Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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March 2015

  • Wednesday, March 4th How Many Maidans Does Ukraine Need to Succeed?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMAlumni Hall 400 (121 St. Joseph Street, 4th floor), University of Toronto
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    Description

    Location of the event: Alumni Hall 400 (121 St. Joseph Street, 4th floor), University of Toronto

    NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

    Andrey Kurkov has published 18 novels, 7 children’s books, and more than 30 film scripts. His most recent work is Ukraine Diaries: Dispatches from Kiev, which documents his experience living through the Euromaidan Revolution (also known as the Revolution of Dignity) from November 2013 through April 2014. The book has been translated into German, French, Italian, Estonian, English, Polish, Russian and Japanese. A member of PEN International, Kurkov commands the largest international audience of any author writing in the Russian language. He is also Ukraine’s best-selling author abroad.

    Kurkov’s novels satirize life in post-Soviet Ukraine. His biting humour nonetheless reveals a tenderness for the characters he creates. Kurkov often uses surrealism to deal with political and social issues. A famous example is his novel Death of the Penguin (1996, English 2001). An independent thinker and fine essayist, Kurkov is an active participant in the civic life of Ukraine, using his excellent command of English, German, French, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian to represent Ukraine’s artists, reformers and human rights activists at international for a.
    Among his recent media engagements in the West, see a BBC feature: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04n30gl

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Andrei Kurkov


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    CERES

    Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th 'Do they not attack here with the same desire...?': Early Republican Gallipoli as Contested Commemorative Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    This paper compares early republican Turkish and foreign memorialization and pilgrimage efforts on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
    Using archival documents and pilgrim accounts, it details the development of foreign commemorative superiority on the peninsula, and the efforts of travelers of various origins to make the space ‘fit’ with preconceived notions of the 1915 Battle of Gallipoli. It will be argued that foreign preeminence in the perceived Turkish national space of the peninsula had a potent effect on Turkish travelers, eliciting intense shame and territoriality, reshaping Gallipoli’s narrative space, and transforming the 1915 battle from an illustrious Turkish (in truth, Ottoman) victory into an ongoing struggle for Turkish national sovereignty

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Pheroze Unwalla
    York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Ethnology and Resistance in Vichy France: A Genealogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Germaine Tillion, a French ethnographer, conducted 36 months of fieldwork in the Aurès mountains of Algeria in the 1930s. Returning to France in 1940, she immediately joined the Resistance only to be betrayed and deported to Ravensbrück with her mother. Tillion survived and became one of the most outspoken early “witnesses” to the Holocaust; she later criticized the use of torture in Algeria. Tillion’s extraordinary commitment to combating injustice in the “dark” twentieth century is being recognized with her “Pantheonization” in Paris this coming May. How do we account for such a life? This talk is not only about Tillion but about a larger group of résistants: scholars. She was in fact part of a remarkable cohort of students in interwar France who, under the mentorship of Marcel Mauss, acquired the conceptual tools to render the so-called primitive Other “familiar.” Mauss understood before most the need not just to denounce the old racial science that underpinned Nazi ideology, but to show that another way of seeing the Other was possible. In their ethnographies, Mauss’ closest students consistently demonstrated how differences among human societies were the product of history rather than that of biology. Several of these students became resisters and precocious critics of colonialism. I will nevertheless conclude with a dramatic counter-example: Jacques Soustelle, a resister-ethnographer from this generation who later joined the OAS.

    Alice L. Conklin is a professor of history at the Ohio State University. She is the author, most recently of In the Museum of Man: Race, Anthropology and Empire in France, 1850-1950. She is currently working on the first global anti-racism campaign conducted by UNESCO’s Social Sciences Department.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Alice L. Conklin
    Departement d'Histoire Ohio State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Film Screening: "Palikari - Louis Tikas and the Ludlow Massacre"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20157:00PM - 9:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Director Nikos Ventouras and Producer Lamprini Thoma will be in attendance.

    Iota Films announces the second US screening tour of “Palikari – Louis Tikas and the Ludlow Massacre”, a 90-minute documentary that deals with labor relations in early 20th-century America, as told through the story of Greek immigrant and trade union activist Louis Tikas.

    Director Nikos Ventouras and producer Lamprini Thoma will be in North America touring with the film in March 2015 and offering insight into its filming, their motivation to make the documentary and additional insight into the history of the Ludlow Massacre and Tikas’ role and legacy.
    Screening events are being planned at universities throughout the nation where immigrant studies, labor studies and US history is taught.
    Acclaimed historian Howard Zinn called the “culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history”.

    It took more than a decade for Ventouras and Thoma to chart the story of the great 1913-1914 coalminers’ strike and Louis Tikas’s murder, as it survives in oral and family traditions, as well as in official history. They interviewed historians and artists, some of them direct descendants of the striking miners. Labor movement emblem Mother Jones and industrialist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. also make cameo appearances in this palimpsest of memory, struggle and deliverance.

    Tikas’ murder and the Ludlow Massacre led to a United States Congressional Order for Inquiry in 1915, which eventually led to the adoption of labor protection laws, changing the history of the United States forever and how immigrant and other laborers were handled by their employers. Tikas’ story can but reverberate in our time, in view of what is happening with the rights of workers and immigrants around the world.

    The documentary had its world premiere on March 16, 2014 as an Official Selection at the Thessaloniki International Documentary Film Festival to critical acclaim, since then it has screened globally— including in Cork, Ireland, at the Spirit of Mother Jones Film Festival and throughout the United States.

    View a trailer of the film at: http://www.palikari.org

    Donations are welcomed in support of the Hellenic Heritage Foundation Apollo Project.

    Sponsors

    Lourakis Family in support of the Hellenic Heritage Foundation Apollo Project

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 12th The OUN (m) and the Holocaust: Case Study of Ivan Yuriiv

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 12, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This presentation explores the biography of Ivan Yuriiv (Johannes Juriiff). He was an officer of the Ukrainian Sich Riflemen, a member of Ukrainian Military Organization, Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists. After the split of this party, he cooperated with Andriy Melnik’s men – OUN (m). During WWII Yuriiv joined Sonderkommando 10 A (Einsatzgruppe D).This detachment took active part in extermination of the Jewish population in Ukraine and the Russian Federation. Who actually was Ivan Yuriiv? What political point of view did he have? How deeply was he involved in crimes of National Socialists? An integral part of OUN (m) ideology till the end of WWII was hatred of the Jews. What role did Yuriiv’s political affiliation play in his activities during WWII? The Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists – OUN (both the Bandera and the Melnyk factions) were actively involved in the establishment and activities of the Ukrainian People’s Militia and Ukrainian Auxiliary Police in different regions of Ukraine. This police structures played an important role in the extermination of the Jews. What was role of Ivan Yuriiv as OUN (m) activist in creation of Ukrainian Auxiliary Police in Ukraine? What was his post-war destiny in Western Europe and Canada? Such questions in the context of “ordinary men/willing executors discussion” using new unpublished sources from German, Ukrainian, American and Israeli archives will be addressed during the presentation.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Yuri Radchenko
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar; Senior Lecturer at the Kharkiv Collegium Institute of Oriental Studies and International Relations, Director of Center for Inter-Ethic Relations (Ukraine)

    Jeffrey Kopstein
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and Director of Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Jewish Studies

    Centre for Euroepan, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th Political Networks and Mobilization against Competitive Authoritarian Regimes: Evidence from Serbia and Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Do social links and connections have consequences for collective behavior? A central aspect of mass mobilization is diffusion of human, material and knowledge resources; while recent studies address its potential effects on collective action by examining networks and their properties, the lack of empirical data limits their insights to the realm of modeling. This study argues that particular configurations of opposition and government network typologies do affect mobilization outcomes, and advances this type of this research by formally examining four cases of mass mobilization [Serbia (1996-7, 2000) and Ukraine (2000-1, 2004)], through the use and analysis of specifically collected primary data. The paper introduces a networks perspective, framing the study in terms of individuals and their organizations–as parts of competing networks through which resources and behavior are communicated. It identifies two main rival political networks with key roles during the election campaign: the democratizing opposition that seeks to inform, recruit and mobilize the public while lowering protest thresholds, and the regime’s coercive apparatus, which tries to contain it. The study’s pluralist methodology includes data collection through extensive field research comprised of locating and interviewing key participants (2007-2013), the application of a modified snow-balling sampling method, and complemented archival research. The resulting data is converted into matrices and networks, with the metrics revealing their topology, emergent properties and performance dynamics vis a vis competing hypotheses, and specific network configurations. The ensuing analysis, including computer simulations, consists of a double, formal and empirical comparison-across different network types, and, across actual cases. Findings suggest that the combined effects of initial network structure and the evolution of the protest once electoral contestation is under way, affect diffusion processes and mobilization outcomes.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Spyridon Kotsovilis
    Speaker
    Lecturer at the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Ukraine in Perpetual Transition: War, Law and Corruption

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20159:30AM - 4:00PMOI 2286 (the Oise – Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Building, 252 Bloor Street West)
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    Description

    The event will take place in room OI 2286 (the Oise – Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Building, 252 Bloor Street West)

    This interdisciplinary workshop gathers political scientists, historians and linguists to discuss Ukrainian realities and Russian-Ukrainian political and cultural encounters including wars, propaganda wars, memory and lustration politics, and judicial reforms.
    There will be two thematically organized panels. The first panel will explore cultural disruption in Ukraine during the Soviet era as a result of Soviet nationalities policies and state terror, and will consider its implications for contemporary Ukrainians. In addition, panelists will discuss the meanings of nationalism in the Ukraine-Russia conflict from a historical perspective, and will provide an analysis of Putin’s memory politics in the context of Soviet history and probe his attempts to rewrite the national historical narrative.

    The second panel will examine Ukrainian law in Ukraine, and Russian legal and extralegal activities in Crimea after its annexation by the Russian Federation. More specifically, panelists will discuss the politics of lustration of judges, judicial reform initiatives of the past decade (police, procuracy and anti-corruption reforms), and the broader lustration program in Ukraine. The situation in Crimea will be assessed in the context of changes in the culturo-ethnic balance, in particular the evolving situation of the Crimean Tatars and their institutions, the methods of enforcement of Russian citizenship, and international legal and regional security issues.

    Conceptually, the workshop traces the continuity of Soviet traditions and practices, and illuminates their influences on contemporary politics in Ukraine and Russia, and on Russian-Ukrainian relations. In all, the program accentuates Ukraine’s geopolitical significance, and identifies the challenges of legal reforms in Ukraine and the consequences of the Russo-Ukrainian war, factors that present serious obstacles on the road to Ukraine’s sovereignty and democratization.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Olga Bertelsen
    University of Toronto

    Todd Foglesong
    University of Toronto

    Marta Dyczok
    University of Western Ontario

    George Liber
    University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto

    Myroslav Shkandrij
    University of Manitoba

    Peter Solomon
    University of Toronto

    Bohdan Vitvitsky
    former Resident Legal Advisor at the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Russia's Great War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    For most of the twentieth century Russia’s Great War was a historical afterthought. Overshadowed by the Bolsheviks’ revolution, Civil War, and consolidation of power, the War took a back seat within professional scholarship as both Soviet and Western experts focused their energy on explaining the origins and rise of Russian Communism. In recent years a new generation of researchers has begun to re-examine and re-evaluate the significance and meaning of the War. Buttressed by new archival findings and freed from the ideological baggage of earlier historical debates they have begun to analyze Russia’s Great War not as a prelude to “Red October,” but as the fulcrum which set into motion a chain of events that transformed Eurasia and much of the world.

    Russia’s Great War and Revolution is a decade-long multinational scholarly effort that aims to fundamentally transform understanding of Russia’s “continuum of crisis” during the years 1914-1922. The project incorporates new research methods, archival sources, and multiple media formats to re-conceptualize critical concepts and events and to increase public awareness of Russia’s contributions to the history of the twentieth century.

    Prof. John W. Steinberg is authoer of All the Tsar’s Men: The Russian General Staff and the Fate of Empire, 1898-1914 (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2010) and co-editor of The Making of Russian History: Society, Culture, and the Politics of Modern Russia (Bloomington, IN: Slavica Academic Publishers, 2009) and The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective: World War Zero.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. John W. Steinberg
    Austin Peay State University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th What Is Greece?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    2 Sussex Avenue
    (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street)
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    **This event will take place at Innis Town Hall at Innis College, 2 Sussex Avenue (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street).**

    Stathis N. Kalyvas is Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he also directs the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence. He obtained his BA from the University of Athens (1986) and his PhD from the University of Chicago (1993), both in political science. He taught at Ohio State University (1993-94), New York University (1994-2000), and the University of Chicago (2000-03), before joining Yale in 2003. He has held visiting professorships and senior fellowships at the University of São Paulo, Lingnan University in Hong Kong, Northwestern University, Columbia University, the University of Witten/Herdecke, the Juan March Institute, the Max Planck Institute, and the European University Institute.

    Prof. Kalyvas is the author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), the co-editor of Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008), and the author of over fifty scholarly articles in five languages. His current research focuses on global trends in political violence. Prof. Kalyvas has received several awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Award for best book on government, politics, or international affairs, the Luebbert Award for best book in comparative politics, the European Academy of Sociology Book Award, the Luebbert Award for the best article in comparative politics (three times), and the Greenstone Award for best book in politics and history. His research has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the United States Peace Institute, the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the Department for International Development, and the Alexander S. Onassis Foundation. He was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in 2007. In 2008 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Follow the Money: International Donors, External Homelands and their Effect on Romani Media and Advocacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Roma are not only Europe’s largest minority, but also Europe’s largest transnational population but there is no one “homeland” state that claims to guard their interest. The lack of “an external national homeland” (Brubaker, 1996) to watchdog and safeguard their rights has a particular effect on how Roma are engaging as political actors and subjects. I argue that international donors/foundations have assumed the role of “external homeland” and this has unintended and problematic consequences. By reviewing nearly 20 years of Romani media, this paper explores the effect that changing donors’ funding priorities have on Romani advocacy.

    Shayna Plaut, PhD, received her Doctorate from the University of British Columbia in November, 2014. Her dissertation was entitled “Writing/Righting Truths across Borders: Learning from Transnational Peoples Journalism and Politics.” Her work primarily focuses on the intersection of media, advocacy and human rights education as activism and she has designed and taught numerous courses in Canada, the United States and Europe with university students and practitioners since 2000. Shayna is particularly interested in working with Peoples who do not fit neatly within the traditional notions of the nation-state including Roma, Saami and other transnational peoples. She has worked with Romani media and journalist since 2003 throughout Central/Eastern Europe especially Hungary and Macedonia. Currently Shayna is continuing her practitioner based research; she is a lecturer at the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University and working on Strangers at Home a journalistic project reaching out to artists, thinkers and doers storytellers throughout Europe to explore the rise of xenophobia, antisemitism and anti Roma sentiment. Shayna received her MA from the University of Chicago and her BA from Antioch College.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Shayna Plaut
    University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Hungarian Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In 1973, a multinational took control of the Lip watch and mechanics firm in Besançon and planned to lay off half of the labor force. Workers responded by occupying the factory, starting up production, and selling watches to pay their salaries. The conflict resonated throughout France and continued in one form or another until 1981. Analysis of the Lip Affair can open up our understandings of challenges to the political, social and economic order in the 1968 years in France.

    Donald Reid is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the author of The Miners of Decazeville and Paris Sewers and Sewermen, both of which have recently appeared in French translation, as well as a book of essays on the memory of the Resistance in France. He has published extensively on the radical impetus in France of the 1968 years and is completing a book on the Lip Affair.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Departement d'Histoire University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 28th Striking Balances: Russia, Energy Security, and National Budgets

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 28, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The 2015 Toronto Conference on Germany
    Striking Balances: Russia, Energy Security, and National Budgets
    *Additional details to be added soon*

    Saturday, March 28, 2015

    Chair: Prof. Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    Keynote Address
    Edelgard Bulmahn, Vice President of the German Bundestag

    In the Black: Balanced Budgets at All Costs?
    Panel and Q&A
    • Prof. Peter Bofinger, University of Würzburg
    • Prof. Kevin Page, University of Ottawa
    • Dr. Ailish Campbell, Canadian Council of Chief Executives
    Moderator: Doug Saunders, The Globe and Mail

    Energy Security: Common Interests – Different Priorities?
    Panel and Q&A
    • R. Andreas Kraemer, Ecologic Institute
    • Linda Duncan, MP
    • Katrina Marsh, Canadian Chamber of Commerce
    Moderator: Prof. Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Negotiate or Isolate?
    Panel and Q&A
    • Edelgard Bulmahn, Vice President of the German Bundestag
    • Dr. Taras Kuzio, University of Alberta
    • Prof. Robert Johnson, University of Toronto
    • Chrystia Freeland, MP
    Moderator: Dr. Constanze Stelzenmüller, Brookings

    Closing Remarks – Prof. Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    **This event will also be streamed live via webcast.**


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st Les occupations et les liens entre les deux guerres mondiales **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    **This event will be held in French.**

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Annette Becker
    Departement d'Histoire Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 6th Book Launch: Mapping Mass Mobilization: Understanding Revolutionary Moments in Argentina and Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Moments of mass mobilization astound us. As a sea of protesters fills the streets, observers scramble to understand this extraordinary political act by ‘ordinary’ citizens. This study presents a paired comparison of two ‘moments’ of mass mobilization, in Ukraine and Argentina. The two cases are compared and analyzed on a cross-temporal and an inter-regional basis, thereby offering two critical cases in response to assumptions that the processes and patterns of mobilization, and democratization politics more broadly, are region specific. This study challenges political science’s focus on elites and structural factors in the study of political participation during democratization.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Olga Onuch
    Research Fellow, University of Oxford


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Friday, May 1st Russia and the Ukraine Crisis: Thinking beyond Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 1, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Annual Munk Lecture on European Affairs

    Description

    Prof. Allison joined the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies (SIAS) in 2011 from a Readership in International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was previously a doctoral student and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford; a Lecturer and Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham (1987-99) and Head of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) (1993-2005). Between 2001 and 2005, Prof. Allison was also a Senior Research Fellow attached to the Centre for International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University. His broad research interests include the international relations, foreign and security policies of Russia and Eurasia and has travelled extensively there for research projects under his direction.


    Speakers

    Prof. Roy Allison
    University of Oxford



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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