Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

August 2016

  • Sunday, August 28th Art Multiple by Myung-Sun Kim

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, August 28, 20169:00AM - 11:00AMGibraltar Point Beach
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    MMMM….Gendai Kitchen

    Description

    MMMMM...Gendai Kitchen is a year-long seasonal subscription service and series of event-based responsive programming. With
    food-inspired artist multiples, responsive performances, and critical texts, the program unfolds over the course of this four-season
    cycle, with one artist multiple delivery and corresponding launch event each season.

    Myung-Sun Kim is an artist and arts programmer based in Toronto. In her practice she examines the evolution of culinary practices and food culture in relation to historical events. During her Winter Island Artist Residency at Artspace Gibaltrar Point she faciliated workshops on alchemy, magic and rice wine, and hosted Haunting In The Flesh, an experimental feast of food and research on the evolving cultural culinary practices and cuisine of Korea, exploring food as a way to tell stories of war, migration, colonialism, resilience, and healing. She has a BFA in Sculpture & Installation from Ontario College of Art & Design and an MFA from York University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

September 2016

  • Thursday, September 15th Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants’ struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims—unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Hae Yeon Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship.

    Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. Decentering Citizenship argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.

    Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Her book Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) examines how inequalities of gender, race, and class affect migrant rights through a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea—factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and club hostesses.

    Discussants:

    Anna Korteweg is Professor and Chair of Sociology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Her work problematizes the notion of “immigrant integration” and the ways in which belonging is defined in the intersections of gender, religion, ethnicity and national origin in Western Europe and Canada. Her co-authored book (with Gökçe Yurdakul), Headscarf Debates: Conflicts of National Belonging, was published by Stanford University Press in 2014.

    Jesook Song is Professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto. She is an urban anthropologist of political economy and subject formation in finance, welfare, education, and neoliberalism, focusing on South Korean context. Her books include South Koreans in the Debt Crisis (Duke University Press 2009), Living on Your Own (SUNY Press 2014), New Millennium South Korea (editor, Routldged 2011).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute; and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Jesook Song
    Discussant
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology and Collaborative Master's Program In Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

    Anna Koreteweg
    Discussant
    Professor & Chair, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga; Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, September 19th Ghosts of Hierarchies Past: Inequality, Hierarchy, and Blame in Nepal

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 19, 201611:00AM - 1:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Anthropology Colloquium Series

    Description

    The hierarchies of the past are challenged, politically and socially, in two important, contested, and interconnected fields in contemporary Nepal: in caste/ethnic relations and in the construction of national identity. In both areas blame (i.e. accusations of responsibility for harm) and recrimination were very evident during 2015, when the country faced two massive shocks, namely the earthquakes of April-May and the blockade of September-December. And yet there were and have been glimmers of hope too, in some moves by idealistic youth in both fields to take responsibility.

    Aspects of Dumont’s theory of hierarchy are helpful for understanding this situation, for all that the encompassment of the impure by the pure is deeply and strongly rejected in today’s Nepal, as in the rest of South Asia. Dumont can be supplemented by Ambedkar on the graded nature of hierarchy and the importance of contempt in constructing it. As heads of households, members of the elite no longer see themselves as responsible for large numbers of hangers-on, as they would have done only two generations ago. Only political parties, through the mobilization of economic and licencing networks, have the resources to support large-scale hierarchies. The relative equalization of esteem, and the flattening of responsibility, on the part of individuals, combined with the pre-eminence of parties (still dominated by gerontocracies) as mobilizers of hierarchy, deference, and money—this combination of factors may help to explain the corruption, short-termism, and apparent lack of any substantial political vision on the part of Nepal’s leaders over the last 25 years.

    David Gellner is Professor of Social Anthropology and a Fellow of All Souls. He was Head of the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography from 2009-2012. His doctoral research (1982-4) was on the traditional, Vajrayana Buddhism of the Newars and on Newar social organization, in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. He has carried out fieldwork in the Kathmandu Valley on many subsequent occasions, broadening his interests to include politics and ethnicity, healers, mediums, and popular approaches to misfortune, and religious change, in particular the history and effects of the newly introduced Theravada Buddhist movement. In 1991 he did three months’ exploratory fieldwork on Buddhist priests in Japan. For eight years he taught at Brunel University, west London, the first British university to introduce a Master’s course in medical anthropology. For three years from 2002-5 he held a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for research into the social history and practice of activism in Nepal (for the academic year 2003-4 he combined this with a Visiting Professorship at the Research Institute for Cultures and Languages of Asia and Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies).

    11:00am-1:00pm, followed by lunch 1:00-2:00pm. Please RSVP for lunch.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, September 23rd How Canadian Universities Contributed to China’s Transformation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 23, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMOISE/UT Library
    252 Bloor Street West
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Canada was one of the first Western countries to sign an agreement to provide development aid to China in 1983, and the Canadian International Development Agency invited universities to cooperate in ways that would facilitate “the multiplication of contacts at the thinking level.”

    In Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation, leading scholars from Canadian and Chinese universities elaborate on the historical experience of collaboration in areas as different as environmental sciences, marine science, engineering, management, law, agriculture, medicine, education, minority cultures, and women’s studies. Contributors use theoretical frames such as dependency theory, human capital, the knowledge economy, and Habermas’s theory of communicative action, to facilitate a striking dialogue between Canadian and Chinese perspectives as common questions are addressed. They provide key insights into factors that ensured the long-term success of some partnerships, as well as barriers that hindered others, and vivid lessons for current collaboration. Case studies include a project that began with the training of Chinese judges developing into reciprocal programs in legal education in China, Canada, and Latin America, and an examination of how joint environmental research has had policy impacts at national and international levels.

    Presenting the story of universities working together shortly after the devastating Cultural Revolution, Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation is a unique account of partnerships in knowledge production and application and their resulting impacts.

    Participants Bios

    Jing M. Chen is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
    He served as project director for “Confronting Global Warming: Enhancing China’s Capacity for Carbon Sequestration (2002-6)”. He is currently a senior consultant to China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, advising on key national research programs.

    Bernie Michael Frolic is Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs University of Toronto. He is the author/editor of Mao’s People (Harvard University); Reluctant Adversaries, Canada and the PRC, 1949-1970 (University of Toronto); Civil Society in China(M.E.Sharpe); Civil Society and Human Rights in Southeast Asia.(University of Toronto/York University). Currently Director of the York Asian Business Management Programme that has trained over 4000 Chinese Party and government officials, executives, and educators in Canada and China. He is completing a book on 50 years of Canada-China relations.

    Ruth Hayhoe is a Professor of Comparative Higher Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Her most recent book, China Through the Lens of Comparative Education came out with Routledge’s World Library of Educationalists in 2015.

    Ping-chun Hsiung is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research areas include gender roles and family relations in Chinese societies; feminist methodologies and epistemologies; and practices and the development of critical qualitative research in the Global South. She has collaborated with Chinese feminist scholars to establish curricula and women’s studies programs in key Chinese universities.

    Guy Lefebvre served as the Dean of the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal from April 2012 to October 2014, when he was appointed Vice-Rector, International Relations and à la Francophonie. He is the author of numerous publications in French, English, Chinese, and Portuguese. Lefebvre teaches at several universities, including the China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL), the East China University of Political Science and Law. In 1997, he founded the Centre for the Law of Business and International Commerce of his faculty. Lefebvre has received several distinctions during his career, including the Canadian Bar Association’s Paul-André-Crépeau Medal and the Medal of Merit from CUPL. He is also Fellow of the Centre for Public Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

    Julia Pan is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Leadership, Higher & Adult Education of OISE/UT. Over the last two decades, Julia has directed and managed Canadian government sponsored Canada-China University Linkage Programs in the areas of higher education and environmental studies, collaborating with many Canadian and Chinese leading institutions nationwide.

    Joseph Whitney, FRGS is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Past-Chair. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the University of Chicago, respectively. He was Director, Joint York/Toronto Centre on Asia-Pacific Studies and has directed several major environmental projects in Asia and Africa.
    Qiang Zha is an associate professor at Faculty of Education, York University, Canada. His recent books include Portraits of 21st Century Chinese Universities (co-author, 2011), Education and Global Cultural Dialogue (co-editor, 2012), Education in China: Educational History, Models, and Initiatives (editor, 2013), and Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation: An Untold Story (co-editor, 2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ruth Hayhoe
    Speaker
    Professor, Higher and Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto

    Jing Chen
    Discussant
    Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Pingchun Hsiung
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Qiang Zha
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, York University

    Bernie Frolic
    Chair
    Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    OISE

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

October 2016

  • Friday, October 7th The Dictator's Dilema: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Many observers predicted the collapse of the Chinese Communist Party following the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, and again following the serial collapse of communist regimes behind the Iron Curtain. Their predictions, however, never proved true. Despite minor setbacks, China has experienced explosive economic growth and relative political stability ever since 1989. In The Dictator’s Dilemma, Bruce Dickson provides a comprehensive explanation for regime’s continued survival and prosperity. Dickson draws upon original public opinion surveys, interviews, and published materials to explain why there is so much popular support for the regime. This basic stability is a familiar story to China specialists, but not to those whose knowledge of contemporary China is limited to the popular media. This talk will appeal to anyone interested in understanding China’s increasing importance in world politics.

    Bruce Dickson is professor of political science and international affairs and chair of the political science department at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on political dynamics in China, especially the adaptability of the Chinese Communist Party and the regime it governs.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, October 28th “Religious Suicide” and the Limits of Indian Secularism: Screening and Discussion with the director Shekhar Hattangadi

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
    130 St George St, 3rd Floor
    Toronto, Ontario
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    What happens when a traditional religious practice conflicts with modern secular law? The talk — in conjunction with the film — addresses this central question as it looks at the tensions that arise when a religious tradition endorses the self-extinguishment of human life in a legal system that treats suicide as a criminal offence. It explores the doctrinal-scriptural, ethical, medico-legal and sociological aspects of Santhara — a Jain practice in which a person fasts unto death — and examines how religion, law and constitutional secularism intersect in the ongoing debate outside the courtroom and in the litigation over the legality of the practice. Irrespective of how the Indian courts may rule in the matter, Santhara remains a classic example of the law-religion conflict, and provides an ideal template for debating the question of reconciling individual freedom as well as a minority community’s religious rights with the justification for state intervention in matters of religion.

    A Mumbai,India-based media columnist, law professor and film-maker, Shekhar Hattangadi believes he is an academic at heart. He topped University of Mumbai’s law exams bagging three gold medals, and he fondly recalls his years as a student and researcher on the American campus: first as a graduate student at Ohio University in Athens,OH and then as a Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F.Kennedy School of Government. SANTHARA: A Challenge to Indian Secularism? is the first of his series of documentaries examining controversial religious practices in India.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shekhar Hattangadi
    University of Mumbai, India


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

November 2016

  • Friday, November 4th The Politics of Shari'a Law: Islamist Activists and the State in Democratizing Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Islamization of politics in Indonesia after 1998 presents an underexplored puzzle: why has there been a rise in the number of shari’a laws despite the electoral decline of Islamist parties? In his talk, Michael Buehler presents an analysis of the conditions under which Islamist activists situated outside formal party politics may capture and exert influence in Muslim-majority countries facing democratization. His analysis shows that introducing competitive elections creates new pressures for entrenched elites to mobilize and structure the electorate, thereby opening up new opportunities for Islamist activists to influence politics.

    Michael Buehler is a Senior Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London. Specializing in Southeast Asian politics, his teaching and research interests evolve around state-society relations under conditions of democratization and decentralization.Previously he taught at Columbia University and Northern Illinois University. He has also held research fellowships at the Center for Equality Development and Globalization Studies at Northwestern University in Chicago, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute in New York City, and the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. Michael Buehler has been an Associate Research Fellow at the Asia Society in New York City since 2011.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Buehler
    Senior Lecture, Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

December 2016

  • Tuesday, December 6th Metamorphoses: Archival Fictioning and the Historian’s Craft

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 6, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In attempting to understand early modern science and medicine from Chinese natural history to Manchu translations of bodily gesture and sensation, my work has placed the history and translation of metamorphic stories at its center. For our gathering – intended more as a conversation about craft than a formal talk – I will introduce recent work in which I have been expanding my practice to integrate short fiction and prose poetry as modes of reading and analyzing historical documents. The focus of my attention will be a new project called Metamorphoses that is loosely inspired by the work of Ovid and is devoted to creating stories of material transformation through creative readings and misreadings of primary source documents that derive from (or are oriented toward) early modern China.

    Carla Nappi is Associate Professor of History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies at the University of British Columbia. Her first book, The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and its Transformations in Early Modern China (Harvard, 2009) was a study of belief-making in early modern Chinese natural history through the lens of the Bencao gangmu (1596), a compendium of materia medica. Her current research explores practices and contexts of translation in the Ming and Qing periods.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Carla Nappi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies, University of British Columbia.

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

Stay in Touch with the Asian Institute

Interested in receiving a list of upcoming events right in your inbox? Join our mailing list!

Click Here!

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.