Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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September 2016

  • Monday, September 26th Russian Life through the Prism of Everyday Speech

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 26, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Raisa Rozina is a leading researcher at the V.V. Vinogradov Russian Language Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and Professor of European Languages, Institute of Linguistics, Russian State Humanities University. A socio-linguist and a specialist in lexical semantics, she is a longtime student of slang and everyday speech in both Russia and the USA. She is the editor-in–chief and co-author of the dictionary Slova s kotorymi my vse vstrechalis’: tolkovyi slovar obshchego russkogo zhargona (Words we have all encountered: An Explanatory dictionary of modern Russian general slang (1995), as well as a compiler of the Tolkovyi slovar russkoi razgovornoi rechi (Explanatory dictionary of Russian everyday speech)–(vol.1 2014; vol.2 in preparation). She has also served as commentator on the works by J.D. Salinger, John Cheever, Sherwood Anderson and other American writers in editions published in English for Russian readers, and translator into Russian of articles by the distinguished Australian linguist Anna Wierzbicka.

    In her presentation “Russian life through the prism of everyday speech” Prof. Rozina explores the perspectives of Russian speakers on their everyday existence by analyzing semantic fields of everyday words. She focuses especially on the richest and most suggestive fields, such as FALL, DIRT, GREEDINESS, and ALIENS. Comparison between these semantic fields and corresponding ones in everyday English speech illuminates differences in the mentalities of Russian and English speakers.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Raisa Rozina
    A leading researcher at the V.V. Vinogradov Russian Language Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and Professor of European Languages, Institute of Linguistics, Russian State Humanities University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 26th The Balance of Trust: Hostages, Stars, Bonnets and Beads

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 26, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMEmmanuel College 119
    75 Queen's Park Crescent
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    Description

    How does one credit someone or something as reliable and trustworthy? By what measure can honesty be adjudicated and dishonesty punished? How can one confidently approach strangers who could not be vouchsafed by any accepted criteria of reliability and trustworthiness? What was the measure of trust and how might it be maintained? The 1529 Voyage of Jean Parmentier from Northern France to Sumatra will guide us as we pursue the practices, skills, and improvisations that constituted the precarious balance between trust and betrayal, profit and loss, life and death. By following the trajectory of Parmentier’s ships as they crossed perilous waters to meet and trade with unknown peoples on the other side of the world, we will encounter and try to understand the strategies he employed to negotiate trust, whether between officers and crew, ships and seas, or French merchants and Sumatrans.


    Speakers

    Michael Wintroub
    Associate Professor, Department of Rhetoric, University of California Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 26th Exchange of Economic Knowledge and Practice Between the Ottoman Empire and its Western Neighbours in the Early Modern Era

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 26, 20164:30PM - 6:30PM2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    Natalie Zemon Davis Room
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Challenging the often accepted view of the Ottomans as intellectually cut off from states to the west, this seminar presentation considers the similarities between Ottoman and western economic approaches. It examines in what ways and to what extent there was an exchange of economic knowledge and practice between the Ottoman empire and its western neighbours in the early modern era.

    Registration is not required for this event.


    Speakers

    Kate H. Fleet
    Skilliter Centre for Ottoman Studies, Cambridge University


    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Institute of Islamic Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2016

  • Thursday, October 13th Q&A with Patrice Leconte

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 13, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMLocation TBA
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    Description

    Details to follow

    Contact

    Véronique Church-Duplessis


    Speakers

    Patrice Leconte
    Filmmaker and comics author



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th The 1956 Hungarian Revolution and Its Repercussions: A Sixty-Year Retrospective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 20169:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “The 1956 Hungarian Revolution and Its Repercussions: A Sixty-Year Retrospective”
    October 14, 2016
    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    October 14th

    9:00 Welcoming Remarks – Robert C Austin, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs

    9:10 – 10:00 Professor Géza Jeszenszky: “Did the Democracies Let Hungary Down in 1956?”

    10:15 – 12:00 Panel 1 – Global 1956
    Panel chair: Susan M. Papp
    Panelists: Laszlo Borhi, Stefano Bottoni, Mark Kramer, Veszna Wessenauer

    12:00 – 1:30 Lunch

    1:30 – 3:30 Panel 2 – 1956 in Different Perspectives
    Panel chair: Eva Tomory
    Panelists: Sandor Hites, Janos Kenyeres, Peter Kreko, Atilla Pok

    3:30 – 4:30 Dr. Magyarics Tamás: “The Revolution as Represented in American Fiction – Robert Little’s The Company, James A. Michener’s The Bridge at Andau, and William F. Buckley, Jr.’s Who’s On First

    Participants

    Professor Robert C. Austin
    Conference Chair
    Robert Austin is an Associate Professor at the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. In the past, Prof. Austin was a Tirana-based correspondent for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty; a Slovak-based correspondent with The Economist Group of Publications; and a news writer with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. Austin has written articles for The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, Southeast European Times, Orbis, East European Politics and Societies and East European Quarterly along with numerous book chapters and two books published separately in Tirana and Prishtina. His most recent book, Founding a Balkan State, was published by the University of Toronto Press in October 2012.

    Professor Laszlo Borhi
    “Could the US and the West have Saved the Revolution of 1956?”
    Laszlo Borhi is the Peter A. Kadas Chair and associate professor, School of Global and International Studies Department of Central Eurasian Studies Indiana University and Scientific Counsellor, Center for Humanities Institute of History Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Professor Borhi has just published Dealing with Dictators, The United States, Hungary, and East Central Europe, 1942-1989, Indiana University Press. He is currently working on a book, Dark Decade: Hungary, Central Europe between Hitler and Stalin, 1944/1953.

    Dr. Stefano Bottoni
    “Repression as Nation Building: The Consenquences of 1956 in Romania”
    Stefano Bottoni is senior fellow at the Research Center for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He has been visiting fellow at the Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung in Potsdam and at Imre Kertész Kolleg in Jena. He is a team member of the EU/Horizon-funded international project “COURAGE” on the cultural opposition in Eastern Europe under state socialism. His main research fields are the communist nationality policy in Eastern Europe and the social impact of state security bodies in a comparative perspective. The English edition of two of his books will be published in 2017: Stalin’s Greenhouse. The Hungarian Autonomous Region in Romania, 1952-1960 (Lexington Books, Harvard Cold War Series) and Long Awaited West: A History of Eastern Europe since 1944 (Indiana University Press).

    Professor Sandor Hites
    “The Revolt of Literature? Hungarian Writers in 1956”
    Sándor Hites studied Hungarian literature and philosophy at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, where he earned his PhD in 2005. Since 2003, he has worked as research fellow at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and as lecturer at universities in Hungary and Romania, teaching courses on the nineteenth-century European novel, exile studies, and political and literary utopianism. He has held visiting fellowships at the University of London (2009) and the University of Edinburgh (2012). His earlier research focused on the nineteenth-century Hungarian historical novel, his recent scholarly work has engaged with twentieth century exilic literature and the nineteenth-century intersections of literature and economy. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto since 2015.

    Professor Géza Jeszenszky
    “Did the Democracies Let Hungary Down in 1956?”
    Géza Jeszenszky was a founding member of the Hungarian Democratic Forum (1988), which won the free elections in April 1990, nominating him Minister for Foreign Affairs in the government of J. Antall (199094). Between 1994 and 1998, he was a member of the Opposition in Parliament and active in the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. He was appointed Ambassador to the United States of America in 1998 and in 2002 resumed teaching history and international relations at the Corvinus University of Budapest. From 2011 to 2014, he was Ambassador to the Kingdom of Norway and the Republic of Iceland.

    Dr. Jeszenszky is the author of a large number of scholarly publications and political writings, including An Outline History of International Relations (Budapest, 1987); The Changing Image of Hungary in Britain,1894-1918 (Budapest, 1986, 1994, in Hungarian); Post-Communist Europe and Its National/Ethnic Problems (Budapest, 2005, 2009), also articles in journals and collective volumes published in Hungary, the United States, the U.K. and Germany. His book on Hungary’s relations to its neighbours in the years of the regime change came out in April. He has been a visiting professor in the United States, Poland, and Romania.

    Professor Janos Kenyeres
    “The 1956 Hungarian Revolution in Film: A Comparative Analysis”
    János Kenyeres is Director and Associate Professor in the School of English and American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, where he teaches English and Canadian literature, Canadian cinema, and literary theory. He has several publications in these fields, including the book Revolving around the Bible: A Study of Northrop Frye (2003). From 2005 to 2008, he was Visiting Professor of Hungarian at the University of Toronto. He is currently vice-president of the Central European Association for Canadian Studies, head of the Canadian Studies Centre in the School of English and American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, and co-editor of The AnaChronisT.

    Professor Mark Kramer
    “The USSR, the Communist Bloc, and Upheavals in Poland and Hungary”
    Mark Kramer is a professor and director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a senior fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has been a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria.

    Professor Peter Kreko
    “The Legacy of 1956 and Its Message for Today”
    Péter Krekó is the director of Political Capital Institute, a Budapest-based Central European political research and consultancy firm. He is also an associate professor at Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences in Budapest and a member of the of the EU Radicalisation Awareness Network Centre of Excellence pool of experts. He regularly serves as commentator for leading international media. His publications include: A Russian spy in Brussels, The Conspiratorial Mindset in Europe, Russian Influence, European far-right and Putin, a Hungarian Putin? Krekó wrote his PhD thesis on the Social Psychology of Conspiracy Theories.

    Dr. Tamás Magyarics
    “The Revolution as Represented in American Fiction – Robert Little’s The Company, James A. Michener’s The Bridge at Andau, and William F. Buckley, Jr.’s Who’s On First
    Dr. Magyarics is currently the Head of the North American Department at the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. He also teaches as Associate Professor at the School of English and American Studies, ELTE, Budapest. He served as Ambassador to Ireland from 2011 to 2015; was a Senior Research Fellow and later the Director of the Hungarian Institute for International Affairs. He has been teaching at ELTE, Budapest since 1987, and was a Guest Professor at the UCSB, the IES in Vienna in addition to various other Hungarian universities. His fields of interest include the history of the Cold War, with special reference to the US-Central European relations, the history of US foreign affairs, and the theory of international relations. He has written and edited eleven books on these topics, and authored some 200 articles in peer reviewed and other journals. He attended some 100 conferences and read papers at most of them.

    Susan M. Papp
    Susan M. Papp is a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation topic is “The Politics of Exclusion: The Hungarian Film Arts Chamber, 1938-1944.” In 2015, she was awarded the Tziporah Wiesel Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. Previously, Ms. Papp spent fifteen years at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a director and story producer. While at the CBC, she won the coveted Michener Award for public service broadcasting. Ms. Papp also ran her own production company for a decade, working in such farflung locations as Taiwan and Bosnia. She is the author of many articles and books including Outcasts: A Love Story, published in English, Hungarian, and Hebrew and produced as a documentary film by the same title.

    Professor Attila Pok
    “Captive Minds in a Turmoil – The 1956 Hungarian Revolution as a Problem of Intellectual History.”
    Attila Pok is deputy director of the Institute of History at the Research Centre for Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, vice-president of the Hungarian Historical Association, senior researcher at the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg. Between 1999 and 2013, he spent 10 semesters as Visiting Professor of History at Columbia University in New York. His publications and courses cover nineteenth- and twentieth-century European political and intellectual history as well as the history of modern European historiography with special regard to political uses of history and theory and methodology of history. His most important books include: Klios Schuld, Klios Sühne. Historie und Politik im Karpatenbecken (MTA BTK TTI, Budapest, 2014), co-editor of The Oxford History of Historical Writing, vol. 4 (Oxford University Press, 2011), A haladás hitele. (The Credibility of Progress) (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2010), The Politics of Hatred in the Middle of Europe. Scapegoating in Twentieth Century Hungary: History and Historiography (Savaria Books on Politics, Culture and Society. Savaria University Press, Szombathely, 2009), co-editor with Randolph L. Braham, The Hungarian Holocaust after Fifty Years (Columbia University Press, New York, 1997), and A Selected Bibliography of Modern Historiography (Bibliographies & Indexes in World History, number 24, Greenwood Press, 1992).

    Dr. Eva Tomory
    Eva M. Tomory graduated from Nagy Lajos High School in Pécs, Hungary. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Toronto and her master’s degree from York University. Eva Tomory earned her PhD (summa cum laude) from the University of Pécs, Hungary, in 2015. From 1984 to 2001, with occasional short breaks, she taught Hungarian at the Hungarian Chair of the University of Toronto. Since 2009, Dr. Tomory has taught introductory, intermediate, and advanced Hungarian language courses in the CERES Program at the Munk School of Global Affairs. From 1991 to 2010, she was the associate secretary of the Hungarian Studies Association of Canada. Dr. Tomory has been published in the Hungarian Studies Review and has presented papers at the conferences of the Hungarian Studies Association of Canada and at academic conferences in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, the United States, and Hungary.

    Veszna Wessenauer
    “The Role and the relevance of Hungarian civil society in 1956 and today.”
    Veszna Wessenauer completed her studies at the University of Szeged, Faculty of Law (International Relations BA, European Studies MA) and Central European University, Department of Legal Studies (Human Rights MA). During her studies she did numerous internships at Hungarian NGOs and international CSOs. She was involved in different projects and have gained expertise in the field of online human rights advocacy, human rights education and became a local consultant of international NGOs. She was the local coordinator of EU-Russia Civil Society Forum’s General Assembly in December 2015. She conducted legal research at the Center for Media, Data and Society on journalistic source protection and on the role and responsibility of social media companies in online violent political extremism. Her research interests consist of the following fields: human rights and its critical aspects; online freedom of expression and privacy; online extremism; correlation of education and democracy; contemporary role and relevance of civil society in CEE region; and Russian influence.

    Sponsors

    Hungarian Research Institute of Canada

    Co-Sponsors

    Linamar Corporation

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Friends of the Hungarian Studies Program

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th Ridicule (1996; dir. Patrice Leconte)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 20166:00PM - 8:00PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    Roundtable discussion with Paul Cohen (Director, CEFMF) followed by screening of Ridicule (1996)

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Paul Cohen
    Director, CEFMF, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 20th Cooperation between Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians in Lviv during WWII

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 20, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During WWII Lviv experienced a variety of traumatic occupations that disrupted the balance of relations between its major ethnic inhabitants, Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians. Prof Hnatiuk explores the myths, the animosities, and the interactions between these groups during the war years, dispelling many of the presumed truths about irremediable hostility and conflicts. Her focus is on the relations between individuals as documented in personal archives rather than on collective perceptions and activities.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Aleksandra (Ola) Hnatiuk
    Speaker
    Professor in Culture Studies, University of Warsaw

    Maxim Tarnawsky
    Chair
    Professor at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 21st Dawn of the Vinelords: Wine and Capitalism in Colonial Algeria

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 21, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith 2098
    100 St George St.
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In the late nineteenth century wine production took off in French-ruled Algeria, to such an extent that for most of the following century this Muslim-majority territory was the fourth biggest wine producer in the world. Many of Algeria’s vineyards were on a scale that far exceeded those found in metropolitan France, earning some colonists spectacular fortunes and, in time, significant influence over the colony’s affairs. Through a study of the backgrounds and business dealings of these “vinelords,” this talk will demonstrate the central importance of wine to the economic life of colonial Algeria, while arguing that agricultural capitalism also posed substantial risks to the French project of colonization.

    Owen White is an associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. His publications include Children of the French Empire: Miscegenation and Colonial Society in French West Africa, 1895-1960 and the edited volume (with J.P. Daughton) In God’s Empire: French Missionaries and the Modern World, as well as articles on a variety of topics in French colonial history. He is currently completing a book manuscript about the Algerian wine industry.


    Speakers

    Owen White
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Delaware


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 24th Distinguished Lecture: Voltaire and the Radical Enlightenment

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 24, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMOld Victoria College, Alumni Hall
    73 Queen’s Park Crescent
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    Description

    Further details to follow


    Speakers

    Nicholas Cronk
    Director, Voltaire Foundation, Oxford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 26th What Ukrainians and Jews Know and What They Do not Know about One Another

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 26, 20165:00PM - 7:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100A
    170 St. George Street
    Toronto, Ontario, M5R 2M8
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    Description

    There is much that ordinary Ukrainians do not know about Jews and that ordinary Jews do not know about Ukrainians. As a result, those Jews and Ukrainians who may care about their respective ancestral heritages usually view each other through distorted stereotypes, misperceptions, and biases. This talk sheds new light on highly controversial moments of Ukrainian-Jewish relations and argues that the historical experience in Ukraine not only divided ethnic Ukrainians and Jews but also brought them together.

    Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern is the Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor of History in the History Department at Northwestern University, Chicago. He has authored a number of prize-winning books, including The Golden Age Shtetl (Princeton University Press, 2015). His research and publications have been supported by a number of foundations, including the Rothschild, Jewish Memorial, DAAD, Kosziuszko, Lady Davis, and National Endowment for the Humanities. He has taught at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv. For his pedagogical and scholarly contribution, he has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” in Kyiv.

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Yohanan Petrovsky Shtern
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    Ukrainian Jewish Encounter


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 27th Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 27, 20164:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A panel discussion on the civic and scholarly significance of the book, Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence, co-authored by Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (University of Toronto) and Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (Northwestern University), and published by University of Toronto Press.

    Chair:

    Professor Doris Bergen
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

    Commentators:

    Adrian Karatnycky
    Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council

    Professor Ori Yehudai
    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Professor Anna Shternshis
    Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Respondents:

    Professor Paul Robert Magocsi
    Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University


    Speakers

    Doris Bergen
    Chair
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

    Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
    Speaker
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University

    Paul Robert Magocsi
    Speaker
    Professor and Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Ori Yehudai
    Speaker
    Professor at the Department of History, University of Toronto

    Anna Shternshis
    Commentator
    Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Adrian Karatnycky
    Commentator
    Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    Ukrainian Jewish Encounter


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th Conference: Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in Comparative Historical Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20161:00PM - 5:30PMKnox College, 23 King's College Circle/St. George St., University of Toronto
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    Description

    The conference will bring together presenters on the Irish (Peter Gray, Queen’s University, Belfast), Bengal (Janam Mukherjee, Ryerson University), and Ukrainian (Liudmyla Hrynevych, Academy of Sciences, Ukraine) famines and examine differences and commonalities (Mark von Hagen, Arizona State University and Andrea Graziosi, Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research).

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 29th The Holodomor and the Language of Hate in Stalinist Propaganda (In Ukrainian).

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 29, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    Dr. Hrynevych will discuss propaganda in the context of the Holodomor.

    Please note that the lecture will be in Ukrainian.

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Liudmyla Hrynevych
    Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Ukrainian Canadian Research & Documentation Centre

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2016

  • Friday, November 4th Chornobyl 30 Years After: Energy, Environment, Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 20162:30PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The explosion at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant on April 26, 1986 continues to have serious economic, social, and biological consequences for the inhabitants of the affected territories and beyond. The problems caused by the disaster in Ukraine and policies developed to address them have been further complicated by geopolitical conflict and the economic and humanitarian crisis this conflict has precipitated. To commemorate the 30th anniversary of the disaster, this panel brings together scholars to discuss issues such as the future nuclear energy in Ukraine, the impact of radiation on wildlife in Chornobyl’s exclusion zone, and the management of displaced people. In situating their research, panelists will draw comparisons between the Chornobyl and Fukushima accidents, and between the Chornobyl accident and Ukraine’s Anti-Terrorist Operation.

    Presentations:

    Chernobyl and the Future of Nuclear Power in Ukraine
    David Marples, Professor, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta

    Do Nuclear Accidents Generate a “Garden of Eden” for Wildlife? Lessons from the Chernobyl and Fukushima Disasters
    Tim Mousseau, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina.

    A Humanitarian Crisis after the Chernobyl Disaster and the Anti-terrorist Operation (ATO) in Ukraine: What do They Have in Common?
    Alexander Belyakov, Ph.D., Certified Sustainability Professional. The Roots Collaborative, Founding Member

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    David Marples
    Distinguished University Professor and Chair, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta; Director of the Stasiuk Program for the Study of Contemporary Ukraine

    Tim Mousseau
    Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of South Carolina. Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Explorers Club

    Alexander Belyakov
    Ph.D., Certified Sustainability Professional. The Roots Collaborative, Founding Member. http://alexbelyakov.com/


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 11th Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture: "The Fields of Sorrow: Mapping the Great Ukrainian Famine"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 11, 20167:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past lecturers have included James Mace, Norman Naimark, Alexander Motyl, Anne Applebaum, and Tymothy Snyder.


    Speakers

    Serhii Plokhy
    Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History; Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto branch


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 18th Le Tombeau du martyr juif inconnu and Jewish Memory of Deportation after the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    A memorial to the six million murdered Jews of Europe was inaugurated in Paris in 1956. It is now known as the Mémorial de la Shoah, but then it was called the Tombeau du Martyr juif inconnu. This memorial was one of the first of its kind, and its construction was completed in the mid-1950s, when, according to received wisdom, a general silence about the fate of European Jewry in the Second World War was said to prevail. How and why was the memorial constructed; how is it to be interpreted; and why was the memorial built in France?

    Philip Nord is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1981. He is the author of several books on the history of modern France, including: The Republican Moment: Struggles for Democracy in Nineteenth-Century France (1995), Impressionists and Politics: Art and Democracy in the Nineteenth Century (2000); France’s New Deal: From the Thirties to the Postwar Era (2010); and France 1940: Defending the Republic (2015).


    Speakers

    Philip Nord
    Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Princeton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2016

  • Thursday, December 1st The Revolutionary Origins of Soviet Durability

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 1, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The twentieth century saw the emergence of a number of authoritarian regimes ­ China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, the USSR ­ that have both challenged the global order and persisted in the face of massive external pressure and catastrophic economic downturns. Drawing on statistical analysis and in-depth case studies, Lucan Way argues that the threat and resilience of such regimes can be traced to their origins in violent revolutionary conflict. A history of violent revolutionary struggle encourages external aggression but also inoculates regimes against major causes of authoritarian breakdown such as military coups and mass protest. Professor Way¹s talk will focus on the impact the Soviet Union¹s revolutionary origins on its durability in the face of repeated crises (rebellion, famine, foreign invasion) in the first half of the twentieth century.

    Lucan Way received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley and is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Way¹s research focuses on democratization and authoritarianism in the former Soviet Union and the developing world. His most recent book, Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (Johns Hopkins, 2015), examines the sources political competition in the former Soviet Union. His book, Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (with Steven Levitsky), was published in 2010 by Cambridge University Press. Way¹s book and articles on competitive authoritarianism have been cited thousands of times and helped stimulate new and wide-ranging research into the dynamics of hybrid democratic-authoritarian rule.

    Way has also published articles in Comparative Politics, Journal of Democracy, Perspectives on Politics, Politics & Society, Slavic Review, Studies in Comparative and International Development, World Politics, as well as in a number of area studies journals and edited volumes. His article in World Politics was awarded the Best Article Award in the Œcomparative Democratization¹ section of the American Political Science Association in 2006. Together with Steven Levitsky, Professor Way is currently writing a book, under contract with Princeton University Press, on the durability of authoritarian regimes founded in violent revolutionary struggle. He is Co-Directorof the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and is Co-Chair of the Editorial Board of The Journal of Democracy.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Prof. Lucan Way
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto

    Prof. Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto

    Prof. Peter Solomon
    Discussant
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2017

  • Thursday, February 16th Lumumba (2000; dir. Raoul Peck)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20177:30PM - 9:30PM Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Julie MacArthur
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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