Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

September 2017

  • Thursday, September 7th Gender, Migration and the Work of Care: Student presentations

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 7, 20171:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event showcases the work of student Interns and Research Assistants connected to the Partnership Project entitled Gender, Migration and the Work of Care, Principal Investigator Ito Peng. A presentation and discussion of policy options and recommendations for:
    – Home Care Models and Worker Registries
    – The Role of Immigration and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program
    – Better Immigrant Access to Care

    Video screening and discussion: Help Them Care, Make it Fair: New Organizing Strategies
    Presenters: Chelsey Legge, Lina Pulido, Alexandra Pileggi, Katerina Kalenteridis (SPPG Interns)
    Joshua Rodriguez, Sarah lima, Melissa Nicholls, Bastian Leones (RAs)

    From the SSHRC funded Partnership Project

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Deanna Pikkov
    Research Associate at the Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 12th A Journey for Love and Pride

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 12, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In a world before smart phones and social media, before there was human rights protection for lesbians and gays, before same sex marriage, Alan Li, a gay Asian teenager moved from Hong Kong to Canada in search for love and belonging. Amidst a world full of homophobia, racism and xenophobia, his pursuit took him onto pathways with many unexpected twists and turns, in his native and adopted countries; overcoming many challenges, and building many rewarding connections and relationships. The journey led to many inspiring experiences, including: practicing medicine in the oldest and poorest public housing neighborhood, leading Toronto gay pride parade through Chinatown, providing palliative care to his best friend who died of AIDS, becoming the first openly gay person to lead a national Chinese Canadian organization, mobilizing diverse racialized groups to fight against homophobic media, finding romance and sustaining long distance relationship before internet, fighting legislated racism with redress campaign for Chinese head tax and Exclusion Act, building the largest HIV/AIDS service organization serving Asian Canadians, founding the first public gay organization in Hong Kong and building a transformative network advocating for access and rights of immigrants and refugees living with HIV/AIDS.
    Through his sharing with images and narratives of historic events and pivotal moments both personal and societal, Alan will reflect on his life journey and the complex pathways and connections that supported his nearly four decades of experiences in building chosen families and communities in the quest for love and pride.

    Dr. Alan Li immigrated from Hong Kong at age 16. Since the 1980s, through his work as physician at Regent Park Community Health Centre and his many community connections, Alan has integrated his personal, professional and community work with many diverse marginalized communities and taken on roles as physician, community organizer, capacity builder, researcher and advocate to advance access and rights many issues related to immigrants and refugees, racial and sexual minorities, HIV/AIDS, and mental health. He has co-founded and played key leadership roles in many pioneering social justice and community service organizations, including as chair of Gay Asians Toronto, as National President of the Chinese Canadian National Council, the Hong Kong10% Club, Asian Community AIDS Services, and the Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Emily Hertzman
    Chair
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Dr. Alan Li
    Speaker


    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 14th On the Muslim Question: Assimilation and Sacrificial Citizenship

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 14, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture considers the preponderance of cultural and political concern with the assimilation of Muslim minorities primarily in the US, but also in Europe. Such an emphasis on producing “good Muslims” comes from both the right and the left, and in the discussions on assimilation there is little talk of the forms of being that have to be given up, renounced, or sacrificed for the sake of assimilation. The putative promise of assimilation is that the state would extend its protections to the assimilated subject, protecting assimilated Muslims from exposure to violence. And yet the sacrifice demanded of minority subjects happens in a political and economic climate of neoliberal rationality. How might sacrifice as a historical and social problematic help us to analyze the renewed emphasis on Muslim assimilation?

    Zahid Chaudhary, Associate Professor of English, Princeton University. Chaudhary specializes in postcolonial studies, visual culture and critical theory, and is the author of Afterimage of Empire: Photography in Nineteenth-Century India.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Zahid Chaudhary
    Associate Professor, Department of English, Princeton University Author of Afterimage of Empire: Photography in Nineteenth-Century India


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Deprtment of Historical Studies, UTM


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 15th Aurangzeb: Writing about the most hated man in Indian history and becoming hated myself

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In twenty first-century India, Aurangzeb Alamgir—the sixth ruler of the Mughal empire who reigned from 1658 until 1707—is relentlessly vilified in the media, politics, and popular culture. Common opinion, bolstered by a divisive Hindu nationalist agenda, pillories Aurangzeb as a callous Islamist oppressor who despised everything about India, especially Hindus. This unrelenting myth of Aurangzeb as a cruel Islamist tyrant is bad history, but it is a difficult—even dangerous—mythology to challenge, as I have learned first-hand from the aftermath of publishing a short biography of Aurangzeb Alamgir.
    In this talk, I present a core contention of my Aurangzeb book, namely that, far from being motivated by Islamic orthodoxy or hatred of Hindus, Aurangzeb’s actions are better explained by his vision of justice. I then explore the backlash to my Aurangzeb book and its key arguments, ending by commenting more broadly on how historians ought to respond and, in some cases, must respond to non-academic objections to their work.
    Audrey Truschke is Assistant Professor of South Asian History at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. She is the author of Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court (Columbia University Press, 2016) and, most recently, Aurangzeb: The Life and Legacy of India’s Most Controversial King (Stanford University Press, 2017).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Karen Ruffle
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Audrey Tuschke
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of South Asian History, Rutgers University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 18th Reading North Korean Wartime Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 18, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    North Korean wartime literature has never been valued highly by literary scholars. The lack of literary qualities in these wartime stories have deterred many from looking more seriously at this type of literature as its heroes, seemingly without any obstacles in their way, defeat the enemy and attain victory. Add this to the subservient role literature plays in North Korea and the worship of its leaders, and it is obvious why one would shy away from analysing these texts.

    However, even under such conditions of prescribed rules and top-down directives, the writer still needs to imbue the story with sufficient literary qualities to make it interesting to its readers. This is because the author is still constrained by the fact that the novel should not stray too far from reality or else the reader will not be persuaded. The author, therefore, also needs to address issues that are politically and socially sensitive in society. Condemnation of these issues in itself is not enough: to make an ideological claim the issue needs to be foregrounded, and the author must give a satisfactory interpretation of the issue.

    This led to the creation of quite interesting propaganda literature in wartime North Korea: The characters are imbued with heroic but down-to-earth characteristics that portray both the wartime experiences of North Korean soldiers and citizens, but also gives expression to North Korea’s wartime concerns.

    Jerôme de Wit is Professor in the Korean Studies department at the University of Tübingen, Germany. He is a specialist on North and South Korean Wartime Literature and modern Korean culture. His research interest in Korean culture is focused on public discourses concerning history and society and how cultural sources can provide us with different viewpoints on debates such as nationalism, identity, and history. His recent projects deal with such topics as post-colonialism in contemporary South Korean alternate history novels, and a study on the representation and changes in identity in the literature and movies of ethnic Koreans in China.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jerome de Wit
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Korean Studies, University of Tubingen

    Janet Poole
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 19th Asia's Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 19, 20171:30PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Richard McGregor’s Asia’s Reckoning is a compelling account of the widening geopolitical cracks in a region that has flourished under an American security umbrella for more than half a century. The toxic rivalry between China and Japan, two Asian giants consumed with endless history wars and ruled by entrenched political dynasties, is threatening to upend the peace underwritten by Pax Americana since World War II. Combined with Donald Trump’s disdain for America’s old alliances and China’s own regional ambitions, east Asia is entering a new era of instability and conflict. If the United States laid the postwar foundations for modern Asia, now the anchor of the global economy, Asia’s Reckoning reveals how that structure is falling apart.

    With unrivaled access to archives in the United States and Asia, as well as to many of the major players in all three countries, Richard McGregor has written a tale that blends the tectonic shifts in diplomacy with bitter domestic politics and the personalities driving them. It is a story not only of an overstretched America, but also of the rise and fall and rise of the great powers of Asia. The about-turn of Japan—from a colossus seemingly poised for world domination to a nation in inexorable decline in the space of two decades—has few parallels in modern history, as does the rapid rise of China—a country whose military is now larger than those of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and southeast Asia’s combined.

    The confrontational course on which China and Japan are set is no simple spat between neighbors: the United States would be involved on the side of Japan in any military conflict between the two countries. The fallout would be an economic tsunami, affecting manufacturing centers, trade routes, and political capitals on every continent. Richard McGregor’s book takes us behind the headlines of his years reporting to show how American power will stand or fall on its ability to hold its ground in Asia.

    Richard McGregor is an award-winning journalist and author with unrivalled experience in reporting on the top-level politics and economies of east Asia, primarily China and Japan, and also in Washington on national security issues.He was the Financial Times bureau chief in Beijing and Shanghai between 2000 and 2009, and headed the Washington office for four years from 2011. His book on the Chinese Communist Party published in 2010, ‘The Party’, was called a “masterpiece” by The Economist and won numerous awards in the US and overseas, including the Asia Society in New York award in 2011 for best book on Asia.A new book, on Sino-Japanese relations and the fate of US power in east Asia, tentatively titled “Asia’s Reckoning”, is due out in September, 2017, through Viking Press in the US, Penguin in the UK, and in Chinese and Japanese editions in Asia.He was a fellow at the Wilson Center in 2015 and a visiting scholar at the Sigur Center at George Washington University in 2016. McGregor has lectured widely, in the US and elsewhere, on Chinese politics and Asia.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Richard McGregor
    Speaker
    Journalist, Writer and Author

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Louis Pauly
    Discussant
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 20th Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 20, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My presentation reframes the history and logic of settler colonial capitalism through a focus on Asian racialization in Canada and the US. Drawing on an archive of Asian North American visual culture, I argue that the historical alignment of Asian bodies and labor with capital’s abstract and negative dimensions became one of settler colonialism’s defining features. My focus on the economic modalities of Asian racialized labor attempts to push beyond existing approaches to settler colonialism as a Native/settler binary to formulate it as a dynamic triangulation of Native, settler, and alien populations and positionalities.

    Iyko Day is an associate professor of English at Mount Holyoke College, chair of the Program in Critical Social Thought, and co-chair of the Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program. She is the author of Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism (Duke, 2016).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Iyko Day
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English, Mount Holyoke College

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Grandparent Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20171:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This is a presentation of the results of the first cohort of students participating in The Grandparent Project: Inter-generational Conversations about Family, Mobility and Identity. Student members of the Asian Pathways Research Lab present their final projects, which combine oral histories of mobility from, between and within Asia and Canada, with their own personal reflections.

    The students working on this project have been investigating, in greater detail, the mobility histories and practices within their own families in order to reflect on how their own pathways are both similar and different from those of older generations.

    The stories present encourage new kinds of inter-generational conversations about the changing meanings of home, belonging, mobility, identity, diaspora and citizenship.

    The event will be structured as a literary short story reading, and copies of our inaugural publication Pathways will be distributed at the event.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 22nd Dismantling Japanese Developmentalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMMassey College
    University of Toronto
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Abstract

    Japan’s combination of economic success and conservative dominance from the 1950s into the early 1990s was the consequence of what Pempel calls “developmentalism.” The term involves more than the well-studied ‘developmental state.’ Most particularly, the Japanese success story relied on a specific and unusual socio-economic alignment; a positive sum relationship between state direction and corporate creativity; and Japan’s Cold War security and economic partnership with the United States. The combination unleashed a positive cycle of economic development and conservative political strength.

    Japan’s positive cycle was challenged by two external changes: first, the breakdown in diplomatic and security bipolarity that began with the Nixon visits to China and the Deng economic reforms; and second, the challenges from increased power of global finance and multinational production networks. These external global shifts undercut the Japan’s prevailing model and opened the challenge to find a suitable substitute. That search has continued for over twenty years resulting in some successes and many false starts. Professor Pempel’s talk will examine the relationship between this more complete understanding of developmentalism as the roots of Japan’s early successes and the subsequent difficulties of finding its adequate replacement.

    Biographical Sketch

    T.J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on Japan’s political economy, economic and security issues in East Asia, and Asian regionalism. His most recent book with Keiichi Tsunekawa is “Two Crises, Different Outcomes: East Asia and Global Finance” (Cornell University Press).

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    T. J. Pempel
    Speaker
    Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th The Cultural Contexts of Indigeneity in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the past century, ‘indigenous’ as a political concept has become internationalized and, more recently, has risen in vogue as environmental protection movements worldwide are increasingly framed as Indigenous resistance to the enduring ills of settler colonialism. However, despite its trendiness, ‘indigeneity’ remains poorly defined, historically contingent, and the answers to its most basic questions (such as ‘who is Indigenous?’) remain in flux. In Southeast Asia, both Western and internal colonialism have been instrumental in the legal and political construction of Indigeneity and its application to specific populations. Meanwhile, Indigenous concepts of indigeneity typically diverge widely from State definitions, especially where territorial sovereignty is at stake. Drawing on my field research in the Philippines (and the work of others in Southeast Asia), I will discuss the cultural and political conundrums perpetuated by this nebulous term, and why grappling with ‘Indigeneity’ – as well as pondering its future – matters more than ever today.

    OONA PAREDES is Assistant Professor in the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, and is the author of A Mountain of Difference: The Lumad in Early Colonial Mindanao (Cornell SEAP, 2013).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Oona Paredes
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, National University of Singapore Inaugural Strom Visiting Professor

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th "Lazy Japanese" and "Degraded Koreans": Does Culture Matter in Explaining Economic Development?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMUniversity College, room 179
    15 King's College Circle
    Toronto, M5S3H7
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    Description

    Culture has been frequently mentioned as an explanation for Asian successes in economic development. Typical is the comment by Samuel Huntington, the author of the controversial book, The Clash of Civilisations, offered as an explanation of the economic divergence between South Korea and Ghana, two countries that were at similar levels of economic development in the 1960s, argued: “Undoubtedly, many factors played a role, but ... culture had to be a large part of the explanation. South Koreans valued thrift, investment, hard work, education, organisation, and discipline. Ghanaians had different values. In short, cultures count”.
    In this talk, Ha-Joon Chang will argue that those arguments trying to explain international differences in economic development in terms of cultural differences are often ignorant, usually fail to take a dynamic view of culture, and are invariably based on simplistic theories.

    Professor Ha-Joon Chang is the economist at the University of Cambridge. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, he has published 16 authored books (five co-authored) and 10 edited books. His main books include The Political Economy of Industrial Policy (Palgrave Macmillan UK, 1996), Kicking Away the Ladder (Anthem Pr, 2002), Bad Samaritans (Bloomsbury Press, 2009), 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (Bloomsbury Press, 2012), and Economics: The User’s Guide (Bloomsbury Press, 2014). By 2018, his writings will have been translated and published in 41 languages and 44 countries. Worldwide, his books have sold 2 million copies. He is the winner of the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize and the 2005 Wassily Leontief Prize. He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ha-Joon Chang
    Speaker
    Economist & Author Reader, Department of Political Economy of Development, University of Cambridge

    Paul Kingston
    Chair
    Director, Political Science and IDS, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Critical Development Studies, UTSC

    Department of Political Science, UTSG


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2017

  • Tuesday, October 3rd U. S. Economic Strategy in Asia in the Trump Era: From Pivot to About-Face?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 3, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2016, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies began preparation of a brief for the next U.S. Administration on what the American strategy should be. President Obama talked about a “Pivot to Asia” and championed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). With incoming President Trump’s announcement that the USA would be withdrawing from TPP negotiations, that strategy needed an update. Join the co-author of the CSIS report “Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific: Recommendations for the Incoming Administration”, Scott Miller, as he brings us up to date on the U.S. economic agenda in Asia, and how Congress is looking at trade negotiations in the post-TPP era.

    Scott Miller has been a senior adviser and the William M. Scholl Chair in International Business at CSIS since 2012. The Scholl Chair focuses on key issues in the global economy, such as international trade, investment, competitiveness, and innovation. He has led many campaigns supporting U.S. free trade agreements and has been a contributor to U.S. trade and investment policy over many years. Mr. Miller advised the U.S. government as a liaison to the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiations, and he is a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy. He was the founding chairman of the Department of Commerce’s Industry Trade Advisory Committee (ITAC) Investment Working Group. He is one of the authors of the CSIS report Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific https://www.csis.org/events/reinvigorating-us-economic-strategy-asia-pacific>


    Speakers

    Scott Miller
    Senior Advisor and Scholl Chair in International Business, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Finding the Third Way

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Raised in a Buddhist household, “the Third Way” describes the path that Kristyn Wong-Tam has found to lead to move forward in new and challenging projects. As a queer, Asian woman, who left home as a teenager, she has forged a path to becoming a successful entrepreneur, realtor, community activist, and now politician. In each stage of her life, she has utilized the principles of finding a Third Way to develop creative solutions to complex problems. Leading with values of social justice and equity, she will share her experiences of bringing people together to find collaborative, community-responsive solutions to many challenges facing Toronto residents.

    Kristyn Wong-Tam is Toronto’s only openly gay, racialized City Councillor. She was elected in 2010 and has been a champion for social justice, equity. She has championed the development of Gender-Responsive Budgeting at the Municipal level, Toronto’s first LGBTQ youth shelters, and initialized comprehensive, sustainable planning policies in the downtown. She has led the way in ensuring Toronto’s downtown communities are liveable and sustainable for all residents.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 926-8996


    Speakers

    Emily Hertzman
    Moderator
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Councillor Kristyn Wong -Tam
    Speaker


    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Following the capitalist crisis in 1997/98, Indonesia’s economic and political reforms led to increased incorporation into global capitalism. This paper examines three major issues related to such capitalist development after reformasi. First, the motor behind the development of capitalism is a remarkable exploitation of labor. Second, the accumulation of capital through land-based industries has seriously assaulted the mass of independent poor producers. Third, evidence indicates that the appropriation of nature has become the underlying feature of capitalist development. In response to such development there is a growing anti-capitalist movement in the country. Thus this paper also examines the anti-capitalist tendencies in the country. I will restrict my attention to two major tendencies among Indonesian activists today. The first is “reformist anti-capitalist” activists who advocate for a more regulated capitalism and demand a role for the state in regulating the market. The second is “revolutionary anti-capitalist” activists, whose concerns go beyond reforms to the capitalist system.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arianto Sangadji
    Speaker
    Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Programme in Geography, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 26th Igniting the Internet: South Korea’s Internet-Born Protests and Popular Politics, 2002 to 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 26, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In late 2016, South Korea saw a series of Internet-born street protests demanding that then-President Park Geun-hye step down, eventually leading to her impeachment in March of 2017. These candlelight protests were only the newest iteration of the youth-driven candlelight protest that originated online in 2002, which has now become a standard repertoire for activism. Drawing on Kang’s recent book Igniting the Internet (2016), this presentation attends to the cultural dynamics that allowed the Internet to so rapidly bring issues to public attention and exert influence on South Korea’s domestic and international politics. Kang will discuss the cultural dynamics of online politics and media-driven popular politics, situating them in the legacies of South Korea’s authoritarian and post-authoritarian eras. This presentation will consider the interplay among local historical context, structural variation across different societies, and the role of chance in the dynamics of mass movements and the “cultural ignition process”—speculating about the future of Internet-driven youth activism in South Korea and beyond.

    Jiyeon Kang is an associate professor of Communication Studies and Korean Studies at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include South Korean social movements, Internet activism, youth culture, globalization, and the mobility of Asian university students.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jiyeon Kang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Communication and Korean Studies, University of Iowa

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2017

  • Monday, November 13th Transnational Domesticity in the Making of Modern Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Modern domesticity in colonial-era Korea has generally been understood using the twin parameters of nationalism and colonialism. Much less attention has been paid to the impact of a transpacific network, mainly between the US and Korea through the Christian missionary societies, on the formation of modern domesticity before, during and after Japanese colonial rule. In this presentation, I examine the ways in which Korea’s modern domesticity was shaped by not only Japanese colonial policies but also the notion of modernity that was transmitted, reinterpreted and performed through the transpacific network that had formed among the Korean elite and American missionaries. Taking the idea of “modern home” as a key locus where national, colonial and missionary projects converged, I demonstrate how the intimate private sphere was rendered as one of the most dynamic sites for uncovering the confluence of interaction between the local, the national and the global.

    Hyaeweol Choi is Professor of Korean Studies at the Australian National University. Her research interests are in the areas of gender history, religion, and transnational studies. She is the author of Gender and Mission Encounters in Korea: New Women, Old Ways and New Women in Colonial Korea: A Sourcebook among others.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hyaeweol Choi
    Speaker
    Professor Korean Studies, Australian National University

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2017

  • Friday, December 8th At the Geographic Limits of Discipline: The Japanese Empire and Indigeneity in Colonial Taiwan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In Michel Foucault’s terminology, the “disciplinary society” is produced by and in turn sustains the institutions that constitute individuals as subjects and objects of dispersed power. In colonial Taiwan (1895-1945), deficit spending on land-surveys, rentier-capitalist buy-outs, and “bandit eradication” established the foundations for disciplinary society in the densely populated areas of the island. However, in what became Taiwan’s indigenous territories, the costs of building an infrastructure (including schools, courts, prisons, hospitals, banks) that could produce self-policing surplus-surrendering modern “individuals” outstripped returns on investment. Therefore, indigenous peoples would be ruled on-the-cheap, as members of units through appointed intermediaries and beat-cops in the interwar years. During this period, a concatenation of ethnological, touristic, literary, and iconographic initiatives from the Japanese side, met with cultural entrepreneurialism from the indigenous side, to produce the durable and spatially containerized ethnic groups known as “Atayal,” “Bunun,” “Paiwan,” “Tsou,” “Saisyat,” “Amis,” “Rukai,” and “Tao” (Taiwan Indigenous Peoples) today.

    Paul D. Barclay teaches East Asian history at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the general editor of the digital repository East Asia Image Collection (http://digital.lafayette.edu/collections/eastasia) and author of numerous articles, reviews, and book chapters on Japanese colonialism. His book-length study on the history of Japanese-Taiwan Indigenous Peoples relations from 1873 to 1945 will be published by the University of California Press in fall, 2017. Barclay’s research has received support from the National Endowment from the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the Japanese Council for the Promotion of Science, and the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul D. Barclay
    Speaker
    Chair, Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of History

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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