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September 2014

  • Friday, September 19th The Wages of Extrication: Civil Society Strength at Regime Termination and Inequality in Postcommunist Eurasia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk continues a line of research that argues that the strength of civil society at the point of extrication from communism is a powerful predictor of how “liberal democratic” post-communist regimes become. This is based on the impact that a mobilized civil society has on the reconfiguration of elites in the initial postcommunist phase and the degree to which the model of accumulation permits concentration of resources in the hands of previous elites on the basis of political power. In cases where civil society was stronger at the moment of extrication the elite was disposed to a more liberal model of capitalism with at least some protection for social welfare. Where civil society was weaker the elite was able to convert political power into concentrated control of economic assets and a more predatory and highly inegalitarian model of political capitalism emerged. This thesis will be tested by examining the impact of civil society strength at the moment of extrication from communism on income equality in the two decades since its collapse.

    Professor Bernhard specializes in comparative politics. His interests include democratization, development, comparative historical analysis, and European politics. His main lines of research have included the role of civil society in processes of democratization, the political economy of democratic survival, the politics and ramifications of institutional choice in new democracies, and paths from dictatorship to democracy in late-democratizing European countries. He is currently working on papers on the role of the state in development, the impact of revolution on the state’s war-making capacity, the effect of how democracy is measured on findings in the literature on regimes and conflict, and the legacies of fascism and communism for democratic political systems.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Michael Bernhard
    Department of Political Science University of Florida



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  • Friday, September 19th Ukraine under Fire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 19, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join four experts for an in-depth panel discussion regarding the ongoing crisis in Ukraine.

    Prof. Marta Dyczok (Western University, Jacyk Program) studies mass media in Ukraine and spent twelve weeks in the country over the summer. She will speak about media representations and their impact.

    Journalist Andriy Kulykov (ICTV, Public Radio Ukraine) who has interviewed many of the key actors and has travelled to Donets’k, Mariupol, Crimea, Kharkiv and other cities, will provide a perspective from Kyiv via Skype.

    Prof. Lucan Way (CERES, University of Toronto) has written extensively on democratization in Ukraine and is a frequent commentator on events in Ukraine.

    Prof. Peter Solomon (CERES and Jacyk Program, University of Toronto), who studies law and courts in Ukraine, will speak about possible measures to decentralize governmental operations and reform the judiciary.


    Speakers

    Prof. Marta Dyczok
    Western University

    Prof. Lucan Way
    University of Toronto

    Andriy Kulykov
    ICTV, Public Radio Ukraine

    Prof. Peter Solomon
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


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  • Tuesday, September 23rd Iryna Balabukha: “Violence in Intimate Relationships: Why does it happen? A case study on Ukraine”

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 23, 201412:30PM - 4:00PM14 Queen's Park Crescent West
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    Description

    Dr. Balabukha received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in psychology from Kharkiv State University and her PhD in Child and Family Studies from Syracuse University.

    Location: Ericson Seminar Room, Centre for Criminology and Socio-legal Studies, 14 Queen’s Park Crescent West, 2nd floor

    Participants are encouraged to brown bag their lunch. Cold drinks will be provided.

    If you are a person with a disability and require accommodation, please contact Lori Wells at 416-978-3722 x226 or email lori.wells@utoronto.ca and we will do our best to make appropriate arrangements.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies


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  • Wednesday, September 24th Poland and Ukraine in the 1930s and 1940s

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 24, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This presentation will deal with the complex issues of Polish-Ukrainian relations during the 1930s and 1940s in light of the recently published documents of Polish and Soviet secret service documents. The presenters will include two representatives of the Polish Institute of National Remembrance and a prominent Ukrainian historian and leading authority on the history of Communist rule in Ukraine. The presentations will include:

    Dr. Jerzy Bednarek:

    The Publication Poland and Ukraine in the 1930s and 1940s. Documents from
    the Archives of the Secret Services: Editorial Issues

    Marcin Majewski:

    The Genesis of Historical-Archival Cooperation between the Polish Institute
    of National Remembrance and the Security Service of Ukraine

    Prof. Yuri Shapoval:

    Poland and Ukraine in the 1930s and 1940s in Light of Secret Services
    Documents

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Dr. Jerzy Bednarek
    Institute of National Remembrance, Lodz

    Marcin Majewski
    Institute of National Remembrance, Warsaw

    Prof. Yuri Shapoval
    Center for Historical Political Studies, Institute of Political and Ethnic Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv



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October 2014

  • Thursday, October 2nd Bomber Command and Canada: Law's Silence

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Nelson teaches modern European history at the University of Windsor, with a special emphasis on German history, the First World War, and colonialism. In his current research, Professor Nelson investigates the development of a German ‘colonial gaze’ upon Eastern Europe, which began in the 1880s, and radicalized during the First World War.His research interests include the social and cultural history of war and occupation, as well as both overseas and ‘inner’ colonialism.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Robert Nelson
    Department of History, University of Windor



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  • Thursday, October 2nd Apartment Stories: Communist Construction and Daily Life during the Khrushchev Years

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Set against the backdrop of the mass transition from communal to single-family housing that Khrushchev ushered in in 1957, this talk traces the everyday experiences and hopes of Soviet citizens who continued to live in the old housing stock as the supply of new apartments failed to keep pace with demand. Drawing upon housing petitions and official responses to them, it also depicts individuals challenging public rhetoric about building Communism, while demanding the realization of a long-awaited postwar normalcy. At the same time, the talk demonstrates the ways in which the housing question constituted a point of convergence for popular expectations and state promises during the Thaw.

    Christine Varga-Harris is an Associate Professor at Illinois State University specializing in postwar Soviet history. Her research examines the intersection of Khrushchev-era housing policy with official ideology, society, and identity. Among her publications are chapters in the volumes Divided Dreamworlds? (University of Amsterdam Press, 2012) and The Dilemmas of De-Stalinization (Routledge, 2006), as well as the article “Homemaking and the Aesthetic and Moral Perimeters of the Soviet Home during the Khrushchev Era,” which appeared in the Journal of Social History (2008). She recently completed the monograph, Stories of House and Home: Socialism, Society and the Soviet Person, during the Khrushchev Years (Cornell University Press, forthcoming). Her new research project focuses on Soviet relations with non-aligned countries, from the perspective of gender.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Christine Varga-Harris
    Illinois State University



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  • Thursday, October 9th Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 9, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture – The Holodomor in the context of current events

    Speaker: Pulitzer Prize winner Anne Applebaum

    Location: George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto

    More details to follow

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Anne Applebaum


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


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  • Friday, October 17th The Donkey Wars: Authority, Satire, and Political Imagination in the Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Bruce Grant is interested in cultural history and politics as well as religion. His research focuses on former Soviet Union, Siberia, and the Caucasus. His current and recent project include a study of changing social mores in the rapidly transforming capital of Azerbaijan, Baku, from model socialist urban centre to nationalizing metropolis. He is also working on a new project on the role of satire in authoritarian settings as seen through the life and work of Celil Memmedquluzade, editor of the Azeri-language, cross-regional journal, Molla Nesreddin, which was published from 1906-1931. Professor Grant is also involved in an ongoing study of rural religious shrines in the Caucasus, with particular regard for the rich historiographies surrounding them, and they way those histories challenge conventional narratives of Caucasus social life.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    Bruce Grant
    Professor of Antropology, New York University



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  • Wednesday, October 29th The Holocaust in Hungary, 1941-1945

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 29, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Tamás Stark is a senior research fellow at the Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary.

    Stark graduated at Karl Marx University of Economics in Budapest in 1983 and received his Ph.D. from the Eötvös Lóránd University of Budapest in 1993. His specialization is forced population movement in East-Central Europe in the period of 1938-1956, with special regard to the history of the Holocaust, the fate of prisoners of war and civilian internees, and the post-war migrations.

    In 1995/1996 he was Pearl Resnick Post-doctoral Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. In the first half of 2014 he was Fulbright professor at Nazareth College in Rochester, NY.

    From 2000 to present, he has worked on many major publications of books, articles, and chapters, including Occupation in Europe Series (2008). His main publications include Hungary’s Human Losses in World War II (Uppsala, 1995), Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust and after the Second World War, 1939-1949: A Statistical Review (Boulder, CO, 2000), Magyarok szovjet fogságban (Budapest, 2006) on the fate of the Hungarian prisoners of war under Soviet control.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Tamás Stark
    Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary



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January 2015

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