Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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September 2015

  • Wednesday, September 16th German Reunification - 25 Years Later

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 16, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After more than four decades of division, Germany’s East and West were officially reunited on 3 October 1990. This panel discussion will focus on the historical importance of this momentous event and will examine the progress achieved by the Federal Republic since then as well as the challenges that it continues to face.

    In an informal setting, our panel of distinguished experts will reflect on a series of questions. How does Germany look 25 years after the heady days of 1989/1990? Which fears were realized, which not? How well integrated is East Germany? How did Reunification impact Germany’s position in regional and global political contexts?

    Doris Bergen is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies. Her research focuses on issues of religion, gender, and ethnicity in the Holocaust and World War II and comparatively in other cases of extreme violence. Her books include Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich (1996); War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (2003 and 2009); The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Centuries (edited, 2004); Lessons and Legacies VIII (edited, 2008), and Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941-1945 (co-edited with Andrea Löw and Anna Hájková, 2013). She has held grants and fellowships from the SSHRC, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, the DAAD, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and she has taught at the Universities of Warsaw, Pristina, Tuzla, Notre Dame, and Vermont.

    Randall Hansen is Director of the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He works on migration and citizenship, eugenics and population policy, and the effect of war on civilian populations. His published works include Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after July 20, 1944 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Doubleday, 2008), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (OUP, 2000). He has also co-edited Immigration and Public Opinion in Liberal Democracies (with David Leal and Gary P. Freeman) (New York: Routledge, 2012), Migration States and International Cooperation (with Jeannette Money and Jobst Koehler, Routledge, 2011), Towards a European Nationality (with P. Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. And Europe (w. P. Weil, Berghahn, 2002), and Immigration and Asylum from 1900 to the Present (w. M. Gibney, ABC-CLIO, 2005).

    Konrad H. Jarausch has written or edited about forty books in modern German and European history. Starting with Hitler’s seizure of power and the First World War, his research interests have moved to the social history of German students and professions, German unification in 1989/90, with historiography under the Communist GDR, the nature of the East German dictatorship, as well as the debate about historians and the Third Reich. More recently, he has been concerned with the problem of interpreting twentieth-century German history in general, the learning processes after 1945, the issue of cultural democratization, and the relationship between Honecker and Breshnew. His latest book is Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton 2015).

    Walter Stechel is the Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in Toronto. Mr. Stechel is originally from Darmstadt, Germany. After obtaining his diploma in economics, he continued his education at the diplomatic academy in Berlin from where he moved to his first postings in Santiago de Chile, San Francisco, Buenos Aires and Ottawa. From 2000 to 2003, Mr. Stechel was the Deputy Head of Mission at the German Embassy in Addis Ababa. Following a posting at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin, he served as Consul General in Mumbai from 2006 to 2010. His career took an academic turn in 2010 when he spent one year as a Fellow in the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University. After two years as an adviser to the Secretary-General for the German representation in the OECD in Paris, Mr. Stechel became Consul General in Toronto in 2013. He is expected to remain in this position until 2016.

    Stephen F. Szabo is the executive director of the Transatlantic Academy (TA). The TA, which is a partnership between German Marshall Fund and the Ebelin and Gerd Bucerius Zeit Stiftung of Hamburg, Germany, the Robert Bosch Stiftung of Stuttgart, Germany, and the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a forum for research and dialogue between scholars, policy experts, and authors from both sides of the Atlantic. Dr. Szabo has held fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the American Academy in Berlin. Szabo received his Ph.D. From Georgetown University in political science and has a bachelor’s and master’s from the School of International Service, the American University. He is the author of a number of books on German foreign policy, most recently Germany, Russia and the Rise of Geo-economics (2015) and teaches German politics at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS.

    Rebecca Wittmann (PhD University of Toronto) is Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto and Chair of the Department of Historical Studies at UTM. Her research focuses on the Holocaust and postwar Germany, trials of Nazi perpetrators and terrorists, and German legal history. She has received fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service). She has published articles in Central European History, German History, and Lessons and Legacies. Her book, Beyond Justice: The Auschwitz Trial (Harvard University Press, 2005) won the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History. She is currently working on her second book project entitled Guilt and Shame through the Generations: Confronting the Past in Postwar Germany.


    Speakers

    Konrad H. Jarausch
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

    Doris Bergen
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Stephen Szabo
    Panelist
    Transatlantic Academy

    Rebecca Wittmann
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Walter Stechel
    Speaker
    Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Germany in Toronto

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 17th From Violence to Action: The Blindspot of Contemporary Radical Politics in the West

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 17, 20153:30PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Global Intellectual History Speaker Series

    Description

    After almost four decades of a neoliberal counterrevolution throughout the Western world, the notion of direct political violence as strategic action and instrument of collective emancipation has become unthinkable, if not utterly demonized, mostly associated with natural catastrophes and religious terrorism.

    But in the meantime the shrinking of public space and dismantlement of existing sociopolitical organizations has made radical existential choices and forms of direct oppositional action the only options in several corners of our disenchanted societies — as witnessed, under various forms, by the likes of Southern European urban secessions, French rural resistance known as “ZADs”, and even the short-lived North-American experience of Occupy Wall Street. Left-wing violence is back from the dead 1970s, or non-discursive protest becomes available again, at last? Scattered notes from a research in progress.

    A former director of the New York-based French Publishers’ Agency and currently professor of American Studies at the University of Paris-Nanterre, François Cusset also teaches critical theory seminars at Paris’ Institute of Political Science and the Swiss art school Ecal. He is the author of two novels and several critically acclaimed essays in the field of contemporary political and intellectual history, including: “French Theory” (2003, eng.tr. In 2008 with U.of Minnesota Press), “Queer Critics” (2002, eng. Tr. In 2011 as “The Inverted Gaze” with Arsenal Pulp), and “La Décennie” (a history of 1980s France published in 2006).

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    François Cusset
    Professeur, Université Paris Ouest


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th How to Make It Well Again? Greek-German Relations in the Shadow of Occupation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    In today’s Europe, one might think that the sins of the Second World War belong to the past and the reconciliation among once occupied countries and the German perpetrators was successfully accomplished. During the recent Greek economic crisis, however, Greek-German tension has proven just the opposite. In my talk, I will briefly characterize the period of the German occupation of Greece (1941-1944) in order to elaborate in more depth on the postwar relation between Athens and Bonn and, later, Berlin. The main focus will be placed on punishment of German perpetrators on one hand and compensation payments towards Greece on the other. This approach will support more general conclusions about how West and later reunified Germany was able to regain credibility in (post-)Cold War Europe.

    Dr. Kateřina Králová is assistant professor in Contemporary History at the Balkan, Eurasian and Central European Studies of the Institute of International Studies and former Vice-Dean for International Relations (2010-2015 at the Faculty of Social Science, Charles University in Prague) (Czech Republic). In her research she focuses on reconciliation with the Nazi past, post-conflict societies, memory and oral history as regards the Holocaust, Greek Civil War and post-war reconstruction particularly in Greece. She completed her master studies in Marburg, Germany (2002) and Ph.D. in Prague (2010) with a thesis on Greek-German relations published in 2012 in Czech Republic and in Greece. A German translation is in progress. During her academic career she obtained several prestigious scholarships including the IKY at the UOM (Greece), the DAAD at the Heinrich Heine University (Germany), and the Fulbright Fellowship at the Yale University (USA). In 2015, she is a Visiting Fellow at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She widely published on the topics of her research in Czech, Greek, German, and English.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Dr. Kateřina Králová
    Visiting Fellow
    Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Assistant Professor of Contemporary History
    Balkan, Eurasian, and Central European Studies
    Institute of International Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 24th War in Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 24, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Abstract for Yuri Zhukov’s presentation:

    In the `information war’ surrounding the armed conflict in Eastern Ukraine, Russian and Ukrainian media outlets have offered strikingly different accounts of the unfolding events, systematically under-reporting and over-reporting certain categories of violence, and attributing the same events to different actors. For instance, Ukrainian media sources routinely blame almost all civilian casualties on rebels, while Russian media sources blame Ukrainian government operations. Since news reporting shapes public knowledge, influences political preferences, and forms the evidentiary basis of the data social scientists use, these reporting biases are highly consequential for theory and policy. This paper performs a parallel analysis of media-generated event data from highly partisan sources, and investigates the extent to which these sources offer differing explanations for political violence, the distribution of territorial control, and privilege different — and differentially accurate — predictive models of the location and timing of future violence.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Yuri Zhukov
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan

    Marta Dyczok
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Western University

    Taras Kuzio
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Still on the Brink? Greece, Europe, and the Euro Debt Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    During negotiations over the latest Greek bailout, Europe was more divided than at any period in recent memory. Although Berlin ultimately prevailed and Athens agreed to a series of reforms, the latter did so with ill-grace (denouncing it as blackmail). Berlin’s position, meanwhile was widely condemned as short-sighted, counterproductive, and inhumane. There remains serious doubt about Greece’s ability to manage its debt in the absence of debt relief, to which Germany is resolutely opposed. In both southern Europe and northern Europe, extremist parties are exploiting the crisis to pursue anti-European, anti-migrant agendas, and in both France and Germany – the anchors of the EU – serious commenters have suggested that those countries would be better off without the euro, and even without the EU.

    A distinguished panel of Toronto-based commentators will explore the reasons for such divergence across Europe as well as the political and economic implications of the current crisis.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Panelist
    Director - Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Mark Manger
    Speaker
    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Carolina de Migel Moyer
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Spyridon Kotsovilis
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Louis Pauly
    Speaker
    Chair - Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Robert Austin
    Speaker
    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th The Colonial Politics of Global Health in Postwar French Africa

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This talk will explore the intersection of two of important phenomena in the postwar world: the emergence of the United Nations system and the disintegration of European empires in Africa. Using colonial and international health interventions in French Sub-Saharan Africa as a lens, this talk considers two interconnected questions: first, what were the implications of decolonization for the relationship between European empires and the broader international system? And second, how did the end of empire and the expanding reach of international organizations in the postwar period shape the more intimate domains of family health and social development in Africa? It will consider the ways that broader international political trends of anti-colonialism and decolonization profoundly shaped the landscape of postwar health cooperation in French Africa, limiting the possibilities for truly global action while also encouraging French colonial doctors to seek out new forms of scientific and technical cooperation with neighboring African empires.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Jessica Pearson-Patel
    College of International Studies, University of Oklahoma


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th Forced Migration in the Mediterranean: EU and South European States' Perspectives and Strategies

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    What are the security repercussions of forced migration for both the EU and of particular South European states? For dealing with this important issue, firstly a detailed picture of how illegal migration unfolds in the broader Mediterranean region over the last decade (trends, migration routes, impact of the Arab uprisings, the Syrian crisis etc.) is given. Secondly, particular emphasis is put on understanding how forced migration is being perceived and interpreted (a “securitization move”? in terms of “strategic culture”?) by the European Union as well as by certain South European states, particularly Italy and Greece. Concurrently, the European Union as well as the national (mainly Greek and Italian) responses and/or strategies to forced migration in the Mediterranean region are further discussed and analysed.

    This lecture is part of the Seminar Series in Hellenic and Balkan Studies.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Panagiotis Tsakonas
    Professor of International Relations, Security Studies, and Foreign Policy Analysis Department of Mediterranean Studies University of the Aegean Rhodes, Greece



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2015

  • Friday, October 2nd Greece's foreign policy: Assessing the past, anticipating the future

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Professor Panagiotis Tsakonas
    Professor of International Relations, Security Studies and Foreign Policy Analysis at the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Greece.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Paprika, Pálinka, and Politics: Variations on Themes in Hungarian Studies

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 20158:00AM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This one-day event aims to explore the diversity and inclusiveness of Hungarian Studies, while providing a platform for students at all levels and from a variety of backgrounds to share their ideas. Papers will explore the diversity of current research and encompass a wide range of multidisciplinary perspectives. The conference will feature the research of past and present students in the Hungarian Studies program. It is organized for students by students.

    Are you an undergraduate or graduate student at University of Toronto interested presenting your academic work? Visit our Call for Papers (https://hungarianstudiesconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/) page to learn more about how you can be part of the conference. Registration is required for this event.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Dr. Laszlo Borhi
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for the Humanities, Institute of History (Budapest, Hungary)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Taxes, Burden, and Anxiety: How Russia and the World Reformed Their Fiscal Systems and Became Modern in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture considers the evolution of Russian, European, and North American tax systems in the context of the formation of a modern polity. It argues that all states moved toward a system of revenue that was at once respectful of certain immunities and rights, and more intrusive and inquisitive about the individual citizen and enterprise. Tax systems embody the duality of modern citizenship: the person has the right to be left alone, and the person is more transparent and vulnerable than ever before.”

    Yanni Kotsonis is professor of history at New York University. He is founding director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. His recent book, States of Obligation: Taxes and Citizenship in the Russian Empire and Early Soviet Republic (2014) was awarded the Wallace K. Ferguson Prize of the Canadian Historical Association. He is the proud father of three tax exemptions.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Yanni Kotsonis
    New York University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 19th Urban Property Rights and the Revitalization, Rehabilitation, and Reform of Paris, 1750-1800

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    “Haussmanisation,” the monumental razing and reconstruction in the Second Empire (1852–1870) helped make Paris into “the capital of the nineteenth century,” in Walter Benjamin’s famous phrase. The vast historiographical domination of the Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann’s transformation of the capital city has all but obliterated the “pre-history” of Parisian urban development. It has also created a teleological gold standard of modern urban reform by which previous aspirations were bound to fail. Fully half of the capital’s buildings, by some estimates, were torn down. Entire neighborhoods were displaced toward the banlieue or toward the faubourgs, such as Belleville and Menilmontant, in the outlying areas of the capital, mostly toward the Northeast areas of Paris. “Haussmannisation” evokes the creation of a centralized administration to carry out visionary plans to raze and rebuild vast swaths of the modern city. By examining previous moments of debate and reform in the eighteenth century, we intend to call into question the exceptional nature of Haussmann’s urban reforms. Haussmanissation is inscribed in a longer history within France but also is a part of a tradition of adaptation undertaken in all great Western capitals to the realities of population explosions, new sciences of hygiene and sanitation, and, above all, the challenge of providing greater fluidity and “circulation” within the city.

    Allan Potofsky is a historian specializing in the French Atlantic and Parisian urban history during the eighteenth century. He is a professor at the Université Paris-Diderot since 2009 after previously holding the position of Maître de conferences at the Université Paris-8 (Vincennes à Saint-Denis). He is the author of Constructing Paris in the Age of Revolutions (Basingstoke and NY : Palgrave, 2009: paperback version 2012) and has edited two collections of articles (for French History, 2011 and the History of European Ideas, 2009). Recent articles concern the environmental history of Paris and the investment of slave wealth in urban property during the French Revolution. He is currently writing a book, Paris-on-the-Atlantic (Editions Vendémiaire), focusing on the French capital as a social and economic hinterland of early globalization of the eighteenth century.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Allan Potofsky
    Université Paris-7


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 21st Neo-Nazi Hate Crimes in Russia: Varieties, Causes, and Interconnections

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 21, 201512:30PM - 2:00PMCentre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies
    Canadiana Gallery
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    2nd Floor
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    Description

    Race-based ‘hate crimes’ in Russia reached unprecedentedly high levels in the first decade of the millennium, a point illustrated through comparison to other countries and historical epochs. While racist violence in the Russian Federation is ‘overdetermined,’ the paper explores a number of putative causes, principally the ongoing simmering ethnic conflict in the Russian south. The paper finishes by drawing conclusions on how international comparisons can help us build better theory and conceptual clarity when discussing ‘hate crimes’ versus ‘ethnic conflict.’

    Richard Arnold is Associate Professor of Political Science at Muskingum University. His research concerns extremist and vigilante groups in the Russian Federation and his book on neo-Nazi and Cossack hate crimes/ethnic violence is under review currently with Routledge. He has previously published articles in Theoretical Criminology, Post-Soviet Affairs, Problems of Post-Communism, Nationalities Papers, PS: Political Science and Politics and Journal for the Study of Radicalism. He has authored chapters on Alexei Navalny for Routledge’s Europa series and has a chapter in a forthcoming Palgrave-Macmillan book about Megaevents in Eurasia. He is currently studying the Cossack revival across the enitre Russian Federation, especially in non-traditional Cossack lands.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Richard Arnold
    Muskingum University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd Starvation as a Political Tool from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century: The Irish Famine, the Armenian Genocide, The Ukrainian Holodomor and Genocide by Attrition in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMBrennan Hall, St. Michael's College, University of Toronto
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    Description

    States have many tools at their disposal to suppress their subjects: the military, police, taxes, and laws, to name a few. The extent to which starvation has been used, or became a way to discriminate against, punish or eliminate national, ethnic, racial or religious groups (as described in the UN Genocide Convention) has not always been appreciated. The symposium focuses on four case studies to shed light on the politics of starvation, examining methods, their effectiveness as instruments of government policy, and the devastating effects on target populations.

    The Irish Famine took place between 1845 and 1852. The Irish population was heavily reliant on potatoes as a food staple, but potato blight destroyed several crops during this period. England’s policies, including those regarding land acquisition, absentee landlords, and the continued export of grain from Ireland, exacerbated the Famine, in which approximately one million people died, with a million more emigrating, causing the island’s population to fall by between 20 and 25 percent.

    During the First World War, as many as 1.5 million Armenians perished due to the genocidal policies of the Young Turk government of the Ottoman Empire. The Armenians were internally displaced, murdered en masse, or died of thirst, starvation and disease. Those who claim there was no genocide say there was a shortage of food for everyone. A closer examination reveals a deliberate policy of withholding food and deporting the Armenians to where there was no food, water or shelter.

    The Holodomor, or artificial famine in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in 1932 and 1933, killed an estimated 4 million Ukrainians. Soviet policies, including confiscation of grain and household foodstuffs and restrictions on travel from affected areas, led to death rates in Ukraine of 25,000 people per day at the height of the Famine. During this period, Stalin also decimated Ukrainian religious, intellectual and political elites in an effort to quell aspirations for Ukrainian political autonomy.

    In the late 1980s-1990s, the government of Sudan perpetrated sustained attacks against the people of the Nuba Mountains in the South Kordofan region through aerial bombardment of civilian villages and a genocide by attrition through forced starvation, including blockading humanitarian aid efforts to bring food and medical care into the starving region. These events preceded the current war (2011-present).

    In some cases, powerful governments willfully acted against civilian minority populations. In others, hunger was intensified by policies directed against specific groups or peoples. The Statute of the International Criminal Court includes the denial of humanitarian assistance as an act that may lead to starvation, and the Geneva Convention prohibits the starvation of civilians as a method of warfare. The United Nations Genocide convention states that “deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part” is a genocidal act. What measures have been employed to intervene in cases of forced starvation? What legal instruments and mechanisms are available to the international community? In reviewing these four cases, the symposium will address these questions and other issues of contemporary relevance.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Mark McGowan
    University of Toronto

    George Shirinian
    Zoryan Institute

    Andrea Graziosi
    Università di Napoli Federico II

    Samuel Totten
    University of Arkansas


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    International Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd The Second Surge: Cultural Transfer and Political Literacy in Central Europe, 1815-1850

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    History Department
    Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098
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    Description

    The transfer of knowledge during the Enlightenment is a well-established research field that has taught us much about the circulation and reception of ideas. Thousands of books crossed borders, and the business of translation transformed the cultural landscape of eighteenth-century Central Europe. But what about the nineteenth century? In absolute numbers, German publishers imported and translated far more books than in the eighteenth century, yet the scholarship on this “second surge” remains in its infancy. Examining the penetration of western texts into German markets, this paper focuses on the publishers who brokered this cultural exchange. Their strategies to market themes of materialism and constitutionalism as mass print for popular audiences call attention to the suffusion of Atlantic World political discourse into Central Europe after 1820.

    James M. Brophy is the Francis H. Squire Professor of History at the University of Delaware. He has written Capitalism, Politics, and Railroads in Prussia, 1830-1870 (1998) and Popular Culture and the Public Sphere in the Rhineland, 1800-1850 (2007) as well as co-edited Perspectives from the Past: Sources in Western Civilization (6th ed., 2015). In addition, he has published numerous essays on nineteenth-century Europe, which have appeared in such journals as Past & Present, Journal of Modern History, and Historische Zeitschrift. He is currently working on Markets of Knowledge: Publishers and Politics in Central Europe, 1770-1870, a book that examines German publishers as cultural brokers, political actors, and entrepreneurs of print.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. James M. Brophy
    Francis H. Squire Professor of History, University of Delaware


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Book Launch - Germany's Second Reich: Portraits and Pathways - by James Retallack

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    How did Germans see themselves, and how did others see them, as modern times arrived between 1866 and 1918? With a kaleidoscopic approach designed to reassess accepted views of this transformative epoch, Retallack sketches Germans who rejoiced in reform and others who celebrated stability, Germans who protested injustice and others who girded themselves against revolution. These chapters also address open questions about the continuities of German history: they chart new paths into and out of the Second Reich, taking readers across geographical and temporal boundaries that were acknowledged or forsaken by Germans at the time. As familiar images of Germany begin to fade from view, Retallack twists the perspective again: some of the portraits he paints are miniatures, others depict “another country” as though it were seen through telescopic and panoramic lenses at the same time.

    In Germany’s Second Reich, Retallack continues his career-long inquiry into social and political conflict in the time of Bismarck and Kaiser Wilhelm II. He argues that a strong, ambitious German bourgeoisie valorized achievement, education, and cultural pluralism, but it was divided from other ranks of German society by important cleavages. Many burghers paid no heed to the ideals of social equality or political inclusiveness. Those who also carried anti-socialist, anti-liberal, and antisemitic banners hardly merit our esteem. Against this backdrop, Retallack’s conclusions are iconoclastic but persuasive: they help us reappraise attempts to plant democracy in stony soil.

    Host: Richard Ratzlaff, Editor (Humanities), University of Toronto Press

    Walter Stechel, Consul General (Toronto) of the Federal Republic of Germany,
    “Reflections of a Diplomat”

    Doris Bergen, Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies,
    University of Toronto,
    “War and Violence”

    James M. Brophy, Francis H. Squire Professor of History, University of Delaware,
    “Reflections of a Cultural Historian”

    James Retallack, Professor of History and German Studies, University of Toronto,
    “Response”

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    James Retallack


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History

    University of Toronto Press


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 30th Les ‘Baby-Boomers’ dans l’histoire française : mutins ou mutants? **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 30, 20153:30PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    **This event will be held in French.**

    Au recensement de 1968, un tiers exactement des Français ont moins de vingt ans et, à eux seuls, les 16-24 ans représentent alors 16 % de la population totale. Ils sont, comme dans d’autres pays de l’Occident industrialisé, le produit du baby-boom démographique intervenu après la Seconde guerre mondiale. Génération de Mai 68, mais surtout classe d’âge contemporaine de la grande mutation qui emporte la France à la même époque, ces baby-boomers ont joué un rôle important dans l’histoire de ce pays depuis les années 1960. A la croisée de l’histoire politique et de l’histoire culturelle, il s’agira donc d’analyser ce rôle.

    Jean-François SIRINELLI
    Professeur à Sciences Po Paris
    (Chaire d’histoire politique et culturelle du XXème siècle)

    Derniers ouvrages parus :

    Dictionnaire de l’historien (Paris, PUF, 2015),
    La France qui vient (Paris, CNRS Editions, 2014),
    Désenclaver l’histoire. Nouveaux regards sur le XXème siècle français (Paris, CNRS Editions, 2013),
    Mai 68. L’événement Janus, rééd., Paris, CNRS Editions, 2013,
    Les Baby-boomers, Paris, Fayard, 2003, rééd., « Pluriel », 2007.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Jean-François Sirinelli
    Sciences Po (Paris)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University

    Alliance Francaise Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2015

  • Wednesday, November 4th Urban Boosterism in Closed Contexts: The ‘Magical State’ and Spectacular Urbanization in Three Caspian Capitals

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Natalie Koch
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Syracuse University, Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 4th Toronto Annual Ukraine Famine Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Ave., Toronto
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    Description

    Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale University. His book Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin received the literature award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Hannah Arendt Prize, and the Leipzig Book Prize for European Understanding. Bloodlands was named a book of the year by some dozen publications, has been translated into more than twenty languages, and was a bestseller in four countries. Professor Snyder is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Times Literary Supplement. His most recent book is Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning.

    The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture series was established in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past speakers have included: James Mace, Frank Sysyn, Ian Hunter, Terry Martin, Hiroaki Kuromiya, Olexiy Haran, Mark von Hagen, Lynne Viola, Roman Serbyn, Alex Hinton, Andrea Graziosi, Oleh Wolowyna, Norman Naimark, Alexander Motyl, and Anne Applebaum.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Timothy Snyder
    Housum Professor of History at Yale University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th Empire, Russia, and the First World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Dominic Lieven graduated first in his year, 1973, at the University of Cambridge. He was a Kennedy Scholar at Harvard and, on completing his PhD, became a lecturer in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, where he is now Professor of Russian Government. He has also been a visiting professor at Tokyo and Harvard Universities, as well as a Humboldt Fellow in Göttingen and Munich. He has published widely, writing on aristocracy, late imperial Russia, and empire. Dominic’s most recent book, Russia against Napoleon, was a major new history of the Napoleonic Wars from the Russian perspective which draws on previously unexploited Russian archival sources. The End of Tsarist Russia, to be published by Allen Lane in May 2015, will provide an account of the First World War told from the Russian perspective.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Dominic Lieven
    London School of Economics


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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