Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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September 2014

  • Friday, September 19th The Wages of Extrication: Civil Society Strength at Regime Termination and Inequality in Postcommunist Eurasia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk continues a line of research that argues that the strength of civil society at the point of extrication from communism is a powerful predictor of how “liberal democratic” post-communist regimes become. This is based on the impact that a mobilized civil society has on the reconfiguration of elites in the initial postcommunist phase and the degree to which the model of accumulation permits concentration of resources in the hands of previous elites on the basis of political power. In cases where civil society was stronger at the moment of extrication the elite was disposed to a more liberal model of capitalism with at least some protection for social welfare. Where civil society was weaker the elite was able to convert political power into concentrated control of economic assets and a more predatory and highly inegalitarian model of political capitalism emerged. This thesis will be tested by examining the impact of civil society strength at the moment of extrication from communism on income equality in the two decades since its collapse.

    Professor Bernhard specializes in comparative politics. His interests include democratization, development, comparative historical analysis, and European politics. His main lines of research have included the role of civil society in processes of democratization, the political economy of democratic survival, the politics and ramifications of institutional choice in new democracies, and paths from dictatorship to democracy in late-democratizing European countries. He is currently working on papers on the role of the state in development, the impact of revolution on the state’s war-making capacity, the effect of how democracy is measured on findings in the literature on regimes and conflict, and the legacies of fascism and communism for democratic political systems.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Michael Bernhard
    Department of Political Science University of Florida



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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October 2014

  • Thursday, October 2nd Law's Silence: Canada and Bomber Command

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Nelson teaches modern European history at the University of Windsor, with a special emphasis on German history, the First World War, and colonialism. In his current research, Professor Nelson investigates the development of a German ‘colonial gaze’ upon Eastern Europe, which began in the 1880s, and radicalized during the First World War.His research interests include the social and cultural history of war and occupation, as well as both overseas and ‘inner’ colonialism.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Robert Nelson
    Department of History, University of Windor



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, October 17th The Donkey Wars: Authority, Satire, and Political Imagination in the Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Bruce Grant is interested in cultural history and politics as well as religion. His research focuses on former Soviet Union, Siberia, and the Caucasus. His current and recent project include a study of changing social mores in the rapidly transforming capital of Azerbaijan, Baku, from model socialist urban centre to nationalizing metropolis. He is also working on a new project on the role of satire in authoritarian settings as seen through the life and work of Celil Memmedquluzade, editor of the Azeri-language, cross-regional journal, Molla Nesreddin, which was published from 1906-1931. Professor Grant is also involved in an ongoing study of rural religious shrines in the Caucasus, with particular regard for the rich historiographies surrounding them, and they way those histories challenge conventional narratives of Caucasus social life.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    Bruce Grant
    Professor of Antropology, New York University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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January 2015

  • Monday, January 19th In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Based on videotaped oral histories conducted with Jews living in small-towns throughout Ukraine, this multimedia presentation discusses Jewish life and death under Communism and Nazism.

    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 170 St. George Street

    Co-sponsors: the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies

    This event is free and open to the public. No registration required. Please arrive early as seating is limited.

    Contact

    Emily Springgay
    (416) 978-1624


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Veidlinger
    University of Michigan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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