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September 2014

October 2014

  • Friday, October 3rd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimaging the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces “Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor” (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press, 2014). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: “Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong”; “Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers”; and ” Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography”, and “‘Mail-Order’ Marriages”.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Professor, Director, Asian Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Department of Sociology

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


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  • Friday, October 10th From "Den of Iniquity" to "the Internet's Favourite Cyberpunk Slum": The Kowloon Walled City 20 Years On.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 10, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    “City of Darkness Revisited”, by Greg Girard and Ian Lambot.

    The Kowloon Walled City, before its demolition in 1993, is widely acknowledged to have been the most densely populated place on earth: over 35,000 people living in 300 interconnected high-rise buildings crammed into a single Hong Kong city block. Built without contributions from architects or engineers, and without government oversight, the Walled City was dismissed as a “den of iniquity”, where drugs, prostitution and other vices circulated. Since its demolition however, the Walled City is better known now than when it existed, having influenced a generation of architects, designers, writers, artists and others, prompting the website Motherboard to christen it “the Internet’s favorite cyberpunk slum”. Greg Girard and Ian Lambot’s new book, “City of Darkness Revisited”, updates the story of the Walled City, as first revealed in photographs and text in their 1993 book, “City of Darkness”, and examines its unexpected influence in the 20 years since its demolition.

    Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer currently living in Vancouver, Canada whose work has examined the social and physical transformations in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

    Following the presentation, a reception will be held to celebrate the launch of the Asian Institute’s 2014 lecture series, “Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans”. Please E-register to confirm an RSVP to the recpetion.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto, Mississauga

    Greg Girard
    Speaker
    Photographer, based in Vancouver, Canada.


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Panel Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    From October 24th to October 25th, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto will be hosting a two-day symposium on the Afterlives of the Korean War. Co-sponsored by the Dr.David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, this symposium aims to bring together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    On Friday, October 24th, 2014 a panel discussion will be held in The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility on the intersections between the military and geopolitics with the dynamics of race, nation, diaspora, gender, and sexuality, which will feature Dr. John Price, Dr. Monica Kim, Dr. Christine Hong and Dr. Hosu Kim.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Assistant Professor, Department of Literature and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at University California, Santa Cruz.

    John Price
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Univeristy of Victoria, British Columbia.

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, New York University, New York State.

    Hosu Kim
    Assistannt Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, College of Staten Island, New York.



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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Performance of "ARA Gut of Jeju" by Dohee Lee and SKIM

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20147:00PM - 8:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C8
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    “Ara” is a Korean word whose various meanings include, “Ocean” and ,”Eye”, which symbolize themes of rebirth and wisdom. This piece will evoke the regenerative powers of the ocean, as the energizing force behind life, and the cycle of rebirth, as the histories and stories that have happened and still happen to the people on the land. This performance piece is dedicated to the history of the people, the stories, the land and justice of Jeju Island.

    Born on Jeju Island in South Korea, where shamanic tradition is very strong, Dohee Lee learned Korean dance, Korean percussion, and vocals. Her art focuses on integrating these traditional forms with contemporary elements. Each piece and performance blends Eastern and contemporary Western musical forms with modern dance languages into works that emphasize the experimental, ritualistic and regenerative aspects of music, dance and visual bodies. Lee has presented her work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Asian Art Museum in SF and performed at Carnegie Zankel Hall in NYC with the Kronos Quartet, Teatro Municipal de Lima Peru, Beijing and Europe.

    SKIM is an artist and cultural worker born and raised in New York, and currently producing music in Los Angeles. Through song, rap, and Korean folk drumming, SKIM’s work breaks silences, honours family, offers love, and demands change.

    Over the past 12 years, SKIM has performed for a wide range of audiences and venues from independent theatres and music festivals, to HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, to youth and senior centers, schools, and juvenile halls, to actions protesting police abuse and war crimes from past to present. They have also shared their work and music through: drumming with organizers and members of Koreatown Immigrant Workers’ Alliance in LA and Jamaesori in the Bay area, performing at events with Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” facilitating creative workshops with youth in Alternative Intervention Models, API Youth Promoting Advocacy and Leadership, the Chicago Children’s Choir; and recently joining a leadership cohort of the Brown Boi Project.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.


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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Keynote Address

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    The symposium’s keynote address will feature Prof. Dong Choon Kim (Sung Kong Hoe University) on rethinking reconciliation and reparation.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dong-Choon Kim
    Keynote
    Department of Sociology, Sung Kong Hoe University, Korea

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    East Asian Studies Institute, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto



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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Screening of Jiseul Directed by O Muel

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
    506 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1Y3

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  • Tuesday, October 28th Screening of Vincent Who? with Director Curtis Chin

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMedia Commons
    3rd Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Toronto. ON
    M5S 1A5
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    Description

    The screening will be followed by a trailer on Curtis Chin’s new film, Tested, and a Q & A session with him

    VINCENT WHO? – In 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese sentiments, Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by two white autoworkers who said, “it’s because of you mother** that we’re out of work.” When the judged fined the killers a mere $3,000 and three years probation, Asian Americans around the country galvanized for the first time to form a real community and movement. This documentary features interviews with the key players at the time, as well as a whole new generation of activists. “Vincent Who?” asks how far Asian Americans have come since then and how far we have yet to go.

    Curtis Chin is an award-winning writer and producer who has written for ABC, NBC, Fox, the Disney Channel and more. As a community activist, he co-founded the Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress. In 2008, he served on Barack Obama’s Asian American Leadership Council where he participated in helping the campaign reach out to the AAPI community. He has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, Newsweek and other media outlet. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at NYU.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Curtis Chin
    Director

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:


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November 2014

  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Where does the call for a new, “planetary” humanities leave the study of the regions that have shaped area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the fact that, more than in any other region of the world, the food and human security of South Asia depend on the annual monsoon. In the long term, changes in the monsoon are a likely but uncertain outcome of planetary warming; but recent meteorological and climatological research has shown that changes in regional patterns of rainfall can be traced to causes on a regional scale, most of which date from the 1950s: aerosols in the atmosphere, changes in land use, agricultural intensification, patterns of migration and urbanization. Our changed perspective shows us that South Asia shapes the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon; regional climate change interacts, unpredictably, with climate change on a planetary level.

    This suggests that, in thinking about human agency in the Anthropocene, intermediate levels of analysis—short of “species history”—and analyses on shorter timescales (in this case, a focus on the middle decades of the twentieth century: the classic terrain of modern historiography) remain essential. Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped the history of Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unpredictable and unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Sunhil S. Amrith
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London



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  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho, a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, is a major South Korean feminist intellectual, author of 8 books, co-founder of Another Culture in 1984, founder of Haja Center in 1999, South Korea’s eminent alternative cultural studios for teens, and one of the key figures in creating critical public scenes since the 1980′s. Cho, as a ‘native anthropologist,’ will be speaking about her whirlwind journey of compressed modernity of South Korea since 1980s. She will start her talk with a discussion about the recent 4.16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo that resonate 9.11 Attacks in 2001 in New York and 3.11 Explosion in 2011 Fukushima in many aspects. She focuses particularly on the split of South Korean public responses into two antagonistic groups, that is, those who say to “never forget!” and those who urge to “ forget and go back to normal life!” Cho will elaborate concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ (Ulich Beck) and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ (Judith Butler) in her analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as lived experience of people in South Korea.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



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  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking about precarious youth and their survival politics based on her own pedagogical and socio-political experiment at Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) launched in 1999. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has been evolved responding proactively to national and global crises such as 1997 Asian financial crisis, 2008-2009 global financial crises, and 2011 Fukushima disaster. Cho is particularly interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning and has endeavored to create platforms that enables the new type of learning in various forms: a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. In her talk, Cho will detail her works of launching these platforms and discuss about her anticipation. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism,” the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises as unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared treat to all humanity, rather than as isolated and unique. The youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds and creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae-Joang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



    Disclaimer:


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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



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February 2015

March 2015


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