Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

September 2014

  • Tuesday, September 16th Windows of Opportunity: Working in the Frontiers of Biomedical Research

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 16, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Lap-Chee Tsui has had a distinguished academic career with major discoveries in Genetics and Genomics. He identified the Cystic Fibrosis gene in the late 1980s and in further studies of the human genome, characterized chromosome 7. He contributed significantly to fighting the SARS coronavirus in 2003 and led the Hong Kong consortium in the international effort in completing the first comprehensive catalogue of the human genetic evaluations. Dr. Aubie Angel, President of Friends of CIHR, notes that “Dr. Tsui has brought international recognition to Canadian strength in Human Genetics”. He has trained a cadre of scientific investigators who are part of the next wave of Canadian scientific leadership. He maintains close ties with the Canadian genomics community as Emeritus University Professor, University of Toronto, and Adjunct
    Scientist, Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute.

    The Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research was established in 2005 by FCIHR in recognition of Dr. Henry Friesen’s distinguished leadership, vision and innovative contributions to health and health research. The $35,000 Friesen Prize is awarded annually. For further information on Friends of CIHR and the Friesen International Prize, please visit: www.fcihr.ca

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Lap-Chee Tsui
    President and Vice-Chancellor of The University of Hong Kong, and recipient of the 2014 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, September 26th Communism and Hunger: The Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet Famines in Comparative Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 26, 20149:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.


    Speakers

    Lucien Bianco
    École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland

    Andrea Graziosi
    Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research

    Niccolò Pianciola
    Lingnan University, Hong Kong

    Ralph Thaxton
    Brandeis University

    Nicolas Werth
    Institut d’histoire du temps présent

    Zhou Xun
    University of Essex


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Saturday, September 27th Communism and Hunger: Stalin and Hunger as a Nation-Destroying Tool

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, September 27, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.

    Contact

    Marta Baziuk


    Speakers

    Andrea Graziosi
    Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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October 2014

  • Friday, October 3rd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimaging the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces “Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor” (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press, 2014). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: “Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong”; “Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers”; and ” Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography”, and “‘Mail-Order’ Marriages”.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Professor, Director, Asian Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Department of Sociology

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, October 10th From "Den of Iniquity" to "the Internet's Favourite Cyberpunk Slum": The Kowloon Walled City 20 Years On.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 10, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    “City of Darkness Revisited”, by Greg Girard and Ian Lambot.

    The Kowloon Walled City, before its demolition in 1993, is widely acknowledged to have been the most densely populated place on earth: over 35,000 people living in 300 interconnected high-rise buildings crammed into a single Hong Kong city block. Built without contributions from architects or engineers, and without government oversight, the Walled City was dismissed as a “den of iniquity”, where drugs, prostitution and other vices circulated. Since its demolition however, the Walled City is better known now than when it existed, having influenced a generation of architects, designers, writers, artists and others, prompting the website Motherboard to christen it “the Internet’s favorite cyberpunk slum”. Greg Girard and Ian Lambot’s new book, “City of Darkness Revisited”, updates the story of the Walled City, as first revealed in photographs and text in their 1993 book, “City of Darkness”, and examines its unexpected influence in the 20 years since its demolition.

    Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer currently living in Vancouver, Canada whose work has examined the social and physical transformations in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto, Mississauga

    Greg Girard
    Speaker
    Photographer, based in Vancouver, Canada.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Panel Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    From October 24th to October 25th, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto will be hosting a two-day symposium on the Afterlives of the Korean War. Co-sponsored by the Dr.David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, this symposium aims to bring together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    On Friday, October 24th, 2014 a panel discussion will be held in The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility on the intersections between the military and geopolitics with the dynamics of race, nation, diaspora, gender, and sexuality, which will feature Dr. John Price, Dr. Monica Kim, Dr. Christine Hong and Dr. Hosu Kim.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Assistant Professor, Department of Literature and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at University California, Santa Cruz.

    John Price
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Univeristy of Victoria, British Columbia.

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, New York University, New York State.

    Hosu Kim
    Assistannt Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, College of Staten Island, New York.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Performance of "ARA Gut of Jeju" by Dohee Lee and SKIM

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20147:00PM - 8:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C8
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    “Ara” is a Korean word whose various meanings include, “Ocean” and ,”Eye”, which symbolize themes of rebirth and wisdom. This piece will evoke the regenerative powers of the ocean, as the energizing force behind life, and the cycle of rebirth, as the histories and stories that have happened and still happen to the people on the land. This performance piece is dedicated to the history of the people, the stories, the land and justice of Jeju Island.

    Born on Jeju Island in South Korea, where shamanic tradition is very strong, Dohee Lee learned Korean dance, Korean percussion, and vocals. Her art focuses on integrating these traditional forms with contemporary elements. Each piece and performance blends Eastern and contemporary Western musical forms with modern dance languages into works that emphasize the experimental, ritualistic and regenerative aspects of music, dance and visual bodies. Lee has presented her work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Asian Art Museum in SF and performed at Carnegie Zankel Hall in NYC with the Kronos Quartet, Teatro Municipal de Lima Peru, Beijing and Europe.

    SKIM is an artist and cultural worker born and raised in New York, and currently producing music in Los Angeles. Through song, rap, and Korean folk drumming, SKIM’s work breaks silences, honours family, offers love, and demands change.

    Over the past 12 years, SKIM has performed for a wide range of audiences and venues from independent theatres and music festivals, to HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, to youth and senior centers, schools, and juvenile halls, to actions protesting police abuse and war crimes from past to present. They have also shared their work and music through: drumming with organizers and members of Koreatown Immigrant Workers’ Alliance in LA and Jamaesori in the Bay area, performing at events with Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” facilitating creative workshops with youth in Alternative Intervention Models, API Youth Promoting Advocacy and Leadership, the Chicago Children’s Choir; and recently joining a leadership cohort of the Brown Boi Project.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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November 2014

  • Friday, November 7th Youth Precarity in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    Cho Haejoang is cultural anthropologist in training and feminist in faith. She is a professor emeritus of Yonsei University, Seoul. Her early research focused on gender studies in Korean modern history; her current interests and research are in the area of youth culture and modernity in the global/local and post-colonial context of modern day Korea. She is the author of “Women and Men in South Korea” (1988), “Reading Texts, Reading Lives in the Postcolonial Era”, 3 volumes (1992, 1994), “Children Refusing School, Society Refusing Children” (1996), “Reflexive Modernity and Feminism” (1998), and “Children Searching School, Society Searching Children” (2000), “Talking at the Edge: Letters Between Japanese and Korean Feminists” (2004, coauthored with Ueno Chizuko),”It’s Life-Learning Village Again” (2006), and “Back to the Classroom: Reading Text and Reading Everyday Lives in Neo-liberal Era” (2009). They are all in Korean language. Two books are translated into Japanese; “Korean Society and the Gender” (Hose University Press) and “Can the Words Reach?” (Iwanami Publisher coauthored Book with Ueno).

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae-Joang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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February 2015

  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Christian Murck
    Trustee at United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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