióban. [Hungarian prisoners in the Soviet Union] (Budapest, 2006) „...akkor aszt mondták kicsi robot” – A magyar polgári lakosság elhurcolása a Szovjetunióba korabeli dokumentumok tükrében. [The deportation of civilians to the Soviet Union in the light of contemporary documents] (Budapest, 2017)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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