Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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September 2015

  • Tuesday, September 8th Unraveling Visions: ‘Girly’ Photography in Recessionary Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 8, 20153:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    This presentation asks what happens to feminist art in contexts of economic deregulation and concomitant care deficit that tend to reconnect women to regimes of social reproduction. Drawing on the observation that women’s photography centered on portraying relationships, photography critics—dominantly men—interpreted the genre as a project that aimed to reconnect communities that have unraveled in the wake of the long recession. Women photographers, however, rejected this interpretation. Building on this tension, I claim that critics projected onto women’s photography their own nostalgia for the high-growth era and its characteristic gender division of labor. My interviews with photographers reveal that it was precisely the desire to disengage from the normative gender roles of the high-growth period that drove women to photography. Women, I argue, practiced photography to expand the zones of subjectivity from which they were able to draw new forms of labor and pleasure.

    Gabriella Lukacs is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research explores themes of mass media, digital media, capitalism, labor, and gender in contemporary Japan. Her first book, Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan, was published by Duke University Press. Her current book project, Diva Entrepreneurs: Labor, Gender, and the Digital Economy in Japan, explores why women turn to the digital economy and how this economy mobilizes them to regimes of unpaid labor that it harnesses as a motor of its own development.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Gabriella Lukacs
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th The Logic and Context of Conformity: Japan’s Entry into International Society

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20151:15PM - 2:45PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Japan’s 19th century entry into international society was dramatic and fraught with danger. In the four decades after being challenged to drastically alter its position in international society in 1853, Japan reinvented itself as a modern sovereign state, shedding its long-standing isolation and political practices. Faced with the crucial task of responding to existing Western norms of international society, Japan’s leaders chose to conform.

    In contrast with the majority of historically-focused inquiries, Professor Okagaki introduces a political science perspective into the central questions of Japan’s internationalization. Why did Japan join the Western state system without voicing as much resistance as other Asian countries? How, in turn, did Japan’s entry affect international society? How did Japan balance international and domestic constraints and resources? What implications does the Japanese experience hold for other countries today in their encounters with prevailing international norms?

    Tomoko Okagaki is Professor of Political Science at Dokkyo University in Saitama, Japan. She holds a doctorate in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She was a visiting student at the University of Toronto and University of British Columbia, and a visiting scholar at both Harvard University and Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Professor Okagaki’s research interests include state socialization, Asian regionalism, and international political relations. She is the author of numerous publications including The Logic of Conformity: Japan’s Entry into International Society (2013), and co-translator of Kenneth Waltz’s Theory of International Politics (2011).

    Presented by The Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto; Japan Studies Association of Canada; Japan Futures Initiative, The Japan Foundation

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tomoko Okagaki
    Professor, Political Science, Dokkyo University in Saitama, Japan


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th The Structure of Protest Cycles: Contagion and Cohesion in South Korea’s Democracy Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In his seminal study of contentious politics, Sidney Tarrow conceptualized social movements as constituting a series of protest cycles. While the concept of protest cycles has received much attention in the social movements literature, its empirical operationalization remains relatively crude compared to the rich theoretical discussion. Most studies operationalize protest cycles as the total number of protest events in a given period. Drawing on recent work on event structures, this paper attempts to further develop the application of the protest cycle concept by conceptualizing social movements as a population of interlinked events and identifying events that play critical roles in historical outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of considering protest cycles as protest event networks with a novel dataset on South Korea’s democracy movement. In our conceptualization the nodes of the network are protest events and links are coded as present if protestors cited a specific prior event as a source of inspiration for mobilizing. Appropriating strategies developed for network analysis we ascertain which events in Korea’s democracy movement were more likely to solicit direct responses and which linked disparate event clusters. By identifying the characteristics of events that contribute to the probability of protest contagion and movement cohesion, we hope to show the usefulness of identifying direct links between events when analyzing protest events data, while providing a better understanding of the structure of protest cycles in South Korea’s democracy movement.

    Paul Y. Chang is Assistant Professor of Sociology and serves on the Executive Committee of the Korea Institute at Harvard University. His primary research interest is in South Korean social and political change. He is the author of Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement (Stanford University Press 2015), and co-editor of South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society (Routledge 2011).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul Chang
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Sociology, Harvard University

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 16th China's Stock Market Crash: Implications and Challenges

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 16, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Chinese stock market crash began with the popping of the stock market bubble on June 12, 2015 when a third of the value of the Chinese A-shares on the Shanghai Stock exchange was lost within the course of one month. The event has alarmed investors globally and has initiated a series of vibrant conversations centred on the inner workings of the Chinese economy and its authoritarian government policy implications. Several schools of macroeconomic thought plugged into rigorous debate with each other after the announcement from the Chinese central government in that it intends to use aggressive approaches to intervene in the Chinese stock market to prop up the stock prices and conduct heavy investigations into the possibility of illegal short selling. Proponents of the market forces argue that this is a perfect scenario of a long time government interventionism that has failed, while others argue that the crisis has emerged due to insufficient government interventionism and monitoring of the Chinese stock market in recent years. The concern now centres on the possible spread of the stock market downfall on other Chinese domestic sectors and its potential global implications. The question of the regime stability of the Chinese government also comes into question.

    This 2 hour expert panel will focus on examining the reasons behind the Chinese stock market crisis and the political and economic implications that it has had or will have on domestic China and the global market. The panel will also strive to produce possible policy suggestions and approaches to deal effectively with the crisis.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 24th Developmental State and Politics of Industrial Complex Development in South Korea: A Multi-scalar Analysis of the Development of Masan Free Export Zone in the 1960s

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 24, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In explaining the economic success of the East Asian countries, the developmental state thesis highlights the positive role of the state intervention in markets. In particular, it sees as an essential condition for the East Asian economic mira¬cle the capacity of the autonomous national bureaucrats, which are assumed to be independent of particular economic and social interests, to lead the policy-making process on behalf of the nation as a whole. More specifically, the state’s industrial policies have been seen as a crucial means through which the national bureaucrats have been able to guide and discipline firms to play a role in national industrialization. This kind of explanations, however, lacks serious under¬standings of the spatial aspects of industrial development due to its limited focus on aspatial elements of industrial governance. Industrial activities actually take place at certain locations, and necessarily require the infrastructures fa¬cilitating the spatial flows and movements of materials, information, money, and so on. Indeed, constructing industrial complexes was an essential spatial technology that the Korean state deployed to promote national industrialization in the 1960s and the 1970s. Without paying sufficient attention to the spatiality of industrialization, the developmental state thesis may pro¬vide a biased view on the Korean industrial development. In particular, its emphasis on the leadership role of the state in national industrialization may not be easily justified, once the complicated socio-spatial processes through which the industrial complexes had been constructed are carefully examined.

    With this problem orientation, this paper aims to explore the ways in which the Masan Free Export Zone was developed in the late 1960s. In contrast to the developmental state thesis, which relies on the neo-Weberian assumption of the state-society separation and the methodological nationalism, this research borrows the strategic-relational view to the state, which sees the state actions as an outcome of complex interactions among social forces acting in and through the state, as well as the multi-scalar approach to the political economic processes, in order to better grasp the spatiality of Korean industrialization. In particular, this paper will examine the ways in which the construction of Masan Free Export Zone was planned, implemented and materialized through complex and contested interactions among social forces at various geographical scales act¬ing in and through the state.

    Bae-Gyoon Park is a Professor of Geography in the College of Education at Seoul National University in Korea, and also serves as the Head of International Relations at Seoul National University Asia Center. He received his PhD in Geography at Ohio State University in the USA after doing his BA and MA in Geography at Seoul National University. He had also taught in National University of Singapore as an assistant professor of Geography. He is now a Co-editor of Territory, Politics, Governance, and a member of the editorial boards of Political Geography, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, and Geography Compass. His recent research is focused on multi-scalar understandings of East Asian developmental states and developmental urbanism in East Asia. He has recently edited an English-written book, entitled “Locating Neoliberalism in East Asia”, and several Korean-written books, including “Gukkawa Jiyeok(State and Localities)”, “Saneok Gyeongkwanui Tansaeng(The Birth of Industrial Landscapes)”, and so on. He has also published papers in International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Political Geography, Economic Geography and Critical Asian Studies.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Bae-Gyoon Park
    Professor, Department of Geography Education, Seoul National University

    Jennifer Chun
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2015

  • Thursday, October 1st Nationalism, Internationalism and Cosmopolitanism: Some Observations from Modern Indian History

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2015-16 Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    This lecture will look at nationalism, internationalism and cosmopolitanism as an interconnected triad of movements and ideas from the beginning of the 20th century. Armed nationalist revolutionaries in India established connections abroad to seek arms and training. Indian communists joined the Communist International launched by the Soviet Union in order to move the anti-colonial movement in India in the direction of a people’s democratic revolution. Following World War II, with an emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, a space was created at Bandung in 1955 for a new internationalism of the new independent nations, demanding the end of colonial rule and racial discrimination and the formal establishment of equal sovereignty of all nation-states. This lecture will argue that despite the recent call for a cosmopolitan global order superseding the nation-state, these historical achievements of nationalism and internationalism cannot be erased.

    Partha Chatterjee is Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies at Columbia University, New York, and Honorary Professor, Center for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta. Among his many books are Natinalist Thought and the Colonial World (1986), The Nation and Its Fragments (1993), The Politics of the Governed (2004) and The Black Hole of Empire (2012).


    Speakers

    Partha Chatterjee
    Professor, Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2015

  • Friday, November 6th Law, the Commodity Image and the Consuming Public

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Although the discourse of globalization following the fall of the Soviet Union was sudden and celebratory, many distinct historical developments were brought together in most of the invocations, converging around the argument, either latent or patent, that a verdict had been delivered with the end of the Cold War, on the side of freedom and against overarching state authority.
    My paper will address two specific sets of developments that instance the globalization of media and markets, namely advertising and trademark regulation. There are interesting differences between these developments, and to some extent they reflect consequential differences in nomenclature and usage, between the brand and the trademark. Although in a sense these are the same entity as intellectual property, and can be figured together in the idea of the commodity image, the former is in a lightly regulated zone at best, while the latter is subject to strenuous adjudication seeking to protect manufacturers’ and merchants’ rights while regulating market behavior. Studying examples from Indian case law and the history of Indian marketing and advertising, I will seek to understand how, when key aspects of the development of Indian markets have not replicated western conditions, the relevant differences appear to remain as aberrations to the given norms of understanding market-led globalization.

    Arvind Rajagopal’s work explores questions of political aesthetics vis-à-vis postcolonial state formation. His book Politics After Television: Hindu Nationalism and the Reshaping of the Public in India (Cambridge, 2001) won the Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy Prize from the Association of Asian Studies in 2003, and his edited volume The Indian Public Sphere appeared in 2009. Recent articles include “The Emergency and the New Indian Middle Class” in Modern Asian Studies, 2011, and “Special Political Zone” on the anti-Muslim violence in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, in South Asian History and Culture, 2011. He has held fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton. In addition, he has been a visiting professor at the University of Goettingen, Germany, the Delhi School of Economics at the University of Delhi, and the Central University of Hyderabad. His current research draws on archives in five countries, including India and the United States, and seeks, among other things, to link the disciplinary history of media studies with the history of communication technology.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arvind Rajagopal
    Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 17th Sacred Mountains of China with Ryan Pyle

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 17, 20156:30PM - 8:30PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Join adventurer and renowned photographer, Ryan Pyle, as he spends months exploring and photographing Western China’s remote Sacred Mountains in an effort to better understand these Tibetan regions. His human-powered adventure is “one of the ages” as he explores the remote provinces of Qinghai, Tibet, Sichuan and Yunnan.

    Born in Toronto, Canada, Ryan Pyle spent his early years close to home. After obtaining a degree in International Politics from the University of Toronto in 2001, Ryan realized a lifelong dream and travelled to China on an exploratory mission. In 2002 Ryan moved to China permanently and in 2004 he became a regular contributor to the New York Times. In 2009 Ryan was listed by PDN Magazine as one of the 30 emerging photographers in the world. In 2010 Ryan began working full time on television and documentary film production and has produced and presented several large multi-episode television series for major broadcasters in the USA, Canada, UK, Asia, China and continental Europe.

    Note: We ask that you arrive 15 minutes prior to the start of the screening with a copy of your ticket to guarantee your seat

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ryan Pyle
    Speaker
    Producer

    Josepj Wong
    Chair
    Director, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    CINSSU

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2015

  • Tuesday, December 8th Landscapes of power: mass housing at the urban core in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 8, 20153:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Largely unknown to city-dwellers before the 1960s, large apartment complexes (ap’at’ŭ tanji) powerfully shape the landscapes of contemporary South Korean cities. Some are now being memorialized by artists, planners and citizen themselves. How did apparently western-style housing blocks migrate to Korea on such a large scale? To what extent do they reflect the power relations between the global and the local in South Korean cities? What is currently at stake regarding the future of apartments in the contemporary post-industrial Korean society? Combining the perspectives of cultural geography and Korean studies, and using ethnographic materials gathered on sites studied since the mid-1990s (in downtown Seoul) or new ones in the making (Songdo), the symposium will address those issues regarding the significance of South Korea as a “Republic of Apartments” (ap’at’ŭ konghwaguk), where apartment complexes have been the main mediation of the Korean society to urban modernity.

    Valérie Gelézeau addresses in her research the various dimensions of space as a social construct in contemporary Korea, via different perspectives including urban geography, cultural geography, regional geography and geopolitics. She is the author of Ap’at’ŭ konghwaguk (“The Republic of Apartments” 2007), Atlas de Séoul (2011, a geographical monograph of Seoul as a megacity) and, with Koen De Ceuster and Alain Delissen, the co-editor of De-bordering Korea. Tangible and intangible legacies of the Sunshine Policy (Routledge 2013).


    Speakers

    Valérie Gelézeau
    Associate professor at l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS, Paris), Affiliated fellow at the International Institute for Asian Studies (Leiden, The Netherlands)

    Jennifer Chun
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2016

  • Friday, March 11th Cooperation and the ‘Population Problem’ in Late Colonial Korea: the 1940 Health Investigation of the Urban Poor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 11, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In 1940, students of the Medical Department at Keijō Imperial University set out to investigate the health and living conditions of urban residents in what were perceived as the ghettos of Seoul (Keijō). Called the t’omangmin, these new urban residents whose burgeoning numbers and needs the infrastructure of Seoul was unable to handle were considered part of the “population problem,” as categorized by colonial authorities. Juxtaposing this with other research projects, the presentation explores the rhetoric of love and cooperation in a purportedly scientific investigation to interrogate medical activities and health administration in the context of Seoul’s urban development and expansion of Japanese military expeditions during the Pacific War.

    Sonja M. Kim is Assistant Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY) where she teaches courses on Korean history and East Asia. Her research interests are on issues of gender, medicine, and public health in 20th century Korea.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sonja Kim
    Assistant professor, Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University (SUNY)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 18th Fights against Trafficking in Persons in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    South Korea is currently listed as a tier 1 country under the US State Department Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report. In 2001, when it was ranked a Tier 3 country as a source and transit country, South Korean government tried diligently to improve its image in many ways. It adopted the Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic in 2004 that punishes the solicitation of sex, transformed pre-existing law, and, in 2013, amended provisions in the Criminal Act which broadened the definition of trafficking to include labour trafficking as well. The protection of the victims and witnesses, however, is still quite weak, and a constitutional challenge on the legality of the punishments has been raised. The ratification bill for the Palermo Protocol submitted by the Government on July 10, 2014, is still pending. Professor Baik reviews the light and shadow of the fights against human trafficking in Korea, and discusses the role of law and social morality.

    Dr. Tae-Ung Baik is an Associate Professor of Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He teaches international human rights law, comparative law, and Korean law. Dr. Baik was appointed a mandate-holder of Special Procedure of the UN Human Rights Council in 2015 as a member of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID). He earned his Master’s (LL.M.) and Doctoral (JSD) degrees from Notre Dame Law School, and is an attorney at-law in the State of New York. His book, “Emerging Regional Human Rights Systems in Asia,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tae-Ung Baik
    Associate Professor of Law,William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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