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September 2017

  • Friday, September 15th Munk Annual Lecture in European Affairs: Europe between Brexit, Trump and Putin

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 15, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Timothy Garton Ash is the author of nine books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last thirty years. He is Professor of European Studies in the University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. His essays appear regularly in the New York Review of Books and he writes a column on international affairs in the Guardian which is widely syndicated in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

    His books are: ‘Und willst Du nicht mein Bruder sein ...’ Die DDR heute (1981), a book published in West Germany about what was then still East Germany; The Polish Revolution: Solidarity (1983), which won the Somerset Maugham Award; The Uses of Adversity: Essays on the Fate of Central Europe (1989), for which he was awarded the Prix Européen de l’Essai; We the People: The Revolution of ’89 witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin and Prague (1990; US Edition: The Magic Lantern), which was translated into fifteen languages; In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent (1993), named Political Book of the Year in Germany; The File: A Personal History (1997), which has so far appeared in sixteen languages; History of the Present: Essays, Sketches and Despatches from Europe in the 1990s (2000); Free World (2004); and Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade without a Name (2009). He is currently writing a book about free speech in the age of the internet and mass migration, and leads a major Oxford university research project built around the 13-language website freespeechdebate.com.

    After reading Modern History at Oxford, his research into the German resistance to Hitler took him to Berlin, where he lived, in both the western and eastern halves of the divided city, for several years. From there, he started to travel widely behind the iron curtain. Throughout the nineteen eighties, he reported and analysed the emancipation of Central Europe from communism in contributions to the New York Review of Books, the Independent, the Times and the Spectator. He was Foreign Editor of the Spectator, editorial writer on Central European affairs for the London Times, and a columnist on foreign affairs in the Independent.

    In 1986–87 he was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. Since 1990, he has been a Fellow of St Antony’s College, Oxford, where he directed the European Studies Centre from 2001 to 2006 and is now Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow. Since 2010, he has directed the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom, based at St Antony’s. He became a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, in 2000. A frequent lecturer, he is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts and a Corresponding Fellow of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences. He has honorary doctorates from St Andrew’s University, Sheffield Hallam University and the Catholic University of Leuven.

    He continues to travel extensively, and remains a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and other journals. His weekly column in the Guardian is syndicated in leading newspapers across Europe, Asia and the Americas. He also contributes to the Financial Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal.

    Honours he has received for his writing include the David Watt Memorial Prize, Commentator of the Year in the ‘What the Papers Say’ annual awards for 1989, the Premio Napoli, the Imre Nagy Memorial Plaque, the Hoffmann von Fallersleben Prize for political writing, the Order of Merit from Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic, and the British CMG. In 2005, he featured in a list of 100 top global public intellectuals chosen by the journals Prospect and Foreign Policy, and in Time magazine’s list of the world’s 100 most influential people. In 2006, he was awarded the George Orwell Prize for political writing.


    Speakers

    Prof. Timothy Garton Ash
    University of Oxford


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Grandparent Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20171:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2003, Environics pollster Michael Adams wrote a bestselling book entitled Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values. That book was based on surveys of the evolving social values of Canadians and Americans his firm had been conducting in Canada since 1983 and the United States since 1992. In 2016, Environics conducted 8,000 interviews in the United States and 4,000 in Canada to bring the comparative tracking data up to date which will be the basis of his new presentation: Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau. He promises his research will surprise, disturb and reassure.

    Michael Adams is the president of the Environics group of research and communications consulting companies which he co-founded in 1970. In 2006, he founded and serves as president of the non-profit Environics Institute for Survey Research.
    Michael is also the author of six books, including: Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values, (2003); and American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States (2005).
    Environics Institute projects include the first major survey of Muslims in Canada, the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study and, most recently, the Black Experience Project in the Greater Toronto Area.
    Michael holds an Honours B.A. in Political Science from Queen’s University (1969) and a M.A. in Sociology from the University of Toronto (1970).
    In 2009, he received an honorary Doctor of Letters from Ryerson University in Toronto.
    In December 2016, Michael was one of 100 leading individuals to be awarded the Order of Canada, the country’s highest domestic honour.
    Outside the field of research, he is a partner in the Robert Craig Winery in Napa Valley, California.


    Speakers

    Michael Adams
    President, Environics Institute



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 28th ITAC Final Presentation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 28, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2017

  • Friday, October 6th 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Following the capitalist crisis in 1997/98, Indonesia’s economic and political reforms led to increased incorporation into global capitalism. This paper examines three major issues related to such capitalist development after reformasi. First, the motor behind the development of capitalism is a remarkable exploitation of labor. Second, the accumulation of capital through land-based industries has seriously assaulted the mass of independent poor producers. Third, evidence indicates that the appropriation of nature has become the underlying feature of capitalist development. In response to such development there is a growing anti-capitalist movement in the country. Thus this paper also examines the anti-capitalist tendencies in the country. I will restrict my attention to two major tendencies among Indonesian activists today. The first is “reformist anti-capitalist” activists who advocate for a more regulated capitalism and demand a role for the state in regulating the market. The second is “revolutionary anti-capitalist” activists, whose concerns go beyond reforms to the capitalist system.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arianto Sangadji
    Speaker

    Tania Li
    Chair



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2017

  • Wednesday, November 8th "To keep alive the emigrants' affection for the home country": State-driven diaspora politics in early 20th century Southeastern Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 8, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:
    At the end of the 19th century, large parts of Southeastern Europe began to see massive emigration to North America and other overseas destinations. At a time of intense nation building, governments in the region could hardly ignore the fact that so many of their citizens were leaving. On the contrary, some of them discovered the usefulness of emigration for fostering nation-building. In my talk I will discuss the emerging politics of diaspora, focussing on three caste studies (Kingdom of Hungary, Greece, and interwar Yugoslavia). These efforts to project symbolic sovereignty across the Atlantic can elucidate new visions of the nation and its relation to territory, and heralded new forms of governmentality.

    Speaker:
    Dr. Ulf Brunnbauer is director of the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies and chair of Southeast and East European History at the University of Regensburg.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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