Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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November 2014

  • Friday, November 28th Multispecies Infrastructure: Infrastructural Inversion and Involutionary Entanglements in the Chao Phraya Delta, Thailand

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific; Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The focus of this talk is a rather strange relationship between rice, water management infrastructure and farmers in the Chao Phraya Delta in Thailand. Floating rice is a type of rice that has the ability to grow its stem rapidly, keeping pace with the rise of the floodwater. Since the 1970s, the role of floating rice in water management infrastructure in the Chao Phraya Delta has increasingly attracted attention from government officials, area studies scholars and hydrologists. Morita will argue that this particular interspecies relation facilitates a reconsideration of the notion of infrastructure and its relationship with nature. Operating in the background of everyday activities, infrastructures often remain largely invisible to the actors that rely on them. However, unusual events such as breakdowns and accidents bring about what STS scholars have denoted “infrastructural inversion”, in which the workings of infrastructure become highly visible to people. In moments of infrastructural inversion, it has often become apparent that the water management infrastructure of the Chao Phraya Delta is entangled with floating rice cultivation. By following the travels of people, ideas and technologies, this talk traces how the concerned parties have delineated this multispecies infrastructure in moments of infrastructural inversion in partly overlapping and partly divergent ways. At the core of this multispecies infrastructure is an involutionary relation between farmers and rice species. In this relationship the care of farmers and the unpredictable variation of rice create a condition for the development and constant variation of divergent but mutually dependent ways of life in the watery environment of the delta.

    Atsuro Morita teaches anthropology at Osaka University. He has done ethnographic research on technology development in Thailand focusing on how ideas, artifacts and people travel in and out Thailand. In his recent research on Environmental Infrastructures (funded by Japan Society for Promotion of Science), he studies the co-existence of heterogeneous components–including cosmological, scientific and multispecies ones–of water management infrastructures in the Chao Phraya Delta. The Environmental Infrastructures project (http://eiam.hus.osaka-u.ac.jp) is an international project based on collaboration between Japanese and Danish scholars, among others. The project is focusing on the intersections of a variety of practices in the making of infrastructures for knowing and managing environmental change.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Atsuro Morita
    Professor of Anthropology, School of Human Sciences, Osaka University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Non-Alignment and Afro-Asianism: The Difficult History of Two Sibling Movements

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Scholars often confuse the Non-Aligned Movement with the Afro-Asianism Movement. Although both were rooted in Nehruvian thinking, they had different, though overlapping, sets of members and goals. In three parts, the current article explores how the movement emerged. From 1946-56, Jawaharlal Nehru conceived the Non-Alignment motion and eventually convinced Iosip Broz Tito and Gamal Abdel Nasser of his ideas. In the five subsequent years, the Yugoslav and Egyptian leaders promoted the ideas of establishing a formal movement. Finally, from 1961 to 1965, during its first four years as a movement,the Non-Alignment struggled and eventually emancipated itself from Afro-Asianism. The article uses archival documents from India, former Yugoslavia, former East Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Australia.

    Lorenz Lüthi is an Associate Professor for the History of International Relations at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. His first book, The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008. The book has been released in a Polish translation by Dialog in Warsaw in 2011; a Chinese translation is in preparation. Lüthi has widely published on the Cold War in East Asia, Sino-Soviet relations, and the Vietnam War. He is currently working a second book project on the regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East. Lüthi’s research has led him to work in archives in China, Australia, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia, Italy, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Lorenz Lüthi
    Associate Professor, History of International Relations, McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2014

  • Wednesday, December 3rd Institutional Design and the Geography of Rural-Urban Water Conflict in Mumbai

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 3, 20142:00PM - 3:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    Water security in metropolitan cities is increasingly important in the developing world. In Mumbai, for example, rapid urban growth has dramatically increased the demand for water, which has resulted in serious consequences for the water entitlements of rural communities located near the sources of water. This presentation focuses on the regional dimensions of water delivery and looks at the role of institutions and the impact of local laws, agencies, and governance on how water is shared between rural and urban areas.

    Bharat Punjabi is the IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow for 2014-15 and is completing his Ph.D. in Geography from Western University in London. His dissertation is on “Canal Bureaucracy: Institutions and the Politics of Inter-Sectoral Water Competition in the Mumbai Region.” His research interests include urban governance and water management in large city-regions in India and Canada.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, December 6th Melodic Harmony: Classic to K-POP 2014 Korea Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, December 6, 20141:00PM - 6:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street West,
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C7
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    Description

    On December 6, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea in partnership with the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto and the University of Toronto Korean Students Association will host the second annual UofT Korea Day. This lively and interactive event is aimed at promoting Korean studies and culture by providing to students, faculty and general Canadian audience, as well as members of the Korean- Canadian society an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of traditional and modern Korean culture. The event features performances by renowned musicians, a Korean cuisine reception, and a K-pop
    contest.

    This year promises to be especially entertaining and educational as the world-renowned Gayageum player Grace Jong Eun Lee joining us for a delightful performance. Gayageum is a traditional Korean instrument with 12 strings with a rich history through time. It is capable of producing the micorotonal ornamentations of pitch and wide vibrato that is common and highly venerated in Korean music.

    The 2014 UofT Korea Day reflects the University of Toronto’s commitment to multiculturalism and diversity, as well as the growing importance of Korean culture in our world today. Please join us for a day of beautiful Gayageum traditional music and moving K-pop performances featuring the talents of skilled musicians

    The schedule of the event:
    12:30pm: Doors Open
    1-3pm: Opening Remarks & Gayageum performance
    3-4pm: Intermission & Korean Cuisine Buffet
    4-6pm: K-Pop Contest & Award Ceremony

    Reserve your tickets at the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Grace Jong Eun Lee
    Composer & Performer, Recipient of Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Award, 2008


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    University of Toronto Korean Students Association (UTKSA)

    Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2015

  • Friday, January 9th When the Future disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 9, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Janet Poole’s When the Future Disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea (Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University). Prof. Poole’s new book takes a panoramic view of Korea’s dynamic literary production in the final decade of Japanese rule, locates the imprint of a new temporal sense in Korean modernism. Such alertness of interruption of time, with no promise of a future, propels Korean literati under the Japanese colonial rule to produce some of the most sophisticated writings of the 20th century modernism.

    Professor Poole teaches Korean literature and cultural history at the University of Toronto and is a a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. She has translated the works of many writers from colonial Korea, including Yi T’aejun’s Eastern Sentiments.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please click on the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Janet Poole
    Associate Professor & Graduate Coordinator, Department of East Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 16th Courtyard Housing and Cultural Sustainability in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 16, 201511:30AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The Chinese have lived in single-extended-family courtyard houses in many parts of China for thousands of years. The earliest courtyard house found in China was during the Middle Neolithic period (5,000-3,000 BCE). However, the 20th century was a significant turning point in the evolution of Chinese courtyard houses. This presentation provides an overview of this transition and evaluates some of its causes. Based on Dr. Zhang’s empirical research and analysis of six multi-household renewed and new courtyard housing experimental projects built in Beijing and Suzhou since the 1990s, she observes that, although the new communal courtyards can facilitate some social interactions, neighborly relations are only partially influenced by the form and space of the courtyard housing, and are perhaps influenced even more so by China’s changing and polarizing society as manifested in these specific residents’ socio-economic levels, housing tenure, modern lifestyles, community involvement, common language, cultural awareness, and demographic backgrounds.

    Dr. Donia Zhang is a graduate of Oxford Brookes University (Barch, MA, PhD) in the UK and Brock University (Med) in Canada. Her area of expertise is in courtyard housing development in China and North America, China’s heritage preservation policies and practices, cultural sustainability, and architectural multiculturalism.

    Donia’s email is doniazhang@gmail.com

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Donia Zhang
    The City Institute, York University


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Nation and Family: Personal Law, Cultural Pluralism, and Gendered Citizenship in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The distinct personal laws that govern the major religious groups are a major aspect of Indian multiculturalism and secularism. States that inherited personal laws reflecting specific cultural norms adopted different approaches to recognition and family regulation. India changed its personal laws less than Turkey and Tunisia, but far more than Algeria, Syria, and Lebanon, and increased women’s rights and individual liberties in certain ways, contrary to the trend in Pakistan, Iran, Sudan, and Nigeria since the 1970s. Moreover, Hindu law was changed earlier and more extensively than the minority laws.

    Ruling elites’ discourses about the nation, its cultural groups, and its traditions interact with the state-society relations that regimes inherit and the projects of regimes to change society. These interactions influence the pattern of multiculturalism, the place of religion in public policy and public life, and forms of family regulation. They led India to introduce moderate yet sustained personal law reforms. Further, the greater engagement of political elites with Hindu initiatives and the predominant place of Hindu motifs in nationalist discourses shaped Indian multiculturalism. They were crucial reasons why policy-makers changed Hindu law far more although support for personal law reform was not clearly higher among Hindus.

    Narendra Subramanian is Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. He studies the politics of nationalism, ethnicity, religion, gender, and race in a comparative perspective, focusing primarily on India. Subramanian’s first book (Ethnicity and Populist Mobilization: Political Parties, Citizens and Democracy in South India, Oxford University Press, 1999) examined why the mobilization of intermediate and lower status groups through discourses of language and caste reinforced democracy and tolerance in Tamil Nadu, southern India. His second book (Nation and Family: Personal Law, Cultural Pluralism, and Gendered Citizenship in India, Stanford University Press, 2014) traced the course of the personal laws that govern family life among India’s major religious groups. He is currently engaged in a project comparing the effects of political rights on the socio-economic status of two historically bonded groups, titled From Bondage to Citizenship: The Enfranchisement and Advancement of Dalits and African-Americans.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Narendra Subramanian
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 28th The Japanese Art of Fascist Modernism: Yasuda Yukihiko’s The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 28, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This presentation investigates The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41) produced by the Japanese-style painter Yasuda Yukihiko. It demonstrates that the painting, which emulates Kamakura-period paintings, depicts medieval warriors, and was displayed at an exhibition that celebrated Japan’s imperial family, significantly contributed to the politicized cultural discourse that espoused the theme of “return to Japan” (Nihon kaiki), which was central to Japan’s wartime ideology. The painting, Asato Ikeda will reveal, clearly drew on pre-modern Japanese pictorial art but it was simultaneously inspired by the modern aesthetics of post-expressionist machine paintings, and thus mirrors the fundamental contradiction of the wartime Japanese state that repudiated some aspects of modernity upon which it was nevertheless predicated. Following recent fascism studies that understand fascism in relation to a paradoxical attitude toward modernity, Asato Ikeda will suggest that Yasuda’s work not only exemplified the Japanese state’s appropriation of modernism, but can also be considered as a Japanese example of fascist modernism.

    Asato Ikeda is Assistant Professor of Art History and Music at Fordham University, New York and an Asia-Pacific Journal contributing editor. Between 2014 and 2016, she is the Bishop White Postdoctoral Fellow at Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where she plans to organize an exhibition about wakashu (male youth). Co-editor, with Ming Tiampo and Aya Louisa McDonald, of Art and War in Japan and its Empire: 1931-1960 (Leiden: Brill, 2012), she is currently working on a monograph that will explore the relationship between Japanese art and war in the 1930s and early 1940s.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Asato Ikeda 
    Assistant Professor, Fordham University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Land’s End Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 201510:00AM - 12:00PMAnthropology Building AP 246
    19 Russell Street
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    Drawing on two decades of ethnographic research in Sulawesi, Indonesia, Land’s End offers an intimate account of the emergence of capitalist relations among indigenous highlanders who privatized their common land to plant a global market crop, cacao. Some prospered; others lost their land. It is a story with potent messages for social movement activists, who expect indigenous people to be guardians of community and tradition, committed to sustaining food production. It also interrupts transition narratives that expect people who lose their land to march off to the city to find a job. For these newly landless highlanders, as for many other post-peasants across Asia, jobs are scarce. When land’s end is a dead end, a different politics must emerge.

    Tania Murray Li is Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy and Culture of Asia in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto, and author of Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier (Duke University Press 2014), Powers of Exclusion: Land Dilemmas in Southeast Asia (with Derek Hall and Philip Hirsch, NUS Press, 2011), and The Will to Improve: Governmentality, Development, and the Practice of Politics (Duke, 2007).

    Join us for a presentation and discussion session with Tania Li, Derek Hall, Christopher Krupa, and Katharine Rankin.

    Click the link below to register.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Professor, St. George Campus and Canada Research Chair in the Political-Economy and Culture of Asia, University of Toronto

    Derek Hall
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Christopher Krupa
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Katharine Rankin
    Professor, Department of Geography and Program in Planning, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    The Department of Anthropology

    Co-Sponsors

    The Development Seminar

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2015

  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee, United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia; Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide; and Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2015

  • Friday, March 6th Living on Your own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Jesook Song’s new book Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea. Interweaving personal interviews, archival sources and media analyses, this illuminating ethnography profiles the stories of young, single women in South Korea who confront difficulties in their pursuits to live independently and achieve residential autonomy. Living on Your Own skillfully exposes the clash between women’s burgeoning desire for independence and traditional conservative norms in Korean housing practices and financial institutions.

    Professor Jesook Song is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Jesook Song received her B.A. in Education Science at the Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology with a minor degree in Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please visit the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th King Dhammacetī and the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions: Ideas, Borders, Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building
    Room 318
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the 15th century, the Buddhist king Dhammacetī sponsored a sīmā (ordination hall) reform that was to become the most famous of its kind in mainland Southeast Asia. Having wrangled with the hairs of monastic law concerning sīmās, Dhammacetī sent monks from his kingdom centered in what is now lower Myanmar to Sri Lanka in order to return with a pure ordination line. In a most significant historical decision, Dhammacetī had an account of these reforms inscribed on ten large stone slabs, which became known as the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions. While addressing matters of law, history, and political order, the inscriptions are also at their heart a sīmā text, that is, a text about the regulation of ritual boundaries and religious land. Drawing especially on these inscriptions, this paper explores elements of the ideational and border-making and border-crossing world Dhammacetī and others participated in and helped cultivate, even as they established innovations that would dramatically shape future memory, religio-political culture, and transregional identity.

    Jason A. Carbine is the C. Milo Connick Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Whittier College. His research and teaching about religion and society combines historical and ethnographic approaches, and draws from an interdisciplinary body of research pertaining to the history and sociology of religions, textual studies, anthropology, and comparative religious ethics. His publications include Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition (2011) and the co-edited volume How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (2012). Carbine is currently preparing a new text and translation of the famous Kalyāṇī Inscriptions.

    For information please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason A. Carbine
    Whittier College


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


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