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September 2014

  • Wednesday, September 3rd Taiwan's Trans-Pacific and Foreign Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 3, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A public discussion focusing on methods and strategies for Taiwan’s foreign relations and economic integration between Taiwan and mainland China will be joined by a visiting delegation of Taiwanese university students.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mark Manger (Moderator)
    Panelist
    Political Economy and Global Affairs, Munk School of Global Affairs, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Mr. David Lee
    Remarks
    Ambassador at home service, Institute of Diplomacy & International Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

    Douglas Goold
    Introductory Remarks
    Director of National Conversation on Asia, Senior Editor of Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Victor Falkenheim
    Panelist
    East Asian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



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  • Wednesday, September 10th Crisis and Reform: Canda and the International Financial System

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 10, 20145:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Canada Among Nations is the premier source for contemporary insight into pressing Canadian foreign policy issues. Started at the Norman Paterson School of international Affairs at Carleton University, the series has brought together leading scholars, practitioners, journalists, and members of the NGO community for an assessment of the Canada’s foreign policy since 1984. The Centre for International Governance Innovation is proud to partner with NPSIA, on previous and future editions of Canada Among Nations.

    To register please visit www.cigionline.org/events


    Speakers

    Dane Rowlands
    Panelist
    Dane Rowlands, Director, The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs

    Lou Pauly
    host
    Professor, Chair of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Rohinton Medhora
    Moderator
    President, CIGI

    Domenico Lombardi
    Panelist
    Director of the Global Economy Program, CIGI



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  • Monday, September 15th Escaping the Commodity Trap: Toward Sustainable Growth

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 15, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    Professor Zysman received his B.A at Harvard and his Ph.D. at MIT. He has written extensively on European and Japanese policy and corporate strategy; his interests also include comparative politics, Western European politics, and political economy. Professor Zysman’s publications include The Third Globalization: Can Wealthy Nations Stay Rich in the Twenty-First Century? (co-edited with Dan Breznitz, Oxford University Press, 2013), Can Green Sustain Growth: from the Religion to the Reality of Sustainable Prosperity (with Mark Huberty, Stanford University Press, 2013), The Highest Stakes: The Economic Foundations of the Next Security System (Oxford University Press, 1992), Manufacturing Matters: The Myth of the Post-Industrial Economy (Basic Books, 1987), and Governments, Markets, and Growth: Finance and the Politics of Industrial Change (Cornell University Press, 1983).

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    John Zysman
    Professor of Political Science at University of California Berkeley Co-director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE)



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  • Tuesday, September 16th Windows of Opportunity: Working in the Frontiers of Biomedical Research

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 16, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    To register, please visit http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/windows-of-opportunity-working-in-the-frontiers-of-biomedical-research-tickets-8110626101

    Dr. Lap-Chee Tsui has had a distinguished academic career with major discoveries in Genetics and Genomics. He identified the Cystic Fibrosis gene in the late 1980s and in further studies of the human genome, characterized chromosome 7. He contributed significantly to fighting the SARS coronavirus in 2003 and led the Hong Kong consortium in the international effort in completing the first comprehensive catalogue of the human genetic evaluations. Dr. Aubie Angel, President of Friends of CIHR, notes that “Dr. Tsui has brought international recognition to Canadian strength in Human Genetics”. He has trained a cadre of scientific investigators who are part of the next wave of Canadian scientific leadership. He maintains close ties with the Canadian genomics community as Emeritus University Professor, University of Toronto, and Adjunct
    Scientist, Hospital for Sick Children, Research Institute.

    The Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research was established in 2005 by FCIHR in recognition of Dr. Henry Friesen’s distinguished leadership, vision and innovative contributions to health and health research. The $35,000 Friesen Prize is awarded annually. For further information on Friends of CIHR and the Friesen International Prize, please visit: www.fcihr.ca

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Lap-Chee Tsui
    President and Vice-Chancellor of The University of Hong Kong, and recipient of the 2014 Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research



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  • Thursday, September 18th APSIA Admissions Fair

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 18, 20143:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is pleased to host the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs (APSIA) Toronto Admissions Fair.

    APSIA fairs can help you take the next step in your career!

    Meet admissions officers from APSIA member schools. Discuss admissions requirements, curricula, financial aid packages, joint degree programs, and career opportunities. Collect application information.

    Exhibitors
    American University School of International Service
    Carleton University Norman Patterson School of International Affairs
    Georgetown University School of Foreign Service
    Harvard Kennedy School
    Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
    Texas A&M Bush School of Government & Public Service
    Tufts University The Fletcher School
    University of California-San Diego School of International Relations & Pacific Studies
    University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public & International Affairs
    University of Toronto Munk School of Global Affairs

    Directions & Parking
    Give yourself plenty of time to get to the fair, especially if you are traveling by car. For transportation information, click here.

    Tips for Success

    There isn’t a dress code, but most people opt for business casual.
    Bring business cards if you have them. You can provide these instead of filling out information request cards.
    Make sure you have a bag to carry the materials you collect from the exhibitors.

    Please register online here.

    For more information on upcoming APSIA fairs please visit the APSIA website.


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  • Friday, September 19th Financial System Design: A Comparative Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 19, 20149:00AM - 1:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    One of the most pressing issues for countries following the recent financial crisis is the design of their financial system: should countries have in place a macroprudential regulator? How should systemic risk be regulated? What should be the role of the central bank? Is a “twin peaks” approach optimal? This conference will examine institutional design of financial markets and the role of regulators, alone and in coordination with each other, within these markets. Domestic and international approaches to regulation will be addressed. Join us for the discussion!

    Speakers include:
    Prof. Anita Anand, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
    Prof. Jutta Brunnee, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
    Prof. Roberta Romano, Yale Law School
    Prof. Steven L. Schwarcz, Duke University School of Law
    Prof. Michael Trebilcock, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
    Joan Monahan, General Counsel, Department of Finance, Government of Canada

    Discussants include:
    Finn Poschmann, Vice-President (Policy Analysis), CD Howe Institute
    Elizabeth Woodman, Senior Project Leader, Department of Finance, Government of Canada
    Edward Iacobucci, Professor and Osler Chair in Business Law, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Lunch included. Registration fee: $100 plus GST. There is no registration fee for academics. Registration is mandatory as space is limited.

    To register, please send your name, organization, phone number, and email address by email to: elana.fleischmann@utoronto.ca

    This Program on Ethics in Law & Business: Conference on “Financial System Design: A Comparative Perspective” to be held on September 19, 2014 has been approved for professionalism credit: .75 Professionalism hour and 1.5 Substantive hours = 2.25 hours total.

    This promises to be a fantastic conference, with thought leaders addressing issues of financial market stability. Please consider passing this onto others that you think would be interested in attending.

    9.00 – 9.15 Introduction and Welcome
    Professor Jutta Brunnée, Metcalf Chair in Environmental Law & Interim Dean, UofT Faculty of Law

    9.15 – 10 Panel 1- Institutional Design and the New Systemic Risk in Banking Crises
    Presenters:
    Anita Anand, Professor UofT Faculty of Law and Academic Director of the Centre for the Legal Profession
    Michael Trebilcock, Professor of Law and Economics, UofT Faculty of Law
    Discussant: Finn Poschmann, Vice-President (Policy Analysis), CD Howe Institute

    10 – 10.45 Panel 2 – Macroprudential Regulation: Regulating the Financial System as a ‘System’
    Presenter:
    Steven L. Schwarcz , Stanley A. Star Professor of Law & Business, Duke University School of Law
    Discussant: Elizabeth Woodman, Senior Project Leader, Department of Finance, Government of Canada

    10.45- 11 Break

    11 – 11.45 Panel 3 – Regulating in the Dark: Pitfalls of the Iron Law of Financial Regulation
    Presenter:
    Roberta Romano, Sterling Professor of Law and Director, Yale Law School Center for the Study of Corporate Law, Yale Law School
    Discussant: Edward Iacobucci, Professor and Osler Chair in Business Law, UofT Faculty of Law

    11.45 – 12 Closing Remarks
    Joan Monahan, General Counsel, Department of Finance, Government of Canada
    Michael Trebilcock, Professor of Law and Economics, UofT Faculty of Law

    12- 1pm Lunch

    Sponsors

    Faculty of Law


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  • Friday, September 19th The Wages of Extrication: Civil Society Strength at Regime Termination and Inequality in Postcommunist Eurasia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk continues a line of research that argues that the strength of civil society at the point of extrication from communism is a powerful predictor of how “liberal democratic” post-communist regimes become. This is based on the impact that a mobilized civil society has on the reconfiguration of elites in the initial postcommunist phase and the degree to which the model of accumulation permits concentration of resources in the hands of previous elites on the basis of political power. In cases where civil society was stronger at the moment of extrication the elite was disposed to a more liberal model of capitalism with at least some protection for social welfare. Where civil society was weaker the elite was able to convert political power into concentrated control of economic assets and a more predatory and highly inegalitarian model of political capitalism emerged. This thesis will be tested by examining the impact of civil society strength at the moment of extrication from communism on income equality in the two decades since its collapse.

    Professor Bernhard specializes in comparative politics. His interests include democratization, development, comparative historical analysis, and European politics. His main lines of research have included the role of civil society in processes of democratization, the political economy of democratic survival, the politics and ramifications of institutional choice in new democracies, and paths from dictatorship to democracy in late-democratizing European countries. He is currently working on papers on the role of the state in development, the impact of revolution on the state’s war-making capacity, the effect of how democracy is measured on findings in the literature on regimes and conflict, and the legacies of fascism and communism for democratic political systems.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Michael Bernhard
    Department of Political Science University of Florida



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  • Tuesday, September 23rd Iryna Balabukha: “Violence in Intimate Relationships: Why does it happen? A case study on Ukraine”

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 23, 201412:30PM - 4:00PM14 Queen's Park Crescent West
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    Description

    Dr. Balabukha received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in psychology from Kharkiv State University and her PhD in Child and Family Studies from Syracuse University.

    Location: Ericson Seminar Room, Centre for Criminology and Socio-legal Studies, 14 Queen’s Park Crescent West, 2nd floor

    Participants are encouraged to brown bag their lunch. Cold drinks will be provided.

    If you are a person with a disability and require accommodation, please contact Lori Wells at 416-978-3722 x226 or email lori.wells@utoronto.ca and we will do our best to make appropriate arrangements.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


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  • Friday, September 26th Communism and Hunger: The Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet Famines in Comparative Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 26, 20149:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.


    Speakers

    Lucien Bianco
    École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland

    Andrea Graziosi
    Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research

    Niccolò Pianciola
    Lingnan University, Hong Kong

    Ralph Thaxton
    Brandeis University

    Nicolas Werth
    Institut d’histoire du temps présent

    Zhou Xun
    University of Essex



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  • Friday, September 26th North American Trade Engagements and Emerging Markets: A Perspective of Turkish Economy and Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 26, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Bio:
    Before joining Brookings, Kirişci was a professor of international relations and held the Jean Monnet chair in European integration in the department of political science and international relations at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. His areas of research interest include EU-Turkish relations, U.S.-Turkish relations, Turkish foreign and trade policies, European integration, immigration issues, ethnic conflicts and refugee movements.

    His recent publications include Syrian Refugees and Turkey’s Challenges: Going Beyond Hospitality (Brookings, May 2014) and “TTIP and Turkey: The Geopolitical Dimension” in The Geopolitics of TTIP: Repositioning the Transatlantic Relationship for a Changing World, Daniel S. Hamilton, ed. (Center for Transatlantic Relations, 2014). His first paper for Brookings was Turkey and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership: Boosting the Model Partnership with the United States (Brookings, September 2014).

    Other publications include Turkey and Its Neighbors: Foreign Relations in Transition (co-authored with R. Linden et al; Lynne Reimer, 2011), Turkey In World Politics: An Emerging Multi-Regional Power (co-edited with B. Rubin; Lynne Reinner, 2001) and The Kurdish Question and Turkey: An Example of a Trans-State Ethnic Conflict (co-authored with G. Winrow, Frank Cass; 1997).

    Kirişci earned a Ph.D. in international relations from the City University, London; an M.A. in international relations from the University of Kent at Canterbury, England; and a B.A. in finance and management from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. Kirişci has also extensively published articles on Turkish foreign policy, EU-Turkish relations and immigration in academic journals and numerous op-eds on current affairs in Turkey since joining Brookings.

    Registration Required.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Professor Kemal Kirişci
    TÜSİAD senior fellow; director, Center on the United States and Europe; director, Turkey Project; Brookings Institution


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    G20 Research Group


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  • Friday, September 26th Communism and Hunger: HOW SOVIET AND CHINESE COMMUNISTS DEALT WITH THE PEASANTRY. A COMPARISON.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 26, 20147:00PM - 9:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.


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  • Saturday, September 27th Communism and Hunger: The Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet Famines in Comparative Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, September 27, 20141:00PM - 3:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute
    620 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.


    Speakers

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland

    Andrea Graziosi
    Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research

    Niccolò Pianciola
    Lingnan University, Hong Kong

    Ralph Thaxton
    Brandeis University

    Nicolas Werth
    Institut d’histoire du temps présent

    Zhou Xun
    University of Essex



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  • Saturday, September 27th Communism and Hunger: Stalin and Hunger as a Nation-Destroying Tool

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, September 27, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMSt. Vladimir Institute
    620 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    There has been surprisingly little systematic comparison of the Chinese, Kazakh, Ukrainian, and Soviet famines to date. This conference will bring together specialists of these famines to produce a deeper understanding of these phenomena. The presenters, on the basis of their research and knowledge of the rapidly increasing specialized literature, will assess the common features and significant differences and place their findings within the dynamics of the histories of the respective countries.


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October 2014

  • Thursday, October 2nd Book Launch: "Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David” by Lawrence Wright

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A dramatic, illuminating day-by-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter convinced Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat to sign a peace treaty–the first treaty in the modern Middle East, and one which endures to this day.
    With his hallmark insight into the forces at play in the Middle East and his acclaimed journalistic skill, Lawrence Wright takes us through each of the thirteen days of the Camp David conference, delving deeply into the issues and enmities between the two nations, explaining the relevant background to the conflict and to all the major participants at the conference, from the three heads of state to their mostly well-known seconds working furiously behind the scenes. What emerges is not what we’ve come to think of as an unprecedented yet “simple” peace. Rather, Wright reveals the full extent of Carter’s persistence in pushing peace forward, the extraordinary way in which the participants at the conference–many of them lifelong enemies–attained it, and the profound difficulties inherent in the process and its outcome, not the least of which has been the still unsettled struggle between the Israelis and the Palestinians. In Thirteen Days in September, Wright gives us a gripping work of history and reportage that provides an inside view of how peace is made.

    Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker, and the author of one novel, God’s Favorite, and six previous books of nonfiction, including In the New World; Saints and Sinners; Remembering Satan; The Looming Tower, which was the recipient of many honors; and Going Clear. He is also a screenwriter and a playwright. He and his wife are longtime residents of Austin, Texas.


    Speakers

    Lawrence Wright
    Speaker
    Staff Writer for The New Yorker

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs



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  • Thursday, October 2nd Law's Silence: Canada and Bomber Command

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 2, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Nelson teaches modern European history at the University of Windsor, with a special emphasis on German history, the First World War, and colonialism. In his current research, Professor Nelson investigates the development of a German ‘colonial gaze’ upon Eastern Europe, which began in the 1880s, and radicalized during the First World War.His research interests include the social and cultural history of war and occupation, as well as both overseas and ‘inner’ colonialism.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Robert Nelson
    Department of History, University of Windor



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  • Friday, October 3rd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 3, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders Lecture

    Description

    This talk introduces “Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor” (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press, 2014). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: “Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong”; “Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers”; and ” Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography”, and “‘Mail-Order’ Marriages”.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Professor, Director, Asian Studies Center, University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Department of Sociology

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


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  • Friday, October 10th From "Den of Iniquity" to "the Internet's Favourite Cyberpunk Slum": The Kowloon Walled City 20 Years On.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 10, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    “City of Darkness Revisited”, by Greg Girard and Ian Lambot.

    The Kowloon Walled City, before its demolition in 1993, is widely acknowledged to have been the most densely populated place on earth: over 35,000 people living in 300 interconnected high-rise buildings crammed into a single Hong Kong city block. Built without contributions from architects or engineers, and without government oversight, the Walled City was dismissed as a “den of iniquity”, where drugs, prostitution and other vices circulated. Since its demolition however, the Walled City is better known now than when it existed, having influenced a generation of architects, designers, writers, artists and others, prompting the website Motherboard to christen it “the Internet’s favorite cyberpunk slum”. Greg Girard and Ian Lambot’s new book, “City of Darkness Revisited”, updates the story of the Walled City, as first revealed in photographs and text in their 1993 book, “City of Darkness”, and examines its unexpected influence in the 20 years since its demolition.

    Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer currently living in Vancouver, Canada whose work has examined the social and physical transformations in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

    Following the presentation, a reception will be held to celebrate the launch of the Asian Institute’s 2014 lecture series, “Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans”. Please E-register to confirm an RSVP to the recpetion.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto, Mississauga

    Greg Girard
    Speaker
    Photographer, based in Vancouver, Canada.


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


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  • Wednesday, October 15th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 15, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Wednesday, October 15th Terry Fenge talk on Arctic issues

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 15, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Friday, October 17th The Donkey Wars: Authority, Satire, and Political Imagination in the Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Bruce Grant is interested in cultural history and politics as well as religion. His research focuses on former Soviet Union, Siberia, and the Caucasus. His current and recent project include a study of changing social mores in the rapidly transforming capital of Azerbaijan, Baku, from model socialist urban centre to nationalizing metropolis. He is also working on a new project on the role of satire in authoritarian settings as seen through the life and work of Celil Memmedquluzade, editor of the Azeri-language, cross-regional journal, Molla Nesreddin, which was published from 1906-1931. Professor Grant is also involved in an ongoing study of rural religious shrines in the Caucasus, with particular regard for the rich historiographies surrounding them, and they way those histories challenge conventional narratives of Caucasus social life.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    Bruce Grant
    Professor of Antropology, New York University



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  • Friday, October 17th R2P & Canadian Foreign Policy Roundtable Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 17, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Panel Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    From October 24th to October 25th, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto will be hosting a two-day symposium on the Afterlives of the Korean War. Co-sponsored by the Dr.David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, this symposium aims to bring together scholars, artists, filmmakers and students to explore the multifaceted ways that unfinished wars are lived, experienced, imagined and transformed.

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    On Friday, October 24th, 2014 a panel discussion will be held in The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility on the intersections between the military and geopolitics with the dynamics of race, nation, diaspora, gender, and sexuality, which will feature Dr. John Price, Dr. Monica Kim, Dr. Christine Hong and Dr. Hosu Kim.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Assistant Professor, Department of Literature and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies at University California, Santa Cruz.

    John Price
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Univeristy of Victoria, British Columbia.

    Monica Kim
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, New York University, New York State.

    Hosu Kim
    Assistannt Professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, College of Staten Island, New York.



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  • Friday, October 24th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Performance of "ARA Gut of Jeju" by Dohee Lee and SKIM

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 24, 20147:00PM - 8:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C8
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    “Ara” is a Korean word whose various meanings include, “Ocean” and ,”Eye”, which symbolize themes of rebirth and wisdom. This piece will evoke the regenerative powers of the ocean, as the energizing force behind life, and the cycle of rebirth, as the histories and stories that have happened and still happen to the people on the land. This performance piece is dedicated to the history of the people, the stories, the land and justice of Jeju Island.

    Born on Jeju Island in South Korea, where shamanic tradition is very strong, Dohee Lee learned Korean dance, Korean percussion, and vocals. Her art focuses on integrating these traditional forms with contemporary elements. Each piece and performance blends Eastern and contemporary Western musical forms with modern dance languages into works that emphasize the experimental, ritualistic and regenerative aspects of music, dance and visual bodies. Lee has presented her work at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Asian Art Museum in SF and performed at Carnegie Zankel Hall in NYC with the Kronos Quartet, Teatro Municipal de Lima Peru, Beijing and Europe.

    SKIM is an artist and cultural worker born and raised in New York, and currently producing music in Los Angeles. Through song, rap, and Korean folk drumming, SKIM’s work breaks silences, honours family, offers love, and demands change.

    Over the past 12 years, SKIM has performed for a wide range of audiences and venues from independent theatres and music festivals, to HBO’s Def Poetry Jam, to youth and senior centers, schools, and juvenile halls, to actions protesting police abuse and war crimes from past to present. They have also shared their work and music through: drumming with organizers and members of Koreatown Immigrant Workers’ Alliance in LA and Jamaesori in the Bay area, performing at events with Still Present Pasts: Korean Americans and the “Forgotten War,” facilitating creative workshops with youth in Alternative Intervention Models, API Youth Promoting Advocacy and Leadership, the Chicago Children’s Choir; and recently joining a leadership cohort of the Brown Boi Project.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.


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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Keynote Address

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Symposium

    Description

    To register, please visit http://afterlives-koreanwar.eventbrite.ca

    Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the end of the Korean War with the signing of the July 27, 1953 armistice. However, one of the most indelible features of the world’s first Cold War conflict is its unfinished nature. The Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), intended to be a temporary cease-fire line at the 38th parallel, is one of the most militarily fortified borders on earth. Continued hostility and mistrust between the two Koreas keep over 100,000 people separated from their kin. And the ebbs and flows of military tension on the Korean peninsula justify on-going social, economic, political and ecological repression in the name of national security, not only between the North and South but also in many countries around the world.

    The symposium’s keynote address will feature Prof. Dong Choon Kim (Sung Kong Hoe University) on rethinking reconciliation and reparation.

    Any students, faculty members, and members of general public interested on the Afterlives of the Korean War are welcome to join. All events are open for free.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dong-Choon Kim
    Keynote
    Department of Sociology, Sung Kong Hoe University, Korea

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    East Asian Studies Institute, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto



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  • Saturday, October 25th The Afterlives of the Korean War Symposium: Screening of Jiseul Directed by Muel O

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 25, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMThe Bloor Hot Docs Cinema
    506 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1Y3

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  • Tuesday, October 28th Screening of Vincent Who? with Director Curtis Chin

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 28, 20143:30PM - 5:30PMMedia Commons
    3rd Floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
    Toronto. ON
    M5S 1A5
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    Description

    The screening will be followed by a trailer on Curtis Chin’s new film, Tested, and a Q & A session with him

    VINCENT WHO? – In 1982, at the height of anti-Japanese sentiments, Vincent Chin was murdered in Detroit by two white autoworkers who said, “it’s because of you mother** that we’re out of work.” When the judged fined the killers a mere $3,000 and three years probation, Asian Americans around the country galvanized for the first time to form a real community and movement. This documentary features interviews with the key players at the time, as well as a whole new generation of activists. “Vincent Who?” asks how far Asian Americans have come since then and how far we have yet to go.

    Curtis Chin is an award-winning writer and producer who has written for ABC, NBC, Fox, the Disney Channel and more. As a community activist, he co-founded the Asian American Writers Workshop and Asian Pacific Americans for Progress. In 2008, he served on Barack Obama’s Asian American Leadership Council where he participated in helping the campaign reach out to the AAPI community. He has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, NPR, Newsweek and other media outlet. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at NYU.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Curtis Chin
    Director

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies, University of Toronto



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November 2014

  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Where does the call for a new, “planetary” humanities leave the study of the regions that have shaped area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the fact that, more than in any other region of the world, the food and human security of South Asia depend on the annual monsoon. In the long term, changes in the monsoon are a likely but uncertain outcome of planetary warming; but recent meteorological and climatological research has shown that changes in regional patterns of rainfall can be traced to causes on a regional scale, most of which date from the 1950s: aerosols in the atmosphere, changes in land use, agricultural intensification, patterns of migration and urbanization. Our changed perspective shows us that South Asia shapes the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon; regional climate change interacts, unpredictably, with climate change on a planetary level.

    This suggests that, in thinking about human agency in the Anthropocene, intermediate levels of analysis—short of “species history”—and analyses on shorter timescales (in this case, a focus on the middle decades of the twentieth century: the classic terrain of modern historiography) remain essential. Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped the history of Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unpredictable and unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Sunhil S. Amrith
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London



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  • Wednesday, November 5th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 5, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Thursday, November 6th Ethnic Studies Event; Cybelle Fox

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho, a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, is a major South Korean feminist intellectual, author of 8 books, co-founder of Another Culture in 1984, founder of Haja Center in 1999, South Korea’s eminent alternative cultural studios for teens, and one of the key figures in creating critical public scenes since the 1980′s. Cho, as a ‘native anthropologist,’ will be speaking about her whirlwind journey of compressed modernity of South Korea since 1980s. She will start her talk with a discussion about the recent 4.16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo that resonate 9.11 Attacks in 2001 in New York and 3.11 Explosion in 2011 Fukushima in many aspects. She focuses particularly on the split of South Korean public responses into two antagonistic groups, that is, those who say to “never forget!” and those who urge to “ forget and go back to normal life!” Cho will elaborate concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ (Ulich Beck) and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ (Judith Butler) in her analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as lived experience of people in South Korea.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



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  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking about precarious youth and their survival politics based on her own pedagogical and socio-political experiment at Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) launched in 1999. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has been evolved responding proactively to national and global crises such as 1997 Asian financial crisis, 2008-2009 global financial crises, and 2011 Fukushima disaster. Cho is particularly interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning and has endeavored to create platforms that enables the new type of learning in various forms: a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. In her talk, Cho will detail her works of launching these platforms and discuss about her anticipation. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism,” the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises as unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared treat to all humanity, rather than as isolated and unique. The youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds and creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hae-Joang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul



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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



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  • Wednesday, November 26th CPHS seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 26, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Friday, November 28th CCR2P Year-End Board Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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December 2014

  • Monday, December 1st Hopes, fears, and the impact of the new Centers of Islamic Theology at German universities

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 1, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Muslims represent approximately five percent of the German population, making them the third largest religious group. Since Germany’s public schools include religious instruction for Catholic and Protestant Christians, the decision was made to extend this privilege to Muslim children as well, which in turn required the establishment of teacher training centers. Four Centers for Islamic Theology at German universities were opened in 2011/2012. The lecture will discuss this new development in the context of Germany’s specific brand of secularism, the hopes and fears it evokes, and what it says about the country’s shifting self-understanding in the European context.

    SPEAKER BIO:
    Monique Scheer is a Professor of Empirische Kulturwissenschaft (Historical and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Tübingen.
    Her interests include cultural histories of popular forms of Christianity in modern Germany as well as questions of religious diversity and secularism.


    Speakers

    Monique Scheer



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January 2015

  • Wednesday, January 14th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 14, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Monday, January 19th In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Based on videotaped oral histories conducted with Jews living in small-towns throughout Ukraine, this multimedia presentation discusses Jewish life and death under Communism and Nazism.

    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 170 St. George Street

    Co-sponsors: the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies

    This event is free and open to the public. No registration required. Please arrive early as seating is limited.

    Contact

    Emily Springgay
    (416) 978-1624


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Veidlinger
    University of Michigan



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  • Wednesday, January 21st CHPS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 21, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Tuesday, January 27th Playing as Living: Goldiggers and Con Artists As Vital Theatrical Subjects in Modern American Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Given the early twentieth century’s continued association with aesthetic modernism, critical engagements with the theatre and theatricality in this period are usually positioned in terms of anti-theatricality. Theatre scholar Martin Puchner has argued (“Stage Fright”) that in fact the key to modernism’s overall aesthetic lies specifically in its opposition to the theatre. Rothstein’s paper reads against the grain by drawing attention to representations of theatricality as vitality, as something positive rather than suspect. Using Henri Bergson’s contemporaneous conception of vitalism as a creative force encompassing intuition, will, and feeling, together with his theories of comedy, in which the “living” being is one who (unlike a machine) is able to change, she fashions a picture of the ways that characters in Anita Loos’s novel “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1925) and Ernst Lubitsch’s film “Trouble in Paradise” (1932) offer models of living with creativity, passion, and vigour. Both Loos and Lubitsch make a link between theatricality and an understanding of what lies behind appearances, the consciousness and mastery of which are essential to their characters’ success. This success is frequently tied to social mobility, with the con artist presented as a working class hero trying to improve his or her position in the class hierarchy. No apologies are made for Lorelei Lee and Gaston Monescu, their role playing and playing with language are held up for pleasure and admiration, their energy and creativity enlivening both themselves and others. Because the vital theatrical subject is often most visible in comedy, these works provide a place to begin to frame a more nuanced discussion of theatricality beyond its frequent dismissal as “inauthentic” and excessive.

    Jackie Rothstein is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Acting Up: Theatricality as Vitality in Modern American Literature” looks at novels, plays, and films in the period 1920–1950 for the way in which they present theatricality as a way of living life with energy, creativity, and passion. Sitting at the intersection of cultural and affect studies, Jackie’s project exhibits her interest in issues of gender, class, and ethnicity, and in blurring the boundaries between “high,” “middlebrow,” and “low” culture. Jackie earned her MA from Columbia University. Prior to returning to university to complete her PhD, she worked as an in-house book editor, as a writer for design and communications firms, and as a project manager and editor on art catalogues and exhibitions.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jackie Rothstein
    PhD Candidate in the Department of English, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


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February 2015

  • Thursday, February 5th Tony Fong talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Tony Fong is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, for 2014-15. Fong recently received his PhD in English at the University of Toronto, and works on issues of contemporary literature and film, focusing especially on life writing, ethics, and gender/sexuality studies.

    His dissertation, “Authoring Death: Mourning Masculinity in American Autobiography,” for which he received the A.S.P. Woodhouse Prize for the best dissertation defended in the Department of English, probes representations of the “unhealthy” male bodies that permeate American personal narratives. By exposing the different ways the auto-biographical text manifests the writer’s failing corporeality—even when he struggles to conceal it—“Authoring Death” challenges the myth of the self-made and invulnerable man of American autobiography. Fong’s next book-length project,” Starving Art: Sacrifice, Ethics, and American Hunger Narratives,” examines the centrality of hunger within American culture by studying how literary and visual narratives diminish the body and its appetites. By approaching hunger as a sacrificial act, this project posits an ethics of self-deprivation. Fong’s writing can also be found in Philip Roth Studies, Kitchen Daily, and The Huffington Post.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tony Fong
    Tony Fong is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States,at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Fong received his PhD in English at the University of Toronto.



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  • Wednesday, February 11th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


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  • Thursday, February 12th Rachel Gordan talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Rachel Gordan received her Ph.D. from Harvard and her BA from Yale College. She teaches a course in American religious history, and is currently working on a book manuscript about post-World War II American Judaism.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rachel Gordan
    CSUS Lecturer and Research Associate, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.



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  • Tuesday, February 24th Job shortages, Care shortages: The U.S. nursing workforce and the crisis of American health care

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The United States has suffered from nursing shortages since at least the 1970s. As a result, rural and inner-city hospitals struggled to properly and consistently staff, offering signing bonuses, and recruiting nurses from abroad. Nursing schools also increased enrollment, and a new generation of nurses—lured by the good job market and salary—entered the profession. As the early stages of the recession began in the mid-2000s, however, the job market changed drastically. Fewer positions exist, and health care facilities are only hiring nurses with experience. On average, new nurses search for work for over a year before finding a position. Yet, nurse-to-patient ratios have remained similar to the days of the labour shortage. This paper investigates this situation, arguing that a new normal in nursing and health care in the U.S. has arrived. By interrogating the recent switch from a shortage to surplus of nurses over the past decade, this paper investigates the impacts of states and federal policies aimed at alleviating the shortage of the late 1990s/early 2000s through growing the domestic labour supply, as well as changing expectations around nurse-to-patient ratios. As this new era of labour surplus and job shortage will show, shortages and surpluses in social reproductive labour involve the manipulation of expectations around care and the value ascribed to it. The new normal in health care and nursing arises through various types of crisis—oversupply of nurses, shortage of nurses, general economic crisis—but in the end is a crisis of neoliberal health care.

    Caitlin Henry is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography, at the University of Toronto. Her research works towards a political definition of health by placing the work of health care at the centre. Her dissertation investigates the impacts of labour surplus and shortage on the nursing workforce, the work of nursing, and the geography of health care by drawing on the everyday practice of nursing, state-driven hospital closures, and federal health and immigration policy since the early 1980s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caitlin Henry
    PhD candidate in the Department of Geography, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


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  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Christian Murck
    Trustee at United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



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March 2015

April 2015


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