Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

March 2015

  • Monday, March 2nd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong; Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers; and Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography, and “Mail-Order’ Marriages.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Director, University Center for International Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 4th “Comfort Women” in Global Histories of Colonialism: A Report from Current Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk is drawn from the newly published book, Thinking about/from “Comfort Women” Histories: Structure of Ordinary Lives beyond Military Violence (Tokyo: Iwanami, 2014). The volume is a series of attempts by historians in Japan and Korea to break through current debates. The experiences of women who were forced to serve in the military brothels of Japan during WWII require scholars to look beyond war time. The authors of the book study broader fields: Korean rural socio-economy in the pre-war period, military brothels in the post-war Korean Army, the daily lives and decisions of Imperial Japanese licensed sex workers, and the history of sexual discipline in the American military. Instead of a revisionist history of bare sexual desire at a time of emergency, this lecture proposes an understanding of the event set in the longer and broader context of colonialism. The audience is invited to review these recent studies in politically charged East Asian settings.

    Dr. Hiroyuki Matsubara is Associate Professor, Faculty of Urban Innovation, Yokohama National University, Japan, where he teaches US History. He is an editor of and contributor to the above mentioned book by the Historical Science Society of Japan. His book Undermined Ground of “Efficiency” : 1910s Social Hygienic Movement and American Political Culture (2013) won the Women’s History Association Award in 2014.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hiroyuki Matsubara
    Professor, Yokohama National University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 4th Yokohama National U Student Mixer

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This event is for students only. Tcards will be checked at the door.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 6th Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Jesook Song’s new book Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea. Interweaving personal interviews, archival sources and media analyses, this illuminating ethnography profiles the stories of young, single women in South Korea who confront difficulties in their pursuits to live independently and achieve residential autonomy. Living on Your Own skillfully exposes the clash between women’s burgeoning desire for independence and traditional conservative norms in Korean housing practices and financial institutions.

    Professor Jesook Song is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Jesook Song received her B.A. in Education Science at the Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology with a minor degree in Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

    Laura C. Nelson (UCBerkeley associate professor, Gender & Women’s Studies, and Chair, Center for Korean Studies) is an anthropologist interested in the mutual engagements of public policies and society/culture. Her three current Korea-based projects examine breast cancer, older women without children, and the generation of new Koreans born to immigrant brides.

    Lisa Yoneyama received her B.A. in German Language Studies and M.A. in International Relations at Sophia University, Tokyo, and Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at Stanford University, California. Prior to joining the University of Toronto, she taught Cultural Studies and U.S.-Japan Studies at University of California, San Diego, where she also served as Director of two academic programs, the Program for Japanese Studies and Critical Gender Studies Program.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please visit the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Jennifer Jihye Chun
    Chair
    Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Associate Professor, Sociology (UTSC)

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of East Asian Studies & Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Laura C. Nelson
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Gender and Women’s Studies, UC Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 6th Intimacy and Reconciliation Otherwise: Tsushima Yuko’s Exceedingly Barbaric

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In recent years, there has been a booming cultural market for products that articulate Japanese colonial period and its legacy in Taiwan in an amicable if not nostalgic way. From films to literature, from memoirs to pop culture, they produce what I call the sentiment of “intimacy” between Taiwan and Japan across time and space, an affective turn that is markedly different from the anti-Japanese representations in mainland China and the two Koreas. While this reconstituted intimate relationship has the benefit of assuaging political tensions, it runs the risk of misrepresenting historical colonialism and its messy legacies that collapse personal accounts to colonial relations. While nation-states remain important sites for official rapprochements, and demands for apologies and compensations, interstate relations alone do not attend to the complexity, ambivalence and contradiction of people’s lives under extraordinary historical circumstances. Through the reading of the Japanese novelist, Tsushima Yuko’s “Exceedingly Barbaric” (2008), I argue for an inter-generational and gendered understanding of colonial and postcolonial sites of violence, survival and reconciliation. Revisiting the brutal insurgency and suppression of the 1930 Musha (Wushe) Incident, Tsushima’s novel crosses time (1930s and 2005) and traces the lives of two Japanese women (aunt and niece) across the colonial divide to expose the “barbarity” of both colonial suppression and patriarchal oppression.

    Leo Ching is the author of Becoming Japanese: The Politics of Identity Formation in Colonial Taiwan. He teaches Japanese and East Asian cultural studies at Duke University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Leo Ching
    Associate Professor, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Sunday, March 8th Contentious Politics on the Korean Peninsula: A Workshop for Koreanists

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, March 8, 201511:30AM - 1:30PMKoffler House, MultiFaith Center
    569 Spadina Ave.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Part of the Comparative Politics Student Group Conference

    Description

    This workshop consists of two groups and four panelists exploring contentious politics in both Koreas. Dr. Adam Cathcart (University of Leeds) and Christopher Green (Leiden University) will present work on contentious politics in North Korea during the Kim Jong-un era, focusing on the government’s use of information strategies, namely “re-defector” press conferences and the Moranbong Band, to maintain a “domain consensus” (i.e, its legitimacy). Professors Jennifer Chun and Judy Han will present their latest work on contentious politics in South Korea, focusing on politically active conservative religious groups and the social and political activities of South Korea’s more precarious workers.

    Click the link below to register.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    The Comparative Politics Student Group (CPSG) Conference

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, March 9th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 9, 201511:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This information session will be insightful for students interested in applying for Dr. David Chu Travel grants. For more information on the Dr. David Chu Scholarships visit the website link listed below.

    This event is for students only; Tcards will be checked at the door.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, March 19th On the historicity of space and urban imagination in South Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture 2014/2015

    Description

    Following David Harvey’s notion of dispossession many urban scholars assume that global capital flows, commodification and capitalization of land universally affect urban areas all over the globe. However, not all spaces are equally amenable to commodification or gentrification and in many cases the specific historical character of a city, a neighborhood or an urban space tends to stick to it for many generations. What happened in a space, who lived there before, which community or class is associated with it, leave marks that do not easily evaporate or change. This is particularly true in post-colonial cities marked by deep historical segmentation. Drawing on material from India (and South Africa) I will show how religious markers and boundaries of caste and community mark space in an enduring way that gets etched onto the urban imagination, profoundly and durably structuring the use and habitation of urban space.

    Thomas Blom Hansen is Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and director of the Center for South Asia at Stanford. He is the author of multiple books and articles on Hindu nationalism, Hindu-Muslim violence, urban life, religious identity politics, sovereignty and the modern state in South Asia and South Africa.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thomas Blom Hansen
    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor; Director, Center for South Asia, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 20th Xi Jinping in Zhejiang (2002-2007)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Chinese political succession literature on Xi Jinping’s accession to becoming general secretary tends to emphasize patronage and factional politics (power struggle, factional balance, etc.) whereas other equally significant factors, such as the deliberate grooming by the Chinese Communist Party CCP) and Xi’s own performance and policy-making records, are often neglected. By focusing on Xi’s career in Zhejiang from 2002-2007, this paper attempts to describe and explain Xi’s performance and policy-making record and the extent to which this had contributed to a “perfect resume” for the CCP’s top position. Specifically, the paper discusses how Xi dealt with the challenging issues of development, economic growth, political participation, rural/urban gap, and environmental degradation. It will also evaluate Xi’s contribution to the modification of the “Zhejiang Model.”

    Alfred L. Chan, PhD (Toronto), is professor and chair of political science at Huron University College, Western University. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one book on Hu Jintao and China in the 21th Century, and another one on Chinese political recruitment and succession.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred L. Chan
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, Huron University College, Western University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 20th King Dhammacetī and the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions: Ideas, Borders, Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building
    Room 318
    170 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the 15th century, the Buddhist king Dhammacetī sponsored a sīmā (ordination hall) reform that was to become the most famous of its kind in mainland Southeast Asia. Having wrangled with the hairs of monastic law concerning sīmās, Dhammacetī sent monks from his kingdom centered in what is now lower Myanmar to Sri Lanka in order to return with a pure ordination line. In a most significant historical decision, Dhammacetī had an account of these reforms inscribed on ten large stone slabs, which became known as the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions. While addressing matters of law, history, and political order, the inscriptions are also at their heart a sīmā text, that is, a text about the regulation of ritual boundaries and religious land. Drawing especially on these inscriptions, this paper explores elements of the ideational and border-making and border-crossing world Dhammacetī and others participated in and helped cultivate, even as they established innovations that would dramatically shape future memory, religio-political culture, and transregional identity.

    Jason A. Carbine is the C. Milo Connick Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Whittier College. His research and teaching about religion and society combines historical and ethnographic approaches, and draws from an interdisciplinary body of research pertaining to the history and sociology of religions, textual studies, anthropology, and comparative religious ethics. His publications include Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition (2011) and the co-edited volume How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (2012). Carbine is currently preparing a new text and translation of the famous Kalyāṇī Inscriptions.

    For information please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason A. Carbine
    Associate Professor, Religious Studies, Whittier College


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, March 25th Canada and China in the 21st Century: A Book Launch and Discussion with David Mulroney

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    China’s rise is having a direct impact on our prosperity, our health and well-being, and our security here in Canada. The road to achieving many of our middle-power aspirations now runs through the Middle Kingdom. We need to start paying closer attention, says former ambassador David Mulroney. China has become our second largest economic partner, not as important as the US is, but far bigger than all the rest. Canada exerts a magnetic pull on Chinese tourists and students. It’s also a popular destination for Chinese home buyers in search of a new life or simply looking for a safe place to park money. An assertive China is challenging the balance of power in the Pacific, and it is more than willing to reach across borders, including Canada’s, to steal technologies and to confront challenges to its ideology.

    We must do better. David Mulroney is uniquely positioned to discuss this issue as the former ambassador to China, and as a leader in forming a successful strategy in Afghanistan. He discusses what our challenges in Afghanistan were and how we eventually got it right, and how these lessons can be applied to the future challenges of China, and beyond.

    David Mulroney served as Ambassador of Canada to the People’s Republic of China from 2009 to 2012. Prior to this, he served as the Deputy Minister responsible for the Afghanistan Task Force, overseeing interdepartmental coordination of all aspects of Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan. He is currently a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.


    Speakers

    David Mulroney
    Speaker
    Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Lynette Ong
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Political Science & Asian Institute and Collaborative Master's Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

    Stephen Toope
    Speaker
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Joshua Baker
    Chair
    Director, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, March 27th Self-organization of precarious informal workers: Using international comparisons to understand forms and outcomes

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Speaker Series

    Description

    The growth of informal and precarious work has led many to conclude that labor organizing and collective worker power face severe obstacles. However, reflecting another instance of Polanyi’s much-cited double movement, even workers who are both informal and precarious have successfully organized and won victories, and are doing so in increasing numbers. The greatest successes in this regard are not found in Canada or the United States, but in the global South. The global distribution of these movements and their varied and uneven outcomes across nations point to the usefulness of comparative research. This talk summarizes two recent comparisons in this vein, one comparing US day laborers with Mexican street vendors, and one comparing subcontracted textile and apparel workers in Brazil, China, India, and South Africa. Results point to how precarious informal worker organizing can win, and how social and institutional context can shape informal worker organizing possibilities, strategies, and outcomes. This talk conclude by discussing evolving plans for a global study examining informal and precarious worker organizing in 8 countries: Canada, China, India, Mexico, South Korea, South Africa, and the U.S.

    Chris Tilly is a professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at UCLA. He has a Joint Ph.D. in Economics and Urban Studies and Planning from MIT. His research specializes in labor markets, with interests in inequality, urban and regional development, public policy, and organizing strategies directed towards better jobs. His current research projects focus on retail jobs and informal worker organizing in a global comparative context. Tilly has published numerous books on labor markets, including Half a Job: Bad and Good Part-Time Jobs in a Changing Labor Market (1996) and Stories Employers Tell: Race, Skill, and Hiring in America (2001). His most recent work includes editing How Global Migration Changes the Workforce Diversity Equation (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Chris Tilly
    Speaker
    Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (ILRE), University of California, Los Angeles

    Jennifer Jihye Chun
    Chair
    Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Associate Professor, Sociology (UTSC)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Labour Research Centre

    York University

    Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

April 2015

  • Thursday, April 2nd What Went Wrong in Japan? The Crisis of Social Reproduction

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 2, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The story of Japanese capitalism, held up as a model for economic prosperity and growth, hid nonstandard employment and women’s unpaid reproductive labor in the narrative of success. Once celebrated as a high trust system generating strong economic performance, Japan seemed to have lost its way spectacularly in what some have called the “Lost Decade” of the 1990s. The forms taken by the decades-long crises and the current efforts at resolution must be understood in terms of the specific features of this variety of coordinated capitalism that has dictated events. This juxtaposition of rapid economic success against subsequent failure has eluded theorists’ attempts to explain the enigma of Japanese capitalism. This presentation will identify the institutional sources of labor insecurities behind Japan’s postwar employment system. Gendering institutional analysis has been key to deciphering the enigma of Japanese capitalism.

    Heidi Gottfried, Associate Professor of Sociology at Wayne State University, has published several books and articles on gender and work transformation. Her recent book is entitled Gender, Work and Economy: Unpacking the Global Economy. She has edited or co-edited books on Gendering The Knowledge Economy: Comparative Perspectives; Remapping The Humanities: Identity, Community, Memory, (Post)Modernity; Equity in the Workplace: Gendering Workplace Policy Analysis; and Feminism and Social Change: Bridging Theory and Practice. Her publications include “Temp(t)ing Bodies: Shaping Gender at Work in Japan” and “Japan: The Reproductive Bargain and the Making of Precarious Employment.” The Reproductive Bargain: Deciphering the Enigma of Japanese Capitalism will be published by Brill in the spring.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Heidi Gottfried
    Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University


    Sponsors

    Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, April 9th Towards a Grounded, Immanent Critique: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in Delhi

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This talk explores possibilities for developing a grounded critique of capitalism in contemporary India, drawing on the politics and cosmologies of migrant workers in Delhi. I begin by discussing the workings of categories (e.g. freedom, dignity, and consciousness), the ambivalence towards religion, and the relative absence of workers’ categories and self-understandings in works of Indian labor studies. Next, I describe the intertwining of politics and cosmology in the discourses and activities of migrant workers working in a metal polishing factory of Delhi. According to the implicit visions of workers, oppressive, work-intensifying processes in factories arise due to a dynamic interplay between souls and the present, ‘decivilizing’ epoch (the Kalyug in Hindu cosmology, the impending Qayamat in Islam), in which thoughts, actions, and dealings become distorted by egoistic and demonic proclivities. Workers attempt to non-cooperate with this distorting interplay through body-conserving resistances, humor and joking, multiple forms of collectivity, public protests, and religious festivity. Through these ‘anti-decivilizing’ activities, workers create possibilities for survival, respect, integrative relations, and glimpses of justice. I conclude by suggesting how categories from multiple sources (workers, proximate discourses, and remote thinkers) might be integrated to construct a grounded, immanent critique of capitalism, which analyses oppressive practices of capital and the state, recognizes distortions in workers’ activities, and intimates possibilities for autonomous transformations in workers’ worlds.

    Shankar Ramaswami is a Lecturer on South Asian Studies at the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University, where he teaches courses on anthropology, religion, literature, and cinema. He completed a B.A. in Economics at Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is currently working on a book entitled, Souls in the Kalyug: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shankar Ramaswami
    Lecturer, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

May 2015

  • Saturday, May 16th – Sunday, May 17th The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA)

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 16, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Sunday, May 17, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA),

    This is an international festival with a difference, truly reflecting the diversity of Toronto. Over 30 writers from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Tanzania, and of course all across Canada will be present. Saturday night dance performance by Hari Krishan and InDance. African guitar by Tichaona Maradze. There will be panels on a variety of subjects, including New Theatre in Canada, East Asian Writing, South Asian Writing, Writing in Languages Other than English.

    Admission is free except for the Saturday night event. It is advisable but not essential to pre-register.

    The event runs May 15-17, 2015, for more information and the full program click the link below.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

Stay in Touch with the Asian Institute

Interested in receiving a list of upcoming events right in your inbox? Join our mailing list!

Click Here!

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.