Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

September 2016

  • Friday, September 30th A lecture by Dr. Un-Chan Chung, Former Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 30, 201610:30AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Arrival and light refreshments
    11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Presentation

    Dr. Un-Chan Chung will share his thoughts on current affairs in the Republic of Korea (South Korea) vis-à-vis global currents from his unique vantage point as a former leader at the highest levels of government and academia.

    Dr. Un-Chan Chung served as the prime minister of the Republic of Korea (South Korea) during 2009-2010. He has served as the chairman of the Presidential Commission on Shared Growth for Large and Small Companies. In February 2012, he was appointed the first honorary mayor of the Jeju Global Education City (JGEC), whose goal is to reduce the country’s educational trade deficit. He was a professor of Seoul National University (SNU) from 1978 to 2009, serving as the president of the university from July 2002 to July 2006.

    Dr. Chung earned a bachelor’s degree in economics at SNU and his master’s degree in economics at Miami University (Ohio). In 1978, he was awarded a doctoral degree in economics from Princeton. Chung returned to Princeton in 2008 as a visiting fellow at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS).

    Contact

    Don Rickerd
    (416) 946-8900


    Speakers

    Dr. Un-Chan Chung
    Former Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea; Former President of Seoul National Univeristy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2016

  • Thursday, October 6th Poetry, Fiction, and Authorial Identity in D. Dilip Kumar’s Short Stories

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 6, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar Annual Tamil Lecture

    Description

    Poets appear as central characters in two of D. Dilip Kumar’s (1951-) Tamil short stories: first, as a feckless, drunken husband in the 1988 experimental piece “Nikala Marutta Arputam” (“The Miracle that Refused to Happen”), and second, as a romantic, suicidal misfit in the 1992 “Manam Enum Tōṇi Parri.” The title of the latter is the first line of a poem from the Śaiva Tirunāvukkarasar Tēvāram, and is used as part of the moody soundscape of the story, but has little bearing on the actual plot (the author and I have titled the story “Scent of a Woman” in English). I will explore three moments in which poetry appears in these stories. First, in “The Miracle that Refused to Happen,” Mr. James, the protagonist and for all practical purposes the only speaker in the entire story, utters a poem of his own composition towards the end of a disastrous monologue aimed at his wife. Second, James also begins to spout passages from the King James Version of the Psalms, and here I will examine how the Psalms in Tamil carry a very different feel from the same lines in the English of the King James text, and how the passages are used in this instance to manipulate and break down the resolve of his wife. My third example is drawn from “Scent of a Woman.” The story is semi-autobiographical, and the two poems that are featured in it are recited in intimate conversation with the story’s romantic heroine at moments of decisive and critical turns in its very structure. Exploring the several instances in which Dilip Kumar pays homage to the antiquity of the Tamil language and to its literary conventions, I will consider how verse is embedded in prose, what the shifts in register accomplish in terms of plot and character development, and how one mode of discourse is ultimately valued over another.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Martha Ann Selby
    Department of Asian Studies, The University of Texas at Austin


    Sponsors

    Department of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 7th The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Many observers predicted the collapse of the Chinese Communist Party following the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, and again following the serial collapse of communist regimes behind the Iron Curtain. Their predictions, however, never proved true. Despite minor setbacks, China has experienced explosive economic growth and relative political stability ever since 1989. In The Dictator’s Dilemma, Bruce Dickson provides a comprehensive explanation for regime’s continued survival and prosperity. Dickson draws upon original public opinion surveys, interviews, and published materials to explain why there is so much popular support for the regime. This basic stability is a familiar story to China specialists, but not to those whose knowledge of contemporary China is limited to the popular media. This talk will appeal to anyone interested in understanding China’s increasing importance in world politics.

    Bruce Dickson is professor of political science and international affairs and chair of the political science department at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on political dynamics in China, especially the adaptability of the Chinese Communist Party and the regime it governs.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Bruce Dickson
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science and International Affairs and Chair, Department of Polical Science, George Washington University

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 21st Dust, between Life and Death: Reflections on the Materiality of Media

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 21, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This paper begins with Zhao Liang’s Behemoth (悲兮魔兽), a controversial experimental film on extractive industries and the lost bodies and ghosts that roam the ruined and toxic landscapes of Inner Mongolia. My interest in this film is part of a larger project asking how we might study the dust that causes industrial explosions, that gathers in gold and coalmines, in the lungs, becomes a part of the everyday for those who care for the near dead, or mourn the already gone. We live now in a moment marked by air pollution masks as fashion statements. We know masking is performed on social media platforms. And we know all about mostly western media attempts to portray China as an eco-apocalyptic death zone. Lost in this media frenzy are those hidden away in factories or those workers who labour underground, those often denied masks and respirators. This takes me into stories of scholars and activists who care for the sick and the dying, who work to make dust legible. Dust kills and it creates demands for justice and forms of compensation, even though these activists and families know that lives sacrificed for national wealth and global media connectivity can never be reclaimed. I conclude with some thoughts on how our own tools of research and storytelling – mobile phones, digital cameras and images, social media platforms, batteries, cables and clouds – are implicated in the dust that enters the everyday lives of miners and industrial workers, in China and elsewhere. How dust is part of the global everyday.

    Ralph Litzinger is Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. He is the author of Other Chinas: the Yao and the Politics of National Belonging (Duke University Press, 2000). His most recent book, with Carlos Rojas, is Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China (Duke University Press, 2016). He has published on dam protests and environmental politics in southwest China, on rural-urban migration, and suicide as a form of protest in contemporary China. He is the editor of the “Labor Question in China: Apple and Beyond,” in South Atlantic Quarterly in 2013, and co-editor of “Self Immolation as Protest in Tibet,” a 2012 online issue of Cultural Anthropology. He is currently completing a book manuscript called Migrant Futures: China from the Urban Fringe. His new research concerns eco-media, media materialism, and the visualization of the Anthropocene.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ralph A Litzinger
    Professor, Duke University, Cultural Anthropology


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 26th A New History of Vietnam? Questions of Colonialism, Collaboration, and Periodization

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 26, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    It has never been easy to write the history of Vietnam. This small country’s role in one of the most violent wars of decolonization of the 20th century and in one of the Cold War’s longest conflicts has meant that its past has been endlessly abused for all sorts of purposes, both inside and outside the country. It is perhaps only now, in the early 21st century, that the events which created the modern state can be seen from a more dispassionate, historical perspective. To illustrate this point, Christopher Goscha examines two themes that have been left out of standard accounts of Vietnam – the question of Vietnamese colonialism and collaboration. He will also suggest why it might be useful to revisit the question of periodizing Vietnam’s ‘modern history’ in terms of this country’s colonial encounter with the French in 1858 in order to push it further back in time or leave it open.

    Christopher Goscha is associate professor of international relations at the department of history at the Université du Québec à Montréal. His works focuses on colonial Indochina, the wars over Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, and the Cold War in Asia. He recently published Vietnam, A New History (Basic Books, 2016) and is currently working on a social history of colonial Saigon and Hanoi in a time of war (1945-54).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 27th The Look of Silence Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 27, 20163:00PM - 7:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
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    Description

    The Center for Southeast Asian Studies invites you to the first screening of a brand-new movie series. We will screen the second documentary by critically-acclaimed filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer (The Act of Killing) about the 1965 Indonesian genocide. In this sequel, Oppenheimer “focuses on a family of survivors who discovers how their son was murdered, as well as the identities of the killers. The youngest son, an optometrist named Adi, decides to break the suffocating spell of submission and terror by doing something unimaginable in a society where the murderers remain in power: he confronts the men who killed his brother and, while testing their eyesight, asks them to accept responsibility for their actions. This unprecedented film initiates and bears witness to the collapse of fifty years of silence http://thelookofsilence.com/).” Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Southeast Studies, will comment on the movie and contextualize it in relation to politics and development in Indonesia.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Professor, Anthropology; Director, Center for Southeast Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th “Religious Suicide” and the Limits of Indian Secularism: Screening and Discussion with the director Shekhar Hattangadi

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
    130 St George St, 3rd Floor
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    What happens when a traditional religious practice conflicts with modern secular law? The talk — in conjunction with the film — addresses this central question as it looks at the tensions that arise when a religious tradition endorses the self-extinguishment of human life in a legal system that treats suicide as a criminal offence. It explores the doctrinal-scriptural, ethical, medico-legal and sociological aspects of Santhara — a Jain practice in which a person fasts unto death — and examines how religion, law and constitutional secularism intersect in the ongoing debate outside the courtroom and in the litigation over the legality of the practice. Irrespective of how the Indian courts may rule in the matter, Santhara remains a classic example of the law-religion conflict, and provides an ideal template for debating the question of reconciling individual freedom as well as a minority community’s religious rights with the justification for state intervention in matters of religion.

    A Mumbai,India-based media columnist, law professor and film-maker, Shekhar Hattangadi believes he is an academic at heart. He topped University of Mumbai’s law exams bagging three gold medals, and he fondly recalls his years as a student and researcher on the American campus: first as a graduate student at Ohio University in Athens,OH and then as a Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F.Kennedy School of Government. SANTHARA: A Challenge to Indian Secularism? is the first of his series of documentaries examining controversial religious practices in India.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shekhar Hattangadi
    University of Mumbai, India


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2016

  • Friday, November 4th The Politics of Shari'a Law: Islamist Activists and the State in Democratizing Indonesia

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Islamization of politics in Indonesia after 1998 presents an underexplored puzzle: why has there been a rise in the number of shari’a laws despite the electoral decline of Islamist parties? In his talk, Michael Buehler presents an analysis of the conditions under which Islamist activists situated outside formal party politics may capture and exert influence in Muslim-majority countries facing democratization. His analysis shows that introducing competitive elections creates new pressures for entrenched elites to mobilize and structure the electorate, thereby opening up new opportunities for Islamist activists to influence politics.

    Michael Buehler is a Senior Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London. Specializing in Southeast Asian politics, his teaching and research interests evolve around state-society relations under conditions of democratization and decentralization.Previously he taught at Columbia University and Northern Illinois University. He has also held research fellowships at the Center for Equality Development and Globalization Studies at Northwestern University in Chicago, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute in New York City, and the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. Michael Buehler has been an Associate Research Fellow at the Asia Society in New York City since 2011.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Buehler
    Senior Lecture, Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London


    Sponsors

    Insitute of Islamic Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 8th Empires and the Idea of Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 8, 20164:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Lecture

    Description

    The word “culture” in English today gestures toward two distinct ideas: one of a universal hierarchy of values, embodied in canons of art and literature; and the other of a plurality of systems of value associated with different societies. In what was called the “culture life,” cosmopolitan intellectuals in Japan between the two world wars conceived a third sort of culture in an attempt to bridge Eurocentric hierarchy and local particularism. The idea also gained currency in colonial Korea. Although the “culture life” in Japan collapsed in the 1930s under the weight of its own idealism, it had a long life in Korea and saw a revival in Japan after the war. The unresolved dialectic between universal Culture and particular cultures was later absorbed into heritage protection policy under UNESCO, where Japan played an important role as one of the most powerful non-European participants. This lecture will show how a hybrid conception of culture was enabled by Japan’s position among the imperial powers, and how the fall of the Japanese empire and the dismantling of European colonial empires redefined what could be imagined under the rubric of culture.

    Jordan Sand is Professor of Japanese History and Culture at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He holds a masters degree in architecture history from the University of Tokyo and a doctorate in history from Columbia University. His research focuses on material culture and the history of everyday life. He is the author of House and Home in Modern Japan (Harvard University Press, 2004), Tokyo Vernacular: Common Spaces, Local Histories, Found Objects (University of California Press, 2013) and 帝国日本の生活空間 (Living Spaces of Imperial Japan; Iwanami shoten, 2015). He has also published on historical memory, museums and cultural heritage policy, and the history of food. He has served as visiting professor at Sophia University, the University of Tokyo, University of Michigan, and the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences in Paris. He is presently a visiting researcher at Waseda University working on a study of the history of slums in Tokyo and other Asian cities.


    Speakers

    Jordan Sand
    Professor, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 11th Revolutions in Indology

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 11, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture

    Description

    Amidst the challenges of diminishing funding and folding departments, the study of India’s classical languages and cultures has been enjoying an unexpected period of excitement and development. Indology is alive, dynamic, and full of new ideas that make major differences to how we think about India’s past. Examples of ideas where old certainties are being challenged include the dating and relationships of early yoga literature, the Greater Magadha hypothesis, the date of the Arthaśāstra, the Buddhist origins of ayurveda and yoga, the Tibetan Buddhist tantric origins of Hatha Yoga, and the origins of Dharmaśāstra. Ideas from Olivelle, Bronkhorst, Zysk, Maas, Pollock, Mallinson, Singleton and others are transforming Indian studies in major ways. Not all these new hypotheses will survive longer scrutiny. But many will, and tomorrow’s Indology may be a renewed and markedly different field of scholarship.

    Dominik Wujastyk is the Saroj and Prem Singhmar Chair of Classical Indian Society and Polity at the University of Alberta, a post he has held since 2015. He was educated at Oxford University, and later worked as a curator of Sanskrit manuscripts at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London. From 2002 to 2009 he held a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship at University College London, and from 2009 to 2014 he worked on the project “Philosophy and Medicine in Early Classical India” at the University of Vienna. His monograph publications include Metarule of Paninian Grammar (1992) and The Roots of Ayurveda (3rd ed. 2003), and he is currently working with Prof. Philipp Maas (Leipzig) on a book about the earliest history of Indian yoga postures.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dominik Wujastyk
    University of Alberta, Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2016

  • Tuesday, December 6th Metamorphoses: Archival Fictioning and the Historian’s Craft

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 6, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In attempting to understand early modern science and medicine from Chinese natural history to Manchu translations of bodily gesture and sensation, my work has placed the history and translation of metamorphic stories at its center. For our gathering – intended more as a conversation about craft than a formal talk – I will introduce recent work in which I have been expanding my practice to integrate short fiction and prose poetry as modes of reading and analyzing historical documents. The focus of my attention will be a new project called Metamorphoses that is loosely inspired by the work of Ovid and is devoted to creating stories of material transformation through creative readings and misreadings of primary source documents that derive from (or are oriented toward) early modern China.

    Carla Nappi is Associate Professor of History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies at the University of British Columbia. Her first book, The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and its Transformations in Early Modern China (Harvard, 2009) was a study of belief-making in early modern Chinese natural history through the lens of the Bencao gangmu (1596), a compendium of materia medica. Her current research explores practices and contexts of translation in the Ming and Qing periods.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Carla Nappi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies, University of British Columbia.

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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