Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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February 2016

  • Monday, February 22nd Reforms and Security in Ukraine Two Years After the EuroMaidan/Revolution of Dignity

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 22, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Andriy Parubiy is a leading public figure in Ukraine and is regarded as the leader of the Maidan Revolution of Dignity. He is immediate past Secretary of National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine – NSDCU (during the critical period of the onset of Russian aggression) and presently serves as First Deputy Speaker of Parliament. Together with Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk, and NSDC Secretary, Oleksandr Turchynov, he is a founding member of the People’s Front Political Party. He was number four on the list of candidates to Parliament from the People’s Front during the elections to Parliament in October 2014. His organization Maidan Self Defense has 16 members in Parliament that belong to the People’s Front and BPP faction

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Andriy Parubiy
    Speaker
    First Deputy Speaker, Parliament of Ukraine

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 22nd The History of the Great War: A Transnational Approach

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 22, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Transnational history is the narrative of the Great War written by transnational historians. This lecture discusses the origins of transnational history in the global expansion of higher education in the period 1960-90, and in the memory boom of the last quarter of the twentieth century. This is the framework within which to set the emergence of a school of history which transcends national boundaries to create a global history of the Great War, and which describes a pathway back to write the national history of the Great War in a more complete and comparative manner.

    Jay Winter, Charles J. Stille Professor of History Emeritus at Yale, received his PhD and DLitt degrees from the University of Cambridge, where he was a Fellow of Pembroke College from 1979 to 2001. He won an Emmy award as co-producer of the BBC/PBS eight-hour television series The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century (1996) and is a founder of the Historial de la Grande Guerre, an international museum of the Great War inaugurated in 1992. He is the author of Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History, published in 1995; editor of America and the Armenian Genocide (2008); and editor-in-chief of the three-volume Cambridge History of the First World War, published in 2014 in English and French. Next year, Cambridge University Press will publish his book, War and the Arts of Memory: Languages of Remembrance in the Twentieth Century and After. He is Distinguished Permanent Visiting Professor at Monash University and has been awarded honorary degrees by the University of Graz, the University of Leuven, and the University of Paris-VIII.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Jay Winter
    Yale University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 23rd When Petro-Dollars Dry Up: The Cases of Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan: A discussion with Aslan Amani and Elena Maltseva

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 23, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Elena Maltseva is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Windsor. Elena holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Toronto. Her research interests include the welfare state and the politics of welfare reforms; globalization, migration and labour policy; human trafficking; state-society relations and civil society development in post-Soviet states.

    Aslan Amani (PhD, LSE, 2013; MSc, LSE, 2009, Hon. B.A., University of Toronto, 2008) received his PhD in political theory from the Department of Government at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Aslan’s PhD dissertation (Is Democratic Multiculturalism Really Possible?) examined the normative interplay of democratic theory with multiculturalism. He is currently completing a book manuscript on democratic multiculturalism. Aslan has taught political science and political theory at the University of Toronto Mississauga, McMaster University, Trent University and the London School of Economics and Political Science. In addition to his work in political theory, Aslan has written op-eds and news analysis on democratic transitions and Eurasian politics for publications such as the World Politics Review, Open Democracy, and The Guardian.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Elena Maltseva
    Assistant Professor, University of Windsor

    Aslan Amani
    PhD in Political Theory, London School of Economics and Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th Petro Jacyk event

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th The Enlightenment Birth of Biopolitics

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    William Max Nelson is an assistant professor of History at the University of Toronto specializing in the history of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. His research focuses on the emergence of ideas about time, race, and biopolitics in eighteenth-century France and the Atlantic world. He is the author of a forthcoming book on this topic and he recently co-edited a book with Suzanne Desan and Lynn Hunt, The French Revolution in Global Perspective.

    In this talk, Prof. Nelson will discuss the emergence of biopolitical ideas and practices in the eighteenth-century French empire.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    William Nelson
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th Pluralism By Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMRoom 3137, Political Science Department, Sidney Smith Hall (100 St. George Street)
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    Description

    Why do some countries that lack preconditions for democracy nevertheless see the rise of democratic political competition?

    Pluralism by Default explores sources of political contestation in the former Soviet Union and beyond. Lucan Way proposes that pluralism in “new democracies” is often grounded less in democratic leadership or emerging civil society and more in the failure of authoritarianism. Dynamic competition frequently emerges because autocrats lack the state capacity or organization to steal elections, impose censorship, or repress opposition. In fact, the same institutional failures that facilitate political competition may also thwart the development of stable democracy.

    Lucan Way is an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto and co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES. He is the coauthor of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Department of Political Science and Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2016

  • Thursday, March 3rd The Early Modern Silk Road: Crisis and Recovery in 18th-Century Central Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 3, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In the first half of the 18th century, the Bukharan Khanate experienced a crisis that included devastating invasions from the north and the south, a severe fiscal crisis, rebellion and revolution. Setting aside the long-held belief that the crisis was caused by isolation from early modern globalizing trends, this talk will advance a new theory, or set of theories, to explain what caused the crisis, why it unfolded when it did, and how globalizing forces impacted early modern Central Asia and contributed to the rise of the Khanate of Khoqand.

    Scott Levi is associate professor of Central Asian history at The Ohio State University. He is the author of The Indian Diaspora and Central Asia and its Trade, 1550-1900 (Leiden, 2002), co-editor (with Ron Sela) of Islamic Central Asia: An Anthology of Sources (Bloomington, 2010), and has recently published Caravans: Indian Merchants on the Silk Road (Gurgaon, 2015). This talk will address conclusions drawn from his current research project, which aims to produce a book tentatively titled, Central Asia on the Frontier of Empires: The Rise and Fall of Khoqand, 1709–1876.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Scott Levi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Ohio State University

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 8th Canada-Russia Relations: Current State and Ways to Re-Engage

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 8, 20162:30PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    “Canada-Russia Relations: Current State and Ways to Re-Engage”
    Roundtable with the Russian Ambassador to Canada Alexander Darchiev

    The Ambassador of the Russian Federation, Alexander Darchiev, will speak on the current state of affairs between Russia and Canada including: sanctions, political and economic relations, media perceptions and perspectives on current global events, while exploring possible ways to improve relations based on shared mutual interests, pragmatism and a spirit of partnership.

    Currently Relations between Canada and Russia, the two largest nations in the world and natural geopolitical partners leave much to be desired. What are the causes of the negative perceptions and media campaigns on both sides and what can be done to mend relations and improve trade? How sustainable is the current sanctions regime and does it serve Canadian interest? In the long term cooperation is inevitable but must happen before business interests can take priority over political posturing?

    Ambassador Alexander Darchiev
    1983 – graduated from History Department, Moscow State University
    1983-1992 – post-graduate student, junior, senior research fellow, Institute of the US and Canada Studies. Russian Academy of Sciences
    Joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Department of North America, in 1992
    1992-1997 – First Secretary, Head of Section, MFA Department of North America
    1997-2002 – Counselor, Embassy of the Russian Federation in the US
    2003-2005 – Deputy Director, MFA, Department of North America
    2005-2010 – Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the Russian Federation in the US
    2010-2014 – Director, MFA Department of North America
    Appointed as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation to Canada on October 24, 2014

    Edward Schatz is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is interested primarily in identity politics, social transformations, social movements, anti-Americanism, and authoritarianism with a focus on the ex-USSR, particularly Central Asia. His publications include an edited volume, Political Ethnography (U. Chicago Press, 2009), and Modern Clan Politics (U. Washington Press, 2004), as well as articles in Comparative Politics, Slavic Review, International Political Science Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, and other academic journals. His current projects include a book on the United States as a symbol and actor in Central Asia and a study of authoritarianism in Central Asia. The American Political Science Association selected Professor Ed Schatz as the co-recipient of the Giovanni Sartori Book Award for his work, Political Ethnography: What Immersion Contributes to the Study of Power. The book, a collection of original essays edited by Professor Schatz, demonstrates how ethnography is uniquely suited for illuminating political science.


    Speakers

    Alexander Darchiev
    Abassador of the Russian Federation to Canada

    Prof. Edward Schatz
    University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 11th 2016 Toronto Conference on Germany: Leadership under Pressure

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 11, 20169:00AM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    An annual event, this conference examines the state of the union in Germany—Europe’s most consequential country—as well as the relationship between Germany and Canada. The conference is comprised of expert panels that this year will examine: state collapse in the Middle East, refugee policy in Canada and Germany, and climate-change policy.

    For the full program and registration, please click here.

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Washington Office


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 11th Russian State-Owned Companies and the Economic and Political Landscape of Bulgaria

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 11, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Distinguished Leaders in Bulgaria Lecture Series

    Description

    Dr. Krassen Stanchev is an associate professor at Sofia University; he is also CEO of KC 2 Ltd and Board Chairman, founder and former Executive Director of the Institute for Market Economics (IME) IME (www.ime.bg) – the first Bulgarian independent and free-market think thank (1993), former member and committee chairman of the Constitutional Assembly (1990-1991), one of the most quoted Bulgarian observers: best country analyst award for 1996 by Euromoney, as well as a laureate of Bulgaria Government Prize – 2002 (for contribution to democracy and civil society), Templeton – 2006 – as IME Director, and Georgi Vassilev’s Fund for Contribution to the Spirit of Liberty – 2006.

    He was a principle drafter of a number of reforms from central planning to market economy and is one of the leaders of those reforms.

    His expertise is in economics and regulatory policies significantly contributed to private sector growth in Bulgaria, New Europe and Former Soviet Union. Since 1990s he worked in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kirgizstan and Tajikistan), Caucasus (Armenia and Georgia), and Russia and Egypt, leading teams and/or being a subcontractor of EU, USAID or the World Bank programs.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Dr. Krassen Stanchev
    Institute for Market Economics


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Daniel and Elizabeth Damov


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 16th A Diaspora Approach to Understanding Human Trafficking for Labour Exploitation

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 16, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Dr. Antonela Arhin
    Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 18th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In 1973, a multinational took control of the Lip watch and mechanics firm in Besançon and planned to lay off half of the labor force. Workers responded by occupying the factory, starting up production, and selling watches to pay their salaries. The conflict resonated throughout France and continued in one form or another until 1981. Analysis of the Lip Affair can open up our understandings of challenges to the political, social, and economic order in the 1968 years in France.

    Donald Reid is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the author of The Miners of Decazeville and Paris Sewers and Sewermen, both of which have recently appeared in French translation, as well as a book of essays on the memory of the Resistance in France. He has published extensively on the radical impetus in France of the 1968 years and is completing a book on the Lip Affair.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Department of History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 21st Kracht lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 21, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Christian Kracht


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Germanic Languages and Literatures


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 22nd Of Pressure Points and Uneven Tempi: Infrastructure, Time and Contingency at the Kyrgyzstan-Tajikistan Border

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 22, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Drawing on long-term ethnographic research in Central Asia’s Isfara valley, this paper critically engages with questions of time and contingency in the study of international borders. It argues that while the emergence of biometric technologies and offshore policing have led to a critical exploration of the distributed spatiality of international borders in geography and anthropology, less attention has been given to what Little (2015) refers to as borders’ complex temporality: the “disorderly manner and the uneven tempo in which change takes place in the real world.” The paper asks how we might explore such uneven tempi ethnographically. Focusing on a particular moment of heightened tensions in the wake of disputed borderland road construction in the Isfara valley, it tracks a moment of border materisaliation and its aftermath to argue for an account of borders attentive both to history and the contingencies of local political dynamics.

    Madeleine Reeves teaches Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester and is a Visiting Fellow at the Aleksanteri Institute in Helsinki. She is the author of Border Work (Cornell 2014), which won the 2015 Rothschild Prize in nationalism and ethnic studies of the Association for the Study of Nationalities. With Johan Rasanayagam and Judith Beyer she has edited Ethnographies of the State in Central Asia: Performing Politics (Indiana 2014) and with Mateusz Laszczkowski she has edited a special issue of Social Analysis on ‘Affective States’ (Berghahn 2016). Her interests lie in the anthropology of politics, infrastructure and space.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Madeleine Reeves
    Speaker
    Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology, University of Manchester; Associate Editor, Central Asian Survey

    Edward Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 22nd Christian Kracht talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 22, 20164:00PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Germanic Languages and Literatures


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 23rd Maturing of the Ukrainian Political Nation

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 23, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    A journalist, author, political comentator, and leading opinion-maker in today’s Ukraine, Portnikov has a large following in social media. His articles have appeared in publications around the world, he is a frequent guest on Tv shows, and hosts a radio program dealing with current affairs. He has won awards for his fearless commentary on events in Ukraine, Russia and Eastern Europe. His recent books include Bohorodytsia v Synahozi (Mother of God in the Synagogue) and Tiurma Dlia Anhaliv (Prison for Angels). A selection of his articles in English can be found at http://www.theotherrussia.org/tag/vitaly-portnikov

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Vitaly Portnikov
    Speaker
    A journalist, author, political commentator in Ukraine

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 24th Ilija Trojanow talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 24, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ilija Trojanow


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2016

  • Thursday, April 7th Le Conteur Amoureux **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 7, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall, room 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    Conteur d’épopées et figure majeure du renouveau du conte en France

    « Bruno de La Salle s’impose comme le chantre du récit oral. Conter, pour Bruno de La Salle, n’est pas affaire d’archéologie : il s’affiche clairement du côté des modernes, de ses frères les chroniqueurs, les humoristes, comme Raymond Devos, Guy Bedos ou Dario Fo qui s’engagent par la parole dans la société. » Télérama

    Adolescent, Bruno de La Salle commence à écrire des poèmes et du théâtre et reçoit les encouragements de Luc Estang, Jean Cayrol et Jean Dasté. Il compose alors une série de rêves parlés qu’il interprète devant de petits groupes d’amis. A vingt ans, il entreprend son tour du monde : Moyen-Orient, Afrique, Australie, Inde...

    De retour à Paris, il se produit avec ses rêves dans les cabarets de la Rive Gauche et fréquente les musiciens travaillant autour des frères Baschet, le Groupe des Lettristes. Il rencontre André Voisin et Marie-Louise Tenèze du musée des Arts et Traditions Populaires qui l’initient à leurs travaux respectifs sur le conte. Il suit des cours de sociologie à la faculté de Censier.

    Mai 1968 et ses bouleversements le conduisent à repenser son action poétique à travers une forme contemporaine qui s’apparenterait à la littérature orale traditionnelle. Il lui reste à la définir et à l’expérimenter avec d’autres artistes.

    Il commence en 1969, avec la narration musicalisée de deux versions transposées du Chaperon Rouge et de la Pêche de Vigne, en s’accompagnant d’un orgue de verre Baschet, au Théâtre de l’Epée de Bois, puis au Festival d’Avignon où il revient, depuis lors, presque chaque année.

    Ces récits suscitent immédiatement chez les responsables culturels un mouvement d’intérêt pour cette forme d’expression que chacun pensait disparue. Il est très rapidement sollicité pour raconter dans toute la France et à l’étranger. Pendant quatre années, il va faire un premier apprentissage en se produisant dans des écoles, des bibliothèques, des MJC et des festivals.

    Il remarque vite, cependant, que cette idée d’un art disparu le classe au rang des « antiquités », alors qu’il conçoit au contraire le conte comme un art de demain.

    Tout en continuant à raconter, il s’attache, dès lors, à sensibiliser tous les gens qu’il rencontre à la modernité de cette expression, et les incite à participer à son développement. C’est dans cette intention qu’il va, jusqu’au milieu des années quatre-vingt, susciter des rencontres, des stages et des ateliers, et produire de nombreuses émissions radiophoniques en France et dans les pays francophones.

    En 1972, pour l’ERA de Genève et à l’invitation de René Zosso, il organise un premier atelier de contes qui sera suivi de bien d’autres, en particulier à la bibliothèque expérimentale pour la jeunesse de La Joie par les Livres, au Petit Clamart, à l’abbaye de Royaumont avec l’aide de Nacer Khémir, au sein de l’association l’Age d’Or de France avec Evelyne Cevin, à Grenoble dans les bibliothèques de quartier.

    En 1977, il suscite la première rencontre de nouveaux conteurs à Vannes avec une dizaine d’artistes, écrivains, chanteurs, chercheurs, bibliothécaires; puis en 1979, une seconde rencontre au Centre Georges Pompidou qui est relayée par France Culture, radio alors dirigée par Yves Jaigu.

    Ces rencontres et ateliers lui donnent l’occasion d’accompagner les débuts des principaux conteurs d’aujourd’hui qui, comme il l’a fait avant eux, commencent, dans cette fin des années soixante-dix, à exercer ce nouveau métier sous des formes et dans des conditions extrêmement variées.

    Craignant de voir le mouvement du « renouveau du conte » rangé dans la catégorie des arts mineurs, il fonde en 1981 à Chartres le CLiO, Centre de Littérature Orale, devenu par la suite le Conservatoire contemporain de Littérature Orale dont il est toujours le directeur. C’est là qu’il réalise ses premières grandes récitations collectives et musicales avec le compositeur Jean-Paul Auboux et le soutien de France Culture et du Festival d’Avignon. En 1981, L’Odyssée d’Homère, qu’il reprendra en solitaire en 1991 ; en 1982 et 1983, Le Récit de Shéhérazade ; en 1984 et 1985, Le Cycle du Roi Arthur.

    Au cours de ces créations, il fait connaître une seconde génération de conteurs tels qu’Abbi Patrix, Yannick Jaulin, Michel Hindenoch, Pascal Fauliot, Jean-Lou Bally...

    Il réalise en même temps, pour France Culture, de nombreuses émissions de radio, soit de création, soit d’information sur la littérature orale universelle ou sur le conte contemporain.

    Il organise ou participe à la mise en place de festivals de conteur, comme ceux de Chevilly-Larue, des Oralies de Provence, des Arts du Récit à Montpellier et de Radio France.

    La fréquentation des grands textes qu’il présente presque chaque année lui montre la nécessité de développer un style oral spécifique à la narration, au sein de laquelle la métrique, le rythme et le chant sont prépondérants. L’étude, l’adaptation, la réécriture ou la traduction de ces textes grecs, moyen-orientaux, celtes, médiévaux et plus récemment celle du Récit ancien du Déluge, genèse mésopotamienne, sont pour lui des occasions d’apprentissage sans cesse renouvelées.

    Il publie, de 1985 à 1990, une série d’albums, « Les Contes de toujours », pour laquelle il réécrit à partir de versions orales collectées, les contes traditionnels français les plus célèbres. Puis, en 1996, une autobiographie contée : Le Conteur amoureux qui rassemble une partie de ces contes, accompagnés de réflexions sur son métier.

    Ses deux dernières créations, La Chanson des Pierres en 2004 et Méga Nada en 2009, sont des épopées contemporaines qui témoignent avec force de sa conception de la narration musicalisée et d’un parcours riche de 40 ans d’expériences.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Bruno de la Salle


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 20th Stories of Khmelnytsky

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 20, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Join us for a panel discussion of the literary legacies of Bohdan Khmelnytsky. This event marks the publication of a new edited volume, Stories of Khmelnytsky: Competing Literary Legacies of the 1648 Ukrainian Cossack Uprising. Contributing authors Frank Sysyn, Taras Koznarsky, Adam Teller, and Amelia Glaser will speak about Khmelnytsky’s charismatic and contentious legacy in Ukrainian, Jewish, Polish, and Russian collective memory. In the middle of the seventeenth century, Bohdan Khmelnytsky was the legendary Cossack general who organized a rebellion that liberated the Eastern Ukraine from Polish rule. Consequently, he has been memorialized in the Ukraine as a God-given nation builder, cut in the model of George Washington. But in this campaign, the massacre of thousands of Jews perceived as Polish intermediaries was the collateral damage, and in order to secure the tentative independence, Khmelnytsky signed a treaty with Moscow, ultimately ceding the territory to the Russian tsar. So, was he a liberator or a villain? This volume examines drastically different narratives, from Ukrainian, Jewish, Russian, and Polish literature, that have sought to animate, deify, and vilify the seventeenth-century Cossack. Khmelnytsky’s legacy, either as nation builder or as antagonist, has inhibited inter-ethnic and political rapprochement at key moments throughout history and, as we see in recent conflicts, continues to affect Ukrainian, Jewish, Polish, and Russian national identity.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Robert Paul Magocsi
    Chair
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto; the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Frank Sysyn
    Speaker
    Director, the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies

    Taras Koznarsky
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Adam Teller
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History, Associate Professor of Judaic Studies, Brown U

    Amelia Glaser
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Director of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program at UC San Diego


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

    The Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    The Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    The Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    The Ukrainian-Jewish Encounter


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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