Upcoming Events

Past Events Login

September 2014

  • Tuesday, September 30th Arab Revolts at the Shop Floor Level: Graffiti and Revolutionary Utopia: Enacting Political Opposition

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 30, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Four years after the popular uprisings that have shaken the Middle East and North Africa, graffiti remain as one of the most visible marks of the region’s dynamics. They reveal changes that have been fostered by the opposition movements that have swept away the autocratic leaders of the region in 2011. Far from being mere cosmetic accessories, the graffiti lie at the very heart of an oppositional strategy aiming at extending the contestation by challenging counter-revolutionary narratives, both on and off the ground, especially through their re-use of socio-digital networks.
    Based on excerpts from a large corpus of photographs from Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco, this lecture aims at situating graffiti in the historical context of their emergence in 2011 up to the present. It will demonstrate that the walls of the largest cities in the Middle East-NMorth Africa region have been used as heterotopies of the revolutionary visions that have been fueling political opposition.

    Enrique Klaus holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Sciences Po Grenoble.His my main research interests are media reform and political communication in the Middle East-North Africa region — and he has been traveling continuously in Egypt (2003-2011), Morocco (2011-2013) and Tunisia (2013 through the present).

    Contact

    Ron Pruessen
    416-946-0977


    Speakers

    Enrique Klaus
    Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain, Tunis, Tunisia


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies




    +
  • Tuesday, September 30th Ukrainian Jewish Encounter Graduate Student Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 30, 20143:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Ukrainian Jewish Encounter, in collaboration with the Chair of Ukrainian Studies (University of Toronto), invites you to its inaugural
    UJE Graduate Student Symposium

    The world is watching Ukraine. Ever since November 2013, when thousands took to the streets of Kyiv, the nation has been under an intense international spotlight. This symposium will examine the consequences of the ongoing crisis on the relationship between Ukrainians and Jews in Ukraine, Israel, and their respective diasporas. Comprised of two panels of graduate students, representing diverse global perspectives, it will aim to both re-imagine the Ukrainian-Jewish relationship in a historical context as well as propose visions of their future together.

    Panel I -“Ukrainians, Jews, and their Historical Perspectives.”
    3:00pm – 4:30pm
    This panel will aim to examine the long-standing relationship between Ukrainians and Jews in a historical context. Graduate students will propose new research in an attempt to both problematize existing narratives and influence future scholarship.

    Presenters:
    Gregory Aimaro, Lewis University 

    Vitalii Chernoivanenko, National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy
    Lev Daschko, Northwestern University
    Daniel Federowycz, University of Oxford 


    Panel II – “The Euromaidan and Visions of the Future.”
    5:00pm – 6:30pm
    This panel will explore Ukrainian-Jewish relations in the context of Euromaidan and the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. Graduate students will consider the consequences of the crisis on this relationship as well as propose visions of its future.

    Presenters:
    Miriam Feyga Bunimovich, National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy 

    Stephen Gellner, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto
    Oleksandr Melnyk, University of Toronto
    Anton Shekhovtsov, University College London

    
Moderator: Kassandra Luciuk, University of Toronto
    Discussant: Nadia Gereliouk, University of Toronto

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Ukrainian Jewish Encounter




    +
  • Tuesday, September 30th Mountain Biking and the Exploration of a Landscape of Conflict Along the Frontier of Jerusalem: An Auto-Ethnography

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 30, 20144:30PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In this talk I tell the stories of my daily commute from home to campus in Jerusalem, on a mountain bike, through wadis and dirt trails along the northwestern frontier of Jerusalem. From a practice of commuting, my rides became, during the years, a process of de-commuting, so to speak: I now take the long routes and not the short ones, I stop along the way and talk with people, I deviate into “restricted” locations and areas. In essence, the bike ride became an exploration of an internal and external landscapes of conflict. I reflect about the various sites, places, structures, people, and landscapes that I see along the trails, and ask questions about the political and social price that one has to pay when he lets himself to be exposed to the pain of the “Other”. Can I, as a subject and product of a society in a protracted conflict, de-securitize myself, and at what cost?

    Speaker Bio
    Oded Lowenheim is a Senior Lecturer and Chair of the Department of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of “Predators and Parasites: Persistent Agents of Transnational Harm and Great Power Authority” (Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2007) and “The Politics of the Trail: Reflexive Mountain Biking along the Frontier of Jerusalem” (Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2014). His articles appeared in journals such as International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Third World Quarterly, International Political Sociology, and Review of International Studies. Between 2001 and 2003 he spent two wonderful years at the (then) Munk Centre for International Studies. Beyond mountain biking and writing about this experience, he also teaches a course at Hebrew University called “science fiction and politics.” He is visiting the Munk School of Global Affairs as a Ralph and Roz Halbert International Relations Visiting Professor.

    Contact

    Sarah Namer
    416-946-8450


    Speakers

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Oded Lowenheim
    Speaker
    Senior Lecturer and Chair, Department of International Relations, Hebrew University of Jerusalem


    Main Sponsor

    Halbert Exchange Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs




    +
  • Tuesday, September 30th Imposed Ignorance? On what evidence does Ottawa base its policies?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 30, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    What are the effects of lack of accurate information on businesses, social services, planners, providers of health care services, on all of us?

    The mandatory long-form census used to inform us about ourselves as a country, not perfectly, of course, but it did provide important and reliable information about the people in our country as a whole as well as in specific areas. Its replacement, a voluntary survey, provides information that is inaccurate and cost more to administer. This is just one example of how Canadians are systematically made to be more ignorant about our country and ourselves than we were in the past. Government scientists are prohibited from speaking with the media and the public without political oversight. A number of environmental monitoring services have been abolished. The list goes on and is long.

    Good policies must be based on solid evidence. Democracy requires an informed electorate. An uninformed or misinformed government and public put democracy at risk.

    These are some of the issues that will be considered by the outstanding panel discussing the ignorance imposed on us and its consequences.


    Speakers

    Munir Sheikh
    Speaker
    School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, Former Chief Statistician of Canada, and Former Deputy Minister of Labour

    Mel Cappe, O.C.
    Speaker
    School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto and Former Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet

    J. David Hulchanski
    Speaker
    Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto and Dr. Chow Yee Ching Chair in Housing

    Carol Goar
    Moderator
    Editorial Columnist for the Toronto Star


    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Faculty Association

    Scientists for the Right to Know




    +

October 2014

  • Wednesday, October 1st DAAD Fellowships & Awards Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 1, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Thursday, October 2nd The Persistence of Cold War Regime: The discourse “chongbuk chwap’a” in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Centre for the Study of Korea Speaker Series

    Description

    How might one explain the rise of “chongbuk chwap’a” , or “pro-North leftists” discourse given South Korea’s recent history of the democratization movement and the transition from a series of authoritarian regimes to a parliamentary democracy? In what ways does this discourse differ from the anticommunism of the earlier period? What are some historical and political implications of the discourse in contemporary South Korea? These are some of the questions explored by Professor Namhee Lee as she situates this discourse broadly within the context of the persistence of the Cold war regime on the Korean peninsular and discourse of failure of revolutionary experiences worldwide.

    Namhee Lee is an associate professor of Korean history at University of California Los Angeles and her publications include The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea (Cornell). Lee is working on a book project entitled Social Memory and Public History in South Korea, which explores production of historical knowledge outside academic institutions.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Namhee Lee
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages & Culture, University of California Los Angeles





    +
  • Thursday, October 2nd Book Launch: "Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David” by Lawrence Wright

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    A dramatic, illuminating day-by-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter convinced Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat to sign a peace treaty–the first treaty in the modern Middle East, and one which endures to this day.

    With his hallmark insight into the forces at play in the Middle East and his acclaimed journalistic skill, Lawrence Wright takes us through each of the thirteen days of the Camp David conference, delving deeply into the issues and enmities between the two nations, explaining the relevant background to the conflict and to all the major participants at the conference, from the three heads of state to their mostly well-known seconds working furiously behind the scenes. What emerges is not what we’ve come to think of as an unprecedented yet “simple” peace. Rather, Wright reveals the full extent of Carter’s persistence in pushing peace forward, the extraordinary way in which the participants at the conference–many of them lifelong enemies–attained it, and the profound difficulties inherent in the process and its outcome, not the least of which has been the still unsettled struggle between the Israelis and the Palestinians. In Thirteen Days in September, Wright gives us a gripping work of history and reportage that provides an inside view of how peace is made.

    Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker, and the author of one novel, God’s Favorite, and six previous books of nonfiction, including In the New World; Saints and Sinners; Remembering Satan; The Looming Tower, which was the recipient of many honors; and Going Clear. He is also a screenwriter and a playwright. He and his wife are longtime residents of Austin, Texas.


    Speakers

    Lawrence Wright
    Speaker
    Staff Writer for The New Yorker

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs





    +
  • Thursday, October 2nd Bomber Command and Canada: Law's Silence

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Professor Nelson teaches modern European history at the University of Windsor, with a special emphasis on German history, the First World War, and colonialism. In his current research, Professor Nelson investigates the development of a German ‘colonial gaze’ upon Eastern Europe, which began in the 1880s, and radicalized during the First World War. His research interests include the social and cultural history of war and occupation, as well as both overseas and ‘inner’ colonialism.

    Dr. Waters’ research interests are in the areas of international human rights law, the law of armed conflict, law and politics in Eastern Europe and bicycling law. He has extensive field experience in the Caucasus and Balkans, including with the UN/OSCE’s Kosovo Mission in 1999-2000, and has been interviewed on Eastern European issues by domestic and international media including CTV, National Public Radio, The New York Times and Agence France Presse. On several occasions he has been deployed by Canada as a monitor for elections in Eastern Europe and has addressed military audiences in Canada and the UK on law of armed conflict issues.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Prof. Chris Waters
    Faculty of Law, University of Windsor

    Prof. Robert Nelson
    Department of History, University of Windsor





    +
  • Thursday, October 2nd Apartment Stories: Communist Construction and Daily Life during the Khrushchev Years

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Set against the backdrop of the mass transition from communal to single-family housing that Khrushchev ushered in in 1957, this talk traces the everyday experiences and hopes of Soviet citizens who continued to live in the old housing stock as the supply of new apartments failed to keep pace with demand. Drawing upon housing petitions and official responses to them, it also depicts individuals challenging public rhetoric about building Communism, while demanding the realization of a long-awaited postwar normalcy. At the same time, the talk demonstrates the ways in which the housing question constituted a point of convergence for popular expectations and state promises during the Thaw.

    Christine Varga-Harris is an Associate Professor at Illinois State University specializing in postwar Soviet history. Her research examines the intersection of Khrushchev-era housing policy with official ideology, society, and identity. Among her publications are chapters in the volumes Divided Dreamworlds? (University of Amsterdam Press, 2012) and The Dilemmas of De-Stalinization (Routledge, 2006), as well as the article “Homemaking and the Aesthetic and Moral Perimeters of the Soviet Home during the Khrushchev Era,” which appeared in the Journal of Social History (2008). She recently completed the monograph, Stories of House and Home: Socialism, Society and the Soviet Person during the Khrushchev Years (Cornell University Press, forthcoming). Her new research project focuses on Soviet relations with non-aligned countries, from the perspective of gender.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Christine Varga-Harris
    Illinois State University





    +
  • Friday, October 3rd World War I and Literary History: A Centenary Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201410:00AM - 6:00PMVictoria College Chapel
    Victoria College
    University of Toronto
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    On Friday, 3 October 2014, the Department of English and the Centre for the Study of the United States at the University of Toronto will present “World War I and Literary History: A Centenary Symposium.” Featuring an international group of scholars—including Denise Cruz (Toronto), Melba Cuddy-Keane (Toronto), Maud Ellmann (Chicago), Paul Saint-Amour (Pennsylvania), and Vincent Sherry (Washington-St Louis)—this event will examine a century of war literature while also discussing how the Great War has shaped literary history.

    This event is free and open to the University of Toronto community. For more information: http://1914-2014.weebly.com

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of English, University of Toronto




    +
  • Friday, October 3rd The Implications of Urbanization and Climate Change in Urbanizing Cities in the Lower Mekong Region

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201411:00AM - 1:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Room 5017A
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Register online at: http://urbanclimateresiliencesea.apps01.yorku.ca/event-activity/thinphanga-09-2014/

    Medium-sized cities in the Lower Mekong countries are rapidly urbanizing. Most urban centres are geographically located in hazardous space, such as low-lying floodplains, river deltas, and coastal zones. Rapid growth and expansion, leading to significant changes in ecological landscapes and land use, exacerbate existing risks. Weak governance and institutional capacity magnify the impacts of climate change and natural disasters, contributing to increasing vulnerability of urban residents. Regionalization will accelerate the pace of urbanization, particularly in smaller border towns. As cities continue to protect urban economic centres from weather-related disasters, risks are shifted and transferred to the hinterlands. But the development growth of urban centres is dependent on the hinterlands for natural resources and labour. Understanding regionalization and urbanization implications as complex, transformative processes is critical for assessing climate vulnerability and strengthening urban resilience to climate change.

    Dr. Pakamas Thinphanga is one of the co-directors of the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership, funded by IDRC and SSHRC. As a Programme Manager at the Thailand Environment Institute Foundation, she leads the Urban Climate Resilience Programme and is responsible for the overall management, strategic planning, and building capacity of the project teams. Under the programme, projects, including the Rockefeller supported Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) and USAID funded Mekong Building Climate Resilient Asian Cities (M-BRACE), focus on research areas in urbanization, climate change, understanding vulnerability and resilience concepts, and translating urban climate resilience concepts into practice. Pakamas provides technical assistance to city stakeholders in urban climate resilience planning and building efforts. Her team at TEI also focuses on disseminating and communicating urban climate resilience thinking to broader audience for dialogues and to inform decision-making processes.

    Pakamas has a technical background in biological sciences and coastal ecology with a PhD from James Cook University, Australia and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oxford.

    A light lunch will be served. To assist us with catering, please RSVP to alicia.filipowich@utoronto.ca before Wednesday, 1 October 2014 and include any food sensitivities or allergies in your RSVP email.


    Speakers

    Pakamas Thinphanga
    Thailand Environment Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    International Development Research Council (IDRC)

    York University

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)




    +
  • Friday, October 3rd Beatings, Beacons and Big Men: Police Disempowerment and De-legitimation in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    It is a truism that police in India generally lack legitimate authority and public trust. This lack is widely understood by scholars, policy analysts, and police practitioners as being rooted in the institution’s colonial development as a means of oppression, and its alleged corruption and criminalization in the postcolonial period. The social facts of situational hyper-empowerment and the widespread decadence of police do much to explain their poor image and performance, but these explanations do not account for the fact that police in India are also structurally disempowered by cultural-political and legal-institutional claims to multiple and conflicting forms of authority that challenge and often overwhelm the authority of police. This structural disempowerment and its performances in everyday interactions between the police and the public constitute an ongoing social process of delegitimation of police authority in contemporary India. Following ethnographic analysis of this process of delegitimation, I explore the implications of focusing on police disempowerment for theorizations of the sources and capabilities of state legal authority more generally

    Beatrice Jauregui is an Assistant Professor of Criminology and Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests involve ethnographic and historical study of the lived experiences of persons working in police and military bureaucracies to understand the everyday dynamics of authority, security and democratic order. Her forthcoming book, with the working title Provisional Authority: Policing and Order in India, is based on more than two years of fieldwork with police in Uttar Pradesh.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto





    +
  • Tuesday, October 7th Style and Substance: Reflections on Canadian Diplomacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 7, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Former Cabinet minister and diplomat Sergio Marchi reflects on Canadian foreign policy and Canada’s place in the world


    Speakers

    The Hon. Sergio Marchi
    Former Minister of International Trade and Canadian Ambassador to the WTO





    +
  • Wednesday, October 8th Technological Change in Cities and Regions – An Evolutionary Analysis of Knowledge Spaces and Technology Trajectories

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 8, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Technological Change in Cities and Regions – An Evolutionary Analysis of Knowledge Spaces and Technology Trajectories

    Significant attention has been directed to the processes of knowledge production in a spatial context, but little consideration has been given to the type of technological knowledge produced within specific places. The objectives of the present research project are to map the US/EU15 technology/knowledge space, to examine the evolution of that space over the time period 1981–2005, and to investigate the character of knowledge cores within US cities and European regions. The knowledge space is based on the proximity of technology classes, utilizing measures derived from co-classification information contained in patent documents.

    First, a measure of technological cohesion within cities and regions is developed. Next, the temporal changes in that measure are decomposed into the effects of technological entry, exit and selection. In sum these indicators aid the identification of the principal drivers of technological change in different geographic contexts. Finally, technological entry and exit within regions are modeled as a function of social, spatial and cognitive proximity.

    The theoretical framework is based on the idea that new technologies emerge from the recombination of existing competences and knowledge, and that the entry and exit of regional technological knowledge is conditioned by technological, spatial, and social proximity to existing knowledge cores. The results confirm that over time cities and regions tend to specialize in technology classes that are located close to one another in the technology space, but they also reveal considerable heterogeneity in measures of technological specialization across US metropolitan areas and European Regions.

    BIO: Dieter F. Kogler is a lecturer in economic geography and director of graduate studies at the School of Geography, Planning & Environmental Policy, University College Dublin. His research focus is on the geography of innovation and evolutionary economic geography, with particular emphasis on knowledge production and diffusion, and processes related to technological change and innovation. He is involved in several multidisciplinary and multi-collaborative research projects, and has recently edited two special journal issues on the topics of global and regional dynamics in knowledge flows and innovation networks (European Planning Studies, 09/2013) and evolutionary economic geography (Regional Studies, forthcoming). His career path combines professional, education and research experience acquired in Europe, the United States, and Canada within a variety of areas pertaining to the spatial analysis of socio-economic phenomena.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Dieter F. Kogler
    School of Geography, Planning & Environmental Policy, University College Dublin





    +
  • Thursday, October 9th Workshop with Professor Govil

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 9, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Cinema Studies Institute




    +
  • Thursday, October 9th Anne Applebaum: Why Stalin Feared Ukraine and Why Putin Fears It Today

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 9, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture – The Holodomor in the Context of Current Events

    Speaker: Pulitzer Prize-winner Anne Applebaum

    Location: George Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto

    Ms. Applebaum will be discussing how Stalin’s actions in the 1930s were shaped by his reaction to Ukrainian peasant rebellions during the civil war, as well as the Kremlin’s fear of Ukraine’s revolutionary potential.

    Anne Applebaum writes on history and contemporary politics in Eastern Europe, Ukraine, and Russia. Her book, Gulag: A History, won the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction in 2004. Her most recent book, Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, describes the imposition of Soviet totalitarianism in Central Europe after the Second World War. Iron Curtain won the Cundill Prize for Historical Literature, the Duke of Westminster Medal, and an Arthur Ross Silver Medal from the Council on Foreign Relations.

    Anne Applebaum is a columnist for the Washington Post and Slate and directs the Transitions Forum at the Legatum Institute in London. Formerly a member of the Washington Post editorial board, she has also worked as the Foreign and Deputy Editor of the Spectator magazine in London, as the Political Editor of the Evening Standard, and as a columnist at the British newspapers the Daily and Sunday Telegraphs. From 1988-1991, she covered the collapse of communism as the Warsaw correspondent of the Economist magazine.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Anne Applebaum


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies




    +
  • Friday, October 10th From "Den of Iniquity" to "the Internet's Favourite Cyberpunk Slum": The Kowloon Walled City 20 Years On

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 10, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library
    8th Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The Kowloon Walled City, before its demolition in 1993, is widely acknowledged to have been the most densely populated place on earth: over 35,000 people living in 300 interconnected high-rise buildings crammed into a single Hong Kong city block. Built without contributions from architects or engineers – and without government oversight – the Walled City was dismissed as a “den of iniquity” where drugs, prostitution, and other vices circulated. However since its demolition the Walled City is better known now than when it existed, having influenced a generation of architects, designers, writers, artists and others, prompting the website Motherboard to christen it “the Internet’s favorite cyberpunk slum”. Greg Girard and Ian Lambot’s new book, “City of Darkness Revisited”, updates the story of the Walled City, as first revealed in photographs and text in their 1993 book “City of Darkness”, and examines its unexpected influence in the 20 years since its demolition.

    Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer currently living in Vancouver, Canada whose work has examined the social and physical transformations in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

    Tong Lam (PhD, University of Chicago) is a professor of history at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on empire, nation, and urban space. He is also a multimedia visual artist with ongoing photographic and documentary film projects.

    Reception to follow to launch the Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans series.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies University of Toronto, Mississauga

    Greg Girard
    Speaker
    Photographer


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library




    +
  • Tuesday, October 14th Making Bad States Behave a Little Better? Introducing the Idea and Practice of Internal Conditionality

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 14, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In retrospect, NATO and EU enlargements can be viewed as easy politics; they admitted states that wanted membership and were lavishly rewarded. In contrast, far harder politics is waged by the much larger regional organizations of the Council of Europe and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). These organizations lack material incentives or instruments of coercion, instead having to work on the basis of shared values. Worse still, they also face threats to their existence from recalcitrant members. Based on 200 interviews across post-Soviet states and in IOs, the presentation introduces the idea of internal conditionality to show how international organizations which lack powers of compulsion or incentivization can still respond – often surprisingly – to the threats from member-states and achieve greater compliance that otherwise conceivable. Case studies include the Chechen wars; the abolition of the death penalty; democratization and election observation; and the Kazakhstan Chairmanship of the OSCE. The presentation concludes with practical and more-broadly based lessons for the international promotion of norms.

    Rick Fawn is a Professor of International Relations at the University of St Andrews, UK. This presentation draws from his recent book International Organizations and Internal Conditionality: Making Norms Matter. Among other books, he has edited Globalising the Regional, Regionalising the Global; Georgia: War and Revolution; and co-authoredfHistorical Dictionary of the Czech State. He works regularly in various post-communist countries, in both policy and academic capacities.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Rick Fawn
    University of St. Andrews





    +
  • Tuesday, October 14th Working with the Grain: Integrating Governance and Growth in Development Strategies: Seminar and Book Launch with Brian Levy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 14, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Brian Levy, long-time senior governance advisor at the World Bank, will discuss his forthcoming book, Working with the Grain: Integrating Governance and Growth in Development Strategies. Drawing on more than two decades of experience at the World Bank, Levy reflects in both analytic and personal terms on the lessons he has learned about the interactions between governance and growth. He lays out an alternative to “best practice” prescriptions in international development, advocating for a practical, analytically grounded, “with the grain” approach to addressing the twin development challenges of reducing poverty and weaknesses in governance.


    Speakers

    Brian Levy
    Senior Adjunct Professor of International Development, John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and Academic Director, Graduate School of Development Policy and Practice, Universtiy of Cape Town





    +
  • Wednesday, October 15th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 15, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Wednesday, October 15th Terry Fenge talk on Arctic issues

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 15, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place

    +
  • Thursday, October 16th Placing the Dead in Times of Solitarization in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 16, 20141:00PM - 3:00PMRoom 200
    Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    At a moment when the population is declining, marriage and birth rates are down, one-third of people live alone while one-fourth are 65 or older, and cases of “lonely death” (of solitary people whose bodies are discovered days, or weeks, after death) are reported daily, the social ecology of existence is undergoing radical change in 21st century Japan. While long-term bonds—to company, family, locale—were once the earmarks of its “group-oriented society,” today it is living, and dying, alone that marks Japan’s new era of “single-ification” and “disconnected society” (muen shakai). How the rise of single-ification affects the management of death—both those already dead as well as those at risk of dying in/from solitude—is the subject of this talk. Looking at new practices of burying/memorializing the dead, new trends in both single and solitary lifestyles, and the case of a Buddhist priest working to keep alive those contemplating self-death (suicide), Allison considers how the neoliberal shift to “self-responsibility” plays out in the everyday rhythms of being with/out others for post-social Japanese.

    Anne Allison is a Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Women’s Studies at Duke University. A specialist in contemporary Japan, she studies the interface between material conditions and desire/fantasy/imagination across various domains including corporate capitalism, global popular culture, and precarity. Allison is the author of Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club (1994), Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan (1996), Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination (2006), and Precarious Japan (2013).

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Anne Allison
    Professor, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Japan Studies Association of Canada




    +
  • Friday, October 17th The Donkey Wars: Authority, Satire, and Political Imagination in the Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bruce Grant is interested in cultural history and politics as well as religion. His research focuses on former Soviet Union, Siberia, and the Caucasus. His current and recent project include a study of changing social mores in the rapidly transforming capital of Azerbaijan, Baku, from model socialist urban centre to nationalizing metropolis. He is also working on a new project on the role of satire in authoritarian settings as seen through the life and work of Celil Memmedquluzade, editor of the Azeri-language, cross-regional journal, Molla Nesreddin, which was published from 1906-1931. Professor Grant is also involved in an ongoing study of rural religious shrines in the Caucasus, with particular regard for the rich historiographies surrounding them, and they way those histories challenge conventional narratives of Caucasus social life.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    Bruce Grant
    Professor of Antropology, New York University





    +
  • Friday, October 17th R2P & Canadian Foreign Policy Roundtable Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Canadian Centre for Responsibility to Protect will be hosting a roundtable on Canadian foreign policy & R2P on Friday, Oct 17th at 12-2pm in room 208N of Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place, Toronto). We have an excellent line up of speakers, Master Hugh Segal of Massey College, Very Rev. Lois Wilson, and Member of Parliament Dr. Kirsty Duncan, who will comment on Canada’s role on the Central African Republic, North Korea, Iraq, and mobilizing our political will to intervene in light of on-going crises around the world. There will be lots of opportunities for Q/A and discussions following the presentations.

    Registration is now available for free at http://roundtableonr2p.eventbrite.ca. All are welcome!

    If you are unable to join us in person but interested in joining the conversation via google hangout, please inform Ms. Megan McGinnis-Dunphy, our Director of Administration at megan.mcginnis.dunphy@gmail.com and she will be back in touch with logistical details. We will also be releasing transcript of the event as well.




    +
  • Friday, October 17th Workshop: The History of the Social Sciences: Recent Past, Digital Futures

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 20141:30PM - 3:30PMVictoria College
    University of Toronto
    Room: VC212
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Social Science, Ideology, and Public Policy in the United States, 1960s to the Present

    This conference is an interdisciplinary academic event (a public workshop, public lecture, and conference) taking place in Toronto, October 17-19th, 2014. It is supported by a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Connections grant and other sponsors. It will bridge disciplines such as the history of science and technology, the history of psychology, the history of economic thought, and others. It will bring together scholars from United States, Canada, and Europe. As the title indicates, the specific focus will be on issues related to ideology and public policy in American social science from the 1960s to present day. The conference presentations will be held at York University, while the methods workshop and public lecture will be held at University of Toronto.

    This methods workshop will bring together graduate students and scholars from the local community to discuss research methods for doing recent history. The objectives of this interactive workshop are:

    •To identify and explore the methodological and historiographic challenges of doing recent history;
    •To present examples from our own projects that exemplify these challenges and explain how we have dealt with them and to have participants share their experiences with doing recent history;
    •To examine the use of interviewing as a method for doing recent history, and the challenges and opportunities of oral history in the digital age;
    •To discuss the growth of digital databases of scholarly and popular media, and the challenges and historiographic implications of “big data” analysis, especially as they pertain to doing recent history.

    For information on this workshop and how to register:

    http://recenthistsocialsci.wordpress.com

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Alexandra Rutherford
    Director of the Dept. of Psychology’s"Feminist Voices" oral history and multimedia digital archive project, York University

    Michael Pettit
    Co-Director of the Psyborgs Digital History Lab at York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute for History & Philosophy of Science & Technology, Victoria College

    Department of Psychology, York University




    +
  • Friday, October 17th The Political Movement that Dared not Speak its own Name: The Neoliberal Thought Collective Under Erasure

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMVictoria College
    University of Toronto
    Room: VC213
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Social Science, Ideology, and Public Policy in the United States, 1960s to the Present

    This conference is an interdisciplinary academic event (a public workshop, public lecture, and conference) taking place in Toronto, October 17-19th, 2014. It is supported by a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Connections grant and other sponsors. It will bridge disciplines such as the history of science and technology, the history of psychology, the history of economic thought, and others. It will bring together scholars from United States, Canada, and Europe. As the title indicates, the specific focus will be on issues related to ideology and public policy in American social science from the 1960s to present day. The conference presentations will be held at York University, while the methods workshop and public lecture will be held at University of Toronto.

    This public lecture will address recent ideological trends in economics and their impact on economics as a policy science. Dr. Mirowski is among the world’s most prominent and prolific historians of economics. He has written extensively about the discipline’s relationship to classical physics and cybernetics as well as the field’s ideological underpinnings. He has also been a leader in the economics of science, analyzing the emergence of neoliberal models of inquiry. His most recent book is “Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste: How Neoliberalism Survived the Financial Meltdown.”

    Dr. Mirowski’s lecture is co-sponsored and hosted by the Centre for the Study of the United States and the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto.

    For more information on this event and how to register:

    http://recenthistsocialsci.wordpress.com/public-lecture/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Philip Mirowski
    Carl E. Koch Professor of Economics and Policy Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science, University of Notre Dame


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute for History & Philosophy of Science & Technology, Victoria College

    Department of Psychology, York University




    +
  • Tuesday, October 21st Repelling ‘Muscovite Tentacles’: The Trieste Crisis of May 1945, Anglo- American Relations, and the Coming of the Cold War

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 21, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    As World War II came to a close in Europe, Yugoslav Partisan forces occupied the province of Venezia Giulia in direct contravention of Anglo-American plans for the post-war occupation of Italy. The ensuing Trieste Crisis pitted wartime allies against one another, as the United States and the United Kingdom seriously contemplated war with Yugoslavia. This paper focuses primarily on the interaction between Washington and London over Trieste, as well as the influences and assumptions which shaped their policy decisions. Their debates, especially those over the nature of the Yugoslav threat and how to engage the Soviet Union in managing it, highlight key assumptions that came to define the Western position during the Cold War. Employing British and American archival material, Susan Colbourn’s research uses the Trieste Crisis to explore the uncertainties of 1945, as neither the Cold War nor the ‘special relationship’ between Washington and London was entrenched yet.

    Susan Colbourn is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in History at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation examines the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s response to the transition from détente to the “second Cold War,” covering the period from 1977 to 1982. Prior to her doctoral studies, Susan completed an MA in the History of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BA (Hon.) in History and International Relations from Trinity College at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Susan Colbourn
    Ph.D.Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +
  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Panel Discussion, “On Unfinished Wars and the Politics of the Past”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    From October 24th to October 25th, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto will be hosting a two-day symposium on the Afterlives of the Korean War. Co-sponsored by the Dr.David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, this symposium aims to bring together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world. The Afterlives of the Korean War brings together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    On Friday, October 24th, 2014 a panel discussion will be held in The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility on the intersections between the military and geopolitics with the dynamics of race, nation, diaspora, gender, and sexuality, which will feature Dr. John Price, Dr. Monica Kim, Dr. Christine Hong and Dr. Hosu Kim.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Assistant Professor, Department of Literature and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at University California, Santa Cruz.

    John Price
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Victoria, British Columbia.

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, New York University, New York State.

    Hosu Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, College of Staten Island, New York.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Political Science

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs




    +
  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Performance of, "ARA Gut of Jeju" by Dohee Lee and SKIM

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20147:00PM - 8:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C8
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    “Ara” is a Korean word whose various meanings include, “Ocean” and ,”Eye”, which symbolize themes of rebirth and wisdom. This piece will evoke the regenerative powers of the ocean, as the energizing force behind life, and the cycle of rebirth, as the histories and stories that have happened and still happen to the people on the land. This performance piece is dedicated to the history of the people, the stories, the land and justice of Jeju Island.

    Born on Jeju Island in South Korea, where shamanic tradition is very strong, Dohee Lee learned Korean dance, Korean percussion, and vocals. Her art focuses on integrating these traditional forms with contemporary elements. Each piece and performance blends Eastern and contemporary Western musical forms with modern dance languages into works that emphasize the experimental, ritualistic and regenerative aspects of music, dance and visual bodies. Lee has presented her work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Asian Art Museum in SF and performed at Carnegie Zankel Hall in NYC with the Kronos Quartet, Teatro Municipal de Lima Peru, Beijing and Europe.

    SKIM is an artist and cultural worker born and raised in New York, and currently producing music in Los Angeles. Through song, rap, and Korean folk drumming, SKIM’s work breaks silences, honours family, offers love, and demands change.

    Over the past 12 years, SKIM has performed for a wide range of audiences and venues from independent theatres and music festivals, to HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, to youth and senior centers, schools, and juvenile halls, to actions protesting police abuse and war crimes from past to present. They have also shared their work and music through: drumming with organizers and members of Koreatown Immigrant Workers’ Alliance in LA and Jamaesori in the Bay area, performing at events with Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” facilitating creative workshops with youth in Alternative Intervention Models, API Youth Promoting Advocacy and Leadership, the Chicago Children’s Choir; and recently joining a leadership cohort of the Brown Boi Project.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dohee Lee
    Artist, Performer based in San Francisco, California.

    SKIM
    Artist, Cultural Worker based in Los Angeles, California.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Political Science

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Science and the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Department of History

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Canadian Studies Program

    Centre for the Study of the United States




    +
  • Saturday, October 25th Munk School Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 201410:00AM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs - 315 Bloor St. West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Munk School of Global Affairs Graduate Programs Open House
    Saturday, October 25, 2015
    10am-3pm
    Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto

    Register online here.

    Come learn more about the Munk School’s graduate programs. Exhibitors from the following programs will be on hand:

    • Collaborative Master’s/PhD in South Asian Studies

    • Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    • Master of Arts in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    • Master of Global Affairs

    Program Info Sessions:

    11:00am- Master of Arts in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies Info Session. Please register here.

    1:00pm- Master of Global Affairs (MGA) Info Session. Please register here.

    For more information please contact mga@utoronto.ca




    +
  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Keynote Address, "Truth and Reconciliation in Korea"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    The symposium’s keynote address will feature Prof. Dong Choon Kim (Sung Kong Hoe University) on rethinking reconciliation and reparation.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dong-Choon Kim
    Keynote
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Sung Kong Hoe University, Korea

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    Professor, East Asian Studies Institute, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    York Centre for Asian Research




    +
  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Screening of Jiseul Directed by O Muel

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
    506 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1Y3
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    In this compelling black-and-white portrait, director O Muel depicts the 1948 uprising and subsequent massacre on Jeju island in Korea with authenticity and heart wrenching realism. After a US military decree classifies all inhabitants within 5 kilometers of the coast as “rioters” and orders their execution, over 120 villagers flee to a cave and fight for their survival.

    Expertly crafted in documentary-style, Jiseul depicts brutality, human perseverance, struggle, and loss. The stark and wintry landscape of Jeju of is skillfully framed by cinematographer Jung-hoon Yang. As a montage of portraits, close-ups of villagers, soldiers, and protesters condemned as communists, all faced with life-threatening circumstances, O Muel’s striking epic explores the senselessness of war and the tenacity of the human spirit.

    Jiseul was the recipient of the prestigious World Cinema Dramatic Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

    Country: South Korea
    Year of Production: 2012
    Run Time: 108 min.
    Language and Subtitles: Korean with English Subtitles

    Following the screening, there will be a brief presentation by Toronto Filmmaker and recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Min Sook Lee.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Min Sook Lee
    Recipient of the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013, Cesar E. Chavez Black Eagle Award, Min Sook Lee Labour Arts Award from The Mayworks Festival


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

    Canadian Studies Program

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Department of Political Science

    Department of History

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

    Department of Sociology

    Faculty of Arts & Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies, OCAD University

    International Relations Program

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival




    +
  • Monday, October 27th Follies and Fiascos: Why Does U.S. Foreign Policy Keep Failing?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 27, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    When the Cold War ended, the United States was in a remarkable position of primacy and on good terms with most of the world’s major powers. Yet its foreign policy record since then is dismal, and consists mostly of missed opportunities and sometimes costly failures. These difficulties are partly due to America’s structural position in the international system, but they also reflect a number of deeper problems in the U.S. foreign policy establishment.

    Stephen M. Walt is the Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Management, Harvard University. He previously taught at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, where he served as Master of the Social Science Collegiate Division and Deputy Dean of Social Sciences. He has been a Resident Associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, and he has also served as a consultant for the Institute of Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses, and the National Defense University. He presently serves on the editorial boards of Foreign Policy, Security Studies, International Relations, and Journal of Cold War Studies, and he also serves as Co-Editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, published by Cornell University Press. Additionally, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in May 2005. Professor Walt is the author of “The Origins of Alliances” (1987), which received the 1988 Edgar S. Furniss National Security Book Award. He is also the author of “Revolution and War” (1996), “Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy” (2005), and, with co-author J.J. Mearsheimer, “The Israel Lobby” (2007).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    (416) 946-8972


    Speakers

    Stephen M. Walt
    Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Management, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Graham Centre forContemporary International History, University of Toronto




    +
  • Tuesday, October 28th Stephen M. Walt Graduate Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This event is for Graduate Students and Faculty members only. Registration is required for this event.

    Stephen M. Walt is the Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Management, Harvard University. He previously taught at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, where he served as Master of the Social Science Collegiate Division and Deputy Dean ofSocial Sciences. He has been a Resident Associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, and he has also served as a consultant for the Institute of Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses, and the National Defense University. He presently serves on the editorial boards of Foreign Policy, Security Studies, International Relations, and Journal of Cold War Studies, and he also serves as Co-Editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, published by Cornell University Press. Additionally, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in May 2005.

    Professor Walt is the author of The Origins of Alliances (1987), which received the 1988 Edgar S. Furniss National Security Book Award. He is also the author of Revolution and War (1996), Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy (2005), and, with co-author J.J. Mearsheimer, The Israel Lobby (2007).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Stephen Walt
    Robert and Renee Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Management, Harvard University.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Graham Centre forContemporary International History, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs




    +
  • Tuesday, October 28th Screening of Vincent Who? with Director Curtis Chin

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMedia Commons
    3rd Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Toronto. ON
    M5S 1A5
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    VINCENT WHO? – In 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese sentiments, Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by two white autoworkers who said, “it’s because of you mother** that we’re out of work.” When the judged fined the killers a mere $3,000 and three years of probation, Asian Americans around the country galvanized for the first time to form a real community and movement. This documentary features interviews with the key players at the time, as well as a whole new generation of activists. “Vincent Who?” asks how far Asian Americans have come since then and how far we have yet to go.

    The screening will be followed by a trailer on Curtis Chin’s new film, Tested, and a Q & A session with the director.

    Curtis Chin is an award-winning writer and producer who has written for ABC, NBC, Fox, the Disney Channel and more. As a community activist, he co-founded the Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress. In 2008, he served on Barack Obama’s Asian American Leadership Council where he participated in helping the campaign reach out to the AAPI community. He has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, Newsweek and other media outlet. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at New York University.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Curtis Chin
    Director
    Filmmaker & Founder of Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress,

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto





    +
  • Wednesday, October 29th The Holocaust in Hungary, 1941-1945

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 29, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Tamás Stark is a senior research fellow at the Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary.

    Stark graduated at Karl Marx University of Economics in Budapest in 1983 and received his Ph.D. from the Eötvös Lóránd University of Budapest in 1993. His specialization is forced population movement in East-Central Europe in the period of 1938-1956, with special regard to the history of the Holocaust, the fate of prisoners of war and civilian internees, and the post-war migrations.

    In 1995/1996 he was Pearl Resnick Post-doctoral Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. In the first half of 2014 he was Fulbright professor at Nazareth College in Rochester, NY.

    From 2000 to present, he has worked on many major publications of books, articles, and chapters, including Occupation in Europe Series (2008). His main publications include Hungary’s Human Losses in World War II (Uppsala, 1995), Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust and after the Second World War, 1939-1949: A Statistical Review (Boulder, CO, 2000), Magyarok szovjet fogságban (Budapest, 2006) on the fate of the Hungarian prisoners of war under Soviet control.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Tamás Stark
    Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary





    +
  • Thursday, October 30th Roop Lal Jain Lecture with Eva de Clercq

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2014-2015 Shri Roop Lal Jain Lecture Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eva de Clerq
    Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent University, Blandijnberg


    Sponsors

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute




    +
  • Thursday, October 30th The United States and Israel in a Rapidly Changing Middle East

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20145:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Dr. Migdal is the Robert F. Philip Professor of International Studies at the University of Washington’s Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Dr. Migdal was formerly an associate professor of Government at Harvard University and senior lecturer at Tel-Aviv University. Among his books are Peasants, Politics, and Revolution; Palestinian Society and Politics; Strong Societies and Weak States; State in Society; Through the Lens of Israel; The Palestinian People: A History (with Baruch Kimmerling); and, Boundaries and Belonging.


    Speakers

    Professor Joel Migdal
    Dr. Migdal is the Robert F. Philip Professor of International Studies at the University of Washington’s Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


    Sponsors

    Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies




    +
  • Friday, October 31st Centennial Workshop on France and World War I

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 31, 20142:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Moderator, Eric JENNINGS, University of Toronto

    Bruno CABANES (Ohio State University). “Sortir de la Grande Guerre”: New Perspectives on the Transition from War to Peace

    Nicolas OFFENSTADT (Université Paris I) “Memory and Memories of the French Veterans of the First World War in the Public Sphere, 1919-2014 : a global reappraisal”

    Richard FOGARTY (University at Albany, SUNY) “Empire, Race, and Religion in the Great War”

    Leonard SMITH (Oberlin College, USA) French Historiography of the Great War and the ‘Return to Experience’

    Olivier WIEVIORKA (ENS Cachan), “Une mémoire pour deux guerres?”

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Commission du Centenaire (French Government)




    +

November 2014

  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Where does the call for a new, “planetary” humanities leave the study of the regions that have shaped area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the fact that, more than in any other region of the world, the food and human security of South Asia depend on the annual monsoon. In the long term, changes in the monsoon are a likely but uncertain outcome of planetary warming; but recent meteorological and climatological research has shown that changes in regional patterns of rainfall can be traced to causes on a regional scale, most of which date from the 1950s: aerosols in the atmosphere, changes in land use, agricultural intensification, patterns of migration and urbanization. Our changed perspective shows us that South Asia shapes the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon; regional climate change interacts, unpredictably, with climate change on a planetary level.

    This suggests that, in thinking about human agency in the Anthropocene, intermediate levels of analysis—short of “species history”—and analyses on shorter timescales (in this case, a focus on the middle decades of the twentieth century: the classic terrain of modern historiography) remain essential. Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped the history of Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unpredictable and unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sunil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Ritu Birla
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto-Scarborough




    +
  • Wednesday, November 5th Scientist Entrepreneurship

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 5, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT: Most of the studies measuring and analyzing technology transfer and knowledge spillovers from universities turn to the databases collected by the universities which report the activities of the Offices of Technology Transfer. This paper instead examines university scientist entrepreneurship not by asking the University Technology Transfer Offices what they do in terms of entrepreneurial activities, but rather university scientists directly what they do in terms of entrepreneurial activities. The results from this study are as startling and novel as they are revealing. While the Offices of Technology Transfer databases suggest that new firm startups by university scientists are not particularly a frequent occurrence, this study instead finds exactly the opposite. Most striking is that using a large database of scientists funded by grants from the United States National Foundation, this study finds that around 13 percent of the scientists have started a new firm. These findings would suggest that university scientist entrepreneurship is considerably more prevalent that would be indicated by the data collected by the Offices of Technology Transfer and compiled by the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM).
    In addition, the propensity for a university scientist to be engaged in entrepreneurial activity apparently varies considerably across scientific fields. In certain fields, such as computer and network systems, the prevalence of entrepreneurship is remarkably high, 23.8 percent. Similarly, in civil, mechanical, and manufacturing innovation, over one in five of the university scientists report starting a new business.
    By contrast, in other scientific fields, the prevalence of entrepreneurship is considerably more subdued. For example, in environmental biology, only 4.6 percent of the university scientists report having started a new business. Similarly, in particle and nuclear astrophysics 6.2 percent of the scientists have started a new firm, and in biological infrastructure 8.2 percent of the scientists have started a new firm.
    There is also considerable evidence that university scientist entrepreneurship mirrors the entrepreneurial activity for the more general population in certain important ways, while in other ways scientist entrepreneurship clearly differs from more general entrepreneurial activity. In sharp contrast to what has been found in the entrepreneurship literature for the general population, certain personal characteristics of university scientists, such as age and experience, do not seem to influence the likelihood of a scientist becoming an entrepreneur. However, gender influences the entrepreneurial decision of university scientists in much the same way it does for the general population. Males have a greater likelihood of starting a new business, both for university scientists as well as for the more general population. Similarly, access to resources and high social capital, in the form of linkages to private companies, encourages entrepreneurial activity among university scientists, just as it does for the overall population.
    The empirical evidence from this study indicates that the determinants of university scientist entrepreneurship apparently are not constant across scientific fields. Rather, what is important in influencing scientific entrepreneurship in some scientific fields is less important in other scientific fields. For example, the extent of social capital has no statistically significant impact on the entrepreneurial activity of university scientists in scientific fields such as environmental biology, while it has a positive and statistically significant impact on entrepreneurial activity in civil, mechanical, and manufacturing innovation, as well as in computer and network systems.
    While the age of the university scientist generally does not play an important role, the empirical evidence does point to a negative relationship between age and entrepreneurial activity that is more radical and less innovative in nature. In particular, those university scientists starting a new business for products that are highly innovative tend to be younger.
    Thus, the findings of this paper based on asking university scientists about their entrepreneurial activities suggest that entrepreneurship is considerably more prevalent among a broad spectrum of university scientists than had been previously identified using databases reporting what Offices of Technology Transfer are doing in terms of entrepreneurship. The results from this study would suggest that the spillover of knowledge from universities for commercialization, innovation and ultimately economic growth, employment creation and global competitiveness is substantially more robust than had been previously thought.

    BIO: David Audretsch is a Distinguished Professor and Ameritech Chair of Economic Development at Indiana University, where he is also serves as Director of the Institute for Development Strategies. He also is an Honorary Professor of Industrial Economics and Entrepreneurship at the
    WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany. In addition, he serves as a Visiting Professor at the King Saud University in Saudi Arabia, Honorary Professor at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany, and is a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London.
    Audretsch’s research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development and global competitiveness. His research has been published in over one hundred scholarly articles in the leading academic journals.
    His books include Valuing the Entrepreneurial Enterprise (with Link, Albert N.), (2013), Oxford University Press; Creating Competitiveness: Entrepreneurship and Innovation Policies for Growth (with Walshok, Mary L.), (2013), Edward Elgar Publishing; Handbook of Research on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (with Oliver Falck, Stephan Heblich and Adam Lederer), (2011), Edward Elgar Publishing
    Entrepreneurship and Openness (with Robert Litan and Robert Strom), 2009, Edward Elgar Publishing; The Entrepreneurial Society. (2007). Oxford University Press, Inc.; Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth, with Oxford University Press in 2006 and The Entrepreneurial Society, also with Oxford University Press in 2007.
    He is co-founder and co-editor of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal. He was awarded the 2001 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research by the Swedish Foundation for Small Business Research. In 2008, he received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Augsburg, and in September, 2010 he received an honorary doctorate degree from Jonkoeping University.
    He is a member of the Advisory Board to a number of international research and policyinstitutes, including the Deutsches Institut fuer Wirtschaftsforschung (German Institute for Economic Analysis), the Basque Institute for Competitiveness, and the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    David Audretsch
    Distinguished Professor, Ameritech Chair of Economic Development Director, Institute for Development Strategies Director, SPEA Overseas Education Program





    +
  • Wednesday, November 5th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 5, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Thursday, November 6th Three Worlds of Relief

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The 2014-2015 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity

    Description

    Cybelle Fox is Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley. Her main research interests are in race, immigration and the American welfare state.

    She received her B.A. in history and economics from UC San Diego and her PhD in sociology and social policy from Harvard University. Her most recent book, Three Worlds of Relief (Princeton University Press, 2012), compares the incorporation of blacks, Mexicans, and European immigrants in the American welfare system from the Progressive Era to the New Deal. Fox won six book awards for Three Worlds of Relief, including the 2012 C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Fox’s work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, American Behavioral Scientist, Sociology of Education, Political Science Quarterly, and Sociological Methods and Research. She is also co-author of Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings (Basic Books, 2004).

    OPEN TO THE PUBLIC – NO REGISTRATION NECESSARY


    Speakers

    Cybelle Fox
    Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of California Berkley





    +
  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor in Asia Pacific Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho, a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, is a major South Korean feminist intellectual, author of 8 books, co-founder of Another Culture in 1984, founder of Haja Center in 1999, South Korea’s eminent alternative cultural studios for teens, and one of the key figures in creating critical public scenes since the 1980′s. Cho, as a ‘native anthropologist,’ will be speaking about her whirlwind journey of compressed modernity of South Korea since 1980s. She will start her talk with a discussion about the recent 4.16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo that resonate 9.11 Attacks in 2001 in New York and 3.11 Explosion in 2011 Fukushima in many aspects. She focuses particularly on the split of South Korean public responses into two antagonistic groups, that is, those who say to “never forget!” and those who urge to “ forget and go back to normal life!” Cho will elaborate concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ (Ulich Beck) and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ (Judith Butler) in her analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as lived experience of people in South Korea.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul





    +
  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders Lecture

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking about precarious youth and their survival politics based on her own pedagogical and socio-political experiment at Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) launched in 1999. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has been evolved responding proactively to national and global crises such as 1997 Asian financial crisis, 2008-2009 global financial crises, and 2011 Fukushima disaster. Cho is particularly interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning and has endeavored to create platforms that enables the new type of learning in various forms: a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. In her talk, Cho will detail her works of launching these platforms and discuss about her anticipation. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism,” the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises as unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared treat to all humanity, rather than as isolated and unique. The youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds and creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Hope 21 (Korean Progressive Network in Canada)

    Draad (German Academic Exchange Service)




    +
  • Tuesday, November 11th Legal Orientalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Teemu Ruskola
    Professor of Law, Faculty Associate in Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, and Studies in Sexualities, Emory University School of Law


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute




    +
  • Wednesday, November 12th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 12, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut





    +
  • Thursday, November 20th The Piggies and the Market: Hollywood’s Global Accounting

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 20, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    J.D. Connor received his Ph.D. from the Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins for a dissertation on grammar and existentialism in postwar American literature. Before coming to Yale in 2009, he worked at Slate and taught at Harvard. His principal focus is the interplay of art and industry in the Hollywood system, particularly its contemporary version. As part of that, he is currently completing “The Studios after the Studios: Neoclassical Hollywood, 1970–2010, Stanford UP, forthcoming 2014.Offshoots include studies of Hollywood numbers and production design. Other interests include the history of tape recording, media shifts in the Kennedy era, and the theory of cinematic fidelity. In all of these, his overriding concern lies in detailing modes of collaborative aesthetic production in highly structured situations, be those studios, transcriptions, or adaptations. Prof. Connor is also a member of the steering committee for Post45, a group of scholars of American postwar literature and culture. Www.post45.org

    To prepare for this lecture, it would be good to watch the following films: “Upstream Color,” “Pacific Rim,” or “Contagion.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    J.D. Connor
    Assistant Professor, History of Art, Yale University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of the History of Art, University of Toronto




    +
  • Tuesday, November 25th Income and Longevity: Evidence from pension incomes of Confederate Veterans

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 25, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    How does differences in pension income effect longevity? Mayvis Rebeira answers this question by investigating Confederate pensions for veterans who fought for the South in the Civil War in the late 19th and early 20th century. She makes use of the exogenous variation in income levels between states as a result of differences in pension laws in two adjacent states – Texas and Oklahoma. Since longevity is defined by life expectancies, she investigated differences in mortality rates between these two groups of veterans to find the impact of differences in pension income levels on longevity. To date, the vast majority of studies on pension income effects on mortality, chronic conditions or onset of diseases during the Civil War period have focused on Union Army veterans. Rebeira developed a novel database on Confederate pension income that was created through primary data collection detailing dates of birth and death of Confederate veterans residing in the two states. Using regression to estimate the mean differences in additional years of life gained by the veterans from the two states and controlled for the year of birth (as many diseases degenerate with age) and other county-level socio-economic variables (e.g. state of the economy, population, literacy), the results show a statistically significant difference in age of death between veterans in Texas and Oklahoma. The difference in pension income levels between the two states was wide in 1926-1927. The results of this study point to some evidence to policy-makers on the use of cash transfers in the form of pension income as a possible health intervention tool to reduce mortality rates.

    Mayvis Rebeira is currently a doctoral candidate in health economics at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include the economics of longevity, economic history, income inequality and economic evaluation. Mayvis obtained her M.A in economics from the University of Toronto and is currently a fellow at the Canadian Centre for Health Economics.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Mayvis Rebeira
    Doctoral Candidate, HealthEconomics at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +
  • Wednesday, November 26th CPHS seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 26, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Friday, November 28th CCR2P Year-End Board Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Friday, November 28th Non-Alignment and Afro-Asianism: The Difficult History of Two Sibling Movements

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Scholars often confuse the Non-Aligned Movement and Afro-Asianism Although they were sibling movements and have their roots in Nehruvian thinking, they had different, though overlapping, sets of members and different goals. The current article explores in three parts how the movement emerged. From 1946-56, Jawaharlal Nehru conceived the Non-Alignment and eventually convinced Iosip Broz Tito and Gamal Abdel Nasser of his ideas. In the five subsequent years, the Yugoslav and Egyptian leaders promoted the ideas of establishing a formal movement. And from 1961 to 1965, during its first four years as a movement, Non-Alignment struggled and eventually emancipated itself from Afro-Asianism. The article uses archival documents from India, former Yugoslavia, former East Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Australia.

    Lorenz Lüthi is an Associate Professor for the History of International Relations at McGill University in Montreal/Canada. His first book, The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008. The book has been released in a Polish translation by Dialog in Warsaw in 2011; a Chinese translation is in preparation. Lüthi has widely published on the Cold War in East Asia, Sino-Soviet relations, and the Vietnam War. He is currently working a second book project on the regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East Lüthi’s research has led him to work in archives in China, Australia, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia, Italy, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Lorenz Luthi
    Professor, History of International Relations, McGill University





    +

December 2014

  • Monday, December 1st Hopes, Fears, and the Impact of the New Centers of Islamic Theology at German Universities

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 1, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The 2014-2015 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity

    Description

    Muslims represent approximately five percent of the German population, making them the third largest religious group. Since Germany’s public schools include religious instruction for Catholic and Protestant Christians, the decision was made to extend this privilege to Muslim children as well, which in turn required the establishment of teacher training centers. Four Centers for Islamic Theology at German universities were opened in 2011/2012. The lecture will discuss this new development in the context of Germany’s specific brand of secularism, the hopes and fears it evokes, and what it says about the country’s shifting self-understanding in the European context.

    SPEAKER BIO:
    Monique Scheer is a Professor of Empirische Kulturwissenschaft (Historical and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Tübingen.
    Her interests include cultural histories of popular forms of Christianity in modern Germany as well as questions of religious diversity and secularism.


    Speakers

    Monique Scheer
    Professor of Empirische Kulturwissenschaft (Historical and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Tübingen





    +

January 2015

  • Wednesday, January 14th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 14, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Monday, January 19th In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Based on videotaped oral histories conducted with Jews living in small-towns throughout Ukraine, this multimedia presentation discusses Jewish life and death under Communism and Nazism.

    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 170 St. George Street

    Co-sponsors: the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies

    This event is free and open to the public. No registration required. Please arrive early as seating is limited.

    Contact

    Emily Springgay
    (416) 978-1624


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Veidlinger
    University of Michigan





    +
  • Wednesday, January 21st CHPS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 21, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Tuesday, January 27th Playing as Living: Goldiggers and Con Artists As Vital Theatrical Subjects in Modern American Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Given the early twentieth century’s continued association with aesthetic modernism, critical engagements with the theatre and theatricality in this period are usually positioned in terms of anti-theatricality. Theatre scholar Martin Puchner has argued (“Stage Fright”) that in fact the key to modernism’s overall aesthetic lies specifically in its opposition to the theatre. Rothstein’s paper reads against the grain by drawing attention to representations of theatricality as vitality, as something positive rather than suspect. Using Henri Bergson’s contemporaneous conception of vitalism as a creative force encompassing intuition, will, and feeling, together with his theories of comedy, in which the “living” being is one who (unlike a machine) is able to change, she fashions a picture of the ways that characters in Anita Loos’s novel “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1925) and Ernst Lubitsch’s film “Trouble in Paradise” (1932) offer models of living with creativity, passion, and vigour. Both Loos and Lubitsch make a link between theatricality and an understanding of what lies behind appearances, the consciousness and mastery of which are essential to their characters’ success. This success is frequently tied to social mobility, with the con artist presented as a working class hero trying to improve his or her position in the class hierarchy. No apologies are made for Lorelei Lee and Gaston Monescu, their role playing and playing with language are held up for pleasure and admiration, their energy and creativity enlivening both themselves and others. Because the vital theatrical subject is often most visible in comedy, these works provide a place to begin to frame a more nuanced discussion of theatricality beyond its frequent dismissal as “inauthentic” and excessive.

    Jackie Rothstein is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Acting Up: Theatricality as Vitality in Modern American Literature” looks at novels, plays, and films in the period 1920–1950 for the way in which they present theatricality as a way of living life with energy, creativity, and passion. Sitting at the intersection of cultural and affect studies, Jackie’s project exhibits her interest in issues of gender, class, and ethnicity, and in blurring the boundaries between “high,” “middlebrow,” and “low” culture. Jackie earned her MA from Columbia University. Prior to returning to university to complete her PhD, she worked as an in-house book editor, as a writer for design and communications firms, and as a project manager and editor on art catalogues and exhibitions.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jackie Rothstein
    PhD Candidate in the Department of English, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +
  • Thursday, January 29th – Friday, January 30th 8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, January 29, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Thursday, January 29th Sola Scriptura?: Book History and Religious Authority in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, January 29, 20156:00PM - 7:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Protestantism has been the dominant influence shaping both American religious history and the history of American book culture, as the drive for widespread literary, mass book dissemination, and the public school movement were each significantly driven by the religious imperative to access the Word. The Protestant doctrine of sola scriptura energized the first large-scale publishing project in North America, John Eliot’s Algonquin Bible of 1663. From these beginnings, through the nineteenth-century Bible and tract societies, to the Christian Booksellers Association of the present, the story of Protestantism in the United States has been inseparable from the drive to control and disseminate print. Yet all along, print has also served as a site of religious conflict and a tool of religious innovation and dissent, as examples ranging from Tom Paine and the Book of Mormon to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Oprah Winfrey make clear.

    This lecture will attend to this dynamic of authority, to the role of print in the interplay of establishment and dissent in American religious life. Three themes structure the analysis: the relationship between scriptural and non-scriptural forms of print; the gendered dimensions of reading, literacy, and authorship; and the nature of print as commodity, and therefore as a site where market dynamics shape religion with particular potency. Through an examination of key examples across four centuries, this talk aims to consider a basic historiographical question: how do the frameworks of book history sharpen our understanding of authority in American religious history

    Matthew Hedstrom is a historian of the United States specializing in religion and culture in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His overarching research interests are the social history of religious sensibilities and the cultural mechanisms of their production and propagation. His particular areas of teaching and research thus far have been religious liberalism, spirituality, the cultures and politics of pluralism, religion and race, and print culture. His first book, “The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century,” employs novel sources in book history to tell the surprising story of religious liberalism’s cultural ascendancy in the twentieth century. The religious middlebrow culture of mid-century, Professor Hedstrom argues, brought psychological, mystical, and cosmopolitan forms of spirituality to broad swaths of the American middle class. He has also authored various articles, reviews, and reference works in American studies and American religious history. He is beginning work on a new book project on race and the search for religious authenticity from the Civil War through the 1960s.

    For additional information:

    http://bhpctoronto.com/event/matthew-hedstrom-university-of-virginia-sola-scriptura-book-history-and-religious-authority-in-the-united-states/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hedstrom
    Professor, University of Virginia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Centre for the Book, University of Toronto

    Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College




    +

February 2015

  • Wednesday, February 11th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Wednesday, February 18th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Tuesday, February 24th Job shortages, Care shortages: The U.S. nursing workforce and the crisis of American health care

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The United States has suffered from nursing shortages since at least the 1970s. As a result, rural and inner-city hospitals struggled to properly and consistently staff, offering signing bonuses, and recruiting nurses from abroad. Nursing schools also increased enrollment, and a new generation of nurses—lured by the good job market and salary—entered the profession. As the early stages of the recession began in the mid-2000s, however, the job market changed drastically. Fewer positions exist, and health care facilities are only hiring nurses with experience. On average, new nurses search for work for over a year before finding a position. Yet, nurse-to-patient ratios have remained similar to the days of the labour shortage. This paper investigates this situation, arguing that a new normal in nursing and health care in the U.S. has arrived. By interrogating the recent switch from a shortage to surplus of nurses over the past decade, this paper investigates the impacts of states and federal policies aimed at alleviating the shortage of the late 1990s/early 2000s through growing the domestic labour supply, as well as changing expectations around nurse-to-patient ratios. As this new era of labour surplus and job shortage will show, shortages and surpluses in social reproductive labour involve the manipulation of expectations around care and the value ascribed to it. The new normal in health care and nursing arises through various types of crisis—oversupply of nurses, shortage of nurses, general economic crisis—but in the end is a crisis of neoliberal health care.

    Caitlin Henry is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography, at the University of Toronto. Her research works towards a political definition of health by placing the work of health care at the centre. Her dissertation investigates the impacts of labour surplus and shortage on the nursing workforce, the work of nursing, and the geography of health care by drawing on the everyday practice of nursing, state-driven hospital closures, and federal health and immigration policy since the early 1980s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caitlin Henry
    PhD candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +
  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee at United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation





    +

March 2015

  • Wednesday, March 4th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Tuesday, March 24th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +

April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +
  • Tuesday, April 14th Invisible Fences and the Aesthetics of Austerity in Thoreau’s "Walden" (1854)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In this paper, D’Amico examines Henry David Thoreau’s distaste for accumulation in “Walden” (1854), focusing on Thoreau’s peculiar desire for property and ownership unimpeded by materiality. She suggests that Walden’s inchoate philosophy of property offers insight into the contradictory position of property in the circuit of capitalist exchange; more specifically, that Thoreau’s dread of over-accumulation and desire for Spartan simplicity reflects capital’s abstract desire for unfettered exchange and circulation. Indeed, throughout “Walden” Thoreau describes physical property as waste, excess, and spiritual pollutants, cultivating an aesthetic of austerity that privileges “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.” Lauding the poet’s ability to enclose the landscape within verse, “the most admirable kind of invisible fence,” Thoreau articulates a theory of ownership that eschews material forms of possession in favour of a higher law (Gilmore 1985; Newman 2010). By placing “Walden” in conversation with Lockean social contract theory and its discontents (Rousseau and Marx), she read Thoreau’s text as part of the history of political philosophy. “Walden” figures property as both excess and insufficiency, and it is the goal of this paper to draw out the implications of this contradiction for contract theory. Importantly, she does not characterize “Walden” as an easy example of bourgeois ideology. Instead, following Rob Nixon’s (2011) claim that representational strategies have serious political weight, she argues that Thoreau’s text is useful because it performs, in aesthetic terms, the contradictory elements of the social contract under capitalism.

    Cristina D’Amico is a fourth year PhD candidate in the department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation reads nineteenth-century American literature’s attempts to address – in formal, aesthetic, and philosophical terms – the limitations of “possessive individualism,” C.B. Macpherson’s useful term for describing what he calls “the proprietary logic of western political ontology.” She is especially interested in representations of unorthodox houses in American fiction as alternative expressions of political subjectivity. She has contributed academic writing to Esquire: Journal of the American Renaissance and The Howellsian: Journal of William Dean Howells Studies. She currently holds a SSHRC CGS- Doctoral Fellowship (2011-2014).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Cristina D'Amico
    PhD candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +
  • Wednesday, April 22nd CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 22, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.




    +

May 2015

  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto




    +

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.