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January 2015

  • Monday, January 26th Sayed Kashua, "The Foreign Mother Tongue"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 26, 20152:00PM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Sayed Kashua, in an interview with Janice Stein, will discuss what it is like to be a stranger in his own land by speaking about his experiences, challenges, and fears as an Arab-Israeli author who writes in the language of the Jewish majority despite belonging to the Arab-Palestinian minority.

    Sayed Kashua is the author of three novels: Dancing Arabs, Let it Be Morning, and Second Person Singular, winner of the Berstein Prize. Kashua also writes a satirical weekly column in Hebrew for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz. In a humorous, tongue-in-cheek style, Kashua addresses the problems faced by Arabs in Israel, caught between two worlds. He is the writer and creator of the hit Israeli TV show “Arab Labor” (Avoda Aravit), now in its third season. In 2004, Kashua was awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize in Literature. He is also the subject of the documentary “Forever Scared.”


    Speakers

    Sayed Kashua
    Speaker
    Author, Journalist

    Janice Stein
    Moderator
    Founding Director and Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Sponsors

    Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 26th Arctic Speaker Series Lecture: "Souvenirs from Thule: The Material Culture of Movement in Canada and Iceland, 1000-1969"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 26, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Historian Laurie Bertram presents a selection of artifacts from Canadian-Icelandic exchanges over the past millennium, to illustrate the distinct challenges northern migration histories pose to conventional southern frameworks of contact, colonialism, and development.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Dr. Laurie Bertram


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 27th Book Launch "Tell it to the World" by Eliott Behar

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 201512:00PM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In Tell It to the World, Eliott Behar, a former war crimes prosecutor for the former Yugoslavia, examines the causes and consequences of mass violence, identifying a powerful and disturbing connection between the justice we seek and the injustices we commit.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 27th Playing as Living: Gold-diggers and Con Artists As Vital Theatrical Subjects in Modern American Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Given the early twentieth century’s continued association with aesthetic modernism, critical engagements with the theatre and theatricality in this period are usually positioned in terms of anti-theatricality. Theatre scholar Martin Puchner has argued (Stage Fright) that in fact the key to modernism’s overall aesthetic lies specifically in its opposition to the theatre. Rothstein’s paper reads against the grain by drawing attention to representations of theatricality as vitality, as something positive rather than suspect. Using Henri Bergson’s contemporaneous conception of vitalism as a creative force encompassing intuition, will, and feeling, together with his theories of comedy, in which the “living” being is one who (unlike a machine) is able to change, she fashions a picture of the ways that characters in Anita Loos’s novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925) and Ernst Lubitsch’s film Trouble in Paradise (1932) offer models of living with creativity, passion, and vigour. Both Loos and Lubitsch make a link between theatricality and an understanding of what lies behind appearances, the consciousness and mastery of which are essential to their characters’ success. This success is frequently tied to social mobility, with the con artist presented as a working class hero trying to improve his or her position in the class hierarchy. No apologies are made for Lorelei Lee and Gaston Monescu, their role playing and playing with language are held up for pleasure and admiration, their energy and creativity enlivening both themselves and others. Because the vital theatrical subject is often most visible in comedy, these works provide a place to begin to frame a more nuanced discussion of theatricality beyond its frequent dismissal as “inauthentic” and excessive.

    Jackie Rothstein is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Acting Up: Theatricality as Vitality in Modern American Literature” looks at novels, plays, and films in the period 1920–1950 for the way in which they present theatricality as a way of living life with energy, creativity, and passion. Sitting at the intersection of cultural and affect studies, Jackie’s project exhibits her interest in issues of gender, class, and ethnicity, and in blurring the boundaries between “high,” “middlebrow,” and “low” culture. Jackie earned her MA from Columbia University. Prior to returning to university to complete her PhD, she worked as an in-house book editor, as a writer for design and communications firms, and as a project manager and editor on art catalogues and exhibitions.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jackie Rothstein
    PhD Candidate in the Department of English, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 28th Putin's Ukraine: Crimea, Donbas, and Transcarpathia (the Hungarian Factor)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 28, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The panel will examine the conflict in Ukraine from three different yet intersecting perspectives. Professor Magocsi will examine on Transcarpathian internal affairs and relations with its neighbours. Dr. Kuzio will discuss Ukrainian regional and security policies vis-a-vis Transcarpathia and Russia’s covert operations. Robert Austin will conclude with Hungary’s Fidesz “Revolution”, Hungarian Minority Policy in the Region with a focus on the Hungarians in Transcarpathia and Hungary’s evolving relations with Russia.

    A live webcast of the event can be accessed via the link below starting at 2 p.m. on the day of the event.


    Speakers

    Dr. Taras Kuzio
    Speaker
    The Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Professor Paul Robert Magosci
    Speaker
    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Professor Randall Hansen
    Chair
    The Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

    Robert Austin
    Speaker
    Hungarian Studies Program, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Hugarian Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 28th The Japanese Art of Fascist Modernism: Yasuda Yukihiko’s The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 28, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This presentation investigates The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41) produced by the Japanese-style painter Yasuda Yukihiko. It demonstrates that the painting, which emulates Kamakura-period paintings, depicts medieval warriors, and was displayed at an exhibition that celebrated Japan’s imperial family, significantly contributed to the politicized cultural discourse that espoused the theme of “return to Japan” (Nihon kaiki), which was central to Japan’s wartime ideology. The painting, Asato Ikeda will reveal, clearly drew on pre-modern Japanese pictorial art but it was simultaneously inspired by the modern aesthetics of post-expressionist machine paintings, and thus mirrors the fundamental contradiction of the wartime Japanese state that repudiated some aspects of modernity upon which it was nevertheless predicated. Following recent fascism studies that understand fascism in relation to a paradoxical attitude toward modernity, Asato Ikeda will suggest that Yasuda’s work not only exemplified the Japanese state’s appropriation of modernism, but can also be considered as a Japanese example of fascist modernism.

    Asato Ikeda is Assistant Professor of Art History and Music at Fordham University, New York and an Asia-Pacific Journal contributing editor. Between 2014 and 2016, she is the Bishop White Postdoctoral Fellow at Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where she plans to organize an exhibition about wakashu (male youth). Co-editor, with Ming Tiampo and Aya Louisa McDonald, of Art and War in Japan and its Empire: 1931-1960 (Leiden: Brill, 2012), she is currently working on a monograph that will explore the relationship between Japanese art and war in the 1930s and early 1940s.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Asato Ikeda 
    Assistant Professor, Fordham University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th – Friday, January 30th 8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, January 29, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference has grown into a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work. We attract a great number of proposals from various universities, not just in Canada but also the United States, Europe and even Asia.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    Every year we are very fortunate to have a dedicated group of graduate faculty members who serve as discussants, and prepare thorough and insightful comments for each paper submitted. Our conference thus provides valuable feedback to those seeking publication of their research.

    The conference is organized with the help of a committee of students from the Collaborative Program in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies. These students are often themselves presenters at the conference, and also serve as session chairs and timekeepers.

    CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

    Thursday January 29, 2015 (8:30-16:30)

    Session 1: Immigration (Discussant: Prof. Vappu Tyska, Sociology, Ryerson University)
    Session 2: Multiculturalism (Discussant: Prof. Russell Kazal, History, University of Toronto)

    Keynote Lecture 12:00-14:00 Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs:
    John Borrows “Living Legal Traditions: Indigenous Law in Practice” (see event poster above)
    Registration required for the keynote lecture. Please click here to register.

    Session 3: Law and Policy (Discussant: Prof. Grace-Edward Galabuzi, Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University)
    Session 4: Identity (Discussant: Prof. Sarah Hillewaert, Anthropology, University of Toronto)

    Friday January 30, 2015 (9:00-16:00)

    Session 5: Health (Discussant: Prof. Morton Beiser, Professor in Distinction, Psychology, Ryerson University)
    Session 6: Race (Discussant: Prof. Rinaldo Walcott, Director of Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto)
    Session 7: Religion (Discussant: Prof. Joseph Bryant, Sociology/Religion, University of Toronto)
    Session 8: Gender (Discussant: Prof. Rania Salem, Sociology, University of Toronto)

    Registration not required except for the keynote lecture.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th 8TH ANNUAL ETHNIC AND PLURALISM STUDIES GRADUATE RESEARCH CONFERENCE Keynote Lecture: Living Legal Traditions: Indigenous Law in Practice

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 201512:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2014-2015 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity

    Description

    This event serves as the keynote lecture for the 8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference.

    Abstract:
    The practice and analysis of Indigenous peoples’ law takes many forms. Indigenous law seems to work best when it simultaneously
    supports and challenges ‘taken for granted’ customs and rules. Indigenous law must be embrace and critique established patterns of
    community regulation and decision-making to work in present contexts. This lecture will examine these themes by focusing on the recognition
    and development of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) peoples’ laws in the Great Lakes watershed.

    Bio:
    John Borrows B.A., M.A., J.D., LL.M. (Toronto), Ph.D. (Osgoode Hall Law School), LL.D. (Hons.)(Dalhousie) F.R.S.C., is Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria Law School. Formerly: Professor and Robina Chair in Law and Society at the University of Minnesota Law School and Professor; Law Foundation Chair of Aboriginal Law and Justice at the University of Victoria Law School; Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto; Associate Professor and First Nations Legal Studies Director, Faculty of Law at the University of British Columbia; Associate Professor and Director of the Intensive Programme in Lands, Resources and First Nations Governments at Osgoode Hall Law School. Professor Borrows has served as a Visiting Professor and Acting Executive Director of the Indian Legal Program at Arizona State
    University College of Law in Phoenix, Arizona; Visiting Professor at the Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales, Australia; New
    Zealand Law Foundation Distinguished Visitor at Waikato University in New Zealand; Visiting Professor at J. Rueben Clark Law School at BYU;
    Vine Deloria Distinguished Visitor at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers School of Law; LG Pathy Professor in Canadian Studies at
    Princeton University. He teaches in the area of Constitutional Law, Indigenous Law, and Environmental Law. His publications include,
    Recovering Canada; The Resurgence of Indigenous Law (Donald Smiley Award for the best book in Canadian Political Science, 2002). Canada’s
    Indigenous Constitution (Canadian Law and Society Best Book Award 2011), Drawing Out Law: A Spirit’s Guide, all from the University of
    Toronto Press. Professor Borrows is a recipient an Aboriginal Achievement Award in Law and Justice, a Fellow of the Trudeau Foundation, and a
    Fellow of the Academy of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada (RSC), Canada’s highest academic honor, and a 2012 recipient of the
    Indigenous Peoples Counsel (I.P.C.) from the Indigenous Bar Association, for honor and integrity in service to Indigenous communities. John is
    Anishinabe/Ojibway and a member of the Chippewa of the Nawash First Nation in Ontario, Canada.


    Speakers

    John Borrows
    Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria Law School


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th 'Sola Scriptura'? Book History and Religious Authority in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, January 29, 20156:00PM - 7:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Protestantism has been the dominant influence shaping both American religious history and the history of American book culture, as the drive for widespread literary, mass book dissemination, and the public school movement were each significantly driven by the religious imperative to access the Word. The Protestant doctrine of sola scriptura energized the first large-scale publishing project in North America, John Eliot’s Algonquin Bible of 1663. From these beginnings, through the nineteenth-century Bible and tract societies, to the Christian Booksellers Association of the present, the story of Protestantism in the United States has been inseparable from the drive to control and disseminate print. Yet all along, print has also served as a site of religious conflict and a tool of religious innovation and dissent, as examples ranging from Tom Paine and the Book of Mormon to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Oprah Winfrey make clear.

    This lecture will attend to this dynamic of authority, to the role of print in the interplay of establishment and dissent in American religious life. Three themes structure the analysis: the relationship between scriptural and non-scriptural forms of print; the gendered dimensions of reading, literacy, and authorship; and the nature of print as commodity, and therefore as a site where market dynamics shape religion with particular potency. Through an examination of key examples across four centuries, this talk aims to consider a basic historiographical question: how do the frameworks of book history sharpen our understanding of authority in American religious history.

    Matthew Hedstrom is a historian of the United States specializing in religion and culture in the late19th and 20th centuries. His overarching research interests are the social history of religious sensibilities and the cultural mechanisms of their production and propagation. His particular areas of teaching and research thus far have been religious liberalism, spirituality, the cultures and politics of pluralism, religion and race, and print culture. His first book, The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century, employs novel sources in book history to tell the surprising story of religious liberalism’s cultural ascendancy in the 20th century. The religious middlebrow culture of mid-century, Hedstrom argues, brought psychological, mystical, and cosmopolitan forms of spirituality to broad swaths of the American middle class. He has also authored various articles, reviews, and reference works in American studies and American religious history. He is beginning work on a new book project on race and the search for religious authenticity from the Civil War through the 1960s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hedstrom
    Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies, University of Virginia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Centre for the Book

    Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th Grafting a New Canon onto the Turkish Literary Field: The First Turkish Publishing Congress and the Will to Translate

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room
    Bancroft Building 200B
    4 Bancroft Avenue
    University of Toronto
    St. George Campus
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Translation took centre stage in early Republican Turkey due to its entanglements with westernization and nation-building efforts, especially throughout the 1930s and 1940s. The talk focuses on the proceedings of the First Turkish Publishing Congress held in 1939 and explores the special emphasis placed on translated literature during the congress. The Congress was held under the auspices of Hasan-Ali Yücel, then Minister of Education, and attended by many leading politicians, publishers, academics, writers, and translators of the day who were all cultural agents in their own right. The discourse built in and around the congress on the topic of translation is indicative of the way early Republican intellectuals built a “need” for translation and identified a “gap” in the literary field, long before this gap started to be filled by a state institution, e.g., Tercüme Bürosu (Translation Bureau), established in 1940. Mapping the discourses of the participants, as well as newspaper articles written on the occasion of the congress, the talk will problematize the strong “will to translate” both as translation in the literal sense and translation as a process of cultural transformation.

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Şehnaz Tahir Gürçağlar
    Boğaziçi University and Glendon College, York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th International Criminal Law at the Crossroads

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20156:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    OVERFLOW REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! Watch live webcast of the event at the Munk School of Global Affairsl in room 208, North House, 1 Devonshire Place.
    Please visit this link to register: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/international-criminal-law-at-the-crossroads-tickets-15382394155
    Free admission for overflow.

    Join us for an intimate conversation with James Stewart (LLB75), Deputy Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, and Richard Dicker, Director of International Justice for Human Rights Watch. The discussion will be moderated by Crown Attorney, Rita Maxwell (LLB01)

    Just over 10 years after the ICC began hearing cases, two of the world’s most prominent international lawyers will discuss the Court’s successes and ongoing challenges. They will address the jurisdictional limitations that impede the Court’s engagement in Syria, explore whether the Court promotes “victor’s justice” or “selective justice,” and debate whether peace and justice can co-exist.

    Registration Fees
    Registration is free for anyone with a University of Toronto Tcard or Business card. A fee of $10 at the door will be applied for any non-University of Toronto attendees.


    Speakers

    Richard Dicker
    Speaker
    Director of International Justice for Human Rights Watch

    Rita Maxwell
    Moderator
    Crown Attorney

    James Stewart
    Speaker
    Deputy Prosecutor, International Criminal Court


    Co-Sponsors

    International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 201510:00AM - 12:00PMAnthropology Building AP 246
    19 Russell Street
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    Drawing on two decades of ethnographic research in Sulawesi, Indonesia, Land’s End offers an intimate account of the emergence of capitalist relations among indigenous highlanders who privatized their common land to plant a global market crop, cacao. Some prospered; others lost their land. It is a story with potent messages for social movement activists, who expect indigenous people to be guardians of community and tradition, committed to sustaining food production. It also interrupts transition narratives that expect people who lose their land to march off to the city to find a job. For these newly landless highlanders, as for many other post-peasants across Asia, jobs are scarce. When land’s end is a dead end, a different politics must emerge.

    Tania Murray Li is Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy and Culture of Asia in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto, and author of Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier (Duke University Press 2014), Powers of Exclusion: Land Dilemmas in Southeast Asia (with Derek Hall and Philip Hirsch, NUS Press, 2011), and The Will to Improve: Governmentality, Development, and the Practice of Politics (Duke, 2007).

    Join us for a presentation and discussion session with Tania Li, Derek Hall, Christopher Krupa, and Katharine Rankin.

    Click the link below to register.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Professor, St. George Campus and Canada Research Chair in the Political-Economy and Culture of Asia, University of Toronto

    Derek Hall
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Christopher Krupa
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Katharine Rankin
    Professor, Department of Geography and Program in Planning, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    The Department of Anthropology

    Co-Sponsors

    The Development Seminar

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Professionalizing Perfume in Eighteenth-Century Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Smell is fundamental to the way in which we perceive the world around us, and yet historians have scarcely explored either the smell of the past or pervious attitudes to odors. While art historians have extant material artifacts with which to reconstruct the ‘period eye’, the very evanescence of scent means that prospective historians of smell lack any comparable sources with which to deduce what we might call the ‘period nose’. This paper suggests that one route into the otherwise problematic history of smell is through the study of perfume, the product that, more than any other, was intended to manipulate olfaction. Rather than searching for the birth of ‘modern’ perfumery, I intend here to delineate the changing meanings of perfume during the eighteenth century. Besides treating perfume as an objective physical substance, I will also show how it was a subjective phenomenon tied to contemporary understandings of air and smell. In doing so, I intend to nuance and modify Alain Corbin’s influential account of odor. The central thesis to be advanced in the paper is that, over the course of the eighteenth century, perfume underwent a partial transformation. Before 1700, perfumers touted above all else the medicinal qualities of their products. During the 1700s, however, these purported medicinal qualities changed and were partly superseded by entirely new claims to the effect that perfume was, for men and women alike, a necessary luxury.

    Kirsten James is a PhD candidate in History at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation is provisionally titled “The Science of Scent and Business of Perfume in Paris and London in the Eighteenth Century.”

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Kirsten James
    Doctorante en Histoire Universite de Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Book Launch: Kyiv, Ukraine: The City of Domes and Demons from the Collapse of Socialism to the Mass Uprising of 2013-2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 20155:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Kyiv, Ukraine: The City of Domes and Demons is a pioneering case study of urban change from socialism to the hard edge of a market economy after the fall of the Soviet Union. It looks in detail at the historic capital of Ukraine – Europe’s seventh-largest city – with emphasis on the changing social geography of the city, on urban development, and on critical problems such as official corruption, social inequality, sex tourism, and destruction of historical ambience. The book is based on fieldwork and an insider’s knowledge of the city, is written in an engaging style, and is nicely illustrated with numerous photographs by the author. A beautiful city that has been known for its great river, the Dnipro, and for so many spectacular churches capped with golden domes that it was once called a New Jerusalem, is today being devoured by demons of capitalist greed and corruption.

    The author, Roman Adrian Cybriwsky is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia, USA, and former Fulbright Scholar at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy. He divides his time between Philadelphia, Kyiv, and Tokyo, about which he has also written books.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Roman Adrian Cybriwsky
    Speaker
    Professor, Temple University

    Taras Koznarsky
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, January 31st Health & High Politics: The modern state’s interest in health equity & security

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 31, 201510:00AM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    10:00-10:45 Registration

    10:45 -11:30 Introductions + Keynote, Peter A Singer, CEO of Grand Challenges Canada

    11:30- 12:45: Panel 1 – Paradigm Shift: The New Health Landscape
    Professor Jillian Kohler
    Professor Joy Fitzgibbon
    Ms. Amy Tang
    The 21st century has seen traditional “state-centric” threats – war, espionage, etc. – replaced with non-state threats from terrorism to tsunamis. International institutions like the G8, the WHO, and the OECD have identified disease and health inequality as chief among these “neo-vulnerabilities.” How did we get to where we are today? What, ultimately, compels a state to address global health equity and security

    12:45 – 2:15 Lunch

    2:15 – 3:30: Panel 2 – Global Co-Operation in Action
    Professor Helen Dimaras
    Dr. James Orbinski
    Dr. Mandana Vahabi
    Addressing new sources of vulnerability requires practical collaboration between governments, non-state actors, and the academy. What is required to reach solutions that meet the goals of all these actors? How can innovators best engage their state, others, and the international community to affect positive health outcomes?

    3:30 – 4:00 Coffee Break

    4:00 – 5:15 Panel 3 – The Next Decade: Stress-Tests in Health Collaboration
    Dr. Leslie Davidson
    Dr. Ali Harris
    Dr. Ophira Ginsburg
    Looking to the future, what will be required of our international health infrastructure? Is our system prepared to meet existing and fast-evolving challenges from communicable and non-communicable disease? How does the status-quo need to change and what are our metrics for success?

    Please click here to visit the IR Society Conference website for further information and speaker bios.

    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Student Union

    Arts and Science Student Union

    International Relations Society

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Trinity College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2015

  • Monday, February 2nd Book Launch: "The Fountain of Knowledge: The Role of Universities in Economic Development" by Shiri M. Breznitz

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 2, 20154:30PM - 6:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S0A7
    416-946-8929
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    Description

    Today, universities around the world find themselves going beyond the traditional roles of research and teaching to drive the development of local economies through collaborations with industry. At a time when regions with universities are seeking best practices among their peers, Shiri M. Breznitz argues against the notion that one university’s successful technology transfer model can be easily transported to another. Rather, the impact that a university can have on its local economy must be understood in terms of its idiosyncratic internal mechanisms, as well as the state and regional markets within which it operates.

    To illustrate her argument, Breznitz undertakes a comparative analysis of two universities, Yale and Cambridge, and the different outcomes of their attempts at technology commercialization in biotech. By contrasting these two universities—their unique policies, organizational structure, institutional culture, and location within distinct national polities—she makes a powerful case for the idea that technology transfer is dependent on highly variable historical and environmental factors. Breznitz highlights key features to weigh and engage in developing future university and economic development policies that are tailor-made for their contexts.

    Shiri M. Breznitz teaches for the Munk One and Master of Global Affairs programs as Assistant Professor. An economic geographer, she specializes in innovation, technology, and regional economic development. Her research is at the critical intersection of theory and policy to fit the new realities of globalization. Professor Breznitz’s work has informed policymaking at the local, national, and international levels. She has advised on the role of universities in the larger story of innovation, on the economic impact of biotechnology, and on the role of clusters in driving innovation. Read more.


    Speakers

    Shiri M. Breznitz
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 3rd Hungarian Foreign Policy Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 3, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Dr. Ódor has been the Hungarian ambassador to Canada since 2014. Prior to assuming this position, he served as the Deputy State Secretary for European Affairs in the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and as the head of the EU Department of the Hungarian National Assembly’s Office for Foreign Relations, among other positions. He has authored numerous articles and two books related to European integration, including his 2014 PhD dissertation at Corvinus University on the topic of the double majority system under the Lisbon Treaty.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Ambassador Bálint Ódor
    Ambassador of Hungary



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 4th Oh Sadaharu / Wang Zhenzhi and the Possibility of Chineseness in 1960s Taiwan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 4, 20151:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Beginning in 1965, the Republic of China government in Taiwan began inviting the great Yomiuri Giants first baseman Oh Sadaharu to Taiwan. Oh, whose father was Chinese was presented as Wang Zhenzhi, the (half-) Chinese Superman who triumphed over Japanese discrimination with unbeatable Chinese morality, patriotism and drive. This role of Home Run King Wang was an important part of 1960s culture created by Taiwan’s population of recent mainland emigres, whose public identity was defined by a dual position of privilege and diasporic trauma. At the same time, Taiwanese fans harkened back to the Japanese colonial support of the game of baseball, and thrilled to the home run feats of Oh, who (like so many of them) was born under Japanese rule. For many Taiwanese people who were discontented under one-party nationalist rule, Oh’s rise to fame via the ‘Japanese’ game of baseball stood as proof of the superiority of Japanese culture vis-à-vis an imagined retrograde ‘China.’

    Andrew Morris is professor of modern Chinese and Taiwanese history at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. He is author of ‘Colonial Project, National Game: A History of Baseball in Taiwan’ (University of California Press, 2010) and Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China (University of California Press, 2004; and editor of ‘Japanese Taiwan: Colonial Rule and Its Contested Legacy’ (Bloomsbury Publishing, forthcoming).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Andrew Morris
    Professor of History, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 4th KANO: Film Screening and Academic Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 4, 20154:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Based on a true story, “Kano” traces how an underdog baseball team in southern Taiwan made it to the finals of the 1931 Koshien, Japan’s national high-school baseball championship.

    For the boys at Kagi Agriculture and Forestry Public School in southern Taiwan, playing at the finals of the Japanese Empire’s greatest youth sports event, Koshien, would have been a dream beyond reach. But under the leadership of coach Kondo, the team slowly starts making progress toward transforming the impossible into reality. In just one year, the seemingly “ragtag” team from southern Taiwan goes from a losing record to unprecedented honour.

    Scripted by Ruby Chen and Te-Sheng Wei, and directed by Taiwanese actor Umin Boya, “Kano” revisits Taiwan’s colonial past within the Japanese Empire and explores the intricate relations between colonialism, sports, race, and ethnicity.

    An academic panel composed of Dr. Takashi Fujitani (University of Toronto) and Dr. Andrew Morris (California Polytechnic State University) will help us unravel the history behind the film.

    Dr. Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). He is the author of Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996) and Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Koreans in WWII (UC Press, 2011); co-editor of Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (Duke U. Press, 2001); and editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).

    Dr. Andrew Morris is Professor of Modern Chinese and Taiwanese history at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. He is author of ‘Colonial Project, National Game: A History of Baseball in Taiwan’ (University of California Press, 2010) and Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China (University of California Press, 2004; and editor of ‘Japanese Taiwan: Colonial Rule and Its Contested Legacy’ (Bloomsbury Publishing, forthcoming).

    REGISTRATION REQUIRED. CLICK LINK BELOW TO REGISTER.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asian Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Andrew Morris
    Professor of History, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    INDePth Conference 2015

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Asian Institute

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 5th The benefits of not ‘being there’? Knowledge production and socializing online

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    Face-to-face interaction still seems the unrivalled mode of interaction. True, the role of distanciated relations as ‘pipelines’ that transmit valuable information from a variety of sources have been appreciated more recently. And yet, face-to-face interactions still seem matchless in fuelling ‘local buzz’, nurturing trust and conveying tacit knowledge. This presentation takes issue with this reification of ‘being there’. Netnographic research on virtual user communities and on the social network site LinkedIn indicates that online interaction (1) affords unique technical opportunities and social dynamics that foster learning processes unattainable in face-to-face contexts and (2) cannot be reduced to a sensory deprived version of face-to-face communication, but in fact signifies a genuinely novel logic of interaction.

    Speaker bio: Gernot Grabher is an economic geographer and Professor of Urban and Regional Economic Studies at the HafenCity University Hamburg. He received his Ph.D. in 1987 at Vienna University of Technology, and held positions at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB), King’s College London, the University of Konstanz and the University of Bonn. Grabher was Visiting Professor at Columbia University, Copenhagen Business School, Santa Fe Institute, Cornell University and the Institute of Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Between 2007 and 2011 he was co-editor of Economic Geography. Currently, he is co-editor of the Regions and Cities book series of the Regional Studies Association. Gernot Grabher is internationally renowned for his research on networks, regional evolution and decline, and project organization. His research has been published in numerous articles in the leading academic journals and his books include Networks (with W.W. Powell, 2013, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar); Restructuring Networks in Post-Socialism: Legacies, Linkages, and Localities (with D. Stark, 1997, OUP); In Praise of Waste. Redundancy in Regional Development: A Socioeconomic Case (1994, Berlin: Edition Sigma); The Embedded Firm: On the Socioeconomics of Industrial Networks (1993, Routledge); The Market Shock: An Agenda for the Economic and Social Reconstruction of Central and Eastern Europe (with J. Kregel and E. Matzner, 1992, University of Michigan Press).
    Further details: http://www.hcu-hamburg.de/research/arbeitsgebiete/gernot-grabher

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Gernot Grabher
    Chair in Urban and Regional Economic Studies HafenCity University Hamburg



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 5th The Treacherous Double Vision of "A Moveable Feast"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Although many critics discuss the importance of World WarI to Hemingway (Cowley, Wilson, Crews), few consider the war in A Moveable Feast (1964). Much of the memoir is narrated through a voice that entwines Hemingway’s perspective with that of his former mentor, Gertrude Stein. Through this complex act of ventriloquism, Hemingway attacks former allies like Stein in a voice that bespeaks his indebtedness to them. He thus exploits F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “double vision” to simultaneously valorize and undermine his autobiographical “I,” recognizing that after WWI, he could no longer conceive of a self disconnected from others – even in the egocentric genre of autobiography.

    Tony Fong is a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, for 2014-15. Fong recently received his PhD in English at the University of Toronto, and works on issues of contemporary literature and film, focusing especially on life writing, ethics, and gender/sexuality studies.

    His dissertation, “Authoring Death: Mourning Masculinity in American Autobiography,” for which he received the A.S.P. Woodhouse Prize for the best dissertation defended in the Department of English, probes representations of the “unhealthy” male bodies that permeate American personal narratives. By exposing the different ways the auto-biographical text manifests the writer’s failing corporeality—even when he struggles to conceal it—“Authoring Death” challenges the myth of the self-made and invulnerable man of American autobiography. Fong’s next book-length project, Starving Art: Sacrifice, Ethics, and American Hunger Narratives, examines the centrality of hunger within American culture by studying how literary and visual narratives diminish the body and its appetites. By approaching hunger as a sacrificial act, this project posits an ethics of self-deprivation. Fong’s writing can also be found in Philip Roth Studies, University of Toronto Quarterly, and The Huffington Post.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tony Fong
    Visiting Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 5th Nazila Fathi Book Launch: "The Lonely War: One Woman's Account of the Struggle for Modern Iran"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 20156:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the summer of 2009, as she was covering the popular uprisings in Tehran for the New York Times, Iranian journalist Nazila Fathi received a phone call. “They have given your photo to snipers,” a government source warned her. Soon after, with undercover agents closing in, Fathi fled the country with her husband and two children, beginning a life of exile.

    In The Lonely War, Fathi interweaves her story with that of the country she left behind, showing how Iran is locked in a battle between hardliners and reformers that dates back to the country’s 1979 revolution. Fathi was nine years old when that uprising replaced the Iranian shah with a radical Islamic regime. Her father, an official at a government ministry, was fired for wearing a necktie and knowing English; to support his family he was forced to labor in an orchard hundreds of miles from Tehran. At the same time, the family’s destitute, uneducated housekeeper was able to retire and purchase a modern apartment—all because her family supported the new regime.

    As Fathi shows, changes like these caused decades of inequality—especially for the poor and for women—to vanish overnight. Yet a new breed of tyranny took its place, as she discovered when she began her journalistic career. Fathi quickly confronted the upper limits of opportunity for women in the new Iran and earned the enmity of the country’s ruthless intelligence service. But while she and many other Iranians have fled for the safety of the West, millions of their middleclass countrymen—many of them the same people whom the regime once lifted out of poverty—continue pushing for more personal freedoms and a renewed relationship with the outside world.

    Drawing on over two decades of reporting and extensive interviews with both ordinary Iranians and high-level officials before and since her departure, Fathi describes Iran’s awakening alongside her own, revealing how moderates are steadily retaking the country.

    To register, please visit https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/nazila-fathi-book-launch-the-lonely-war-tickets-15219552090

    Please note that advance registration does not guarantee you entrance to the event. The event will start promptly at 6:00pm, and we cannot guarantee that latecomers will be admitted. In this case, there will be overflow space to allow you to see the event.


    Speakers

    Nazila Fathi
    Speaker

    Martin Regg Cohn
    Moderator



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 6th – Saturday, February 7th Protest in Progress: Resistance in the 21st Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 6, 20156:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Saturday, February 7, 20159:30AM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    9th Annual Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies Conference

    Description

    This conference will explore the role of protests in shaping our world. Entirely student run, the conference will provide a platform for the world’s top experts and practitioners to discuss international issues that are at the cutting-edge of academia. The event will be composed of a Keynote presentation and reception Friday evening, as well as four panels (Rural Protests, Urban Protests, Social Media, and Hacktivism) and a debate on the efficacy of protests on Saturday.

    Speakers:

    Keynote: Suzanne Staggenborg, University of Pittsburgh

    Hacktivism: Molly Sauter, McGill
    Hacktivism: Alan Carswell, University of Maryland
    Hacktivism: Rafal Rohozinski, Practitioner–SecDev Group

    Social Media: Nahed Eltantawy, High Point University
    Social Media: Jason Ng, University of Toronto
    Social Media: Greg Elmer, Ryerson University
    Social Media: Robert Austin (Moderator), University of Toronto

    Rural Protest: Gerald Otero, Simon Fraser University
    Rural Protest: Raju Das, York University
    Rural Protest: Marie Massicotte, University of Ottawa
    Rural Protest: Phil Monture, Native Land Rights Expert
    Rural Protest: Michael Morden (Moderator), University of Toronto

    Urban Protest: Michael Rios, UC Davis
    Urban Protest: Amara Possian, Leadnow.ca
    Urban Protest: Judy Lubin, American University
    Urban Protest: Lesley J. Wood, York University
    Urban Protest: Wilson Prichard (Moderator), University of Toronto

    Debate : Don Kingsburry, University of Toronto
    Debate : Dylan Clark, University of Toronto
    Debate: Mary Lou Lobsinger, University of Toronto
    Debate : Joanna Robinson, University of Toronto

    Facebook Page:

    https://www.facebook.com/ProtestinProgress

    Sponsors

    Department of Sociology

    Department of Political Science

    University College

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Arts and Science Student Union

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 9th The Young and the Clueless: the Strategic Promotion of Junior Officials to the Top Echelon in Chinese Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 9, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Both Mao and Deng used the excuse of rejuvenating the party to “helicopter” very junior officials into the upper echelon of the party. This paper provides an analytical explanation of why Mao and Deng pursued this strategy. Furthermore, using both historical and statistical evidence will be used to illustrate how the promotion of junior officials afford the incumbent leader greater policy flexibility and less threat to their power. This talk will conclude with a discussion of how this strategy has affected contemporary politics in China.

    Victor C. Shih is a political economist at the University of California at San Diego specializing in China. An immigrant to the United States from Hong Kong, Dr. Shih received his doctorate in Government from Harvard University, where he researched banking sector reform in China with the support of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship and the Fulbright Fellowship. He is the author of a book published by the Cambridge University Press entitled Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation. It is the first book to inquire the linkages between elite politics and banking policies in China. He is further the author of numerous articles appearing in academic and business journals, including The American Political Science Review, The China Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Politics, The Wall Street Journal and The China Business Review, and frequent adviser to the financial community. Dr. Shih holds a B.A. from the George Washington University, where he studied on a University Presidential Fellowship and graduated summa cum laude in East Asian studies with a minor in economics

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Victor Shih
    Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 10th PCJ Speaker Series: Paradigm Shift Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 10, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 11th Birthing Culture: Indigeneity and Biomedicalization of Childbirth in Yucatan, Mexico

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    While governmental and NGO health initiatives often assume that the development and provision of biomedical services are the most obvious and simple means of combating maternal and infant mortality, ethnographic studies of these implementations in indigenous contexts have demonstrated that maternal health and birthing practices are extremely complex cultural phenomena. Thus, transitioning from a traditional health model to a Western health model is rarely as smooth as is planned. Using interviews, participant observations, and document analysis, this paper explores the shifting practices and relationships between mothers, health practitioners, and the Maya community in Tulum, Quintana Roo as the region experiences unprecedented development and urbanization. By tracing the efforts made by Maya midwives and other community members to promote and protect midwifery in reaction government and media stigmatization of indigenous health practices, this presentation will highlight some of the major barriers to improved maternal and infant health in Tulum and the surrounding villages, as well as outline locally-identified solutions to this problem.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn
    Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    Sarah Williams
    Lupina/OGS Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 12th Becoming the Nation's Third Faith: Judaism and the Shaping of Post-WWII American Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    During the 1940s and 1950s, Jews became – improbably, considering their tiny numbers – “America’s third faith.” For most of the nation’s history, American religion had meant, for all intents and purposes, Christianity. But as postwar America defined itself in contrast to its Cold War enemies, as Jews moved to the suburban frontiers and became known and befriended by middle-class neighbours who attended churches and Sunday schools, and as the Cold War demanded that every American have a religion, social and political rules were rewritten, resulting in a reordering of the American moral order. What was associated with Nazism was deemed undemocratic, if not evil. Jews’ racial categorization was replaced by a new American agreement: Judaism now counted as one of the nation’s primary religions. “Judeo-Christianity” proclaimed a bold revision of the nation’s religious history to include Jews and Judaism in America’s moral tradition. How Jews and American culture responded to those changes is at the heart of this story.

    Rachel Gordan received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her BA from Yale College. She teaches a course in American religious history, and is currently working on a book manuscript about post-World War II American Judaism.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rachel Gordan
    Lecturer and Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 19th Urban Field Speakers Series: Rebecca Solnit

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 19, 20157:30PM - 9:30PMPrefix Institute of Contemporary Art
    401 Richmond Street West, Suite 124
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Rebecca Solnit, the award-winning writer, historian, and activist, speaks about her wide-ranging publications on art, politics, and community, including her brilliantly reinvented atlases of the cities of San Francisco, New Orleans, and, soon, New York. Solnit is the author of fifteen books about environment, landscape, community, art, politics, the power of stories, and hope, most recently, Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas. This talk will be moderated by award-winning Canadian poet and novelist, Anne Michaels.

    This event is part of the Urban Field Speakers Series, presented by Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art. For additional information on this lecture series, please contact Prefix at: info@prefix.ca, or call 416-591-0357.

    Admission Information:

    Series passes are available for $42. Special series passes, discounted for students, seniors and Prefix Photosubscribers, are available for $28. Gold series passes, featuring front-of-the-line privileges, guaranteed seating until 7:20 PM, and a charitable receipt for $100 for income-tax purposes, are available for $180. Orders may be placed by phone, fax or e-mail; payments may be made by cash, cheque, Visa or MasterCard. Please note that tickets to single events are not available for advance purchase and are only sold at the door. Single event tickets are $12; Prefix Photo subscribers, students, and seniors tickets are $8.

    For series-pass purchases or other inquiries, please contact:
    Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art
    401 Richmond Street West, Suite 124
    Toronto, ON M5V 3A8
    T 416-591-0357
    F 416-591-0358
    E info@prefix.ca
    www.prefix.ca

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rebecca Solnit
    Speaker
    award-winning writer, historian, and activist

    Anne Michaels
    Moderator
    award-winning poet and novelist



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 20th Writing, Activism, and North American Geographies: a Conversation with Rebecca Solnit

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 20, 20152:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Rebecca Solnit, the award-winning writer, historian, and activist, speaks about her wide-ranging publications on art, politics, and community. She is the author of fifteen books about environment, landscape, community, art, politics, the power of stories, and hope, most recently, Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas.

    This is a private seminar for graduate students and faculty members only. Registration is required.

    To register, please RSVP to Stella Kyriakakis at: csus@utoronto.ca, or call 416-946-8972.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rebecca Solnit
    Speaker
    award-winning writer, historian, and activist

    Deborah Cowen
    Discussant
    Dept. of Geography and Planning

    Ju Hui Judy Han
    Discussant
    Dept. of Geography, UTSC

    Alexis Mitchell
    Discussant
    Dept. of Geography and Planning


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art, Toronto

    Spacing Magazine


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 24th TRADING GENERATION:The Comprehensive Economic & Trade Agreement & Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20151:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Free admission by RSVP to manager@ccil-ccdi.ca before February 20, 2015

    Join the experts from a range of backgrounds provide their views and perspectives on the major legal and public policy issues arising from next generation free trade agreements. Do the TPP and CETA offer successful models of free trade agreements for a new generation of international trade? What do these next generation treaties mean for Canada?

    To encourage openness and the sharing of information, this event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received during the event, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speakers, nor that of any other participant, may be revealed.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Stephen J. Toope
    Keynote
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    His Excellency Werner Wnendt
    Speaker
    Ambassador of the Federal German Republic to Canada

    Matthew S. Kronby
    Speaker
    Partner, Bennett Jones, Toronto (acted as Canada’s lead Counsel in CETA negotiations)

    Robert Brookfield
    Speaker
    Director General, Trade Law Bureau, Government of Canada, Ottawa, specialist in Trade Law and International Law

    Hugh J. Cheetham
    Speaker
    General Counsel, Trade Law Bureau, Government of Canada, Ottawa (Canada’s lead legal counsel for the TPP) TBC

    Dr. Laura Dawson
    Speaker
    President, Dawson Strategic, specialist in U.S.-Canada relations

    Dr. Alan S. Alexandroff
    Speaker
    Director of Online Research and the Global Summitry Project, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Canadian Council on International Law


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 24th Job shortages, Care shortages: The U.S. nursing workforce and the crisis of American health care

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The United States has suffered from nursing shortages since at least the 1970s. As a result, rural and inner-city hospitals struggled to properly and consistently staff, offering signing bonuses, and recruiting nurses from abroad. Nursing schools also increased enrollment, and a new generation of nurses—lured by the good job market and salary—entered the profession. As the early stages of the recession began in the mid-2000s, however, the job market changed drastically. Fewer positions exist, and health care facilities are only hiring nurses with experience. On average, new nurses search for work for over a year before finding a position. Yet, nurse-to-patient ratios have remained similar to the days of the labour shortage. This paper investigates this situation, arguing that a new normal in nursing and health care in the U.S. has arrived. By interrogating the recent switch from a shortage to surplus of nurses over the past decade, this paper investigates the impacts of states and federal policies aimed at alleviating the shortage of the late 1990s/early 2000s through growing the domestic labour supply, as well as changing expectations around nurse-to-patient ratios. As this new era of labour surplus and job shortage will show, shortages and surpluses in social reproductive labour involve the manipulation of expectations around care and the value ascribed to it. The new normal in health care and nursing arises through various types of crisis—oversupply of nurses, shortage of nurses, general economic crisis—but in the end is a crisis of neoliberal health care.

    Caitlin Henry is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography, at the University of Toronto. Her research works towards a political definition of health by placing the work of health care at the centre. Her dissertation investigates the impacts of labour surplus and shortage on the nursing workforce, the work of nursing, and the geography of health care by drawing on the everyday practice of nursing, state-driven hospital closures, and federal health and immigration policy since the early 1980s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caitlin Henry
    PhD candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 26th THE GREEK WAR OF INDEPENDENCE IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 26, 20155:00PM - 7:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, M5S 2E2
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    Series

    Margaret MacMillan Lecture in International Relations

    Description

    This lecture will explore why the 1821 struggle for national independence reverberated around the world and ask what we can learn about our own attitudes to questions of state sovereignty, humanitarian intervention and politics itself from those events and the way they were understood at the time.

    Prof. Mark Mazower, Ira D. Wallach Professor of History, specializes in modern Greece, 20th century Europe, and international history. His current interests include the history of international norms and institutions, the history of Greek independence, and the historical evolution of the Greek islands in the very long run.


    Speakers

    Mark Mazower
    Ira D. Wallach Professor of History


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Trinity College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee, United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia; Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide; and Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Association



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 27th CSAS Reception

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20156:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2015

  • Monday, March 2nd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong; Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers; and Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography, and “Mail-Order’ Marriages.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Director, University Center for International Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 2nd The Politics of Peace in Israel

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20156:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    With earth-shaking changes taking place all over the Middle East and the peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians stalled, Israelis remain divided on how – and if – peaceful coexistence between Jews and Arabs in the region can be achieved. Michael Keren presents various attitudes and reactions in Israel towards the current threats and opportunities facing the country as reflected in public opinion polls as well as in contemporary Israeli thought and literature.

    Professor Michael Keren is an Israeli political scientist and holder of a Canada Research Chair at the University of Calgary. He is the author of many books including Ben-Gurion and the Intellectuals: Power, Knowledge and Charisma, The Pen and the Sword: Israeli Intellectuals and the Making of the Nation State, Professionals against Populism: The Peres Government and Democracy, The Citizen’s Voice: Twentieth Century Politics and Literature, We Are Coming, Unafraid: The Jewish Legions and the Promised Land in the First World War, International Intervention: Sovereignty vs. Responsibility, War Memory and Popular Culture, and others.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Michael Keren
    Canada Research Chair, Communication, Culture and Civil Society, University of Calagary.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women's Health and Human Rights

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Dr. Sesia will present on the topic “Possibilities and limitations of the judicialization of human rights’ violations in maternal health care. A preliminary analysis of current experiences of strategic litigation in Mexico.”

    In today’s Mexico, we experience a new development: some victims and supporting activist organizations are taking cases of human rights’ (HR) violations that occurred in the provision of maternal health care within public hospitals to Court. Almost all victims are poor, underserved, and indigenous women. Judicialization may be a promising avenue for obtaining justice for the victims. Strategic litigation may also play a positive role in putting pressure on the Mexican health system to become more responsive, improve its quality, and become less discriminatory in the provision of maternal health care.
    Still, judicialization faces major hurdles in a country where the judicial system is not well-suited to HR litigation pursuing social justice and where the health system reproduces social inequalities and treats the mistreatment of poor women as something to be expected.
    The presentation will critically assess what judicialization may or may not accomplish in its attempt to improve maternal health care from a rights-based approach in contemporary Mexico.

    The title and the abstract of Dr. Jeannie Samuel’s talk are forthcoming.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Paola Sesia
    Professor and researcher at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology (CIESAS, its Spanish acronyms) in Mexico

    Jeannie Samuel


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Book Launch: "Forgiveness: A Gift from My Grandparents" by Mark Sakamoto

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20155:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “You are going to remember this book” – Michael Ignatieff

    Please join as bestselling author Mark Sakamoto recounts his moving, personal saga of a family scarred by history’s pain and their own self-destructiveness, yet redeemed by stoic endurance and the capacity for forgiveness.

    Q&A and book signing to follow.

    MARK SAKAMOTO, a lawyer by training, has enjoyed a rich and varied career. He began his professional career in live music, working with international acts such as Shania Twain and Tim McGraw. Since law school, Mark has worked at a national law firm and a national broadcaster-the CBC-and has also cut his teeth in politics as a senior advisor. He is currently an executive at an international software company and sits on the Premier of Ontario’s media development advisory board. Sakamoto lives in Toronto with his wife and two children.


    Speakers

    Mark Sakamoto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Early Mass Culture’s Image Ecology

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In the history of picture production, as opposed to the narrower history of fine arts, the United States in the 19th century was a site of internationally significant developments. It became a principal locus for advances in the instrumentalization of images for marketing, political persuasion, and the circulation of information. At first slow by European standards to develop a pictorial press, a lithography trade, and a corps of skilled draughtsmen, printmakers, and designers, the U. S. was, by the end of the century, a world leader in the mass production of pictures and in the expansion of commercial, political, and aesthetic uses for them. Although the growth of mass visual culture was an international phenomenon, the unconstrained capitalism and rapid territorial and demographic expansion of the U. S. made it ground zero. This crucial chapter in the commodification of images is largely unwritten, yet it is foundational for the international image-culture of the 21st c. This paper will argue for an account of 19th-century U. S. visual culture as a complex image ecology warranting comprehensive, critical, and non-triumphalist historical examination. It will focus on a small cross section of this visual culture drawn from the transformative period between 1835 and 1860.

    Michael Leja (Ph.D., Harvard) studies the visual arts in various media (painting, sculpture, film, photography, prints, illustrations) in the 19th and 20th centuries, primarily in the United States. His book, Looking Askance: Skepticism and American Art from Eakins to Duchamp (2004), traces the interactions between the visual arts and the skeptical forms of seeing engendered in modern life in northeastern American cities between 1869 and 1917. It won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize in 2005. An earlier book, Reframing Abstract Expressionism: Subjectivity and Painting in the 1940s (1993), situates the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and others in a culture-wide initiative to re-imagine the self in the midst of a traumatic history. It won the Charles Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He is currently at work on a book exploring changes in pictorial forms and in social relations associated with the industrialization of picture production and the development of a mass market for images in the mid-nineteenth century.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Michael Leja
    Department of Art, University of Pennsylvania


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Art, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Living on Your own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Jesook Song’s new book Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea. Interweaving personal interviews, archival sources and media analyses, this illuminating ethnography profiles the stories of young, single women in South Korea who confront difficulties in their pursuits to live independently and achieve residential autonomy. Living on Your Own skillfully exposes the clash between women’s burgeoning desire for independence and traditional conservative norms in Korean housing practices and financial institutions.

    Professor Jesook Song is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Jesook Song received her B.A. in Education Science at the Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology with a minor degree in Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please visit the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Ethnology and Resistance in Vichy France: A Genealogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Alice L. Conklin
    Departement d'Histoire Ohio State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Intimacy and Reconciliation Otherwise: Tsushima Yuko’s Exceedingly Barbaric

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In recent years, there has been a booming cultural market for products that articulate Japanese colonial period and its legacy in Taiwan in an amicable if not nostalgic way. From films to literature, from memoirs to pop culture, they produce what I call the sentiment of “intimacy” between Taiwan and Japan across time and space, an affective turn that is markedly different from the anti-Japanese representations in mainland China and the two Koreas. While this reconstituted intimate relationship has the benefit of assuaging political tensions, it runs the risk of misrepresenting historical colonialism and its messy legacies that collapse personal accounts to colonial relations. While nation-states remain important sites for official rapprochements, and demands for apologies and compensations, interstate relations alone do not attend to the complexity, ambivalence and contradiction of people’s lives under extraordinary historical circumstances. Through the reading of the Japanese novelist, Tsushima Yuko’s “Exceedingly Barbaric” (2008), I argue for an inter-generational and gendered understanding of colonial and postcolonial sites of violence, survival and reconciliation. Revisiting the brutal insurgency and suppression of the 1930 Musha (Wushe) Incident, Tsushima’s novel crosses time (1930s and 2005) and traces the lives of two Japanese women (aunt and niece) across the colonial divide to expose the “barbarity” of both colonial suppression and patriarchal oppression.

    Leo Ching is the author of Becoming Japanese: The Politics of Identity Formation in Colonial Taiwan. He teaches Japanese and East Asian cultural studies at Duke University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Leo Chin
    Associate Professor, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 11th A Multilevel Analysis of Neighborhood Contextual Effects of Unmet Mental Needs in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Philip Baiden
    Speaker
    Junior Doctoral Fellow

    Frederick A. Armah
    Discussant
    PhD Candidate at the University of Western Ontario and an Ontario Trillium Scholar



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 16th The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty: Oil, Ice, and Inuit Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 16, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Jessica Shadian discusses her recent book The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty: Oil, Ice, and Inuit Governance, the first in-depth account of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Beginning with European exploration of the region and concluding with recent debates over ownership of the Arctic, the book unfolds the history of a polity that has overcome colonization and attempted assimilation to emerge as a political actor which has influenced both Arctic and global governance.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Jessica Shadian
    Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies, Aarhus University


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 18th Autonomy, equality, and supported decision-making for persons with disabilities: Assessing the role for personal support networks

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Sophie Nunnelley
    Lupina/OGS Doctoral Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th Nuclear Weapons: The Sate of Play 2015

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 201512:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Five years ago hopes were high that the world was at last seriously headed towards nuclear disarmament. By the end of 2012, however, as reported in the inaugural State of Play report, much of this sense of optimism had evaporated. By the end of 2014, the fading optimism had given way to pessimism. New START was signed and ratified, but the treaty left stockpiles intact and disagreements about missile defence and conventional-arms imbalances unresolved. Nuclear weapons numbers have decreased overall but increased in Asia; nuclear-weapons programs in India, Pakistan and China have accelerated; North Korea has conducted three nuclear tests and the CTBT is yet to enter into force; and fissile material production is not yet banned. A comprehensive agreement on Iran eluded negotiators by the extended deadline of 24 November 2014 and the push for talks on a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East has stalled. Cyber-threats to nuclear weapons systems have intensified, outer space remains at risk of nuclearization, and the upsurge of geopolitical tensions over the crisis in Ukraine produced flawed conclusions about the folly of giving up nuclear weapons on the one hand, and open reminders about Russia’s substantial nuclear arsenal, on the other. Against this sombre backdrop, Nuclear Weapons: The State of Play 2015 by Gareth Evans, Tanya Ogilvie-White and Ramesh Thakur, provides an authoritative advocacy tool for governments, organizations and individuals committed to achieving a safer and saner nuclear-weapon-free world in the lead-up to the Ninth NPT Review Conference in New York in April–May 2015

    RAMESH THAKUR, a former United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and ICISS Commissioner and co-author of The Responsibility to Protect doctrine (2001), is Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, Australian National University. In this talk he presents the main findings of the above study and also draws on his new book Nuclear Weapons and International Security: Collected Essays (Routledge, 2015).

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Ramesh Thakur
    Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, Australian National University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th On the historicity of space and urban imagination in South Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture 2014/2015

    Description

    Following David Harvey’s notion of dispossession many urban scholars assume that global capital flows, commodification and capitalization of land universally affect urban areas all over the globe. However, not all spaces are equally amenable to commodification or gentrification and in many cases the specific historical character of a city, a neighborhood or an urban space tends to stick to it for many generations. What happened in a space, who lived there before, which community or class is associated with it, leave marks that do not easily evaporate or change. This is particularly true in post-colonial cities marked by deep historical segmentation. Drawing on material from India (and South Africa) I will show how religious markers and boundaries of caste and community mark space in an enduring way that gets etched onto the urban imagination, profoundly and durably structuring the use and habitation of urban space.

    Thomas Blom Hansen is Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and director of the Center for South Asia at Stanford. He is the author of multiple books and articles on Hindu nationalism, Hindu-Muslim violence, urban life, religious identity politics, sovereignty and the modern state in South Asia and South Africa.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thomas Blom Hansen
    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor, Director, Center for South Asia, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Xi Jinping in Zhejiang (2002-2007)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Chinese political succession literature on Xi Jinping’s accession to becoming general secretary tends to emphasize patronage and factional politics (power struggle, factional balance, etc.) whereas other equally significant factors, such as the deliberate grooming by the Chinese Communist Party CCP) and Xi’s own performance and policy-making records, are often neglected. By focusing on Xi’s career in Zhejiang from 2002-2007, this paper attempts to describe and explain Xi’s performance and policy-making record and the extent to which this had contributed to a “perfect resume” for the CCP’s top position. Specifically, the paper discusses how Xi dealt with the challenging issues of development, economic growth, political participation, rural/urban gap, and environmental degradation. It will also evaluate Xi’s contribution to the modification of the “Zhejiang Model.”

    Alfred L. Chan, PhD (Toronto), is professor and chair of political science at Huron University College, Western University. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one book on Hu Jintao and China in the 21th Century, and another one on Chinese political recruitment and succession.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred L. Chan
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, Huron University College, Western University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th King Dhammacetī and the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions: Ideas, Borders, Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building
    Room 318
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the 15th century, the Buddhist king Dhammacetī sponsored a sīmā (ordination hall) reform that was to become the most famous of its kind in mainland Southeast Asia. Having wrangled with the hairs of monastic law concerning sīmās, Dhammacetī sent monks from his kingdom centered in what is now lower Myanmar to Sri Lanka in order to return with a pure ordination line. In a most significant historical decision, Dhammacetī had an account of these reforms inscribed on ten large stone slabs, which became known as the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions. While addressing matters of law, history, and political order, the inscriptions are also at their heart a sīmā text, that is, a text about the regulation of ritual boundaries and religious land. Drawing especially on these inscriptions, this paper explores elements of the ideational and border-making and border-crossing world Dhammacetī and others participated in and helped cultivate, even as they established innovations that would dramatically shape future memory, religio-political culture, and transregional identity.

    Jason A. Carbine is the C. Milo Connick Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Whittier College. His research and teaching about religion and society combines historical and ethnographic approaches, and draws from an interdisciplinary body of research pertaining to the history and sociology of religions, textual studies, anthropology, and comparative religious ethics. His publications include Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition (2011) and the co-edited volume How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (2012). Carbine is currently preparing a new text and translation of the famous Kalyāṇī Inscriptions.

    For information please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason A. Carbine
    Whittier College


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 23rd Marcel Cadieux, Pierre Trudeau, and the Department of External Affairs, 1968-1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 23, 20152:00PM - 3:30PMLA200, Larkin Building
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    Series

    Contemporary International History Graduate Research Forum

    Description

    Between Marcel Cadieux and Pierre Trudeau there was a history. In 1949, fresh from backpacking around the world and sporting a raffish beard, the future prime minister came to Ottawa hoping for a job. When he expressed an interest in the Department of External Affairs (DEA), however, its Personnel Officer (Cadieux) vowed to bar his way. Yet almost two decades later, when Trudeau succeeded Lester Pearson as prime minister of Canada, Cadieux, who was now under-secretary of state for external affairs, was thrilled. The challenge from nationalist Quebec and Gaullist France was serious and demanded a commensurate response, one that Trudeau was determined to provide. Unfortunately, he and Cadieux agreed on liSle else. This paper explores the DEA’s difficult adaptation to the new Trudeau government through the eyes of Cadieux and argues that the essen3al difference between him and the prime minister was between the consummately professional civil servant who believed in tradition and the brilliant politician who sought to redefine the government in new and startling ways.

    Interested in presenting your work as part of the Graduate Research Forum? Contact susie.colbourn@mail.utoronto.ca for more information.


    Speakers

    Brendan Kelly
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 24th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Russia's Great War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    For most of the twentieth century Russia’s Great War was a historical afterthought. Overshadowed by the Bolsheviks’ revolution, Civil War, and consolidation of power, the War took a back seat within professional scholarship as both Soviet and Western experts focused their energy on explaining the origins and rise of Russian Communism. In recent years a new generation of researchers has begun to re-examine and re-evaluate the significance and meaning of the War. Buttressed by new archival findings and freed from the ideological baggage of earlier historical debates they have begun to analyze Russia’s Great War not as a prelude to “Red October,” but as the fulcrum which set into motion a chain of events that transformed Eurasia and much of the world.

    Russia’s Great War and Revolution is a decade-long multinational scholarly effort that aims to fundamentally transform understanding of Russia’s “continuum of crisis” during the years 1914-1922. The project incorporates new research methods, archival sources, and multiple media formats to re-conceptualize critical concepts and events and to increase public awareness of Russia’s contributions to the history of the twentieth century.

    Prof. John W. Steinberg is authoer of All the Tsar’s Men: The Russian General Staff and the Fate of Empire, 1898-1914 (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2010) and co-editor of The Making of Russian History: Society, Culture, and the Politics of Modern Russia (Bloomington, IN: Slavica Academic Publishers, 2009) and The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective: World War Zero.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. John W. Steinberg
    Austin Peay State University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th What Is Greece?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    2 Sussex Avenue
    (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street)
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    Description

    **This event will take place at Innis Town Hall at Innis College, 2 Sussex Avenue (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street).**

    Stathis N. Kalyvas is Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he also directs the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence. He obtained his BA from the University of Athens (1986) and his PhD from the University of Chicago (1993), both in political science. He taught at Ohio State University (1993-94), New York University (1994-2000), and the University of Chicago (2000-03), before joining Yale in 2003. He has held visiting professorships and senior fellowships at the University of São Paulo, Lingnan University in Hong Kong, Northwestern University, Columbia University, the University of Witten/Herdecke, the Juan March Institute, the Max Planck Institute, and the European University Institute.

    Prof. Kalyvas is the author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), the co-editor of Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008), and the author of over fifty scholarly articles in five languages. His current research focuses on global trends in political violence. Prof. Kalyvas has received several awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Award for best book on government, politics, or international affairs, the Luebbert Award for best book in comparative politics, the European Academy of Sociology Book Award, the Luebbert Award for the best article in comparative politics (three times), and the Greenstone Award for best book in politics and history. His research has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the United States Peace Institute, the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the Department for International Development, and the Alexander S. Onassis Foundation. He was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in 2007. In 2008 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Departement d'Histoire University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st Austerity as Epidemic: The New Political Economy of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Faraz Shahidi
    Lupina Research Associate



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 1st Les occupations et les liens entre les deux guerres mondiales **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    **This event will be held in French.**

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Annette Becker
    Departement d'Histoire Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 9th Towards a Grounded, Immanent Critique: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in Delhi

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This talk explores possibilities for developing a grounded critique of capitalism in contemporary India, drawing on the politics and cosmologies of migrant workers in Delhi. I begin by discussing the workings of categories (e.g. freedom, dignity, and consciousness), the ambivalence towards religion, and the relative absence of workers’ categories and self-understandings in works of Indian labor studies. Next, I describe the intertwining of politics and cosmology in the discourses and activities of migrant workers working in a metal polishing factory of Delhi. According to the implicit visions of workers, oppressive, work-intensifying processes in factories arise due to a dynamic interplay between souls and the present, ‘decivilizing’ epoch (the Kalyug in Hindu cosmology, the impending Qayamat in Islam), in which thoughts, actions, and dealings become distorted by egoistic and demonic proclivities. Workers attempt to non-cooperate with this distorting interplay through body-conserving resistances, humor and joking, multiple forms of collectivity, public protests, and religious festivity. Through these ‘anti-decivilizing’ activities, workers create possibilities for survival, respect, integrative relations, and glimpses of justice. I conclude by suggesting how categories from multiple sources (workers, proximate discourses, and remote thinkers) might be integrated to construct a grounded, immanent critique of capitalism, which analyses oppressive practices of capital and the state, recognizes distortions in workers’ activities, and intimates possibilities for autonomous transformations in workers’ worlds.

    Shankar Ramaswami is a Lecturer on South Asian Studies at the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University, where he teaches courses on anthropology, religion, literature, and cinema. He completed a B.A. in Economics at Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is currently working on a book entitled, Souls in the Kalyug: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shankar Ramaswami
    Lecturer, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Social Determinants of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 201512:00PM - 3:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The CPHS policy workshop will take place at the George Ignatieff Theatre at the Trinity College (15 Devonshire Place)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn
    Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    Arjumand Siddiqi
    Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    Gary Bloch
    Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto

    Faraz Vahid Shahidi
    CPHS Research Associate Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society

    Co-Sponsors

    Dalla Lana School of Public Health


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Invisible Fences and the Aesthetics of Austerity in Thoreau’s "Walden" (1854)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In this paper, D’Amico examines Henry David Thoreau’s distaste for accumulation in “Walden” (1854), focusing on Thoreau’s peculiar desire for property and ownership unimpeded by materiality. She suggests that Walden’s inchoate philosophy of property offers insight into the contradictory position of property in the circuit of capitalist exchange; more specifically, that Thoreau’s dread of over-accumulation and desire for Spartan simplicity reflects capital’s abstract desire for unfettered exchange and circulation. Indeed, throughout “Walden” Thoreau describes physical property as waste, excess, and spiritual pollutants, cultivating an aesthetic of austerity that privileges “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.” Lauding the poet’s ability to enclose the landscape within verse, “the most admirable kind of invisible fence,” Thoreau articulates a theory of ownership that eschews material forms of possession in favour of a higher law (Gilmore 1985; Newman 2010). By placing “Walden” in conversation with Lockean social contract theory and its discontents (Rousseau and Marx), she read Thoreau’s text as part of the history of political philosophy. “Walden” figures property as both excess and insufficiency, and it is the goal of this paper to draw out the implications of this contradiction for contract theory. Importantly, she does not characterize “Walden” as an easy example of bourgeois ideology. Instead, following Rob Nixon’s (2011) claim that representational strategies have serious political weight, she argues that Thoreau’s text is useful because it performs, in aesthetic terms, the contradictory elements of the social contract under capitalism.

    Cristina D’Amico is a fourth year PhD candidate in the department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation reads nineteenth-century American literature’s attempts to address – in formal, aesthetic, and philosophical terms – the limitations of “possessive individualism,” C.B. Macpherson’s useful term for describing what he calls “the proprietary logic of western political ontology.” She is especially interested in representations of unorthodox houses in American fiction as alternative expressions of political subjectivity. She has contributed academic writing to Esquire: Journal of the American Renaissance and The Howellsian: Journal of William Dean Howells Studies. She currently holds a SSHRC CGS- Doctoral Fellowship (2011-2014).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Cristina D'Amico
    PhD candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th Social Justice and Public Health: Policy-Maker Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    ‘Social justice’ is often identified as a central value for public health practice and, indeed, for the public’s health. Yet, at the same time it is rarely acknowledged that social justice is a complex, multifaceted concept that does different work in different contexts. As such, ‘social justice’ often precludes a single (or simple) interpretation or application. Despite the ubiquity and apparent foundational role of social justice in public health, in practice a commitment to social justice might therefore tend to refer to diverse, if not divergent, views about the goals and obligations of public health. While some philosophical accounts have recently been proffered to specify the contents of social justice in this context, these works lack a morally significant empirical component that should be considered integral to any account of social justice in public health; that is, how social justice is understood, negotiated, and pursued in practice. This presentation will report findings from a study that involved key informant interviews with public health policy-makers in two distinct domains of public health, chronic disease prevention and public health emergency preparedness and response, which were conducted with the aim of achieving contextual understanding of how social justice is conceptualized and negotiated in practice and to capture whether different norms of social justice obtain in different public health contexts.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Maxwell Smith
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Friday, May 1st Russia and the Ukraine Crisis: Thinking beyond Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 1, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Annual Munk Lecture on European Affairs

    Description

    Prof. Allison joined the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies (SIAS) in 2011 from a Readership in International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was previously a doctoral student and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford; a Lecturer and Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham (1987-99) and Head of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) (1993-2005). Between 2001 and 2005, Prof. Allison was also a Senior Research Fellow attached to the Centre for International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University. His broad research interests include the international relations, foreign and security policies of Russia and Eurasia and has travelled extensively there for research projects under his direction.


    Speakers

    Prof. Roy Allison
    University of Oxford



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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