Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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April 2015

  • Monday, April 27th The Sun Sets Over the Planning Commission: Where is India's Economic Policy Headed?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 27, 20155:00PM - 7:30PMFleck Atrium (Ground floor, North Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
    105 St George Street, Toronto
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    Description

    No fee – all are welcome. Pre-registration online by noon on April 27 is mandatory.To register for this event, please go to:

    http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/april27/

    SPEAKERS:
    Kant Bhargava, former Diplomat and former South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation Secretary General (India)
    Richard Bird, Senior Fellow of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance and Professor Emeritus, Economics, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    Sanjay Reddy, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, New School University, United States
    Mitu Sengupta, Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
    MODERATOR: Dilip Soman, Director, India Innovation Institute, Behavioural Economics in Action, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    The Indian Planning Commission was one of India’s leading public economic institutions. While the Commission was largely seen as a legacy of the socialist period, it also played an important role in providing legitimacy to the country’s federal framework and guided the economic and political dimension of the relationship between the Central Government and states. The dissolution of the Planning Commission by the present government in New Delhi and its replacement by the Niti Aayog thus raises some important questions for economic policy. Join our panel as they will provide an overview and update of the situation as well as tackle the following questions:

    1) Will the quasi constitutional Finance Commission now play a greater role in the fiscal relationship between the states and the Central Government? And what do the changes mean for relations between New Delhi and the states?
    2) Will the Niti Aayog continue to liaise with civil society and individual economists who were consulted by the Planning Commission on social expenditures?
    3) What does the dissolution of the Planning Commission mean for the future policy trajectory of Indian economic development and the Federal Structure of the political system?

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972

    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    India Innovation Institute Speaker Series, University of Toronto

    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Monday, May 4th Buddhism, religious affiliation and social visibility in contemporary Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This presentation addresses the contemporary ambition of Buddhist actors and institutions to redefine and affirm their place in South Korean society. On the basis of ethnographical and sociological data, it presents how Buddhist temples in Seoul have undertaken massive development projects and broadened their activities in order to adapt to the population’s demands and to promote a formal religious adhesion both on individual and collective basis. In a context of strong concurrence among religious groups, and especially between Buddhist temples and Protestant churches, many Buddhist leaders aim at strengthening their religious denomination by developing a more “conscious”, “proud” and “collective” affiliation among the believers, with the explicit aim that religiously educated and socialized Buddhists would contribute to represent Buddhism in society and subsequently to its influence. By analyzing this phenomenon, this paper will explore the ambivalent relationship of Buddhism with the Protestant “megachurch” model and the new positioning of temples in Seoul.

    Florence Galmiche’s research interest lies in examining the place and roles of religion in contemporary Korean society. She received her Ph.D in sociology at the EHESS in 2011 with a dissertation on urban Buddhism in South Korea. She is now maître de conférence (associate professor) in Korean Studies at the University Diderot-Paris 7. She is a member of the research units CESSMA (Centre d’études en sciences sociales sur les mondes africains, américains et asiatiques) and CCJ (Chine, Corée, Japon).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Florence Galmiche
    Associate Professor, Korean Studies, University Diderot-Paris 7


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, May 16th – Sunday, May 17th The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA)

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 16, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Sunday, May 17, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA),

    This is an international festival with a difference, truly reflecting the diversity of Toronto. Over 30 writers from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Tanzania, and of course all across Canada will be present. Saturday night dance performance by Hari Krishan and InDance. African guitar by Tichaona Maradze. There will be panels on a variety of subjects, including New Theatre in Canada, East Asian Writing, South Asian Writing, Writing in Languages Other than English.

    Admission is free except for the Saturday night event. It is advisable but not essential to pre-register.

    The event runs May 15-17, 2015, for more information and the full program click the link below.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 19th Reparations and the Human

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 19, 20153:00PM - 5:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100
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    Description

    This presentation comes from his forthcoming book, Reparations and the Human, which investigates the problem of reparations and human rights in Cold War Asia. Following the devastating violence of World War II, an emerging discourse of reparations and human rights sought to articulate new precepts against state harm of individuals. Traditionally, reparations could be claimed by one state from another as compensation for the “costs of war.” For the first time, however, the idea of reparations was extended to encompass individual and group claims for redress for state-sponsored violence in the name of human rights and in the interests of protecting the sanctity of human life.

    His approach to the topic is fundamentally interdisciplinary. Reparation is a key term in political theory, but it is also a central concept in psychoanalysis specifically, object relations yet the two are rarely discussed in relation to one another. Reparations and the Human focuses on unexamined links between political and psychic genealogies of reparation in order to explore the possibilities and limits of repairing the injuries of war, violence, and colonialism in the Transpacific region. Here, he investigate three interlocking events: the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ending that war; and contemporary legal claims of “Comfort Women,” girls and women conscripted by the Japanese Imperial Army into sexual slavery.

    From this larger perspective, he analyzes the postwar ascension of reparations and human rights not only as a moral response to but also, and indeed, as a form of continued state violence.

    In this talk, he focuses specifically on the afterword to his book, “Absolute Apology, Absolute Forgiveness,” which explores the history of uranium mining and “Little Boy,” the atomic bomb detonated by the U.S. military over Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Much of the world¹s uranium supply is mined from indigenous lands, and the uranium for Little Boy, too, came in part from the lands of the Sahtu Dene, an indigenous people in Great Bear Lake, Canada. Ignorant at the time of how their mining efforts would be applied and the destination of the ore, the Sahtu Dene nonetheless felt implicated once they learned of Hiroshima¹s fate. In response to the disaster, they sent a delegation to Hiroshima to apologize. He will discuss the Sahtu Dene’s response to the atomic bombing in order to propose an alternate concept for reparations and the human. Here, he extends Jacques Derrida¹s notion of “absolute forgiveness” to develop a corollary concept: “absolute apology.”
    David L. Eng is Richard L. Fisher Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also Professor in the Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory and the Program in Asian American Studies.

    Eng is author of The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy (Duke, 2010) and Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Duke, 2001). He is co-editor with David Kazanjian of Loss: The Politics of Mourning (California, 2003) and with Alice Y. Hom of Q & A: Queer in Asian America (Temple, 1998). In addition, he is co-editor of two special issues of the journal Social Text: with Teemu Ruskola and Shuang Shen, “China and the Human” (2011/2012), and with Judith Halberstam and José Esteben Muñoz, “What’s Queer about Queer Studies Now?” (2005). His current book project, Reparations and the Human, investigates the relationship between political and psychic genealogies of reparations in Cold War Asia. Eng is the recipient of research fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and the Mellon Foundation, among others. Last year, he helped to organize a Penn Mellon Sawyer Seminar on “Race, Across Time and Space,” focusing on race as a fungible yet persistent feature of human history and as a global phenomenon with long and diverse histories.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    David Eng
    Professor, University of Pennsylvania


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Geography and Program in Planning (Intersections Speakers Series)

    Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto

    Department of English


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 21st Gala Performance of Asian Canadian Artists:Silk Roads Ii – Mongolia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 21, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College Town Hall
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FESTIVAL 2015

    Opening Address: Mr. Justin Poy, Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI
    “Photographic Images of Magnificent Mongolia” by Dr. Neville Poy and The Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy

    Keynote and Performance:

    “A Rare Instrument From China: Hongkou 箜篌”by Professor Chan Ka Nin
    Hongkou Performance by Liu Xuanyi

    “Magnetic Fields” (An Excerpt) – Contemporary Dance by Yvonne Ng and tiger princess dance projects

    Mongolian Music on Morin Khuur (Horsehead Fiddle) (Tbc) Traditional Mongolian Dances for the Grand Feast Event by Chi‐Ping Dance Group & dancers of Chinese Collective Arts Association

    Middle Eastern Music on 3 Different Instruments: Bouzouki, Oud And Saz by Yiannis Kapoulas

    RECEPTION FOLLOWS
    Free admission, please register at asianheritagecanadian@yahoo.ca.

    Note: Event starts at 7:00 p.m., please be seated by 6.45 p.m.
    Map at http://www.utoronto.ca/townhall/contact.html (St. George Stn)

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI


    Sponsors

    Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 27th Evergreen Tree Film Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 27, 20156:30PM - 8:30AMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
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    Series

    4th Annual Toronto Korean Film Festival 2014

    Description

    Evergreen Tree (상록수)
    SHIN Sang-ok | Classics, Drama | 141 min | Korea 1961
    CANADIAN PREMIERE

    Korean language finds itself strangled under Japanese colonial rule during the 1930s. Lack of education and will to progress plagues those living in the more rural areas of the peninsula. A story about two lovers and a goal to promote education amid political suppression, ‘Evergreen Tree’ was directed by the legendary Shin Sang-ok and is based on the 1935 novel of the same name by prolific screenwriter Shim Hoon.

    *There will be a post-screening discussion and Q&A session with Janet Poole, author of the book ‘When The Future Disappears’ and Professor in the East Asian Studies Department at the Centre For The Study of Korea, University of Toronto

    For more information visit the website below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Janet Poole
    Associate Professor, Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Department of East Asian Studies Affiliated Faculty


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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