Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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March 2017

  • Friday, March 24th Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge: Winners Report Back

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In April 2016, nine teams pitched their ideas to a panel of judges to compete for funding in the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC, formerly Big Ideas Competition). In this presentation, the winning teams will present the results of their projects to show how they applied their academic studies to make a difference in addressing real-world issues in Asia and what they learned from the process.

    Winners of this year’s Insights through Asia Challenge, who will carry out their projects in summer 2017, will also be presented with their awards.

    Presenters Include:

    Evaporative Cooling Vests – Preventing Deadly Heat Stress
    Presentation by Adam Sheikh

    Thousands of migrant construction workers in the Gulf have died as a result of heat induced heart complications. Local governments have done little to address serious workplace safety problems giving construction companies little incentive to ensure the safety of cheap, easily replaceable, labour. Through use of low cost cooling vests we have found a means of changing this dynamic and ensure protecting workers’ is less costly then leaving them exposed.

    Upward
    Presentation by David Tobiasz and Melody Liang

    Upward is a small-scale educational development project founded by three University of Toronto graduate students that provides dynamic classroom experiences to migrant children in China.

    Cleanopy Air4Kids
    Presentation by Natalia Mykhaylova and Julie Huber

    Our overall goal is to reduce the health risk factors of air pollution for children by providing affordable devices for monitoring and purifying the air and an awareness campaign that together will result in reduced disease incidence and improved health. We have conducted a detailed survey of parents, clinicians and NGOs and used the findings to improve the design of our solution.

    Red Pocket

    Our goal was to disrupt stereotypes of Chinese people as silent and conservative by elevating lived experiences and voices of youth. Through our media production company, we have aimed to encourage discussion about racial stereotyping and to share real stories from real people.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Forget Chineseness: On the Geopolitics of Cultural Identification

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    Forget Chineseness provides a critical interpretation not only of discourses of Chinese identity—Chineseness—but also of how they have reflected differences between “Chinese” societies, such as in Hong Kong, Taiwan, PRC, Singapore and communities “overseas”. It asserts that identity has meaning not only in cultural, representational terms but is moreover a product of its embeddedness in specific entanglements of modernity, colonialism, nation-state formation, and globalization. By articulating these processes underlying institutional practices vis-à-vis public mindsets, it is thus possible to elucidate various epistemic moments that lay the basis for their socio-political transformation.
    From a broader perspective, this should have salient ramifications for prevailing discussions of identity politics. Not only has the concept of identity been predicated on flawed notions of ethnicity and culture in the social “sciences”, but it has been acutely exacerbated by polarizing assumptions that drive our understanding of identity “politics”.

    Speaker Bio:

    Allen Chun is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. His research interests include socio-cultural theory, (trans)national identity, and (post)colonial formations. Most of his work has dealt with Chinese-speaking societies, contemporary and late traditional. In addition to a monograph, Unstructuring Chinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of “Land” in the New Territories of Hong Kong (2000), he edited a special double issue of Cultural Studies (vol. 14, nos. 3–4), “(Post)Colonialism and Its Discontents”; a special issue of Social Analysis (vol. 46, no. 2), “Global Dissonances”; and co-edited a book, Refashioning Pop Music in Asia: Cosmopolitan Flows, Political Tempos and Aesthetic Industries (2004). His major articles have appeared in diverse journals, including Toung Pao, Late Imperial China, History and Anthropology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Historical Sociology, Current Anthropology, Theory Culture & Society, boundary 2, Communal/Plural, Cultural Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Critique of Anthropology, Anthropological Theory, and positions.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Allen Chun
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Indian Visual Culture and Contemporary Art, Department of Visual Studes

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st A Remittance Forest in Java; Turning Migrant Labour into Agrarian Capital

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
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    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    lunch will be served in the Faculty Lounge at 12:00pm; talk begins at 12:30pm

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nancy Peluso
    UC Berkeley



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Thursday, April 6th Performing Revolution: Violence and Dissent in China's Red Guard Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMFirst Floor Conference Room, Jackman Humanities Building, 262 Bloor St W
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    From 1966 to 1968, students and workers in urban China were embroiled in deadly factional battles in what many of them believed to be a revolution of a lifetime – the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the middle of factional violence, they also expressed radical ideas of political dissent. Based on the recently published book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that both violence and dissent were the results of the dramatic enactment of a revolutionary culture. The mechanism of this enactment was revolutionary competition. This conclusion has direct implications for understanding the role of political culture in collective violence in today’s world.

    Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols. 2003). He is the editor of Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Victor Pickard, forthcoming), China’s Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Guobin Yang
    Speaker
    Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th The representation of 'Zainichi-Chosenjin'(Korean residents in Japan) in South Korea in the 1970s: Mass-media and representation of home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMMain Activity Hall, 2nd Floor
    Multi-faith Centre
    569 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    In this speech I would like to tell you how the ‘home-visiting project’ in 1975 has represented in the mass media in South Korea, and that this particular method of representation has been targeted. I want to talk about the representation of the Zainichi- Chosenjin(在日朝鮮人) in the 1970s reflect today’s South Korea rather than the realistic reconstruction of the surrounding home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan. The Zainichi-Chosenjin refer to ancestry of chosen(Korea) peninsula and their descendants who defected to Japan from colonial rule, regardless of nationality, belong to the Japanese colonial rule. In the 1970s, however, Zainichi-Chosenjin was understood as the image of ‘Pro-North Korea’ and ‘Converted chongnyeon (在日朝鮮人總聯合會)’ in South Korea. In 1975, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan began in the South Korean government’s intention to gain dominance over the North Korean regime. At the same time, it was an active national anti-communistic tourism project, which is distinguished from the “North Korea Repatriation Project”(歸國事業) in 1959.

    On the surface, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan appeared to be based on humanitarianism. By December 29, 1975, the number of visitors to South Korea was about 1,600. If the North Korea Repatriation Project was exodus for the settlement of paradise of socialism, home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan was the anti-communistic tourism for the purpose of denying the dark past as pro-North Korea by showing the rapid development of South Korea. In the 1970s, the mass media in South Korea represented Zainichi-Chosenjin as the converted to South Korea(“Total System converted collectively, 總轉向體制). However, the anti-communistic project planned by Yushin government, the National Intelligence Service, were not intended for Zainichi-Chosenjin. In Conclusion, the issue of dispersed family between North and South Korea, legal status concerning Zainichi-Chosenjin was not discussed. Instead converting of Zainichi-Chosenjin to South Korea was represented as victory of South Korea in competition of Cold War.

    Kim Won is an associate professor of political science at the Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies. Now he reserches at Hiroshima University in Japan for investigating memories of Zainichichosejin in era of cold war. Recently he presented “Stow away, border and nationality : Atomic notebook tial by Sohn Jin-doo victim of Korean atomic bomb”(2016). His interests include reemberinig of East Asia, labor history, and oral history. He is the author of several books including Factory Girl: Antihistory of Her (2006), Ghost of Park-Jung Hee Era(2011), Uprising June in 1987 (2009), The Disappearing Place of Politics (2008), Memories about the 1980s: Subculture and Mass Politics of Korean Students in the 1980s (1999).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Won
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies

    Jesook Song
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Transcendence in a Secular World: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall
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    Description

    The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

    I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions—particularly of China and India– that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic: separating God or the human subject from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOS, quasi-governmental and inter-governmental agencies committed to to the inviolability or sacrality of the ‘commons’ will need to find common cause with these communities struggling to survive.

    Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. Born and educated in India, he received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was Professor of History and East Asian Studies at University of Chicago (1991-2008) and Raffles Professor and Director of Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

    His books include Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) winner of Fairbank Prize of the AHA and Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA, Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014; discussion of the book can be found in http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/world/asia/china-religion-prasenjit-duara.html?ref=world

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Bookish Transactions in the Countryside: Missionary Print in nineteenth-century rural India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle
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    Description

    Coinciding with the rise of Protestant missionary activity, the spread of print technology in nineteenth-century South Asia introduced the cheap, mass-produced book in Indian languages and led to a boom in religious print. Despite the considerable body of work on Christian missionaries’ pioneering role in vernacular printing and their use of print for proselytizing, little attention has been paid to the impact of Christian tracts in the low-literacy environment of rural India. This talk examines how missionaries used the printed tract as both an object of transaction and a tool of conversion in their encounters with prospective converts in the Indian countryside. It also explores the understudied role of Indian colporteurs and catechists in disseminating Christian tracts. In tracing the shifting status of the tract as gift and saleable object, I outline the challenges of the missionary print enterprise, while drawing attention to the material dimensions of the book.

    Ulrike Stark is Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history. She is the author of An Empire of Books: The Naval Kishore Press and the Diffusion of the Printed Word in Colonial India (2007) and is currently completing a biography of Raja Sivaprasad ‘Sitara-e Hind.’

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ulrike Stark
    Speaker
    Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Co-Sponsors

    the Centre for Comparative Literature

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Seeing as Touch: Gao Jianfu's Revolutionary Design in Modern Canton

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the early years of the Republic the revolutionary Cantonese brush-and-ink painter Gao Jianfu (1879-1951) presented Sun Yatsen, father of the Republic, with an essay in which he argued that porcelain manufacture would save the new nation. Important among Gao’s own porcelain designs was a dish painted with mantises devouring pupa, encircled by a rim ornamented with patterns of stylized fishes, flowers, and birds on a ground much like Japanese shibori tie-dyed textiles. The striking contrast of the decorative rim with the specimen-like insect depiction at the dish’s centre raises questions. How did the rim’s artificial lines mediate the naturalism of the insects to embody Gao’s radical conception of modern design – a design that was more than formal, but social and political as well? And what did it mean for the nation to see and touch insects on their patriotic porcelains? How, in short, was the dish designed and designing?

    Lisa Claypool publishes widely on late imperial and Republican-era visual culture and design in China, and has curated and published a series of essays and interviews about contemporary art. She is currently at work on two projects: a book about the mediation of science through the ink brush in early 20th century China, and; an article about curatorial practices of contemporary artists in China.

    本人在阿尔伯塔大学主要教授中国艺术方面的课程,并负责大学美术馆的中国古代绘画和艺术藏品的管理和展览. 主要研究方向包括十八世纪之后的中国艺术和现当代视觉文化。目前已有多篇关于博物馆、近现代艺术、展览学以及审美学的文章在重要学术刊物和会议出版物中发表。

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Lisa Claypool
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Depertment of the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Alberta

    Ailsa Mellon Bruce
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery 2016-17

    Jennifer Purtle
    Chair
    Interim Dr. David Chu Director in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 13th Provisional Authority: Police, Order, and Security in India Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 13, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.

    Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.

    Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.
    Beatrice Jauregui is assistant professor at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Global Policing and Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute

    Frank Cody
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; and Department Of Anthropology, UTM

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, UTM

    Kevin O’Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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