Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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October 2014

  • Thursday, October 2nd The Persistence of Cold War Regime: The discourse “chongbuk chwap’a” in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Centre for the Study of Korea Speaker Series

    Description

    How might one explain the rise of “chongbuk chwap’a” , or “pro-North leftists” discourse given South Korea’s recent history of the democratization movement and the transition from a series of authoritarian regimes to a parliamentary democracy? In what ways does this discourse differ from the anticommunism of the earlier period? What are some historical and political implications of the discourse in contemporary South Korea? These are some of the questions explored by Professor Namhee Lee as she situates this discourse broadly within the context of the persistence of the Cold war regime on the Korean peninsular and discourse of failure of revolutionary experiences worldwide.

    Namhee Lee is an associate professor of Korean history at University of California Los Angeles and her publications include The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea (Cornell). Lee is working on a book project entitled Social Memory and Public History in South Korea, which explores production of historical knowledge outside academic institutions.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Namhee Lee
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages & Culture, University of California Los Angeles



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 3rd The Implications of Urbanization and Climate Change in Urbanizing Cities in the Lower Mekong Region

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201411:00AM - 1:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Room 5017A
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    Description

    Register online at: http://urbanclimateresiliencesea.apps01.yorku.ca/event-activity/thinphanga-09-2014/

    Medium-sized cities in the Lower Mekong countries are rapidly urbanizing. Most urban centres are geographically located in hazardous space, such as low-lying floodplains, river deltas, and coastal zones. Rapid growth and expansion, leading to significant changes in ecological landscapes and land use, exacerbate existing risks. Weak governance and institutional capacity magnify the impacts of climate change and natural disasters, contributing to increasing vulnerability of urban residents. Regionalization will accelerate the pace of urbanization, particularly in smaller border towns. As cities continue to protect urban economic centres from weather-related disasters, risks are shifted and transferred to the hinterlands. But the development growth of urban centres is dependent on the hinterlands for natural resources and labour. Understanding regionalization and urbanization implications as complex, transformative processes is critical for assessing climate vulnerability and strengthening urban resilience to climate change.

    Dr. Pakamas Thinphanga is one of the co-directors of the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership, funded by IDRC and SSHRC. As a Programme Manager at the Thailand Environment Institute Foundation, she leads the Urban Climate Resilience Programme and is responsible for the overall management, strategic planning, and building capacity of the project teams. Under the programme, projects, including the Rockefeller supported Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) and USAID funded Mekong Building Climate Resilient Asian Cities (M-BRACE), focus on research areas in urbanization, climate change, understanding vulnerability and resilience concepts, and translating urban climate resilience concepts into practice. Pakamas provides technical assistance to city stakeholders in urban climate resilience planning and building efforts. Her team at TEI also focuses on disseminating and communicating urban climate resilience thinking to broader audience for dialogues and to inform decision-making processes.

    Pakamas has a technical background in biological sciences and coastal ecology with a PhD from James Cook University, Australia and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oxford.

    A light lunch will be served. To assist us with catering, please RSVP to alicia.filipowich@utoronto.ca before Wednesday, 1 October 2014 and include any food sensitivities or allergies in your RSVP email.


    Speakers

    Pakamas Thinphanga
    Thailand Environment Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    York University

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

    International Development Research Council (IDRC)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 3rd Beatings, Beacons and Big Men: Police Disempowerment and De-legitimation in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    It is a truism that police in India generally lack legitimate authority and public trust. This lack is widely understood by scholars, policy analysts, and police practitioners as being rooted in the institution’s colonial development as a means of oppression, and its alleged corruption and criminalization in the postcolonial period. The social facts of situational hyper-empowerment and the widespread decadence of police do much to explain their poor image and performance, but these explanations do not account for the fact that police in India are also structurally disempowered by cultural-political and legal-institutional claims to multiple and conflicting forms of authority that challenge and often overwhelm the authority of police. This structural disempowerment and its performances in everyday interactions between the police and the public constitute an ongoing social process of delegitimation of police authority in contemporary India. Following ethnographic analysis of this process of delegitimation, I explore the implications of focusing on police disempowerment for theorizations of the sources and capabilities of state legal authority more generally

    Beatrice Jauregui is an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests involve ethnographic and historical study of the lived experiences of persons working in police and military bureaucracies to understand the everyday dynamics of authority, security and democratic order. Her forthcoming book, with the working title Provisional Authority: Policing and Order in India, is based on more than two years of fieldwork with police in Uttar Pradesh.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 9th Workshop on Media Industries

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 9, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nitin Govil
    Assistant Professor, Department of Critical Studies, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California


    Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute

    Cinema Studies Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 9th Orienting Hollywood: Producing “India” as Location

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 9, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMRoom 222, Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, 2 Sussex Avenue (at St. George south of Bloor)
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    Description

    International film production studies often considers the importance of location shooting.The popular “woods” suffix appended to various film industries: Bollywood, Nollywood, and Kollywood frames a kind of imagined location of practices dispersed across different places. While location can become part of a region’s creative capital, it can also stand in for the nation and link to imperatives that position the national within global. Since tourism ties into the auratic assumptions about location and a perceived irreproducible distinctiveness, international film producers have been drawn to location shooting because unique local geographies provide the requisite authenticity to anchor a film’s narrative. On the other hand, the transposable mutability of place: Vancouver for New York, Dubai for Mumbai, means that location is now integrated into broader policy and economic frameworks. This talk considers Hollywood’s production of place, focusing on American cinema’s real and imagined engagement with India. Professor Govil will discuss how geographies of production narrativize place across histories of practice.

    Nitin Govil is Assistant Professor of Critical Studies at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. He is the co-author of Global Hollywood
    (2001) and Global Hollywood 2 (2005). Other work has been published in over twenty journals and anthologies and has been translated into Chinese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Turkish. His new book, “Orienting Hollywood: A Century of Film Culture Between Los Angeles and Bombay”, will be out early next year. His new project is called “Out of Alignment: Bombay Film and the Cold War”.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nitin Govil
    Assistant Professor, Department of Critical Studies, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California


    Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 10th From "Den of Iniquity" to "the Internet's Favourite Cyberpunk Slum": The Kowloon Walled City 20 Years On

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 10, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library
    8th Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The Kowloon Walled City, before its demolition in 1993, is widely acknowledged to have been the most densely populated place on earth: over 35,000 people living in 300 interconnected high-rise buildings crammed into a single Hong Kong city block. Built without contributions from architects or engineers – and without government oversight – the Walled City was dismissed as a “den of iniquity” where drugs, prostitution, and other vices circulated. However since its demolition the Walled City is better known now than when it existed, having influenced a generation of architects, designers, writers, artists and others, prompting the website Motherboard to christen it “the Internet’s favorite cyberpunk slum”. Greg Girard and Ian Lambot’s new book, “City of Darkness Revisited”, updates the story of the Walled City, as first revealed in photographs and text in their 1993 book “City of Darkness”, and examines its unexpected influence in the 20 years since its demolition.

    Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer currently living in Vancouver, Canada whose work has examined the social and physical transformations in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

    Tong Lam (PhD, University of Chicago) is a professor of history at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on empire, nation, and urban space. He is also a multimedia visual artist with ongoing photographic and documentary film projects.

    Reception to follow to launch the Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans series.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies University of Toronto, Mississauga

    Greg Girard
    Speaker
    Photographer


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 16th Placing the Dead in Times of Solitarization in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 16, 20141:00PM - 3:00PMRoom 200
    Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    At a moment when the population is declining, marriage and birth rates are down, one-third of people live alone while one-fourth are 65 or older, and cases of “lonely death” (of solitary people whose bodies are discovered days, or weeks, after death) are reported daily, the social ecology of existence is undergoing radical change in 21st century Japan. While long-term bonds—to company, family, locale—were once the earmarks of its “group-oriented society,” today it is living, and dying, alone that marks Japan’s new era of “single-ification” and “disconnected society” (muen shakai). How the rise of single-ification affects the management of death—both those already dead as well as those at risk of dying in/from solitude—is the subject of this talk. Looking at new practices of burying/memorializing the dead, new trends in both single and solitary lifestyles, and the case of a Buddhist priest working to keep alive those contemplating self-death (suicide), Allison considers how the neoliberal shift to “self-responsibility” plays out in the everyday rhythms of being with/out others for post-social Japanese.

    Anne Allison is a Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Women’s Studies at Duke University. A specialist in contemporary Japan, she studies the interface between material conditions and desire/fantasy/imagination across various domains including corporate capitalism, global popular culture, and precarity. Allison is the author of Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club (1994), Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan (1996), Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination (2006), and Precarious Japan (2013).

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Anne Allison
    Professor, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Japan Studies Association of Canada


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Panel Discussion, “On Unfinished Wars and the Politics of the Past”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    From October 24th to October 25th, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto will be hosting a two-day symposium on the Afterlives of the Korean War. Co-sponsored by the Dr.David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, this symposium aims to bring together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world. The Afterlives of the Korean War brings together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    On Friday, October 24th, 2014 a panel discussion will be held in The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility on the intersections between the military and geopolitics with the dynamics of race, nation, diaspora, gender, and sexuality, which will feature Dr. John Price, Dr. Monica Kim, Dr. Christine Hong and Dr. Hosu Kim.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Assistant Professor, Department of Literature and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at University California, Santa Cruz.

    John Price
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Victoria, British Columbia.

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, New York University, New York State.

    Hosu Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, College of Staten Island, New York.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Department of Political Science

    Department of Sociology

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Department of History

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Canadian Studies Program

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Performance of, "ARA Gut of Jeju" by Dohee Lee and SKIM

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20147:00PM - 8:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C8
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    “Ara” is a Korean word whose various meanings include, “Ocean” and ,”Eye”, which symbolize themes of rebirth and wisdom. This piece will evoke the regenerative powers of the ocean, as the energizing force behind life, and the cycle of rebirth, as the histories and stories that have happened and still happen to the people on the land. This performance piece is dedicated to the history of the people, the stories, the land and justice of Jeju Island.

    Born on Jeju Island in South Korea, where shamanic tradition is very strong, Dohee Lee learned Korean dance, Korean percussion, and vocals. Her art focuses on integrating these traditional forms with contemporary elements. Each piece and performance blends Eastern and contemporary Western musical forms with modern dance languages into works that emphasize the experimental, ritualistic and regenerative aspects of music, dance and visual bodies. Lee has presented her work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Asian Art Museum in SF and performed at Carnegie Zankel Hall in NYC with the Kronos Quartet, Teatro Municipal de Lima Peru, Beijing and Europe.

    SKIM is an artist and cultural worker born and raised in New York, and currently producing music in Los Angeles. Through song, rap, and Korean folk drumming, SKIM’s work breaks silences, honours family, offers love, and demands change.

    Over the past 12 years, SKIM has performed for a wide range of audiences and venues from independent theatres and music festivals, to HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, to youth and senior centers, schools, and juvenile halls, to actions protesting police abuse and war crimes from past to present. They have also shared their work and music through: drumming with organizers and members of Koreatown Immigrant Workers’ Alliance in LA and Jamaesori in the Bay area, performing at events with Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” facilitating creative workshops with youth in Alternative Intervention Models, API Youth Promoting Advocacy and Leadership, the Chicago Children’s Choir; and recently joining a leadership cohort of the Brown Boi Project.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dohee Lee
    Artist, Performer based in San Francisco, California.

    SKIM
    Artist, Cultural Worker based in Los Angeles, California.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Canadian Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Political Science

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Science and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Department of History

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Keynote Address, "Truth and Reconciliation in Korea"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    The symposium’s keynote address will feature Prof. Dong Choon Kim (Sung Kong Hoe University) on rethinking reconciliation and reparation.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dong-Choon Kim
    Keynote
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Sung Kong Hoe University, Korea

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    Professor, East Asian Studies Institute, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    York Centre for Asian Research


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Screening of Jiseul Directed by O Muel

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
    506 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1Y3
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    In this compelling black-and-white portrait, director O Muel depicts the 1948 uprising and subsequent massacre on Jeju island in Korea with authenticity and heart wrenching realism. After a US military decree classifies all inhabitants within 5 kilometers of the coast as “rioters” and orders their execution, over 120 villagers flee to a cave and fight for their survival.

    Expertly crafted in documentary-style, Jiseul depicts brutality, human perseverance, struggle, and loss. The stark and wintry landscape of Jeju of is skillfully framed by cinematographer Jung-hoon Yang. As a montage of portraits, close-ups of villagers, soldiers, and protesters condemned as communists, all faced with life-threatening circumstances, O Muel’s striking epic explores the senselessness of war and the tenacity of the human spirit.

    Jiseul was the recipient of the prestigious World Cinema Dramatic Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

    Country: South Korea
    Year of Production: 2012
    Run Time: 108 min.
    Language and Subtitles: Korean with English Subtitles

    Following the screening, there will be a brief presentation by Toronto Filmmaker and recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Min Sook Lee.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Min Sook Lee
    Recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Cesar E. Chavez Black Eagle Award, Min Sook Lee Labour Arts Award from The Mayworks Festival


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Department of History

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    York Centre for Asian Research


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 28th Screening of Vincent Who? with Director Curtis Chin

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMedia Commons
    3rd Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Toronto. ON
    M5S 1A5
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    Description

    VINCENT WHO? – In 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese sentiments, Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by two white autoworkers who said, “it’s because of you mother** that we’re out of work.” When the judged fined the killers a mere $3,000 and three years of probation, Asian Americans around the country galvanized for the first time to form a real community and movement. This documentary features interviews with the key players at the time, as well as a whole new generation of activists. “Vincent Who?” asks how far Asian Americans have come since then and how far we have yet to go.

    The screening will be followed by a trailer on Curtis Chin’s new film, Tested, and a Q & A session with the director.

    Curtis Chin is an award-winning writer and producer who has written for ABC, NBC, Fox, the Disney Channel and more. As a community activist, he co-founded the Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress. In 2008, he served on Barack Obama’s Asian American Leadership Council where he participated in helping the campaign reach out to the AAPI community. He has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, Newsweek and other media outlet. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at New York University.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Curtis Chin
    Director
    Filmmaker & Founder of Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress,

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 30th Roop Lal Jain Lecture with Eva de Clercq

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2014-2015 Shri Roop Lal Jain Lecture Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eva de Clerq
    Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent University, Blandijnberg


    Sponsors

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2014

  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Where does the call for a new, “planetary” humanities leave the study of the regions that have shaped area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the fact that, more than in any other region of the world, the food and human security of South Asia depend on the annual monsoon. In the long term, changes in the monsoon are a likely but uncertain outcome of planetary warming; but recent meteorological and climatological research has shown that changes in regional patterns of rainfall can be traced to causes on a regional scale, most of which date from the 1950s: aerosols in the atmosphere, changes in land use, agricultural intensification, patterns of migration and urbanization. Our changed perspective shows us that South Asia shapes the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon; regional climate change interacts, unpredictably, with climate change on a planetary level.

    This suggests that, in thinking about human agency in the Anthropocene, intermediate levels of analysis—short of “species history”—and analyses on shorter timescales (in this case, a focus on the middle decades of the twentieth century: the classic terrain of modern historiography) remain essential. Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped the history of Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unpredictable and unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sunil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Ritu Birla
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto-Scarborough


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor in Asia Pacific Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho, a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, is a major South Korean feminist intellectual, author of 8 books, co-founder of Another Culture in 1984, founder of Haja Center in 1999, South Korea’s eminent alternative cultural studios for teens, and one of the key figures in creating critical public scenes since the 1980′s. Cho, as a ‘native anthropologist,’ will be speaking about her whirlwind journey of compressed modernity of South Korea since 1980s. She will start her talk with a discussion about the recent 4.16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo that resonate 9.11 Attacks in 2001 in New York and 3.11 Explosion in 2011 Fukushima in many aspects. She focuses particularly on the split of South Korean public responses into two antagonistic groups, that is, those who say to “never forget!” and those who urge to “ forget and go back to normal life!” Cho will elaborate concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ (Ulich Beck) and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ (Judith Butler) in her analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as lived experience of people in South Korea.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders Lecture

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking about precarious youth and their survival politics based on her own pedagogical and socio-political experiment at Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) launched in 1999. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has been evolved responding proactively to national and global crises such as 1997 Asian financial crisis, 2008-2009 global financial crises, and 2011 Fukushima disaster. Cho is particularly interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning and has endeavored to create platforms that enables the new type of learning in various forms: a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. In her talk, Cho will detail her works of launching these platforms and discuss about her anticipation. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism,” the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises as unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared treat to all humanity, rather than as isolated and unique. The youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds and creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Anthropology

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute

    Hope 21 (Korean Progressive Network in Canada)

    Draad (German Academic Exchange Service)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th Legal Orientalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Teemu Ruskola
    Professor of Law, Faculty Associate in Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, and Studies in Sexualities, Emory University School of Law


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Non-Alignment and Afro-Asianism: The Difficult History of Two Sibling Movements

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Scholars often confuse the Non-Aligned Movement and Afro-Asianism Although they were sibling movements and have their roots in Nehruvian thinking, they had different, though overlapping, sets of members and different goals. The current article explores in three parts how the movement emerged. From 1946-56, Jawaharlal Nehru conceived the Non-Alignment and eventually convinced Iosip Broz Tito and Gamal Abdel Nasser of his ideas. In the five subsequent years, the Yugoslav and Egyptian leaders promoted the ideas of establishing a formal movement. And from 1961 to 1965, during its first four years as a movement, Non-Alignment struggled and eventually emancipated itself from Afro-Asianism. The article uses archival documents from India, former Yugoslavia, former East Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Australia.

    Lorenz Lüthi is an Associate Professor for the History of International Relations at McGill University in Montreal/Canada. His first book, The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008. The book has been released in a Polish translation by Dialog in Warsaw in 2011; a Chinese translation is in preparation. Lüthi has widely published on the Cold War in East Asia, Sino-Soviet relations, and the Vietnam War. He is currently working a second book project on the regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East Lüthi’s research has led him to work in archives in China, Australia, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia, Italy, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Lorenz Luthi
    Professor, History of International Relations, McGill University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2015

  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee at United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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