Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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February 2016

  • Friday, February 19th Planning, Development and the politics of the Everyday State in South Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 19, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Centre for South Asian Studies PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The event is open graduate students and faculty only.

    This panel is part of the Centre for South Asian Studies PhD Seminar Series, involving core CSAS faculty as discussants and chairs.
    The aim is to workshop the papers through discussion with colleagues.

    Elsie Lewison, “Reframing Agricultural Biopolitics through a Postcolonial Lens: Contested organic value chains in Jumla, Nepal”

    Signs and stories of the failures of the state are both potent and pervasive in Nepal, particularly in the wake of the 2015 earthquakes and the highly contested passing of a constitution. However, the all too easy critique of the state and its compounding failures presents something of a dilemma as well, particularly as efforts to bypass dysfunctional states are often framed in terms of a “neoliberal turn.” In this paper, I draw on post-colonial critiques and calls for a “dis-aggregated” approach to the state in an effort to explore some of the everyday ways in which actors work across institutional boundaries and in the interstices of the Nepali state in pursuit of biopolitical aims. I focus in on development interventions to promote organic value chains in a “remote” corner of Nepal, highlighting how state and non-state actors, at the district scale, have mobilized technologies and institutions of value chain development in ways that deviate significantly from the agendas of donor agencies and Kathmandu-based officers. Through this investigation, I suggest that a post-colonial perspective can be useful in identifying potential openings for pursuing alternative agrarian futures.

    Sujata Thapa, “Infrastructure Violence: Daily mobility of women in public transportation in Kathmandu City”

    Many South Asian cities are adopting a technocratic approach to urban development to attract global capital. These cities are dramatically changing their built environment with modern infrastructure such as the metro rail, multi-lane motorways, shopping malls, high rises, and luxury hotels. The growth in manufacturing, construction and service sector jobs in these cities has attracted poor people from villages and small towns, leading to rapid increase in the urban population as well as urbanization in the peri-urban areas of the city. It is in this context that infrastructure development of Kathmandu Metropolitan city has taken place during the post-conflict reconstruction phase since 2008.

    In this review paper, I critically examine the transportation infrastructure projects that have been implemented in Kathmandu to explore the linkage between infrastructure and the broader process of marginalization. The malfunctioning or the lack of infrastructure inflicts harm or violence. Lack of adequate and thoughtful planning has also given rise to a transportation system dominated by motorized private vehicles. Drawing on the concept of ‘infrastructural violence,’ I aim to show the current transportation infrastructure often marginalizes poor people in general and women in particular. For example, both the inadequacy of transportation infrastructure and the predominance of private motorized vehicles disadvantage these groups disproportionately. I make this argument through the analyses of infrastructure policies of municipal government, donor agencies, multi-national companies and national and international government. The paper concludes with a set of normative ideas to imagine and build urban infrastructure differently for greater equality and collective benefit.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Elsie Lewison
    Speaker
    Ph.D candidate, Human Geography, University of Toronto

    Sujata Thapa-Bhattarai
    Speaker
    Ph.D candidate, Program in Planning, University of Toronto

    Katharine Rankin
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 23rd Chūshingura & the Edo Literary Imagination

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 23, 20166:30PM - 8:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In the spring of 1701, a daimyō from western Japan drew his sword against a senior shogunal official within the hallowed halls of Edo Castle. This rash, split-second decision set in motion a dramatic chain of events that is retold in a theatrical masterpiece that remains one of Japan’s most captivating and enduring cultural markers: Chūshingura, the story of the forty-seven rōnin.

    Chūshingura enjoyed immediate success on stage and quickly captured the Japanese popular imagination, inspiring all manner of imitators, adaptations, and parodies. This talk introduces several works of comic pictorial fiction based on the Chūshingura story and considers their significance as products of the flourishing literary culture of early modern Japan.

    William Fleming is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages & Literatures & Theater Studies at Yale University. His research focuses on 18th- and 19th-century Japanese fiction and the popular stage. He completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at Harvard University, and was a visiting researcher at Kyoto University and Tokyo’s National Institute of Japanese Literature.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    William Fleming
    Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages & Literatures & Theater Studies, Yale University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 24th One Belt One Road: A New Era of China's Geopolitical Strategies

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 24, 20162:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House
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    Description

    One Belt One Road: A New Era of China’s Geopolitical Strategies is a panel conference event initiated by Synergy: The Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies at the Asian Institute which aims to examine the dramatic shift in China’s recent geopolitical strategies and China’s rising international role through an academic approach, specifically focusing on the centrepiece initiative of China’s new geopolitical agenda — the “One Belt One Road” (OBOR) initiative. China as a nation which has long sought to maintain a low international profile, has in recent years begun to advocate a greater role for itself in the international order. The “One Belt One Road” (OBOR) initiative is a China-led multilateral initiative announced by Chinese President Xi in late 2013, with the aim to promote economic engagement and investment in the Eurasia continent along two main travel routes — “One Belt” and “One Road”. “One Belt” refers to the “New Silk Road Economic Belt” sub-initiative, which aims to extend China’s continental road westward through Central Asia to Europe. “One Road” refers to the “21st-Century Maritime Silk Road” sub-initiative, which aims to extend the maritime road from China to Southeast Asia and eventually to Europe. The OBOR is backed financially by the US $40 billion Silk Road Fund from China’s state government and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) — a multilateral financial institution spearheaded by China. The implications of this massive and ambitious geopolitical agenda is the centre discussion of this panel.

    Panelists:

    Jeremy Paltiel – Jeremy Paltiel is a Professor of Political Science specializing in the politics, government and foreign policies of Asia (China and Japan) and development politics at Carleton University.

    Hasan H. Karrar (video presentation) – Hasan H. Karrar is an assistant professor of History specializing in modern Chinese and Central Asian history and political economy at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. His current research is focused on informal connections across the greater Central Asian region (inclusive of western China and northern Pakistan) since the 1980s. His earlier research on the development of Sino-Central Asian relations appeared as The New Silk Road Diplomacy: China’s Central Asian Foreign Policy Since the Cold War (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2009).

    Victor Falkenheim – Victor C. Falkenheim is Professor Emeritus of Political Science and East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto where he has taught since 1972. Educated at Princeton (B.A) and Columbia (MA & Ph.D) Professor Falkenheim has previously served twice as Chair of the Department of East Asian Studies as well as Director of the Joint Centre for Modern East Asia. His research interests and publications center on local politics and political reform in China. He has lectured widely in China and has worked on a number of CIDA and World Bank projects in China over the past two decades. His publications include Citizens and Groups in Contemporary China, and Chinese Politics: From Mao to Deng.

    2:10-2:13 Welcome Remarks from Editor-in-Chief: Susan Cui
    2:13-2:18 Remarks from Deputy Consul General of PRC Consulate Mr. Xu Wei
    2:18-2:20 Remarks from the Chair: Karl Yan (PhD)
    2:20-2:35 Panelist #1: Professor Hasan H. Karrar (Skype presentation from Pakistan)
    2:35-2:50 Panelist #2: Professor Jeremy Paltiel
    2:50-3:05 Panelist #3: Professor Victor C. Falkenheim
    3:05-3:40 Discussion Period moderated by the Chair
    3:40-3:58 Q&A
    3:58-4:00 Closing Remarks by Editor-in-Chief: Susan Cui
    4:00-5:00 Reception

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Karl Yan
    Chair
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science

    Jeremy Paltiel
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science, Carleton University

    Hasan H. Karrar
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, History, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan

    Victor C. Falkenheim
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus, Political Science and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Synergy: The Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 25th The Cyborg in Globalizing India: Technology, Community, and Revolution in Indra Sinha’s Animal’s People and Altaf Tyrewala’s Engglishhh©

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 25, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Centre for South Asian Studies PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    In this presentation I look at technology, particularly in the form of machines like the telephone and tape recorder, as well as more abstract and nebulous technologies like the Internet, to map the formation of cyborg and what I call “sahiborg” subjectivities in an era of rapidly changing and ever-improving modes of communication. These technologies seem at once to bring us closer together and further apart, fostering a greater sense of global solidarity and “connectivity,” in John Tomlinson’s terms, but also setting out battle lines for revolutionary new Indian movements: between the international rich and poor, in Sinha’s work, and Global North and South, in Tyrewala’s.

    Stephanie Southmayd is a fifth-year doctoral student in the English programme at the University of Toronto. Her interest in the issues of globalized middle-class labour, business, and technology in South Asian literature stems from the time she spent in Gurgaon, India, where she worked as an editor for an outsourcing firm before returning to graduate school. She hopes to finish her dissertation on postmillennial Indian fiction in English and its narrative strategies with regards to globalization and nationalism by late spring 2016.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Stephanie Southmayd
    Doctoral Student, Department of English and Collaborative Program in South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th Ethnic Nationalities in Myanmar’s Transitional Democracy: New Trajectories Under NLD Rule?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Since 2011, Myanmar has begun a transition to civilian and democratic rule. The 2015 elections have further confirmed Myanmar’s transition to democracy, with the victory of the National League for Democracy. Yet, peace with ethnic nationalities and new institutional powers for ethnic states remain elusive. Under the 2008 Constitution, very few powers were devolved to ethnic states. How are ethnic states gaining more powers from the central government? How are new powers being negotiated? What are the prospects for greater devolution of power to ethnic states? The panel will focus on the fundamental contradictions between the central government’s historically persistent centralizing approach and its stated objective of devolving power to ethnic states. Since 2012, changes remain primarily cosmetic rather than substantive. Although the government has pledged support for federalism, has negotiated a national cease-fire, and has introduced a new decentralization law in the national parliament, there is little evidence so far of a willingness to amend the 2008 Constitution to give more autonomy and power to ethnic states or, in practice, to provide sufficient powers and resources for ethnic states to exercise any meaningful degree of autonomy. The panel will also discuss the rise of violence against Muslims. These represent important challenges as the National League for Democracy forms a new government, and attempts to find new solutions to the sixty-year civil war with ethnic groups and achieve peaceful democratic change.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jacques Bertrand
    Director, Collaborative Master's Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung
    Global Studies Department Chair, Professor, Political Science, University of Massachusetts, Lowell

    Alexandre Pelletier
    PhD Candidate, Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 29th Ghosts and Rocks: The Past That Would Shape the Future in Northeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 29, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The talk will consider various examples of the region’s memory wars and interrogate the possibilities for the production of history in the mix. Of particular concern is the matter of the islands in the region left up for grabs in the Treaty of Peace with Japan, signed in San Francisco in 1951. Through claims to these islands today, the memory wars have the potential to spark actual conflict and render treacherous the ongoing political manipulation of both victims and survivors of the Japanese Empire.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She publishes regularly about Japan and Northeast Asia, and her books include Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States (Columbia) and Japan’s Colonization of Korea (Hawaii). Dudden received her BA from Columbia University in 1991 and her PhD in history from the University of Chicago in 1998. She has lived and studied for extended periods of time in Japan and South Korea, with awards from Fulbright, ACLS, NEH, and SSRC and fellowships at Princeton and Harvard and is the recipient of the 2015 Manhae Peace Prize. She is currently completing a book about Japan’s territorial problems called, The Shape of Japan: Islands, Empire, Nation (forthcoming, Oxford University Press).

    She is on the advisory council of Harvard University’s Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies’ Research Project on Constitutional Revision and was the recipient of the Chosun Ilbo’s 2015 Manhae Peace Prize.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Speaker
    Professor of History, University of Connecticut

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Professor, East Asian Studies Department


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2016

  • Wednesday, March 2nd Japan’s New Position and its Role in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 2, 20162:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Situated in East Asia where the power relationship is undergoing a substantial transformation, Japan must adapt itself to the new realities of the security environment of the region. China, with its aggressive expansion both politically and militarily is posing to seize the hegemony in the South and East China Sea, further advancing into the Pacific Ocean.

    North Korea will continue its nuclear test and missile launch as much as needed until the country becomes capable of covering the North American Continent with its nuclear missiles.

    Prime Minister Abe of Japan last year enacted a new set of security laws enabling Japan to exercise the collective right of defense. While Japan’s Peace Constitution remains intact, the new legislation will widen the scope of Japan’s contribution to international peace building activities. For Japan to lead the regional security cooperation, it has to come to terms with the neighboring countries about “the issue of history”, without which the basis on which Japan stands to engage with the neighboring countries will remain to be vulnerable. How can Japan come to reconciliation with its neighbors?

    Yukio OKAMOTO, a former Special Advisor to two Prime Ministers of Japan, is the President of Okamoto Associates and a Robert E. Wilhelm Fellow at MIT. From 1968 to 1991 Mr. Okamoto was a career diplomat in Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. His overseas postings were at Paris, Cairo and Washington. He retired from the Ministry in 1991 and established Okamoto Associates Inc., a political and economic consultancy.

    Post-retirement, Mr. Okamoto has served in a number of advisory positions. From 1996 to 1998, he was a Special Advisor to Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. From 2001 to 2004, he was again a Special Advisor to Prime Minister Jun-ichiro Koizumi, also serving as the Chairman of the Prime Minister’s Task Force on Foreign Relations.

    Mr. Okamoto is a visiting professor of international relations at Ritsumeikan University. He sits on the Board of several Japanese multinational companies. Mr. Okamoto is the Director of the Signal of Hope Fund, an initiative he established to assist the Tohoku fisheries industry recover from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.


    Speakers

    Yukio Okamoto
    President, Okamoto Associates and a Robert E. Wilhelm Fellow, MIT


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 3rd Planning for Smart Cities in Japan

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 3, 20166:00PM - 8:00PMGalbraith Building
    35 St. George Street
    Room 120
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    Description

    Many cities in the world are undertaking initiatives to improve environmental performance. The ‘Smart City’ concept and approach are exactly in line with this challenge to make urban areas sustainable through innovative technologies and plans to promote efficient energy use, recycling and environmentally friendly traffic management. Yokohama and Kitakyushu are examples of cities that are actively working to become smarter. They are linking environmental policies with policies relating to economic revitalization, urban planning, health, and welfare, particularly post 3/11. They are also promoting cooperation with other Asian cities to share environmental management experience and knowledge.

    Professor Imura will discuss shifts in Japanese perspectives on energy management and smart technology investment, not only for the creation of low-carbon cities and a green economy, but also for disaster recovery.

    Hidefumi Imura is Professor at the Global Cooperation Institute for Sustainable Cities of Yokohama City University and Professor Emeritus of Nagoya University, and a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies. He received his PhD in Applied Physics from the University of Tokyo, and has subsequently worked for the Japan Environment Agency, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Yokohama Municipal Government.

    Professor Imura has a wide range of expertise covering domestic and international environmental policy issues, environmental technologies and economics in Japan, China, and other East Asian regions. His research centers on energy and material flow analysis of human activities in cities, life cycle assessment of civil infrastructures, and modeling of human and environmental interactions.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hidefumi Imura
    Professor, Global Cooperation Institute for Sustainable Cities, Yokohama City University; Professor Emeritus, Nagoya University; and Senior Fellow, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies


    Sponsors

    Japan Foundation

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 10th What’s in a name? Postmodern criticisms of Buddhists under colonialism.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 10, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In a recent anthology of essays titled, How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (Silkworm Press 2012), contributors ranging from philologists, anthropologists and area studies specialists of South and Southeast Asian Buddhism have challenged the use of the term Theravāda (Teachings of the Elders) as a legitimate designation of identity by and for the Buddhists of Sri Lanka and the religiously affiliated countries of mainland Southeast Asia. The claim made in these writings is that “Theravāda” emerged as a term of self-reference only during the late colonial era as a product of Orientalist scholarship, and that by accepting this contrived and essentialized identity Buddhists of the region have unwittingly participated in the misunderstanding and misrepresentation of their own multiple and complex Buddhist traditions that collectively go by the name Theravāda today. In this presentation I will challenge that claim along with the methodology and evidence brought to bear in its support. Then, referencing mostly Burmese sources, I will show how in Burma use of the word Theravāda as a term of self-reference pre-dates British conquest and the rise of Orientalism, and further, that contemporary meanings of the word Theravāda in Burma are not incongruous with attested usages in the past.

    Patrick Pranke is an Assistant Professor of Religion in the Humanities at the University of Louisville. He is trained in Buddhist Studies and his area of specialization is Burmese Buddhism. Pranke’s interests include Buddhist monastic history and historiography, weikza cult practices, and the interface of Buddhist scholasticism with Burmese popular traditions. Pranke’s recent publications include: “Buddhist Foundation Legends” (co-authored with Donald Stadtner), and “Buddhism in Myanmar” in The Buddhist Art of Myanmar (Asia Society and Yale University Press, 2015); “On Saints and Wizards: Ideals of Human Perfection and Power in Contemporary Burmese Buddhism,” in Champions of Buddhism: Weikza Cults in Contemporary Burma (NUS Press 2014); and Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism, Assistant Editor, (Princeton University Press. 2014).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Patrick Pranke
    Assistant Professor, Religion in the Humanities, University of Louisville


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 11th Cooperation and the ‘Population Problem’ in Late Colonial Korea: the 1940 Health Investigation of the Urban Poor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 11, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In 1940, students of the Medical Department at Keijō Imperial University set out to investigate the health and living conditions of urban residents in what were perceived as the ghettos of Seoul (Keijō). Called the t’omangmin, these new urban residents whose burgeoning numbers and needs the infrastructure of Seoul was unable to handle were considered part of the “population problem,” as categorized by colonial authorities. Juxtaposing this with other research projects, the presentation explores the rhetoric of love and cooperation in a purportedly scientific investigation to interrogate medical activities and health administration in the context of Seoul’s urban development and expansion of Japanese military expeditions during the Pacific War.

    Sonja M. Kim is Assistant Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY) where she teaches courses on Korean history and East Asia. Her research interests are on issues of gender, medicine, and public health in 20th century Korea.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sonja Kim
    Assistant professor, Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University (SUNY)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 14th Critical Refugee Studies and the Wars in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 14, 20161:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    The current Syrian crisis has alerted us once again to the plight of the tens of millions of displaced people who in recent times have been forced to seek refuge from political persecution, wars, and violence. Yet too often mainstream representations of generic “refugees” have figured them as merely objects of pity and benevolence, or in the worst cases into populations whose diasporic condition is in part a result of their own inability to survive in the modern and contemporary world. This symposium takes last year’s fortieth anniversary of the official end of the Vietnam War as an occasion to question mainstream memories and representations of the wars in Southeast Asia, while also calling attention to the resilience, alternative memories, and self-making of those who have relocated to the United States and Canada.

    1:00 PM – 2:45 PM – Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Lecture
    3:00 PM – 5:00 PM – Panel Discussion
    5:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Reception

    The Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es): The Production of Memories of the “Generation
    After”

    Yen Le Espiritu, Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC San Diego

    Focusing on the multiple recollections of the US War in Vietnam, this talk examines the ways in which the mutually constituted processes of remembering and forgetting work in the production of official discourses about empire, war, and violence as well as in the construction of refugee subjectivities. Challenging conventional ideas about memory as recuperation, this talk analyzes the production of the “postmemories” of the post-1975 generation: the young Vietnamese who were born in Vietnam or in the United States after the official end of the Vietnam War.

    Please note that the lecture and panel each require a separate registration.


    Speakers

    Yen Espiritu
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC San Diego

    Vinh Nguyen
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, English and East Asian Studies, Renison University College, University of Waterloo

    Ma Vang
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, University of California, Merced

    Bee Vang
    Panelist
    Actor (including lead opposite Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino), activist, writer

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor & Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Thy Phu
    Commentator
    Associate Professor, Department of English and Writing Studies, Western University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 17th Abenomics 2.0 and Japan's Past, Present and Future

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 17, 20162:00PM - 4:00PMKoefler House
    569 Spadina Avenue
    KP 108
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    After three years of “Abenomics”, it became clear these policies would need to evolve in order to meet the needs of a changing world, prompting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to announce the second stage of his economic strategy last fall. This presentation will start with a look at Japan’s “frozen” past and its departure from “Japanisation” then move through the challenges now facing the Japanese economy. Addressing the question of whether Japan is headed for a downturn in the 2020s, the presentation will also show how the country has become a leader in crisis response.

    Hajime Takata is Managing Executive Officer and Chief Economist at Mizuho Research Institute. He has been Chief Strategist at Mizuho Securities, as well as Chief Strategist within the Fixed Income Group at IBJ Securities. Earlier, he worked for the Industrial Bank of Japan, working both in the credit and the capital market departments. He is the author of several books, including 2001’s The Collapse of the Japanese Government Bond Market, which has been translated into English, and 2012’s 20XX – Footsteps of a Global Depression. He received his Masters Degree in Development Economics from Oxford University, and a Bachelor Degree in Economics from Tokyo University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hajime Takata
    Managing Executive Officer and Chief Economist, Mizuho Research Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 18th The Make+Shift: Transforming Urban Popular Economies

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 18, 201612:00PM - 2:00PMSS 2127
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    The enormous transformations of the built environment and the enhanced possibilities of consumption that have marked even the most marginal of the world’s cities should not detract from acknowledging just how dependent the majority of the urban residents in the so-called South are on constantly putting together some workable form of income and inhabitation. The makeshift character of much of what this majority does is quite literally make + shift. Whatever they come up with rarely is firmly institutionalized into a fixed set of practices, locales or organizational forms. This doesn’t mean that relationships and economic activities do not endure, that people do not find themselves rooted in the same place and set of affiliations over a long period of time. Rather, these stabilities inhere from a constant recalibration of edges, boundaries, and interfaces. Whatever appears to be stable largely depends upon its participation is a series of changing relationships with other activities, personnel, and sites. Whatever is made then shifts in terms of its availability to specific uses and users, as well as its exposure to new potentials and vulnerabilities.

    A light lunch will be provided, please register by clicking on the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    AbdouMaliq Simone
    Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Geography and Planning

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 18th Fights against Trafficking in Persons in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    South Korea is currently listed as a tier 1 country under the US State Department Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report. In 2001, when it was ranked a Tier 3 country as a source and transit country, South Korean government tried diligently to improve its image in many ways. It adopted the Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic in 2004 that punishes the solicitation of sex, transformed pre-existing law, and, in 2013, amended provisions in the Criminal Act which broadened the definition of trafficking to include labour trafficking as well. The protection of the victims and witnesses, however, is still quite weak, and a constitutional challenge on the legality of the punishments has been raised. The ratification bill for the Palermo Protocol submitted by the Government on July 10, 2014, is still pending. Professor Baik reviews the light and shadow of the fights against human trafficking in Korea, and discusses the role of law and social morality.

    Dr. Tae-Ung Baik is an Associate Professor of Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He teaches international human rights law, comparative law, and Korean law. Dr. Baik was appointed a mandate-holder of Special Procedure of the UN Human Rights Council in 2015 as a member of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID). He earned his Master’s (LL.M.) and Doctoral (JSD) degrees from Notre Dame Law School, and is an attorney at-law in the State of New York. His book, “Emerging Regional Human Rights Systems in Asia,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tae-Ung Baik
    Associate Professor of Law,William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 22nd Who governs the “in-between”? Climate change, beneficial flooding, and the everyday resourcefulness of local resource management in peri-urban Myanmar

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 22, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Climate change is having an impact on the severity and timing of river level fluctuations across Asia (Tanner et al 2009, Xu et al 2009, Palmer et al 2008, Dudgeon 2000). Flooding and flood-related disasters in mainland Southeast Asia make news around the world and are generating increasingly severe economic and political disruptions as they impact an urbanizing region. In Myanmar—a so called “water hotspot”—flooding is considered a crisis for state water management and governance, particularly in urban contexts. Moreover, in work on water and resilience, alongside an emphasis on ‘crisis’, we have seen water continually linked to scarcity and ‘disaster’ (Tanner et. al 2015, Mukheibir 2010). What these debates could better elucidate are the ways that everyday people work to address hydro-social practices in a changing climate, and the implications of this work for water management and social outcomes (Driscoll Derickson and MacKinnon 2015, MacKinnon Derickson 2013, ISET-I 2015).

    One way that we can better understand the impacts of climate change on water and river fluctuations and take an approach that highlights the work of everyday people is to examine the impacts or changes to beneficial flooding and to its associated agro-ecological practices in mainland Southeast Asia, where the monsoon climate and regular flooding have been adapted by residents into local cultivation practices. In the places where flood-linked agriculture is practiced, the challenges and transformations posed by climate changes interact with both the current processes of urbanization and with historical and traditional technologies that have been developed to ‘harness’ river fluctuations. Riverbank gardening is one such hydro-social practice in Southeast Asia that produces food for/from both rural and urbanizing environments, and requires cultivators to understand and work around a river’s fluctuating water levels, the rise and fall of which shapes local ecologies, climate and the growing season.

    This paper/presentation investigates the practices of riverbank gardeners in urbanizing monsoon landscapes as one way to understand changes to beneficial flooding as related to both climate change and the multifaceted processes and impacts of urbanization. I draw on a framework that emphasizes the historical emergence of such practices, their contemporary challenges, and the role of everyday people in their management. Drawing three examples together, I argue that examination of these gardeners’ practices and strategies of ‘resourcefulness’ reveal the work of individuals and institutions governing overlooked in-between spaces—which might otherwise be described as ‘un-governed’ or ‘ungovernable’—in everyday practice. I argue that these spaces are being adaptively managed and governed by local residents, in connection with municipal (and other) authorities.

    Vanessa Lamb is postdoctoral researcher with the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA) project and is an affiliated researcher with the York Centre for Asian Research, York University (Toronto, Canada). She has worked and conducted research in Southeast Asia on natural resource access for the past 10 years. Dr. Lamb completed her dissertation, Ecologies of Rule and Resistance, focused on the politics of ecological knowledge and development of the Salween River at York University’s Department of Geography. She was recently awarded an ASEAN-Canada Junior Fellowship for continued Research on water politics and transboundary environmental governance in Southeast Asia. Dr. Lamb is also the lead PI for a new CGIAR WLE Greater Mekong project on water governance titled: Matching policies, institutions and practices of water governance in the Salween-Thanlwin-Nu River Basin: Towards inclusive, informed, and accountable water governance.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Vanessa Lamb
    UCRSEA Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 24th How to Dodge the Draft and Make it as a Pirate in the Ming: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 24, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    The near universality of armies in states makes the military a productive site to explore the interaction of states and their subjects. The hereditary military households of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) have left us records of their elaborate strategies to optimize their obligations to provide manpower to the army. Though the men of these households were charged with preventing illegal overseas trade and piracy, many of them engaged in the very activities they were supposed to suppress. The key to resolving this apparent paradox lies in seeing the state institution not simply as a response to illegal activities but the two as mutually constitutive of one another. By looking at the range of strategies pursued by hereditary military households to deal with the institutions that shaped but did not determine their lives, this lecture will aim to develop a theory of everyday politics in the Ming, and beyond.

    Michael Szonyi is Professor of Chinese History and Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. His books include Practicing Kinship: Lineage and Descent in Late Imperial China, Cold War Island: Quemoy on the Frontline, and the forthcoming Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese History.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Szonyi
    Professor of Chinese History and Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 31st Conceptualizing the State-Nation via Education Reform: From Multicultural to Intercultural Citizenship

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 31, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Centre for South Asian Studies PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    Nation-state education systems organized to deliver citizenship values fail to rectify the fracture between their quest for multicultural participation versus the promotion of conformity within a single “national” identity. Education reform can only be achieved by substituting the concept of multi-cultural, with inter-cultural citizenship, thereby transforming the nation-state into a pluralist state-nation. The state-nation can facilitate South-South dialogue while promoting alternate notions of “modernity,” “development,” and “globalization.” De-linking education from the nation-state, creates the potential for a greater “reform” and “education” from a social justice perspective.

    Neville Gustad Panthaki is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Social Justice Education at OISE, whose degree is being pursued in collaboration with CIDE (Comparative International Development Education) and South Asian Studies.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Neville Panthaki
    Doctoral Candidate, Department of Social Justice Education at OISE, in collaboration with Comparative International Development Education and South Asian Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2016

  • Friday, April 8th Third World Internationalism in the Peking Opera On the Dock

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 8, 20161:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Cosmopolitanism based on the Cold War rhetoric of development denies the third world nations their rights to self-determination. In contrast, internationalism expresses a shared democratic aspiration for national autonomy, self-directed ways of life, and solidarity among working people of the world. This talk will illustrate the political distance between capitalist cosmopolitanism and third world internationalism by reading the Peking Opera On the Dock (海港Haigang 1972). The opera focuses on the Shanghai dock as a locus of an unfinished drama extending from memories of colonial oppression to the scenes of empowered workers as the masters of the Shanghai dock. It offers an image of international assistance and trade, with cargos bound for the vast continents in the global South. The motifs of internationalism, socialism, and industrial self-management converge in a tightly woven narrative.

    Ban Wang is William Haas Professor in Chinese Studies in East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. He is the author of The Sublime Figure of History, Illuminations from the Past, and History and Memory. He has edited 6 books on Chinese cinema, revolution, socialism, the New Left, and Chinese visions of the world.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ban Wang
    Stanford University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 8th In Search of Our Frontier: Racial Exclusion and Japanese Settler Colonialism in the Transpacific Triangle of the American West, Northern Australia, and Colonial Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 8, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The history of early Japanese America was deeply intertwined with that of Japanese imperialism even though a spatially-organized way of scholarly research has rendered the two histories almost completely separate. Inspired by the success of Anglo Saxon colonialism in its settler societies, the first group of self-styled Japanese “frontiersmen” congregated in California and its vicinity between the mid-1880s and the 1910s, regarding their own agrarian colonization and settlement in the New World frontier to be an integral part of Japan’s “overseas development.” This paper sketches out the transpacific mobility of those resettlers, who refashioned their identity as “pioneers of overseas Japanese development” in various parts of the Asia-Pacific region from the 1890s on after race-based exclusion from white settler societies of North America.

    Eiichiro Azuma is Alan Charles Kors Term Chair Associate Professor of History and Director of Asian American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Between Two Empires: Race, History, and Transnationalism in Japanese America (Oxford, 2005) and a co-editor of Yuji Ichioka, Before Internment: Essays in Prewar Japanese American History (Stanford, 2006) and the Oxford Handbook of Asian American History (Oxford, 2016). He has a number of peer-reviewed articles in academic journals, including the Journal of American History, Journal of Asian Studies, and Pacific Historical Review.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eiichiro Azuma
    Associate Professor of History and Director of Asian American Studies, University of Pennsylvania


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2016

  • Friday, June 10th Taiwan Studies in Trans* Perspectives: Transdisciplinary, Transnational, and Transcultural

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 10, 20169:00AM - 5:00PMUniversity of Toronto, Canada
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    Series

    North American Taiwan Studies Annual Conference

    Description

    We are pleased to announce that the 22nd North American Taiwan Studies Association (NATSA) Annual Conference will be held from June 10-11, 2016. This year’s conference, titled “Taiwan Studies in Trans* Perspectives: Transdisciplinary, Transnational, and Transcultural,” welcomes scholars interested in studying Taiwan from all disciplines and explores how Taiwan—as a case, a theory, or even a method—can further transform current knowledge constructs toward an inclusive global vision.

    Trans*, used in transgender studies as an umbrella term to include individuals seeking gender identities within and beyond the traditional male-female dichotomy, sheds light on an insightful and radical approach to Taiwan Studies. The asterisk in trans*, originating from computer science, serves as a wildcard character that stands for any words starting with trans, and symbolizes the openness and inclusiveness of the transdisciplinary community of Taiwan Studies. In line with this inclusive spirit, Trans* opens up new approaches to encourage scholars of Taiwan Studies to boldly transgress disciplinary boundaries and cull perspectives from various intellectual communities.

    Of all the relevant trans* themes in this conference, participants are encouraged, but not limited, to set transdisciplinarity, transnationality, and transculturalism as a point of reference. Transdiciplinarity is not only a series of cross-disciplinary activities but also a transformation among contexts and the transcendence of multiple disciplines to create innovative context-based theories. Taiwan Studies from a transdisciplinary perspective offers a lens for researchers to examine, discuss, and understand issues in multiple contexts. Transnationality both emphasizes and questions the existence of universal values or a one-size-fits-all nation-state theory. It not only digs out the diversity derived from the uniqueness of local contexts, but also tries to clarify the imbalanced power structure among the units. Transculturalism, a theoretical concept that seeks to break the boundaries between different communal, cultural, societal, and national sectors. Additionally, a new framework is established in which participants are understood not as members exclusively belonging to particular groups but as constantly crossing categorical boundaries in a search for self-identity.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    North American Taiwan Studies Association

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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