Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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September 2016

  • Thursday, September 15th Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants’ struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims—unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Hae Yeon Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship.

    Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. Decentering Citizenship argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.

    Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Her book Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) examines how inequalities of gender, race, and class affect migrant rights through a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea—factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and club hostesses.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute; and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Jesook Song
    Discussant
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology and Collaborative Master's Program In Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

    Anna Koreteweg
    Discussant
    Professor & Chair, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga; Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 23rd How Canadian Universities Contributed to China’s Transformation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 23, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMOISE/UT Library
    252 Bloor Street West
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Canada was one of the first Western countries to sign an agreement to provide development aid to China in 1983, and the Canadian International Development Agency invited universities to cooperate in ways that would facilitate “the multiplication of contacts at the thinking level.”

    In Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation, leading scholars from Canadian and Chinese universities elaborate on the historical experience of collaboration in areas as different as environmental sciences, marine science, engineering, management, law, agriculture, medicine, education, minority cultures, and women’s studies. Contributors use theoretical frames such as dependency theory, human capital, the knowledge economy, and Habermas’s theory of communicative action, to facilitate a striking dialogue between Canadian and Chinese perspectives as common questions are addressed. They provide key insights into factors that ensured the long-term success of some partnerships, as well as barriers that hindered others, and vivid lessons for current collaboration. Case studies include a project that began with the training of Chinese judges developing into reciprocal programs in legal education in China, Canada, and Latin America, and an examination of how joint environmental research has had policy impacts at national and international levels.

    Presenting the story of universities working together shortly after the devastating Cultural Revolution, Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation is a unique account of partnerships in knowledge production and application and their resulting impacts.

    Participants Bios

    Jing M. Chen is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
    He served as project director for “Confronting Global Warming: Enhancing China’s Capacity for Carbon Sequestration (2002-6)”. He is currently a senior consultant to China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, advising on key national research programs.

    Bernie Michael Frolic is Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs University of Toronto. He is the author/editor of Mao’s People (Harvard University); Reluctant Adversaries, Canada and the PRC, 1949-1970 (University of Toronto); Civil Society in China(M.E.Sharpe); Civil Society and Human Rights in Southeast Asia.(University of Toronto/York University). Currently Director of the York Asian Business Management Programme that has trained over 4000 Chinese Party and government officials, executives, and educators in Canada and China. He is completing a book on 50 years of Canada-China relations.

    Ruth Hayhoe is a Professor of Comparative Higher Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Her most recent book, China Through the Lens of Comparative Education came out with Routledge’s World Library of Educationalists in 2015.

    Ping-chun Hsiung is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research areas include gender roles and family relations in Chinese societies; feminist methodologies and epistemologies; and practices and the development of critical qualitative research in the Global South. She has collaborated with Chinese feminist scholars to establish curricula and women’s studies programs in key Chinese universities.

    Guy Lefebvre served as the Dean of the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal from April 2012 to October 2014, when he was appointed Vice-Rector, International Relations and à la Francophonie. He is the author of numerous publications in French, English, Chinese, and Portuguese. Lefebvre teaches at several universities, including the China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL), the East China University of Political Science and Law. In 1997, he founded the Centre for the Law of Business and International Commerce of his faculty. Lefebvre has received several distinctions during his career, including the Canadian Bar Association’s Paul-André-Crépeau Medal and the Medal of Merit from CUPL. He is also Fellow of the Centre for Public Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

    Julia Pan is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Leadership, Higher & Adult Education of OISE/UT. Over the last two decades, Julia has directed and managed Canadian government sponsored Canada-China University Linkage Programs in the areas of higher education and environmental studies, collaborating with many Canadian and Chinese leading institutions nationwide.

    Joseph Whitney, FRGS is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Past-Chair. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the University of Chicago, respectively. He was Director, Joint York/Toronto Centre on Asia-Pacific Studies and has directed several major environmental projects in Asia and Africa.
    Qiang Zha is an associate professor at Faculty of Education, York University, Canada. His recent books include Portraits of 21st Century Chinese Universities (co-author, 2011), Education and Global Cultural Dialogue (co-editor, 2012), Education in China: Educational History, Models, and Initiatives (editor, 2013), and Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation: An Untold Story (co-editor, 2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ruth Hayhoe
    Speaker
    Professor, Higher and Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto

    Jing Chen
    Discussant
    Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Pingchun Hsiung
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Qiang Zha
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, York University

    Bernie Frolic
    Chair
    Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    OISE

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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