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January 2017

  • Wednesday, January 18th Zero Waste: Fictional or Achievable Goal?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series & Environment Seminar Series

    Description

    All countries, large or small, rich or poor, suffer waste problems to various degrees. If not properly dealt with, waste issues could impose heavy environmental burdens which not only hinder economic growth but also lead to social discomfort. A sound strategic approach for effective waste management therefore is critical to finding an economically viable and environmentally sound solution.

    Recently, a zero-waste concept has emerged worldwide as a new initiative to curtail the worsening waste problem. Realization of such a concept, however, necessitates the prevention and/or making the best use of the waste via workable mechanisms. Plausible measures include: waste minimization, waste reduction, reuse, recycle and recovery, cleaner production, eco-industrial networking, sustainable consumption and production, etc. The application of these measures, on the other hand, is case and location specific, requiring a careful consideration of many inter-related technical, regulatory, economic and social factors.

    This presentation will review the background and challenges of the waste problem, ways and means of planning and implementing a zero-waste society, paradigm shift from waste to resource management, innovation and partnership, and key elements of success or failure with discussion on the exemplary case of Taiwan.

    Zero waste: is it a fictional or achievable goal? This is an open question that we must address, to help build a sound foundation for pursuance of sustainability.

    Professor Chih C. Chao is a former Vice President of Tunghai University, Taiwan and received his PhD from the University of Montreal. Trained as a chemical and environmental engineer, Dr. Chao has a grave concern over the social and environmental impacts that are caused by un-thoughtful economic activities. Recently, he has worked extensively with natural and social scientists to search for and implement feasible approaches that will lead to establishment of sustainable low-carbon circular economic systems. Dr. Chao has over 40 years’ experience in North America, EU and Asia, covering a wide spectrum of sustainability driven issues. His most recent focal interest is in facilitating the development of value-added zero-waste systems, with a goal of maximizing material and energy use efficiency and minimizing the natural resource exploitation, towards a low-carbon society.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Chin C. Chao
    Speaker
    Honorary Professor, Tunghai University, Taiwan

    John Robinson
    Chair
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and School of the Environment; Adjunct Professor, Copenhagen Business School


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of the Environment

    Co-Sponsors

    Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA)

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2017

  • Thursday, February 2nd One Belt One Road Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20171:30PM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the fall of 2013, China’s President Xi Jinping proposed a global effort known as “One-Belt-One-Road” (OBOR). Unlike many other Chinese proposals currently on the table such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) which has multi-national economic development as underpinning, the implication and potential impact of OBOR appears to be deeper and broader. Roughly speaking, the upstream of OBOR is what President Xi refers to as CULTURAL COMMUNICATION (文化相通). It is an initiative to culturally (and economically as a spin-off) revitalize the Ancient Silk Routes (ASR), be they land-based or maritime-based. However, unlike ASR, OBOR’s success places unprecedented demand on China to profoundly understand other cultures and civilizations. For the maritime OBOR, India, being next door to China, geographically situated in South Asia, and with 1.2 billion people, is an unavoidable challenge. If OBOR is successful, measured not by years but decades and maybe centuries, it could initiate a neo-Renaissance to allow humanity to meet unprecedented challenges.

    Da Hsuan Feng received his physics BA from Drew University (1968) and his PhD the University of Minnesota (1972). He joined Drexel University in 1976, where in 1990 he became M. Russell Wehr Chair Professor. In 1996, Feng became a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has been named an honorary professor at fifteen Chinese universities. He was a consultant for three National Laboratories in the United States: Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Brookhaven, and has served on a number of academic advisory boards and university Boards of Trustees throughout Asia. In 2000, Feng became Vice President for Research and Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas. From 2007 to 2014, he brought significant change to Taiwan as Senior Executive Vice President of National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) and National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). Since 2007, Feng has lectured widely throughout Asia on challenges of higher education. In 2014, he assumed his current position at the University of Macau. In the past year has lectured extensively on One-Belt-One-Road in Singapore, Malaysia, Mainland China, and Taiwan.

    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of Asian Politics.  Her research examines the relationship between popular contention, state power, and civil society, with an emphasis on contemporary China.  Her book manuscript, “Mobilizing Without the Masses in China” examines state control and civil society contention under authoritarian rule.  Based on two years of ethnographic research that tracks the development of informal labor organizations, the book explores counterintuitive dynamics of organized contention in post-1989 China. Articles that are part of this broader project have appeared in Governance (Forthcoming), Comparative Political Studies (2016) and Modern China (2009) among others.  Her research has been supported by the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Chiang Ching Kuo Foundation, and the Rhodes Trust, Prior to joining the department, she was a Walter H. Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University and a Predoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Political Science.   She holds a D.Phil. In Politics and an M.Phil. In Development Studies with distinction from Oxford University, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. 

    Lynette Ong is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, jointly appointed by the Department of Political Science and the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. She was An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies in 2008-09. She received her PhD from the Australian National University. Professor Ong’s theoretical interests are authoritarian politics and the political economy of development. She studies contentious politics and repression in China, particularly with respect to land acquisition and housing demolition, and has a broader interest in how social mobilization take shape in authoritarian countries, and the nexus between protest and repression in non-democratic settings. Her book, Prosper or Perish: The Political Economy of Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China was published by Cornell University Press in 2012. Her publications have appeared in Comparative PoliticsInternational Political Science ReviewChina QuarterlyPacific AffairsAsian Survey and the Journal of East Asian Studies. Professor Ong’s opinion pieces have also appeared in the Foreign AffairsFar Eastern Economic ReviewChina Economic ReviewChina Economic QuarterlyEast Asia ForumAsia-Pacific Foundation of CanadaAsia SentinelNew Mandala and Asia Times Online.

    Yong Wang is Professor at School of International Studies, and the Director of the Center for International Political Economy, Peking University. He is also Professor at Party School of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China, and Former Visiting Chevalier Chair Professor at Institute of Asian Research(IAR), University of British Columbia(UBC). Member of the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Agenda Council on Global Trade and FDI, Asia Society Regional Trade Architecture Commission and Economic Diplomacy Expert Working Group of China Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM). He has published numerous books and articles focusing on the topics of Chinese political economy, foreign policy, China-US relations, regional cooperation, international political economy, World Trade Organization (WTO) and global governance. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Global Asia, the Journal of Global Governance, the journal of Contemporary Politics and the Journal of Human Security. His recent article on political economy of One Belt One Road is published by UK-based journal of Pacific Review.


    Speakers

    Da Hsuan Feng
    Keynote
    Special Assistant to the Rector and Director of Global Affairs, University of Macau; Former Senior Vice President, National Tsing Hua University

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute

    Yong Wang
    Discussant
    Professor, School of International Studies; Director, Center for International Political Economy, Peking University, Beijing


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 2nd JALANAN, a Film by Daniel Ziv

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, Robarts Library, 3rd Floor, 130 St George St
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    Series

    Film Screening

    Description

    Documentary Screening............... 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
    Commentary and Discussion....... 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

    JALANAN (“Streetside”) is an award-winning documentary that tells the captivating story of Boni, Ho, and Titi, three street musicians in Jakarta. Directed by Canadian Daniel Ziv, the film follows these musicians as they seek to secure their livelihoods by busking on Jakarta’s streets and navigate the city’s complex social and legal landscape. Jalanan is not only an intimate portrait of Jakarta, it is a glimpse into the lives of marginalized urban communities facing the pressures of globalization.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Joshua Barker
    Associate Professor of Anthropology, St. George Campus; Vice-Dean, Graduate Education & Program Reviews; and expert on urban Indonesia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 8th Curative Violence: How to Inhabit the Time Machine with Disability

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This presentation explores “folded time” in which the present disappears through the imperative of cure in South Korea. By folding time, cure demands temporal crossings to a past through “rehabilitation” and “recovery” and to a future without disabilities and illnesses. By thinking about the imperative of cure as a time machine, Kim explores the possibility of inhabiting in the present with disability and illness. Cure appears as an attempt at category-crossing from otherness to normality, which reveals the multiplicity of the boundaries that divide “human” and “inhuman” as well as “life” and “nonlife.” Kim also discusses the temporal trap into which discussions of non-Western societies in Western academic contexts might fall, one that denies coevalness or universalizes disability experiences across different cultural and historical contexts. In this analysis, cure is reframed, not as unequivocally beneficial nor politically harmful, but as a set of political, moral, economic, emotional, and ambivalent negotiations.

    Eunjung Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program at Syracuse University. Her research and teaching involve transnational feminist disability studies, visual cultures, Korean cultural history of disability and activism, humanitarian communications, asexuality theories, and queer inhumanism.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eunjung Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program, Syracuse University

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 13th From Modernity to Postmodernity: Malaysian Art in a Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the key narratives in the development of Malaysian modern art in the last 100 years. It will start with a discussion on Low Kway Song’s “Portrait of Man in Three Piece Suit with Orchid on Lapel” produced in 1917 and the art scene in Malaya prior to its Independence. Post Independence saw an exposure of Western Abstract Expressionism, albeit in a localized manner, on Malaysian art pioneered by newly returned Malaysian artists from their studies abroad. Such influence could be observed in the works of Syed Ahmad Jamal and Latiff Mohidin. However, the period of late 1970s and throughout 1980s has changed the previous trend, which marked a new turning point in Malaysian art, due to the implementation of the National Cultural Policy and Islamization Policy. Tis was followed by the decade of the 1990s that witnessed a growing Malaysian art scene that led to the produce of artworks that were indirectly conditioned by the ‘postmodern situation’. This paper will conclude with the works of selected Malaysian artists in the current Singapore Biennale: An Atlas of Mirrors (2016).

    Sarena Abdullah is a Senior Lecturer at the School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), where she teaches Art History subjects for both undergraduate and graduate class. She has an MA in Art History from the State University of New York, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A., and a PhD in Art History (2010) from the University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. Her research interests are contemporary Malaysian and Southeast Asian Art. She has numerous papers published both locally and abroad, and has presented at conferences in Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, the United States and China. She is one of the Field Leader for “Ambitious Alignments: New Histories of Southeast Asian Art,” a research project led by the Power Institute, The University of Sydney and funded by the Getty Foundation in 2015. She was the recipient of the 2016 CAA-Getty Travel Grant as part of the CAA-Getty International Program and will be part of the 2017 CAA-Getty International Reunion Program in February as well.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sarena Abdullah
    Senior Lecturer, School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2017

  • Friday, March 3rd Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street, Room 318
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    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series; Lecture in the Arts, Histories, Literatures and Religions of Burma

    Description

    THE LEGAL HISTORY OF BURMA over the course of the second millennium CE offers a series of literary, juridical, and intellectual contributions that are unique when considered in relation to the wider Buddhist world of South, Central, and East Asia. From the 13th through 19th centuries upper Burma was a regional center for the production of a distinctive genre of Buddhist legal literature known as dhammasattha (“treatise on law”), whose laws claimed jurisdiction over all members of society, including monks and laypersons, and kings, commoners, and slaves. Prose and verse dhammasattha texts were composed in Pali and vernacular languages (Burmese, Mon, Arakanese, Shan, etc.), as well as in
    bilingual gloss versions (nissaya), and there is extensive testimony, dating from the mid-13th century onward, for their utilization by judges in contexts of dispute resolution. Aspects of the early history of this genre can be gleaned from lithic epigraphy, vernacular poetry, and bibliographic catalogues (piṭakat samuiṅḥ), although surviving dhammasattha treatises, transmitted in palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, can be dated no earlier than circa 1637, whereas the youngest examples of the tradition were written under British colonialism around 1900.

    For the past decade Christian Lammerts has been involved in the first major study of this genre—its textual histories, laws, and shifting modes of reception and jurisprudence—on the basis of extensive fieldwork in Burma and close investigation of the epigraphic corpus and manuscript archive, which preserves hundreds of discrete texts in multiple, sometimes highly variant, versions. In this presentation Lammerts will discuss the results of this project, drawn from his forthcoming book, Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE (University of Hawai’I Press).

    D. CHRISTIAN LAMMERTS is Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He is interested in the cultural and intellectual histories of Buddhism and religious law in Burma and Southeast Asia, and is currently at work on a study of
    juridical curses, oaths, and ordeals around of the Bay of Bengal from the late first
    millennium CE up to the early colonial era.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lammerts
    Assistant Professor, Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies, Rutgers University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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