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March 2015

  • Monday, March 30th Famines in Maoist China and the Soviet Union: Challenges of Comparison

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 30, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Since the last years, the Great Leap Forward Famine (1959-1962) has become a “hot topic” in the China Studies. Felix Wemheuer will show that we can learn about the Chinese case by comparing it to the Soviet famine under Stalin (1931-33). He will analyze the historical and political roots of these socialist-era famines, in which overambitious industrial programs created greater disasters than those suffered under prerevolutionary regimes. Focusing on famine as a political tool, Wemheuer systematically exposes how conflicts about food among peasants, urban populations, and the socialist state resulted in the starvation death of millions. Furthermore, he will examine the long-term effects of the great famines on the relationship between the state and its citizens and argues that the lessons governments learned from the catastrophes enabled them to overcome famine in their later decades of rule.

    Felix Wemheuer is professor for Modern China Studies at the University of Cologne. This last book “Famine Politics in Maoist China and the Soviet Union” was published with Yale UP (2014). He published several journal articles on the Great Leap Forward and coedited the volumes Eating Bitterness: New Perspectives on China’s Great Leap Forward and the Famine (2011) and Hunger and Scarcity under State-Socialism (2012). He is also the author of two popular books in German: a biography of Mao Zedong (2009) and The Great Hunger: Famines under Stalin and Mao. From 2000 to 2002, he studied Chinese and “History of the Communist Party of China” at the People’s University in Beijing. During various field studies in China, he held oral history interviews with older peasants, intellectuals, and local cadres on the Great Leap Forward famine. In 2006, he received his PhD from the University of Vienna for his thesis on rural memories of the famine in Henan Province. From 2008 to 2010, Felix Wemheuer was a visiting scholar at the Fairbank Center.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Felix Wemheuer
    Professor of Modern China Studies, University of Cologne


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Thursday, April 2nd What Went Wrong in Japan? The Crisis of Social Reproduction

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 2, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The story of Japanese capitalism, held up as a model for economic prosperity and growth, hid nonstandard employment and women’s unpaid reproductive labor in the narrative of success. Once celebrated as a high trust system generating strong economic performance, Japan seemed to have lost its way spectacularly in what some have called the “Lost Decade” of the 1990s. The forms taken by the decades-long crises and the current efforts at resolution must be understood in terms of the specific features of this variety of coordinated capitalism that has dictated events. This juxtaposition of rapid economic success against subsequent failure has eluded theorists’ attempts to explain the enigma of Japanese capitalism. This presentation will identify the institutional sources of labor insecurities behind Japan’s postwar employment system. Gendering institutional analysis has been key to deciphering the enigma of Japanese capitalism.

    Heidi Gottfried, Associate Professor of Sociology at Wayne State University, has published several books and articles on gender and work transformation. Her recent book is entitled Gender, Work and Economy: Unpacking the Global Economy. She has edited or co-edited books on Gendering The Knowledge Economy: Comparative Perspectives; Remapping The Humanities: Identity, Community, Memory, (Post)Modernity; Equity in the Workplace: Gendering Workplace Policy Analysis; and Feminism and Social Change: Bridging Theory and Practice. Her publications include “Temp(t)ing Bodies: Shaping Gender at Work in Japan” and “Japan: The Reproductive Bargain and the Making of Precarious Employment.” The Reproductive Bargain: Deciphering the Enigma of Japanese Capitalism will be published by Brill in the spring.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Heidi Gottfried
    Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University


    Sponsors

    Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 2nd To Singapore, with Love - Screening and Panel Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 2, 20157:00PM - 10:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    To Singapore, With Love is a love letter to the country. Director Tan Pin Pin attends a funeral in the hills of southern Thailand and a family reunion in Malaysia, and later goes for a drive through the English countryside as she searches for different generations of Singaporean political exiles who have not been able to come home. Some were activists or student leaders, others were card-carrying communists – all fled Singapore from the 1960s to 1980s to escape the threat of detention without trial carried out by the British colonial authorities, and later, the independent Singapore government. Some have not returned for fifty years and yet still long for the Singapore of their dreams. As they recount their lives, we see a city-state that could have been.

    The film explores this sense of loss: their personal loss, but also the loss to Singapore herself. Contemporary Singapore has been shaped by their absence. Seen as a model for urban development and success in a globalized world, the city-state celebrates its fiftieth year of independence in 2015. Yet, amid the fanfare and celebrations, its official history is very much a contested terrain. The government has banned this film from all public screenings, saying that “undermines national security.” Singaporeans, however, have resorted to crossing into Malaysia for screenings there, and its overseas communities and international film festivals have held screenings of the film in Asia, Europe and North America. This is To Singapore, With Love’s first public screening in Canada.

    Tan Pin Pin’s films have focused on Singapore, its histories and its limits. They have screened widely in Singapore and internationally at Berlinale, Busan, Cinema du Reel, Visions du Reel, Rotterdam, MOMA and at the Flaherty Seminar as well as on the Discovery Channel. In Singapore, they have received sold- out theatrical screenings, toured schools and been acquired by Singapore Airlines for their in-flight entertainment services. Pin Pin has won or been nominated for more than 20 awards. The citation from Cinema du Reel for Invisible City (2007) described it as “A witty, intellectually challenging essay on history and memory as tools of civil resistance”. Pin Pin’s thesis film Moving House (2001), won the Student Academy Award for Best Documentary. Pin Pin is also a co-founder of filmcommunitysg, a community of independent filmmakers. She was until recently on the Board of The Substation Arts Centre and the National Archives of Singapore.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Victor Li
    Associate Professor, Comparative Literature and English, University of Toronto

    Girish Daswani
    Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies

    Centre for Comparative Literature

    Department of English

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Reel Asian Film Festival

    Malaysian Singaporean Students' Association


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 7th National Identity Query Might Help Myanmar to be Peaceful

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 7, 20153:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After century-long repression, Myanmar people lost their ability to think about their identity. A lot of people still cannot differentiate between race and ethnics, between race and religion. Lack of qualified education throughout its history contributes people’s confused perception towards their identity. Repression made minority groups lost their identity, language and literature. Therefore, when current government makes relaxation in its political system, all groups, either minority or majority, aggressively defend their identity. In other words, people prefer ethnic identity than national identity and so there are different kinds of fights and wars among different groups of people. However people of Myanmar yet define the national identity. National identity query, then, might help Myanmar to be peaceful.

    Ma Thida was born in Rangoon in 1966, where she later studied medicine. In the mid-eighties, she began writing short stories that were published by different journals. The doctor and editor got involved in several democratization projects at the time. She edited pamphlets, evaluated tapes and videos, and was a medical volunteer for the family members of political prisoners. Because of increased censorship, it became more and more difficult for her to publish literary texts. In 1993, Ma Thida was sentenced to twenty years in prison for supporting the pro-democracy movement. Also in 1993, Anna J. Allott at the Northern Illinois University read her essay “Thumbnail sketch on Burmese literature world 1988 onwards’’, which covers in detail different literary forms and includes examples of contemporary works as well as background information about the censorship procedures of the authorities in Myanmar. A lot of sympathy for Ma Thida was shown all over the world while the author was in prison. She was awarded PEN USA’s Barbara Goldsmith Freedom to Write award, Reebok Human Rights award and honor award from American Association of Advancement of Science in 1995-96. After she was released in 1999, Ma Thida spent a lot of time abroad and participated in medical training programmes, international writers’ projects, festivals of literature and panel discussions dealing with freedom of speech. Since 2009 she has been a fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard University. Vipassanā meditation techniques helped her cope while she was in jail. In 2011, she received the Norwegian ‘’Freedom of Speech Award’’, in particular for her novel ‘’The Roadmap’’ (2011), which she published under the pen name Suragamika (tr.: Brave traveller). Based on two families’ story, the book describes two decades of the Burmese democracy movement. Ma Thida also published an anthology of translations of Japanese poems by writers from three decades. Her prison memoir in Burmese named ‘’Sanchaung, Insein, Harvard’’ was published last November and till now, it was published again and again. And she translated a memoir of a Japanese woman and it is called ‘’Letter To Aung San Suu Kyi’’. Another book of her published very recently is a collection of editorials from The Myanmar Independent news journal which she edited last year. She still writes articles and short stories in English and Burmese. Ma Thida is now editing Pae Tin Tharn journal.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ma Thida
    Writer, human rights activist, surgeon, and former political prisoner.


    Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 8th Infrastructure Development and Flooding Mitigation: a Case of the Megacity of Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 8, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    Not only is Jakarta the largest metropolitan area in Southeast Asia, it is the also one of the most dynamic, though beset with most of the urban problems experienced in twenty-first century Southeast Asia. Batavia, colonial capital of the Netherland Indies in the first half of the 20th century was a small urban area of approximately 150,000 residents. In the second half, Batavia became Jakarta, the 28 million megacity capital of independent Indonesia. Among many urban problems, one major problem plagued Jakarta in the last two decades is floods. Despite several infrastructure development projects to alleviate flooding, the severity of flooding in many parts of Jakarta has not decreased. Floods have become a threat and brought woes for Jakarta residents every year. This presentation will describe the transformation of Jakarta and discuss infrastructure development projects and annual flooding in Jakarta. All efforts of mitigating the annual flooding will also critically analyzed.

    Dr. Deden Rukmana is an associate professor and coordinator of Urban Studies and Planning Program at Savannah State University, USA. He is currently a member of the Governing Board of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. He received a PhD degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Florida State University and completed master’s degrees from the University of Southern California as well as Bandung Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Savannah State University, he worked as a planning analyst with the Florida Department of Community Affairs. He also has eight years of experience as urban planner in Indonesia. He has authored a book (Residential Origins of the Homeless), a number of journal articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, book reviews, and dozens of Op-ed pieces in various publications, newspapers and magazines in the US, Indonesia, Singapore and the UK. His works appeared in many academic journals including International Planning Studies, Journal of Planning Education and Research, Area and Planning Theory and Practice. His current research centers on health disparities, homelessness and poverty in the US, and spatial planning, housing and development challenges in Indonesia. His works had been cited by many media including AFP, Straits Times, Jakarta Post, Jakarta Globes, and Public Radio International. His blog Indonesia’s Urban Studies is one of the world’s best city blogs by the Guardian Cities.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Deden Rukmana
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Public Affairs, Savannah State University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 9th A Threat to Peace: Humanitarian Mine Action in Burma/Myanmar and the Mismanagement of Risk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This article examines current debates for and against Humanitarian Mine Action (HMA) in Burma/Myanmar. The analysis, based on interviews with key local, national, and international actors involved in HMA, reveals why so many of them regard the mapping and removal of “nuisance” (i.e. non-strategic) mines to pose a security threat to the peace process. These same debates also shed light on the growing role risk management approaches now take in Burma/Myanmar as a response to decades of authoritarian misrule by a succession of military regimes. The land mines, although buried in the ground, actively unsettle such good governance initiatives and the neoliberal development projects to which they are often linked, most often by re-territorializing military, political, economic, and environmental authority in overlapping and conflicting ways at multiple scales. The findings reveal why HMA actors resist labeling the crisis mine contamination poses to civilians a “crisis” that requires immediate humanitarian action.

    Ken MacLean, an Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change at Clark University, has more than two decades of experience working with NGOs on issues related to human rights violations, conflict-induced displacement, extractive industries, and territorial disputes across South East Asia. He is currently preparing a book on the impact NGO archival practices have upon human rights “fact” production related to Burma/Myanmar. He has published widely on Vietnam in addition to Burma/Myanmar.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ken MacLean
    Assistant Professor, Clark University


    Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 9th Towards a Grounded, Immanent Critique: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in Delhi

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This talk explores possibilities for developing a grounded critique of capitalism in contemporary India, drawing on the politics and cosmologies of migrant workers in Delhi. I begin by discussing the workings of categories (e.g. freedom, dignity, and consciousness), the ambivalence towards religion, and the relative absence of workers’ categories and self-understandings in works of Indian labor studies. Next, I describe the intertwining of politics and cosmology in the discourses and activities of migrant workers working in a metal polishing factory of Delhi. According to the implicit visions of workers, oppressive, work-intensifying processes in factories arise due to a dynamic interplay between souls and the present, ‘decivilizing’ epoch (the Kalyug in Hindu cosmology, the impending Qayamat in Islam), in which thoughts, actions, and dealings become distorted by egoistic and demonic proclivities. Workers attempt to non-cooperate with this distorting interplay through body-conserving resistances, humor and joking, multiple forms of collectivity, public protests, and religious festivity. Through these ‘anti-decivilizing’ activities, workers create possibilities for survival, respect, integrative relations, and glimpses of justice. I conclude by suggesting how categories from multiple sources (workers, proximate discourses, and remote thinkers) might be integrated to construct a grounded, immanent critique of capitalism, which analyses oppressive practices of capital and the state, recognizes distortions in workers’ activities, and intimates possibilities for autonomous transformations in workers’ worlds.

    Shankar Ramaswami is a Lecturer on South Asian Studies at the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University, where he teaches courses on anthropology, religion, literature, and cinema. He completed a B.A. in Economics at Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is currently working on a book entitled, Souls in the Kalyug: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in Delhi.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shankar Ramaswami
    Lecturer, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Civilizations

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 10th Maiden Voyage: The Senzaimaru and the Creation of Modern Sino-Japanese Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 10, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    After centuries of virtual isolation, during which time international sea travel was forbidden outside of Japan’s immediate fishing shores, Japanese shogunal authorities in 1862 made the unprecedented decision to launch an official delegation to China by sea. Concerned by the fast-changing global environment, they had witnessed the ever-increasing number of incursions into Asia by European powers—not the least of which was Commodore Perry’s arrival in Japan in 1853–54 and the forced opening of a handful of Japanese ports at the end of the decade. The Japanese reasoned that it was only a matter of time before they too encountered the same unfortunate fate as China; their hope was to learn from the Chinese experience and to keep foreign powers at bay. They dispatched the Senzaimaru to Shanghai with the purpose of investigating contemporary conditions of trade and diplomacy in the international city. Japanese from varied domains, as well as shogunal officials, Nagasaki merchants, and an assortment of deck hands, made the voyage along with a British crew, spending a total of ten weeks observing and interacting with the Chinese and with a handful of Westerners. Roughly a dozen Japanese narratives of the voyage were produced at the time, recounting personal impressions and experiences in Shanghai. The Japanese emissaries had the distinct advantage of being able to communicate with their Chinese hosts by means of the “brush conversation” (written exchanges in literary Chinese). For their part, the Chinese authorities also created a paper trail of reports and memorials concerning the Japanese visitors, which worked its way up and down the bureaucratic chain of command.

    This was the first official meeting of Chinese and Japanese in several centuries. Although the Chinese authorities agreed to few of the Japanese requests for trade relations and a consulate, nine years later China and Japan would sign the first bilateral treaty of amity in their history, a completely equal treaty. East Asia—and the diplomatic and trade relations between the region’s two major players in the modern era—would never be the same.

    Joshua Fogel is Professor of History and Canada Research Chair in the History of Modern China at York University. A leading scholar of modern East Asian history, Professor Fogel is the author of numerous books and articles on China and Japan and their reciprocal interaction from the fourteenth through to the nineteenth century.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Joshua Fogel
    Professor of History and Canada Research Chair in the History of Modern China,York University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, April 18th The Land of Many Palaces: A Screening and Q&A with Filmaker Adam Smith

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 18, 20156:00PM - 7:30PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
    Toronto, ON
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    In Ordos, China, thousands of farmers are being relocated into a new city under a government plan to modernize the region. “The Land of Many Palaces” follows a government official whose job is to convince these farmers that their lives will be better off in the city, and a farmer in one of the last remaining villages in the region who is pressurized to move. The film explores a process that will take shape on an enormous scale across China, since the central government announced plans to relocate 250 million farmers to cities across the nation, over the next 20 years.

    Adam is a Stanford-educated documentary filmmaker from England. His films focus on characters experiencing rapid change in their lives. To date, he has produced, directed and edited four short documentaries in America – The Diner, Love & Allegiance (co-dir Tijana Petrovic), Shangri-La, Role Play – and one feature documentary in China, The Land of Many Palaces (co-dir Song Ting). He is currently in the pre-production stage for his next two feature-documentaries in China: Mountain Town (working title) about the replica Wyoming town of Jackson Hole in Hebei, and On the Banks of the Pearl River (working title) exploring entrepreneurialism in Shenzhen. In addition to making his own films, he has worked for TED, the Journal Sentinel, Rabbit Bandini Productions, Stanford’s Office of Public Affairs, the China Central Academy of Fine Arts, and the Chinese National Academy of Painting.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Adam Smith
    Filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 27th The Sun Sets Over the Planning Commission: Where is India's Economic Policy Headed?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 27, 20155:00PM - 7:30PMFleck Atrium (Ground floor, North Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
    105 St George Street, Toronto
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    Description

    No fee – all are welcome. Pre-registration online by noon on April 27 is mandatory.To register for this event, please go to:

    http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/april27/

    SPEAKERS:
    Kant Bhargava, former Diplomat and former South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation Secretary General (India)
    Richard Bird, Senior Fellow of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance and Professor Emeritus, Economics, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    Sanjay Reddy, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, New School University, United States
    Mitu Sengupta, Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
    MODERATOR: Kasi Rao, Vice President, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and Director, APF Toronto Office; Senior Advisor (India), Bennett Jones
    HOST: Dilip Soman, Director, India Innovation Institute, Behavioural Economics in Action, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    The Indian Planning Commission was one of India’s leading public economic institutions. While the Commission was largely seen as a legacy of the socialist period, it also played an important role in providing legitimacy to the country’s federal framework and guided the economic and political dimension of the relationship between the Central Government and states. The dissolution of the Planning Commission by the present government in New Delhi and its replacement by the Niti Aayog thus raises some important questions for economic policy. Join our panel as they will provide an overview and update of the situation as well as tackle the following questions:

    1) Will the quasi constitutional Finance Commission now play a greater role in the fiscal relationship between the states and the Central Government? And what do the changes mean for relations between New Delhi and the states?
    2) Will the Niti Aayog continue to liaise with civil society and individual economists who were consulted by the Planning Commission on social expenditures?
    3) What does the dissolution of the Planning Commission mean for the future policy trajectory of Indian economic development and the Federal Structure of the political system?

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972

    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    India Innovation Institute Speaker Series, University of Toronto

    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Saturday, May 16th – Sunday, May 17th The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA)

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 16, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Sunday, May 17, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA),

    This is an international festival with a difference, truly reflecting the diversity of Toronto. Over 30 writers from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Tanzania, and of course all across Canada will be present. Saturday night dance performance by Hari Krishan and InDance. African guitar by Tichaona Maradze. There will be panels on a variety of subjects, including New Theatre in Canada, East Asian Writing, South Asian Writing, Writing in Languages Other than English.

    Admission is free except for the Saturday night event. It is advisable but not essential to pre-register.

    The event runs May 15-17, 2015, for more information and the full program click the link below.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 21st Gala Performance of Asian Canadian Artists:Silk Roads Ii – Mongolia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 21, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College Town Hall
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FESTIVAL 2015

    Opening Address: Mr. Justin Poy, Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI
    “Photographic Images of Magnificent Mongolia” by Dr. Neville Poy and The Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy

    Keynote and Performance:

    “A Rare Instrument From China: Hongkou 箜篌”by Professor Chan Ka Nin
    Hongkou Performance by Liu Xuanyi

    “Magnetic Fields” (An Excerpt) – Contemporary Dance by Yvonne Ng and tiger princess dance projects

    Mongolian Music on Morin Khuur (Horsehead Fiddle) (Tbc) Traditional Mongolian Dances for the Grand Feast Event by Chi‐Ping Dance Group & dancers of Chinese Collective Arts Association

    Middle Eastern Music on 3 Different Instruments: Bouzouki, Oud And Saz by Yiannis Kapoulas

    RECEPTION FOLLOWS
    Free admission, please register at asianheritagecanadian@yahoo.ca.

    Note: Event starts at 7:00 p.m., please be seated by 6.45 p.m.
    Map at http://www.utoronto.ca/townhall/contact.html (St. George Stn)

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI


    Sponsors

    Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


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