Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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October 2014

  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Keynote Address, "Truth and Reconciliation in Korea"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    The symposium’s keynote address will feature Prof. Dong Choon Kim (Sung Kong Hoe University) on rethinking reconciliation and reparation.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Dong-Choon Kim
    Keynote
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Sung Kong Hoe University, Korea

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    Professor, East Asian Studies Institute, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Department of Political Science

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Sociology

    Canadian Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Screening of Jiseul Directed by O Muel

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
    506 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1Y3
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    In this compelling black-and-white portrait, director O Muel depicts the 1948 uprising and subsequent massacre on Jeju island in Korea with authenticity and heart wrenching realism. After a US military decree classifies all inhabitants within 5 kilometers of the coast as “rioters” and orders their execution, over 120 villagers flee to a cave and fight for their survival.

    Expertly crafted in documentary-style, Jiseul depicts brutality, human perseverance, struggle, and loss. The stark and wintry landscape of Jeju of is skillfully framed by cinematographer Jung-hoon Yang. As a montage of portraits, close-ups of villagers, soldiers, and protesters condemned as communists, all faced with life-threatening circumstances, O Muel’s striking epic explores the senselessness of war and the tenacity of the human spirit.

    Jiseul was the recipient of the prestigious World Cinema Dramatic Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

    Country: South Korea
    Year of Production: 2012
    Run Time: 108 min.
    Language and Subtitles: Korean with English Subtitles

    Following the screening, there will be a brief presentation by Toronto Filmmaker and recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Min Sook Lee.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Min Sook Lee
    Recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Cesar E. Chavez Black Eagle Award, Min Sook Lee Labour Arts Award from The Mayworks Festival


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Department of History

    Department of Political Science

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 28th Vincent Who? Screening with Film Director Curtis Chin in Attendance

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMedia Commons
    3rd Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
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    Description

    VINCENT WHO? – In 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese sentiments, Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by two white autoworkers who said, “it’s because of you mother** that we’re out of work.” When the judged fined the killers a mere $3,000 and three years of probation, Asian Americans around the country galvanized for the first time to form a real community and movement. This documentary features interviews with the key players at the time, as well as a whole new generation of activists. “Vincent Who?” asks how far Asian Americans have come since then and how far we have yet to go.

    The screening will be followed by a trailer on Curtis Chin’s new film, Tested, and a Q & A session with the director.

    Curtis Chin is an award-winning writer and producer who has written for ABC, NBC, Fox, the Disney Channel and more. As a community activist, he co-founded the Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress. In 2008, he served on Barack Obama’s Asian American Leadership Council where he participated in helping the campaign reach out to the AAPI community. He has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, Newsweek and other media outlet. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at New York University.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Curtis Chin
    Director
    Filmmaker & Founder of Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress,

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 30th Jain Engagements with the Rāmāyaṇa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2014-2015 Shri Roop Lal Jain Lecture Series

    Description

    The story of Rāma, first told in Vālmīki’s Rāmāyaṇa, has made a considerable impact on the social, political, cultural and religious life in South Asia and beyond. Though the Sanskrit epic Rāmāyaṇa is the oldest surviving, and in many ways normative Rāma story, it is just one of a plethora of tellings, adaptations of the Rāma narrative by artists and composers from different social, geographical and ideological backgrounds who rework the story in accordance with their own particular agendas. Jain authors too engaged with this story. This lecture will look at the two different ways in which Jains confronted the Rāma story and its growing popularity: by openly rejecting it on the one hand, and by appropriating it on the other.

    Eva de Clercq received her PhD in Oriental languages and cultures from Ghent University (Belgium) in 2003 with a thesis “Critical study of Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu”, a Jain adaptation of the Rāmāyaṇa in Apabhraṃśa. Since then, she has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Ghent University, SOAS London and the University of Würzburg (Germany) with projects on the Jain adaptations of the Sanskrit epics and Apabhraṃśa literary culture. In 2010 she was appointed assistant professor at Ghent University, where she teaches Sanskrit, Prākrit, Hindi (esp. Brajbhāṣā), Indian literature and Religious traditions of India.

    For questions please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Eva de Clercq
    Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent University, Blandijnberg


    Sponsors

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Religious Genealogies of Contemporary South Asia Colloquium

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 31st QWERTY is Dead, Long Live QWERTY! Lin Yutang, the MingKwai Chinese Typewriter, and the Birth of Input in Twentieth-Century China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 31, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In China, the QWERTY keyboard and traditional typing practices are dead and have been reborn as innovative technolinguistic-cum-exstitential condition of writing referred to as “input”, or “Shuru”. In contrast to traditional typing methods, in which the typer relies on onto that we now refer to as “input” (shuru). In contrast to the world of “typing,” in which the typer relies on onte-to-one correspondence between symbols-upon-the-keys and symbols -upon-the-screen, “input” is more a form of telecommunication than inscription: the user sends out alphabetically coded transmission to onboard software known as an Input Method Editor (IME). The IME then returns to the user a menu of Chinese characters known as “candidates”. Thus, the Chinese computer user uses the QWERTY keyboard in an iterative process of code, candidacy, and confirmation.

    The input system in China, however predates computers. The first input system was a 1940′s mechanical typewriter called MingKwai Chinese typewriter, invented by noted liguist and cultural commentor Lin Yutang. In this talk, historian Thomas S. Mullaney will chart out the historical origins of input and its evolution alongside evolving technologies.

    Thomas S. Mullaney is a Professor of Chinese History at Stanford University. He is the author of Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China and Critical Han Studies: The History, Representation and Identity of China’s Majority.
    His current book project, The Chinese Typewriter: A Global History, examines China’s development of a modern, nonalphabetic information infrastructure encompassing telegraphy, typewriting, word processing, and computing. This project has received three major awards and fellowships, including the 2013 Usher Prize, a three-year National Science Foundation fellowship, and a Hellman Faculty Fellowship.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thomas S. Mullaney
    Professor, Chinese History, Stanford University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2014

  • Monday, November 3rd Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMCouncil Chambers
    (AA 160)
    University of Toronto, Scarborough Campus
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    Description

    The Indian Ocean was global long before the Atlantic, and today the countries bordering the Bay of Bengal-India, Bangladesh, Burma, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Malaysia-are home to one in four people on Earth. Crossing the Bay of Bengal places this region at the heart of world history for the first time. Integrating migration and environmental history Sunil Amrith gives an account of the Bay and the diasporas who have inhabited it, with a particular focus on the Tamil diaspora.

    Sunil Amrith is Reader in Modern Asian History at Birkbeck College, University of London. His work focuses on the circulation of people, ideas, and institutions between South and Southeast Asia. His most recent book is Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (Harvard, 2013). He is currently working on the environmental history of India’s eastern seaboard, supported by the European Research Council.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sunhil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Commentator
    Associate Professor, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Donna Gabaccia
    Chair
    Professor, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    Sponsors

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Co-Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in South East Asia

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    The Department of History

    Religious Materiality in Indian Ocean Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Where does the call for new, “planetary” humanities leave area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the South Asian Monsoon. Crucial to food and human security, changes in the monsoon are an uncertain outcome of planetary warming. But does South Asia shape the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon? Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Sunil Amrith is Reader in Modern Asian History at Birkbeck College, University of London. His work focuses on the circulation of people, ideas, and institutions between South and Southeast Asia. His most recent book is Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (Harvard, 2013). He is currently working on the environmental history of India’s eastern seaboard, supported by the European Research Council

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Sunil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Ritu Birla
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto-Scarborough


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor in Asia Pacific Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking as a ‘native anthropologist’ about her whirlwind journey experiencing South Korea’s compressed modernity since the 1980’s. The discussion begins with the recent 4/16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo, that has resonated with 9/11 and the 3/11 Disaster in Fukushima. Professor Cho will focus on the split of South Korean public responses into disparate antagonistic groups; those who say to “never forget”, and those who urge to “forget and go back to normal life”, The discussion will elaborate on concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ in its analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as the lived experiences of people in South Korea.

    Haejoang Cho is cultural anthropologist in training and feminist in faith. She is a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, Seoul. Her early research focused on gender studies in Korean modern history; her current interests and research are in the area of youth culture and modernity in the global/local and post-colonial context of modern day Korea. Cho is the founding director of Haja center (The Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) which is an alternative educational and cultural studio for the teenagers since 1999. The Haja project has been launched as a part of ‘action research’ of solving the problems of youth from the perspectives of feminism, cultural studies and ecological studies in the rapidly globalizing East Asian context.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 7th China’s New Urbanization Blueprint and Hukou Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Room SS2125
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    China released its first national urbanization plan in March 2014. The plan outlines a bold move to grant urban hukou (household registration) to 100 million people in the next six years. If successfully implemented, the plan will help China to achieve genuine urbanization and alleviate some major social and economic problems. The plan has also brought forth a new vision of urbanization with an emphasis on the human aspect. This presentation examines the relationship between urbanization and hukou reform, the feasibility of the plan and the problems.

    Kam Wing Chan is Professor of Geography at the University of Washington. His main research focuses on China’s cities, migration, employment, and the household registration system. He is the author of Cities with Invisible Walls: Reinterpreting Urbanization in Post-1949 China, and some 60 articles and book chapters. He has served as a Consultant for the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, United Nations, and McKinsey & Co. and worked with the Chinese Government on a number of policy projects. His recent commentaries and interviews have appeared in the public media such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, The Economist, South China Morning Post, BBC, CBC, Caixin, and China Daily. He is a graduate of the University of Hong Kong and the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Kam Wing Chan
    Professor of Geography, University of Washington


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Program in Planning

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Description

    This lecture will focus on the precarious youth at the Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) and their survival politics based on Professor Haejoang Cho’s pedagogical and socio-political experiments. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has evolved responding proactively to national and global crises; the 1997 Asian financial crisis, the 2008-2009 global financial crises, and the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning, Cho has endeavored to create platforms that enable new types of learning in various forms including a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. This discussion will explain the launching of these platforms and the discussion of anticipated new projects. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism”, the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises. It is unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared, rather than as isolated and unique. Hence, the youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds, creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Haejoang Cho is cultural anthropologist in training and feminist in faith. She is a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, Seoul. Her early research focused on gender studies in Korean modern history; her current interests and research are in the area of youth culture and modernity in the global/local and post-colonial context of modern day Korea. Cho is the founding director of Haja center (The Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) which is an alternative educational and cultural studio for the teenagers since 1999. The Haja project has been launched as a part of ‘action research’ of solving the problems of youth from the perspectives of feminism, cultural studies and ecological studies in the rapidly globalizing East Asian context.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service)

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Hope 21 (Korean Progressive Network in Canada)

    Department of Anthropology

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since the end of the Cold War, China has become a global symbol of disregard for human rights, while the United States has positioned itself as the world’s chief exporter of the rule of law. How did lawlessness become an axiom about Chineseness rather than a fact needing to be verified empirically, and how did the United States assume the mantle of law’s universal appeal?

    In a series of wide-ranging inquiries, Teemu Ruskola investigates the history of “legal Orientalism”: a set of globally circulating narratives about what law is and who has it. For example, why is China said not to have a history of corporate law, as a way of explaining its “failure” to develop capitalism on its own? Ruskola shows how a European tradition of philosophical prejudices about Chinese law developed into a distinctively American ideology of empire, tracing back to the first Sino–U.S. treaty in 1844 authorized the extraterritorial application of American law in a putatively lawless China., creating a kind of legal imperialism causing enduring damage to legal Orientlalism to this day. .

    Teemu Ruskola is Professor of Law at Emory University. His scholarship addresses questions of legal history and theory from multiple perspectives, comparative as well as international, frequently with China as a vantage point. Most recently, he is the author of Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law (Harvard, 2013).

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Teemu Ruskola
    Professor, Faculty Associate in Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, and Studies in Sexualities, Emory University School of Law


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Non-Alignment and Afro-Asianism: The Difficult History of Two Sibling Movements

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Scholars often confuse the Non-Aligned Movement with the Afro-Asianism Movement. Although both were rooted in Nehruvian thinking, they had different, though overlapping, sets of members and goals. In three parts, the current article explores how the movement emerged. From 1946-56, Jawaharlal Nehru conceived the Non-Alignment motion and eventually convinced Iosip Broz Tito and Gamal Abdel Nasser of his ideas. In the five subsequent years, the Yugoslav and Egyptian leaders promoted the ideas of establishing a formal movement. Finally, from 1961 to 1965, during its first four years as a movement,the Non-Alignment struggled and eventually emancipated itself from Afro-Asianism. The article uses archival documents from India, former Yugoslavia, former East Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Australia.

    Lorenz Lüthi is an Associate Professor for the History of International Relations at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. His first book, The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008. The book has been released in a Polish translation by Dialog in Warsaw in 2011; a Chinese translation is in preparation. Lüthi has widely published on the Cold War in East Asia, Sino-Soviet relations, and the Vietnam War. He is currently working a second book project on the regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East. Lüthi’s research has led him to work in archives in China, Australia, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia, Italy, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Lorenz Lüthi
    Associate Professor, History of International Relations, McGill University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2014

  • Saturday, December 6th Melodic Harmony: Classic to K-POP 2014 Korea Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, December 6, 20141:00PM - 6:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street West,
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C7
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    Description

    On December 6, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea in partnership with the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto and the University of Toronto Korean Students Association will host the second annual UofT Korea Day. This lively and interactive event is aimed at promoting Korean studies and culture by providing to students, faculty and general Canadian audience, as well as members of the Korean- Canadian society an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of traditional and modern Korean culture. The event features performances by renowned musicians, a Korean cuisine reception, and a K-pop
    contest.

    This year promises to be especially entertaining and educational as the world-renowned Gayageum player Grace Jong Eun Lee joining us for a delightful performance. Gayageum is a traditional Korean instrument with 12 strings with a rich history through time. It is capable of producing the micorotonal ornamentations of pitch and wide vibrato that is common and highly venerated in Korean music.

    The 2014 UofT Korea Day reflects the University of Toronto’s commitment to multiculturalism and diversity, as well as the growing importance of Korean culture in our world today. Please join us for a day of beautiful Gayageum traditional music and moving K-pop performances featuring the talents of skilled musicians

    E-registration to be released shortly.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Grace Jong Eun Lee
    Composer & Performer, Recipient of Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Award, 2008


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    University of Toronto Korean Students Association (UTKSA)

    Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2015

February 2015

  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee, United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia; Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide; and Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2015

  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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