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December 2016

  • Tuesday, December 13th The Roots and Directions of Hong Kong's Never-Ending Political Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 13, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The roots of Hong Kong’s political crisis are deep. “One country-two systems” is in trouble. Alienated youth, identity politics, a strong absence of mutual understanding, unmet expectations on both sides, and Beijing’s fear of secessionism and foreign interference all intensify the dilemma, which the recent Legco elections have only deepened. Professor Zweig will provide an update on events in Hong Kong and discuss the road forward.

    David Zweig is Chair Professor, Division of Social Science, and Director, Center on China’s Transnational Relations (www.cctr.ust.hk), The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He is a Senior Research Fellow, Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada; Adjunct Professor, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan; and Vice-President of the Center on China’s Globalization (Beijing). He lived in the Mainland for 4 years (1974-76, 1980-81, 1986 and 1991-92), and in Hong Kong since 1996. In 1984-85, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University. His Ph.D. is from The University of Michigan (Political Science, 1983).

    He is the author of four books, including Internationalizing China: domestic interests and global linkages (Cornell Univ. Press, 2002) and a new edited book, Sino-U.S. Energy Triangles: Resource Diplomacy under Hegemony, with Hao Yufan (Routledge: 2015). In 2013, he received The Humanities and Social Sciences Prestigious Fellowship, Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, 2013-14, and in 2015 received a grant from the RGC for a project entitled, “Coming Home: Reverse Migration of Entrepreneurs and Academics in India and Turkey in Light of the Chinese Experience.”

    Recent consultancies include reports for the Central Policy Unit (Government of Hong Kong), the Guangdong Provincial Government, Goldman Sachs, Handelsbank Capital Markets, Deutsche Bank and Shenzhen University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    David Zweig
    Speaker
    Chair Professor, Division of Social Science; Director, Center on China's Transnational Relations Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 16th Al-Qaeda vs. Daesh: Front Lines in the Global Jihad

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 16, 20165:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2014, notorious Daesh leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi announced himself the “caliph” of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), and the sole legitimate ruler of the entire Muslim world. Baghdadi’s radical declaration created shockwaves, and threatened Al-Qaeda’s longstanding position as the leader of the global jihad. The successor to bin Laden, Ayman Al-Zawahiri, immediately rejected the so-called Daesh caliphate and asked jihadists around the world to rally behind the Al-Qaeda brand. After a failed attempt at reconciliation, this standoff turned bloody. Daesh and Al-Qaeda militants turned their guns on each other in the war-ravaged battlefields of Syria.

    The impact was global. Daesh quickly emerged as a powerful ideological competitor, with groups in Nigeria, Libya, Yemen, and Pakistan pledging fealty to Baghdadi. As jihadists around the world bent the knee to the so-called caliph, Daesh declared these groups “provinces” of their radical state. Al-Qaeda franchises around the world saw this expansion as a threat to their global brand, and pushed back against Daesh forcefully in a violent bid for power and authority.

    Understanding this conflict between Al-Qaeda and Daesh is essential to mapping the front lines of the global jihad. What are the ideological and political differences between Al-Qaeda and Daesh? Are these groups irreconcilable, or is a future merger a possibility? What exactly are these regional provinces and franchises, and do they truly represent a global movement? Which of these groups is more competitive, and how can we expect these networks to transform in the coming years?

    To address these critical questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs, in collaboration with the University of Toronto, Scarborough Campus, is pleased to host a panel discussion with world-leading experts on these pressing issues.

    Panelists:

    Renad Mansour is an Academy Fellow at Chatham House in London and a Research Fellow at the Cambridge Security Initiative at Cambridge University. He specializes in the challenges of political transition and state building, and has done extensive fieldwork in both Iraq and Syria on the ethnic and sectarian factions involved in the fight. Having recently travelled through Iraq to track the Mosul offensive, Renad brings fresh insights from the field to the Munk School.

    Barak Mendelsohn is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Haverford College, and a leading expert on Middle Eastern politics, terrorism, and international security. Barak’s forthcoming book with Oxford University Press, “The al-Qaeda Franchise: The Expansion of al-Qaeda and Its Consequences” explores the proliferation of Al-Qaeda regional affiliate groups around the world, and its implications of global security.

    Aisha Ahmad is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, co-director of the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative and a senior researcher at the Global Justice Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs. She has conducted research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Kenya, Lebanon, and Mali. Aisha’s forthcoming book with Oxford University Press, “Jihad & Co.: Black Markets and Islamist Power” examines the economic foundations of jihadists groups across the Muslim world.

    Amarnath Amarasingam is a Fellow at The George Washington University’s Program on Extremism, and Co-Directs a study of Western foreign fighters based at the University of Waterloo. He is the author of “Pain, Pride, and Politics: Sri Lankan Tamil Activism in Canada” (2015). Amarnath is considered a leading authority on online foreign fighter radicalization, and has research interests are in terrorism, diaspora politics, post-war reconstruction, and the sociology of religion.


    Speakers

    Renad Mansour
    Panelist
    Academy Fellow, Chatham House
    Research Fellow, Cambridge Security Initiative, Cambridge University

    Barak Mendelsohn
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Haverford College

    Aisha Ahmad
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Co-director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative
    Senior Researcher, Global Justice Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Amarnath Amarasingam
    Panelist
    Fellow, The George Washington University’s Program on Extremism


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    UTSC


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2017

  • Thursday, January 12th Japan’s Global Reach: Development Cooperation and Foreign Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Lecture Abstract:
    Japan has been engaged in development cooperation throughout the world since the 1950s. The initial efforts of development cooperation were made to augment and reinforce the postwar settlements with the countries invaded by Japan. Japan’s development cooperation expanded quantitatively and geographically in the 1970s and 1980s. Some of the projects conducted in this period illustrate Japan’s approach to international development cooperation, an approach that emphasizes both human capacity development and infrastructure building. Reviewing the history of Japan’s activities globally, I would like to discuss challenges Japan faces in the 21st century as a civilian power.

    Speaker Biography:
    Akihiko Tanaka is Professor of International Politics at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, The University Tokyo. He served as President of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) from April, 2012 to September, 2015. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in International Relations at the University of Tokyo and Ph.D. in Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has numerous books and articles on world politics and security issues in Japanese and English including The New Middle Ages: The World System in the 21st Century (Tokyo: The International House of Japan, 2002). He received the Medal with Purple Ribbon in 2012 for his academic achievements.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    Stephen Toope
    Chair
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Akihiko Tanaka
    Speaker
    Professor of International Politics, Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 12th Book Launch: Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism, and Memory in a Balkan Community

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 12, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    During two terrifying days and nights in early September 1941, the lives of nearly two thousand men, women, and children were taken savagely by their neighbors in Kulen Vakuf, a small rural community straddling today’s border between northwest Bosnia and Croatia. This frenzy—in which victims were butchered with farm tools, drowned in rivers, and thrown into deep vertical caves—was the culmination of a chain of local massacres that began earlier in the summer. In Violence as a Generative Force, Max Bergholz tells the story of the sudden and perplexing descent of this once peaceful multiethnic community into extreme violence. This deeply researched microhistory provides provocative insights to questions of global significance: What causes intercommunal violence? How does such violence between neighbors affect their identities and relations?

    Max Bergholz is Associate Professor of History at Concordia University in Montreal. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in the Balkans since 2003 on the dynamics of intercommunal violence, nationalism, and memory. His research has won support from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies, and his articles have been published in journals such as American Historical Review. In November 2016, Cornell University Press published his first book, Violence as a Generative Force.

    Copies of Prof. Bergholz’s book will be available for purchase at the event.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Max Bergholz
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Concordia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    University Professor Research Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 17th Innovation by the People, for the People

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Amos Zehavi
    Senior lecturer, Department of Political Science Department of Public Policy, Tel Aviv University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 18th Zero Waste: Fictional or Achievable Goal?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMSchool of the Environment
    Earth Sciences Building
    5 Bancroft Avenue
    Room ES 1042
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series & Environment Seminar Series

    Description

    All countries, large or small, rich or poor, suffer waste problems to various degrees. If not properly dealt with, waste issues could impose heavy environmental burdens which not only hinder economic growth but also lead to social discomfort. A sound strategic approach for effective waste management therefore is critical to finding an economically viable and environmentally sound solution.

    Recently, a zero-waste concept has emerged worldwide as a new initiative to curtail the worsening waste problem. Realization of such a concept, however, necessitates the prevention and/or making the best use of the waste via workable mechanisms. Plausible measures include: waste minimization, waste reduction, reuse, recycle and recovery, cleaner production, eco-industrial networking, sustainable consumption and production, etc. The application of these measures, on the other hand, is case and location specific, requiring a careful consideration of many inter-related technical, regulatory, economic and social factors.

    This presentation will review the background and challenges of the waste problem, ways and means of planning and implementing a zero-waste society, paradigm shift from waste to resource management, innovation and partnership, and key elements of success or failure with discussion on the exemplary case of Taiwan.

    Zero waste: is it a fictional or achievable goal? This is an open question that we must address, to help build a sound foundation for pursuance of sustainability.

    Professor Chih C. Chao is a former Vice President of Tunghai University, Taiwan and received his PhD from the University of Montreal. Trained as a chemical and environmental engineer, Dr. Chao has a grave concern over the social and environmental impacts that are caused by un-thoughtful economic activities. Recently, he has worked extensively with natural and social scientists to search for and implement feasible approaches that will lead to establishment of sustainable low-carbon circular economic systems. Dr. Chao has over 40 years’ experience in North America, EU and Asia, covering a wide spectrum of sustainability driven issues. His most recent focal interest is in facilitating the development of value-added zero-waste systems, with a goal of maximizing material and energy use efficiency and minimizing the natural resource exploitation, towards a low-carbon society.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Chih C. Chao
    Speaker
    Honorary Professor, Tunghai University, Taiwan

    John Robinson
    Chair
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs; Adjunct Professor, Copenhagen Business School


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of the Environment

    Co-Sponsors

    Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 19th The Crisis of Postnationalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    For years, the mainstream liberal opinion, shared by many social scientists, was that nationalism is a transient phenomenon that will either disappear or become marginal in the course of general development. However, what we see everywhere, including the most developed parts of the world, is the rise of nationalism. This often causes shock and bewilderment. But what we need is to analyze what were the theoretical premises on which the expectations of the coming decline of nationalism were based, and what was wrong about them.

    Ghia Nodia is professor of politics and director of the International School of Caucasus Studies in Ilia Chavchavadze State University in Tbilisi, Georgia. He is also a founder of the Caucasus Institute for Peace, Democracy and Development (CIPDD), an independent public policy think tank in Tbilisi, Georgia and member of the Forum’s NDRI think tank network, which he has led since August 2009 and in 1992-2008. In February–December 2008, he served as the minister for education and science of Georgia.
    Prof. Nodia has published extensively on democratization; state-building, security, and conflicts in Georgia and the Caucasus; theories of nationalism; and democratic transition in the post-cold-War context. He has been involved in pro-democracy advocacy efforts in Georgia and internationally and has been a frequent participant of international congresses and conferences on related topics.


    Speakers

    Ghia Nodia


    Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 25th Unpacking the ‘Core Content’ of Essential Medicines under the Right to Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 25, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Access to essential medicines is part of the right to health and a cornerstone of an equitable health system. Enshrined in the ICESCR, the right to health offers a set of standards, principles and duties to guide its realisation. Global health and development initiatives increasingly embrace a right to health approach, particularly for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health.

    Authoritative entities such as the WHO and the former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health maintain that national governments should give legal recognition in domestic law to essential medicines as part of the right to health. Legal recognition offers a framework for national policy makers and health workers to implement these rights while providing a foothold for their enforcement. In particular, universal health coverage (UHC) enshrined in domestic law can advance health rights by making essential medicines affordable and available to all.

    Currently, it is unclear to what degree domestic legal rules providing for essential medicines mirror right to health principles and how such legal approaches are framed. This research maps the domestic legal terrain governing access to essential medicines in middle income countries. Through comparative legal analysis, this multidisciplinary study determines how domestic legal texts articulate the public health dimensions of access to medicines (i.e. Who are the beneficiaries? Which medicines are provided? What are the direct costs to patients?) through a human rights lens that considers provisions for non-discrimination and vulnerable groups. This research reflects on how national policy makers have made explicit use of the norms and standards in the right to health when forming pharmaceutical benefits in national UHC schemes. It will outline potential ‘best practice’ legal approaches to express rights- sensitive provisions for universal access, offering tools for prospective domestic policy learning to advance the SDG for health.

    Katrina Perehudoff M.Sc. LL.M. is a PhD candidate at the University of Groningen where she studies model domestic law for universal access to medicines through a human rights lens under the supervision of prof. Hans V. Hogerzeil (Faculty of Medical Sciences) and prof. Brigit Toebes (Faculty of Law). As a Research Fellow at the Global Health Law Groningen Research Centre, Katrina coordinates the Essential Laws for Medicines Access project and the Centre’s 2016 Summer School. Katrina has 5 years of experience advocating for access to medicines and their rational use at the NGOs Health Action International and The European Consumer Organization. She will join the CPHS as a Temporary Health & Human Rights Fellow in 2017.


    Speakers

    Katrina Perehudoff
    Visiting Health and Human Rights Fellow (University of Groningen)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2017

  • Wednesday, February 8th Re-Conceptualizing Mental Health Services for Women Who Have Experienced IPV: Responding to Intersecting Experiences of Trauma

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Despite the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its devastating effects on Canadian women, there is a gap in empirically-supported mental health interventions for IPV. Specifically, despite wide acknowledgment of the links between IPV and trauma, there is a research gap in understanding how IPV interventions address trauma. Also problematic is that Canadian IPV interventions have mainly been informed by the 1980s experiences of white, cis-gendered, middle-class, heterosexual women from Duluth, Minnesota, rather than representing women’s diverse experiences of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, socioeconomic status, religion, and immigration experiences. Interventions for IPV need to shift from a view of gender-based oppression as the root cause of IPV, to a view that encompasses the multiple ways in which identity-based oppressions and traumatic experiences can impact IPV. Informed by critical feminist intersectional and trauma-informed approaches, this qualitative study aims to build theory to address these gaps, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Theoretical sampling and semi-structured interviews with women in Ontario who have accessed mental health services for IPV will be employed to: 1) understand how trauma is conceptualized and addressed within IPV services; and 2) compare differences in women’s service experiences based on intersecting identities and oppression. Through comparative analysis, this study aims to identify service inequities based on women’s complex identities, and to understand how trauma on multiple levels (childhood adversities, racism, classism, homophobia, etc.) impacts IPV-related trauma. Findings will provide knowledge necessary to reduce inequities in the future design of mental health care for IPV survivors.

    Stephanie Baird is a PhD candidate at Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at University of Toronto. Her research interest in trauma and intimate partner violence builds on her community and clinical social work practice with people who have been impacted by experiences of trauma and violence. Her dissertation, which is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship, will explore the intersectional experiences of trauma of women who have been abused by a partner.


    Speakers

    Stephanie Baird
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 16th Lumumba (2000; dir. Raoul Peck)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20177:30PM - 9:30PM Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Julie MacArthur
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 22nd We’re Here: Understanding Subjugation and Resistance among Older Gay Men Seeking and Receiving Care in Medical Settings

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 22, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In recent years, a growing body of literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging has highlighted the systemic exposure of older sexual and gender minorities to complex expressions of stigma and discrimination across a variety of social contexts, the confluence of which tends to adversely affect the social conditions and health outcomes of these groups. Older gay men have specifically been recognized as a population of concern, given this group’s exposure to the unique social history of HIV, and therefore the unique features of stigma and discrimination that are likely to typify the realities of these older adults as they access health care and social services (Addis et al., 2009). Informed by this literature, my research seeks to examine how older gay men experience the production of subjugation at the intersection of older age, gay sexuality, and HIV stigma, specifically when they access health care systems, and how they resist these systemic issues in their interactions with health services. In this qualitative study, I aim to interview 30 gay men who are 50 years of age or older with recent experience accessing health care services, 15 of whom will be HIV-positive. In these interviews, I will ask participants to discuss their overall experiences of accessing health care services as older gay men, and how they believe they navigate potential barriers to access in these contexts. Drawing on these accounts, I will infer how intersectional subjugation is produced and resisted as older gay men, including those living with HIV, enter and interact with systems of care. The results of this study will be used not only to further insight in the growing field of LGBT aging, but also to develop health care policy and practice implications that seek to address access to care in a key subpopulation of aging and sexual minorities.

    Hannah Kia is a third year PhD Candidate in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences Division of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She is also a member of the Re:searching for LGBTQ Health Team, led by Dr. Lori Ross. Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Hannah was a clinical social worker in British Columbia, where she gained practice experience in palliative care and other health care specialty areas. During her time as a social worker, she conducted research on the experiences of care-giving partners of gay men, and assisted with a Metropolis BC-funded study that examined the experiences and service needs of sexual minority newcomers. Hannah holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work from the University of British Columbia. At this time, Hannah’s research interests centre on examining health care access among older LGBTQ adults. In pursuing her doctoral studies, she hopes to gain a better understanding of how older LGBTQ adults, particularly those living with HIV and other chronic illnesses, experience stigma and discrimination as barriers to accessing care. In April 2015, Hannah was awarded a Doctoral Research Award by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to support her work in this area.


    Speakers

    Hannah Kia
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2017

  • Tuesday, March 7th Cities, Immigrant Diversity and Complex Problem Solving

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Cities play host to residents hailing from a wide range of countries. Theory suggests such immigrant diversity can influence worker productivity, both positively and negatively. Benefits flow from the idea that people born in different countries complement each other in problem solving and innovation, by enabling the combination of different skills, ideas and perspectives. But heterogeneity can also inhibit productivity by raising the costs of co-operation and spurring rent-seeking behavior. This project makes several contributions to a growing body of empirical work exploring these claims. First, it leverages a rich matched employer-employee dataset for the U.S. that enables us to better account for bias from non-random worker selection, while distinguishing between impacts flowing from diversity manifested at city- and workplace-scales. Second, we ‘stress-test’ motivating theory, examining the extent to which any benefits from diversity are concentrated among workers engaged in complex problem solving and innovation. Results suggest that the benefits of immigrant diversity outweigh the costs. Consistent with theory, the association is concentrated among workers engaged in industries where complex problem solving is particularly important. In light of continued controversy about the economic implications of immigration, this project suggests an additional channel by which immigration improves overall economic well-being.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Thomas Kemeny
    Department of Geography and Environment University of Southampton



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 8th In the Image of a Woman: Spirited and Embodied Interpellations Along the Betsiboka River

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 22nd Socioeconomic inequalities across birth outcome distributions: A comparative study of Canada and its peer nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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