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September 2016

  • Friday, September 9th Against Democratizing Tendencies and the Ruthenian Danger: City Council’s Discourses on the Reform of Local Election Regulations in Lviv before World War I

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 9, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Heidi Hein-Kircher earned her M.A. and PhD from Heinrich Heine-University in Düsseldorf. She has been on the research staff of the Herder-Institute for Historical Research in East Central Europe in Marburg, Germany since 2003.

    In her research, she focuses on political and cultural memory and political cults in East Central Europe. Another field of research is urban history of the 19th and 20th in East Central Europe, especially emerging cities and L’viv (Lwów/Lemberg) in the 19th century in relation to local government.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Heidi Hein-Kircher
    the Herder-Institute for Historical Research


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    The Chair in Polish History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 9th Ukraine's Euromaidan: Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 9, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    How can you counteract an information war? Hromadske Radio, Public Radio Ukraine, decided to provide accurate and objective information to audiences – free of state and corporate censorship and any kind of manipulation. They broadcasted throughout Ukraine’s Euromaidan, and beyond. This book brings together a series of English language reports on the Ukraine crisis first broadcast on Hromadske Radio between 3 February 2014 and 7 August 2015. Collected and transcribed here, they offer a kaleidoscopic chronicle of events in Ukraine. Bookending the reports, purpose written introduction and conclusion sections contextualize the independent radio project within the larger picture of Ukraine’s media and political developments – both before the Euromaidan and in its dramatic aftermath. The book also features a preface by David R. Marples.

    For more information on the book, please follow this link: http://www.e-ir.info/2016/03/22/open-access-book-ukraines-euromaidan-broadcasting-through-information-wars-with-hromadske-radio/

    Marta Dyczok is Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University, Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, and Adjunct Professor at the National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. She has published five books, including Ukraine’s Euromaidan. Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016) Ukraine Twenty Years After Independence: Assessments, Perspectives, Challenges (co-edited with Giovanna Brogi, 2015), Media, Democracy and Freedom. The Post Communist Experience (co-edited with Oxana Gaman-Golutvina, 2009), articles in various journals including The Russian Journal of Communication (2014), Demokratizatsiya (2014), and regularly provides media commentary. Her doctorate is from Oxford University and she researches mass media, memory, migration, and history.

    Olivia Ward is a foreign affairs reporter for The Toronto Star who has written on international affairs for over 16 years, beginning as the Star’s UN correspondent and reporting from countries around the globe. Olivia has led the Moscow and London bureaus for the Star and has reported from the former Soviet Union, South Asia, and the Middle East, and on conflict zones including Chechnya, Tajikistan, Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan, Kosovo, Serbia, Iraq, and Israel and Palestine.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Marta Dyczok
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History and Political Science, Western University

    Olivia Ward
    Moderator
    Foreign Affairs Correspondent, the Toronto Star


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 12th CCR2P Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 12, 201612:00PM - 1:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 15th China's Cyber Power

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 201612:30PM - 1:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    You are invited to the first of several upcoming IISS-Americas events to be held in Canada. With offices in four geographic regions, the London-based IISS is a leading authority on global security issues. The IISS-Americas, located in Washington, DC, USA, serves as a hub through which policymaking communities, multilateral organizations, nongovernmental organizations and multinational corporations in the Americas connect with the Institute’s world-leading research and convening power.

    You are invited to the launch of the latest IISS Adelphi book, China’s Cyber Power. Please join the IISS-Americas, the Munk School of Global Affairs, and author Nigel Inkster for a discussion on the implications of China’s growing cyber capabilities.

    China’s Cyber Power provides a detailed analysis of the country’s growing cyber capabilities, and situates these capabilities within their wider cultural, historical, and strategic context. Through the prism of the cyber domain, the book examines China’s long struggle to modernize while preserving cultural self-esteem. It addresses many of the significant strategic questions about China’s rise that are increasingly occupying the attention of policymakers and scholars alike.

    Nigel Inkster is Director of Future Conflict and Cyber Security at the IISS. He served for 31 years in the British Secret Intelligence Service (commonly known as MI6). He had postings in Asia, Latin America, and Europe and worked extensively on transnational security issues. He was on the Board of SIS for seven years, the last two as Assistant Chief and Director for Operations and Intelligence. He graduated from St. John’s College, Oxford with a first-class degree in oriental studies. His languages include Chinese and Spanish. He is the former Chairman of the World Economic Forum’s Committee on Terrorism and a current member of the WEF Council on Cyber Security.


    Speakers

    Nigel Inkster
    Speaker
    Director of Future Conflict and Cyber Security, IISS

    Mark Fitzpatrick
    Chair
    Executive Director, IISS-Americas

    Jon Lindsay
    Commentator
    Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Global Affairs, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 15th Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants’ struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims—unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Hae Yeon Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship.

    Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. Decentering Citizenship argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.

    Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Her book Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) examines how inequalities of gender, race, and class affect migrant rights through a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea—factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and club hostesses.

    Discussants:

    Anna Korteweg is Professor and Chair of Sociology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. Her work problematizes the notion of “immigrant integration” and the ways in which belonging is defined in the intersections of gender, religion, ethnicity and national origin in Western Europe and Canada. Her co-authored book (with Gökçe Yurdakul), Headscarf Debates: Conflicts of National Belonging, was published by Stanford University Press in 2014.

    Jesook Song is Professor at the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto. She is an urban anthropologist of political economy and subject formation in finance, welfare, education, and neoliberalism, focusing on South Korean context. Her books include South Koreans in the Debt Crisis (Duke University Press 2009), Living on Your Own (SUNY Press 2014), New Millennium South Korea (editor, Routldged 2011).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute; and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Jesook Song
    Discussant
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology and Collaborative Master's Program In Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

    Anna Koreteweg
    Discussant
    Professor & Chair, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga; Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 15th What Do We Really Know About the Holodomor: New Research Results

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Wolowyna will speak about the results of recent research conducted by a team of demographers from Ukraine and the US. In-depth analysis of available data and recently discovered documents put in question some popular believes about the Holodomor. Also a comparative analysis of 1932-1934 famine losses at the regional level in Ukraine and of recent estimates of regional losses in Russia provide a new perspective on the Holodomor in particular and the 1932-1934 famine in general.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Oleh Wolowyna
    University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 15th Israel & Palestine Symposium: ‘Divergent Ideological Frameworks, One Conflict’

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 15, 20165:30PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Please note that this event is only open to University of Toronto Faculty and Students. TCards will be required upon entry.

    A team of interdisciplinary undergraduate students have worked together to host a conference on evolving Israeli and Palestinian ideologies in the 21st Century, as an agent or reconciler of the ongoing conflict, entitled “Divergent Ideological Frameworks, One Conflict”

    The conference will be jointly hosted by the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, the Institute of Islamic Studies at the UofT, the Department of Political Science, the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice, and the Munk School of Global Affairs.

    This event will feature various academic experts on the topic of Israel & Palestine, who will each bring their respective research to demonstrate how conflicting ideological lenses have added to the contention surrounding the almost 70 year dispute between the two peoples.

    Our aims are to share diverse perspectives, experiences, knowledges, and understandings of the Israel- Palestine conflict to the greater academic community at the University of Toronto. The program hopes to simultaneously demonstrate the complexity of the Israel- Palestine conflict, while empowering students to use academia as a critical and objective bridge between peoples.

    Sponsors

    The Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    The Institute of Islamic Studies at the University of Toronto

    The Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto

    The Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    The Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 19th Ghosts of Hierarchies Past: Inequality, Hierarchy, and Blame in Nepal

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 19, 201611:00AM - 1:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
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    Series

    Anthropology Colloquium Series

    Description

    The hierarchies of the past are challenged, politically and socially, in two important, contested, and interconnected fields in contemporary Nepal: in caste/ethnic relations and in the construction of national identity. In both areas blame (i.e. accusations of responsibility for harm) and recrimination were very evident during 2015, when the country faced two massive shocks, namely the earthquakes of April-May and the blockade of September-December. And yet there were and have been glimmers of hope too, in some moves by idealistic youth in both fields to take responsibility.

    Aspects of Dumont’s theory of hierarchy are helpful for understanding this situation, for all that the encompassment of the impure by the pure is deeply and strongly rejected in today’s Nepal, as in the rest of South Asia. Dumont can be supplemented by Ambedkar on the graded nature of hierarchy and the importance of contempt in constructing it. As heads of households, members of the elite no longer see themselves as responsible for large numbers of hangers-on, as they would have done only two generations ago. Only political parties, through the mobilization of economic and licencing networks, have the resources to support large-scale hierarchies. The relative equalization of esteem, and the flattening of responsibility, on the part of individuals, combined with the pre-eminence of parties (still dominated by gerontocracies) as mobilizers of hierarchy, deference, and money—this combination of factors may help to explain the corruption, short-termism, and apparent lack of any substantial political vision on the part of Nepal’s leaders over the last 25 years.

    David Gellner is Professor of Social Anthropology and a Fellow of All Souls. He was Head of the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography from 2009-2012. His doctoral research (1982-4) was on the traditional, Vajrayana Buddhism of the Newars and on Newar social organization, in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. He has carried out fieldwork in the Kathmandu Valley on many subsequent occasions, broadening his interests to include politics and ethnicity, healers, mediums, and popular approaches to misfortune, and religious change, in particular the history and effects of the newly introduced Theravada Buddhist movement. In 1991 he did three months’ exploratory fieldwork on Buddhist priests in Japan. For eight years he taught at Brunel University, west London, the first British university to introduce a Master’s course in medical anthropology. For three years from 2002-5 he held a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for research into the social history and practice of activism in Nepal (for the academic year 2003-4 he combined this with a Visiting Professorship at the Research Institute for Cultures and Languages of Asia and Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies).

    11:00am-1:00pm, followed by lunch 1:00-2:00pm. Please RSVP for lunch.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 19th Interviewing a Washington Insider on Elections and the Media: How the Digital Revolution Has Changed U.S. Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 19, 20165:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the 140 characters of Twitter to the 10 seconds of Snapchat, digital and social media are transforming the role of media in U.S. politics. As the Presidential candidates, TV and cable news, and print media race to keep pace with instantaneous reporting, citizen journalists and social media, how is political coverage evolving, and how is this changing politics? What will be the impact when 100 million Snapchat users become politically active?

    Join former Globe and Mail editor John Stackhouse in discussion with Marcus Brauchli, former editor of the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal in what will no doubt be a compelling and insightful discussion just six weeks away from the U.S. elections.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    (416) 946-8972


    Speakers

    John Stackhouse

    Marcus Brauchli



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 22nd Strategies and policies for excellent research and education, and changing responsibilities of Higher Education Institutions IPL Speaker Series: Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 22, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    This presentation outlines current thinking on important terms for research and innovation driven regional development. In our case study from Baden-Württemberg, Germany, we describe the supporting policies for and the activities of a public-private partnership comprising: HEIs and RTOs, enterprises from MNCs to SMEs, different innovation-facilitating and -boosting, administrative and civil society organisations. In order to stay successful also in global markets, and thus to maintain well-paid jobs and quality of life in the region, they invested about C$ 150 million from private (50%) and public sources (regional, national, EU) to develop Microsystem Technology (MST) applications. MST, General Purpose Technologies (GPTs) with innovation promoting potential in all industrial sectors, impact increasingly on practically all aspects of our everyday lives. Investments went to interrelated R&I activities, and a range of ‘structural projects’, from internationalisation to education and (re)training, to strategy (co)development and implementation.
    Dr. Günter Clar, an industrial chemist by education, started his professional career in the academic sphere teaching, performing research and cooperating with industry in Europe, Asia and America. Firmly rooted in his professional and policy networks, Günter Clar is an independent consultant, involved in policy advice and development, strategic capacity building, R&I program design and evaluation, and the development of the institutional landscape/governance systems.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Gunter Clar
    Director of Regional Strategies & Innovation Steinbeis Europa-Zentrum (SEZ), (Stuttgart, Germany)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 23rd How Canadian Universities Contributed to China’s Transformation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 23, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMOISE/UT Library
    252 Bloor Street West
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Canada was one of the first Western countries to sign an agreement to provide development aid to China in 1983, and the Canadian International Development Agency invited universities to cooperate in ways that would facilitate “the multiplication of contacts at the thinking level.”

    In Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation, leading scholars from Canadian and Chinese universities elaborate on the historical experience of collaboration in areas as different as environmental sciences, marine science, engineering, management, law, agriculture, medicine, education, minority cultures, and women’s studies. Contributors use theoretical frames such as dependency theory, human capital, the knowledge economy, and Habermas’s theory of communicative action, to facilitate a striking dialogue between Canadian and Chinese perspectives as common questions are addressed. They provide key insights into factors that ensured the long-term success of some partnerships, as well as barriers that hindered others, and vivid lessons for current collaboration. Case studies include a project that began with the training of Chinese judges developing into reciprocal programs in legal education in China, Canada, and Latin America, and an examination of how joint environmental research has had policy impacts at national and international levels.

    Presenting the story of universities working together shortly after the devastating Cultural Revolution, Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation is a unique account of partnerships in knowledge production and application and their resulting impacts.

    Participants Bios

    Jing M. Chen is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
    He served as project director for “Confronting Global Warming: Enhancing China’s Capacity for Carbon Sequestration (2002-6)”. He is currently a senior consultant to China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, advising on key national research programs.

    Bernie Michael Frolic is Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs University of Toronto. He is the author/editor of Mao’s People (Harvard University); Reluctant Adversaries, Canada and the PRC, 1949-1970 (University of Toronto); Civil Society in China(M.E.Sharpe); Civil Society and Human Rights in Southeast Asia.(University of Toronto/York University). Currently Director of the York Asian Business Management Programme that has trained over 4000 Chinese Party and government officials, executives, and educators in Canada and China. He is completing a book on 50 years of Canada-China relations.

    Ruth Hayhoe is a Professor of Comparative Higher Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. Her most recent book, China Through the Lens of Comparative Education came out with Routledge’s World Library of Educationalists in 2015.

    Ping-chun Hsiung is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research areas include gender roles and family relations in Chinese societies; feminist methodologies and epistemologies; and practices and the development of critical qualitative research in the Global South. She has collaborated with Chinese feminist scholars to establish curricula and women’s studies programs in key Chinese universities.

    Guy Lefebvre served as the Dean of the Faculty of Law of the Université de Montréal from April 2012 to October 2014, when he was appointed Vice-Rector, International Relations and à la Francophonie. He is the author of numerous publications in French, English, Chinese, and Portuguese. Lefebvre teaches at several universities, including the China University of Political Science and Law (CUPL), the East China University of Political Science and Law. In 1997, he founded the Centre for the Law of Business and International Commerce of his faculty. Lefebvre has received several distinctions during his career, including the Canadian Bar Association’s Paul-André-Crépeau Medal and the Medal of Merit from CUPL. He is also Fellow of the Centre for Public Law at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

    Julia Pan is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Leadership, Higher & Adult Education of OISE/UT. Over the last two decades, Julia has directed and managed Canadian government sponsored Canada-China University Linkage Programs in the areas of higher education and environmental studies, collaborating with many Canadian and Chinese leading institutions nationwide.

    Joseph Whitney, FRGS is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto, Department of Geography and Past-Chair. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Cambridge University and the University of Chicago, respectively. He was Director, Joint York/Toronto Centre on Asia-Pacific Studies and has directed several major environmental projects in Asia and Africa.
    Qiang Zha is an associate professor at Faculty of Education, York University, Canada. His recent books include Portraits of 21st Century Chinese Universities (co-author, 2011), Education and Global Cultural Dialogue (co-editor, 2012), Education in China: Educational History, Models, and Initiatives (editor, 2013), and Canadian Universities in China’s Transformation: An Untold Story (co-editor, 2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ruth Hayhoe
    Speaker
    Professor, Higher and Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto

    Jing Chen
    Discussant
    Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Pingchun Hsiung
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Qiang Zha
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, York University

    Bernie Frolic
    Chair
    Professor Emeritus, Political Science, York University and Senior Researcher at the Munk School for Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    OISE

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 26th Russian Life through the Prism of Everyday Speech

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 26, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Raisa Rozina is a leading researcher at the V.V. Vinogradov Russian Language Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and Professor of European Languages, Institute of Linguistics, Russian State Humanities University. A socio-linguist and a specialist in lexical semantics, she is a longtime student of slang and everyday speech in both Russia and the USA. She is the editor-in–chief and co-author of the dictionary Slova s kotorymi my vse vstrechalis’: tolkovyi slovar obshchego russkogo zhargona (Words we have all encountered: An Explanatory dictionary of modern Russian general slang (1995), as well as a compiler of the Tolkovyi slovar russkoi razgovornoi rechi (Explanatory dictionary of Russian everyday speech)–(vol.1 2014; vol.2 in preparation). She has also served as commentator on the works by J.D. Salinger, John Cheever, Sherwood Anderson and other American writers in editions published in English for Russian readers, and translator into Russian of articles by the distinguished Australian linguist Anna Wierzbicka.

    In her presentation “Russian life through the prism of everyday speech” Prof. Rozina explores the perspectives of Russian speakers on their everyday existence by analyzing semantic fields of everyday words. She focuses especially on the richest and most suggestive fields, such as FALL, DIRT, GREEDINESS, and ALIENS. Comparison between these semantic fields and corresponding ones in everyday English speech illuminates differences in the mentalities of Russian and English speakers.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Raisa Rozina
    A leading researcher at the V.V. Vinogradov Russian Language Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and Professor of European Languages, Institute of Linguistics, Russian State Humanities University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 27th U.S. Africa Command, medical assistance, and special warfare

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 27, 20164:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    The ‘war on terror’ has seen a growing overlap between humanitarian and medical assistance efforts and military operations in the actions of the U.S. military globally. In particular, this overlap has been prominent in the practices of the U.S. military’s geographic combatant command for Africa, US Africa Command (AFRICOM). Established in 2007, all U.S. military operations in Africa fall under AFRICOM’s remit, and it represents both the ambition of the U.S. to further extend military intervention globally under the banner of the ‘war on terror’, and an articulation of the interconnected core tenets of contemporary U.S. foreign policy: the “3Ds” of defence, diplomacy, and development. Military led medical assistance practices have been a central feature of the command’s efforts. However, the seeming benevolence of these practices obscures their intersecting geopolitical and biopolitical underpinnings, and the logic of war that ultimately guide them. This talk will explore these dimensions of the medical assistance efforts of AFRICOM through a study of its Medical Civic Action Programmes (MEDCAPS) and Medical Readiness Training Exercises (MEDRETEs). After situating these contemporary efforts in the context of earlier colonial and counterinsurgency wars, the talk will discuss how medical assistance operations extend military logics to practices of care, tying geopolitical performance and rationale to biopolitical management at the scale of the body, while also contributing to the further generation of knowledge of target populations on-the-ground.

    Killian McCormack is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto. He holds a BA (Geography and History) from University College Dublin, and an MA (Geography) from the National University of Ireland, Galway. His Ph.D. research focuses on the biopolitical and geopolitical dimensions of the medical assistance efforts of the US military in Africa.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Killian McCormack
    Ph.D. candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 28th Book Launch: A Home for all Jews: Citizenship, Rights and National Identity in the New Israeli State

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 28, 201612:30PM - 2:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Orit Rozin, is senior lecturer in the Department of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University. Her research interests and publications focus on the social, legal and cultural history of the Israeli state and society in the 1950s and 1960s. Rozin has published articles on Israeli legislation and ruling; the relations between policy-makers and the media, and between immigrants and old-timers, on desparate housewives in times of austerity, and on the image of Mizrahi women. Other published works deal with various aspects of quotidian life which reflect and mold national identity, such as hygiene, parenthood and food consumption.
    Her book, The Rise of the Individual in 1950s Israel: A Challenge to Collectivism (2011), was published by UPNE/Brandeis University Press. The Hebrew version of the book, published by Am Oved Press and the Chaim Weizmann Institute at Tel Aviv University received the Shapiro best book award in 2009.
    Her book A Home for all Jews: Citizenship, Rights and National Identity in the New Israeli State was published by UPNE/Brandeis University Press in July 2016. Rozin is currently working on a new manuscript: A History of Fear: Israelis in the Shadow of War, 1949-1967.

    Contact

    Sylvia Adler
    416-978-3347


    Speakers

    ORIT ROZIN
    Tel Aviv University


    Sponsors

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 29th Brexit Roundtable

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 29, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The recently-held British referendum on whether or not the United Kingdom should leave the European Union has generated much discussion worldwide. While the country’s response to Brexit has been confirmed, much remains unknown—including the implications of said Brexit for the greater EU and, more specifically, for Canadian foreign policy. Please join the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and Massey College for a free panel discussion on Brexit on Thursday, September 29 from 12-2PM in Room 108N of the Munk School. Speakers include Mel Cappe, Randall Hansen, and the Honourable Hugh Segal.

    Light lunch will be served. Space is limited, so please register ASAP.
    Any questions? Email media@ccr2p.org (www.ccr2p.org)

    Speakers

    Mel Cappe: Mel Cappe is a Professor in the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto. He teaches in the Masters Program and is Coordinator of the Undergraduate Program in Public Policy. From 2006-2011 he was President of the Institute for Research on Public Policy. Prior to that for four years he was High Commissioner for Canada to the United Kingdom. Before that he served as Clerk of the Privy Council, Secretary to the Cabinet and Head of the Public Service in Ottawa. Earlier in his career he held senior economic and policy positions in the Departments of Finance and Industry. He was Deputy Secretary to the Treasury Board, Deputy Minister of the Environment, Deputy Minister of Human Resources Development, Deputy Minister of Labour and Chairman of the Employment Insurance Commission. He did graduate studies in Economics at the Universities of Western Ontario and Toronto and has honourary doctorates from both. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Randall Hansen: Randall Hansen is Director of the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He works on Immigration and Citizenship, Demography and Population Policy and the Effects of War on Civilians. His published works include Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after Operation Valkyrie (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014), Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Penguin, 2009), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (Oxford University Press, 2000).

    Hugh Segal: Hugh Segal is the fifth Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto. While in the Senate of Canada (Conservative, Ontario) he Chaired both the committees on Foreign Affairs and Anti-Terrorism. A graduate in history from the University of Ottawa, he is a former President of the Institute for Research on Public Policy in Montreal and Senior Fellow at both the Queen’s School of Policy Studies and School of Business. He is the Honourary Chair of the Navy League of Canada and a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute in Calgary. An honorary Captain in the Royal Canadian Navy, Master Segal holds honorary doctorates from the Royal Military College and his Alma Mater. He was made a member of the Order of Canada in 2003.

    Contact

    Tina Park
    (416) 946-8900


    Speakers

    Mel Cappe
    Professor, School of Public Policy and Governance

    Randall Hansen
    Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Hugh Segal
    Master, Massey College



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2016

  • Friday, October 7th The Dictator's Dilema: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Many observers predicted the collapse of the Chinese Communist Party following the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, and again following the serial collapse of communist regimes behind the Iron Curtain. Their predictions, however, never proved true. Despite minor setbacks, China has experienced explosive economic growth and relative political stability ever since 1989. In The Dictator’s Dilemma, Bruce Dickson provides a comprehensive explanation for regime’s continued survival and prosperity. Dickson draws upon original public opinion surveys, interviews, and published materials to explain why there is so much popular support for the regime. This basic stability is a familiar story to China specialists, but not to those whose knowledge of contemporary China is limited to the popular media. This talk will appeal to anyone interested in understanding China’s increasing importance in world politics.

    Bruce Dickson is professor of political science and international affairs and chair of the political science department at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on political dynamics in China, especially the adaptability of the Chinese Communist Party and the regime it governs.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th CCR2P Fall Roundtable

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 201612:00PM - 1:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 17th Policy and Industry Co-Evolution for the Bioenergy Topic

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 17, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen
    Professor and Chair, Department of Geography University at Buffalo



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th Conference: Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in Comparative Historical Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20161:00PM - 5:30PMKnox College, 23 King's College Circle/St. George St., University of Toronto
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    Description

    The conference will bring together presenters on the Irish (Peter Gray, Queen’s University, Belfast), Bengal (Janam Mukherjee, Ryerson University), and Ukrainian (Liudmyla Hrynevych, Academy of Sciences, Ukraine) famines and examine differences and commonalities (Mark von Hagen, Arizona State University and Andrea Graziosi, Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research).

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th “Religious Suicide” and the Limits of Indian Secularism: Screening and Discussion with the director Shekhar Hattangadi

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
    130 St George St, 3rd Floor
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    What happens when a traditional religious practice conflicts with modern secular law? The talk — in conjunction with the film — addresses this central question as it looks at the tensions that arise when a religious tradition endorses the self-extinguishment of human life in a legal system that treats suicide as a criminal offence. It explores the doctrinal-scriptural, ethical, medico-legal and sociological aspects of Santhara — a Jain practice in which a person fasts unto death — and examines how religion, law and constitutional secularism intersect in the ongoing debate outside the courtroom and in the litigation over the legality of the practice. Irrespective of how the Indian courts may rule in the matter, Santhara remains a classic example of the law-religion conflict, and provides an ideal template for debating the question of reconciling individual freedom as well as a minority community’s religious rights with the justification for state intervention in matters of religion.

    A Mumbai,India-based media columnist, law professor and film-maker, Shekhar Hattangadi believes he is an academic at heart. He topped University of Mumbai’s law exams bagging three gold medals, and he fondly recalls his years as a student and researcher on the American campus: first as a graduate student at Ohio University in Athens,OH and then as a Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F.Kennedy School of Government. SANTHARA: A Challenge to Indian Secularism? is the first of his series of documentaries examining controversial religious practices in India.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shekhar Hattangadi
    University of Mumbai, India


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 29th The Holodomor and the Language of Hate in Stalinist Propaganda (In Ukrainian).

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 29, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    Dr. Hrynevych will discuss propaganda in the context of the Holodomor.

    Please note that the lecture will be in Ukrainian.

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Liudmyla Hrynevych
    Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Ukrainian Canadian Research & Documentation Centre

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2016

  • Friday, November 4th The Politics of Shari'a Law: Islamist Activists and the State in Democratizing Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Islamization of politics in Indonesia after 1998 presents an underexplored puzzle: why has there been a rise in the number of shari’a laws despite the electoral decline of Islamist parties? In his talk, Michael Buehler presents an analysis of the conditions under which Islamist activists situated outside formal party politics may capture and exert influence in Muslim-majority countries facing democratization. His analysis shows that introducing competitive elections creates new pressures for entrenched elites to mobilize and structure the electorate, thereby opening up new opportunities for Islamist activists to influence politics.

    Michael Buehler is a Senior Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London. Specializing in Southeast Asian politics, his teaching and research interests evolve around state-society relations under conditions of democratization and decentralization.Previously he taught at Columbia University and Northern Illinois University. He has also held research fellowships at the Center for Equality Development and Globalization Studies at Northwestern University in Chicago, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute in New York City, and the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. Michael Buehler has been an Associate Research Fellow at the Asia Society in New York City since 2011.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Buehler
    Senior Lecture, Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2016

  • Tuesday, December 6th Metamorphoses: Archival Fictioning and the Historian’s Craft

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 6, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In attempting to understand early modern science and medicine from Chinese natural history to Manchu translations of bodily gesture and sensation, my work has placed the history and translation of metamorphic stories at its center. For our gathering – intended more as a conversation about craft than a formal talk – I will introduce recent work in which I have been expanding my practice to integrate short fiction and prose poetry as modes of reading and analyzing historical documents. The focus of my attention will be a new project called Metamorphoses that is loosely inspired by the work of Ovid and is devoted to creating stories of material transformation through creative readings and misreadings of primary source documents that derive from (or are oriented toward) early modern China.

    Carla Nappi is Associate Professor of History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies at the University of British Columbia. Her first book, The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and its Transformations in Early Modern China (Harvard, 2009) was a study of belief-making in early modern Chinese natural history through the lens of the Bencao gangmu (1596), a compendium of materia medica. Her current research explores practices and contexts of translation in the Ming and Qing periods.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Carla Nappi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies, University of British Columbia.

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2017

  • Tuesday, January 17th Innovation by the People, for the People

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Amos Zehavi
    Senior lecturer, Department of Political Science Department of Public Policy, Tel Aviv University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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