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April 2014

  • Monday, April 21st Delhi and Capitalism: What an Emerging-World Megalopolis Can Teach Us about the Future of the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 21, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    RANA DASGUPTA studied at the universities of Oxford and Wisconsin. He is the author of the highly praised linked short story collection, Tokyo Cancelled, which was shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize (U.K.) and the Hutch Crossword Book Award (India); and Solo, which won the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for Best Book. Most recently, he is the author of Capital: A Portrait of Twenty-First Century Delhi, which will be released in North America by Harper Collins in May 2014. Dasgupta is currently Distinguished Visiting Lecturer & Writer-in-Residence in Modern Culture and Media, Brown University. He lives in Delhi.

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rana Dasgupta
    Author; and Distinguished Visiting Lecturer & Writer-in-Residence in Modern Culture and Media, Brown University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Comparative Literature

    Asian Institute

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Monday, April 21st Governance and Finance of Metropolitan Areas in Federal Systems

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 21, 20144:30PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    IMFG Director Enid Slack and Rupak Chattopadhyay, President and CEO of the Forum of Federations, have edited a new book entitled Governance and Finance of Metropolitan Areas in Federal Systems (Oxford University Press, 2013). The presentation will compare the findings on the governance and finance of 18 metropolitan areas in federal systems around the world and identify some of the issues that will need to be resolved if these areas are to thrive in the future. Copies of the book will be available for sale after the presentation.

    Copies of the book will be available for sale after the presentation in the Main Lounge, South House, Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Space is limited and registration is required for this event. To register, please go to:

    https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/governance-and-finance-of-metropolitan-areas-in-federal-systems-tickets-10767035493

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Enid Slack
    Director, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance; and Adjunct Professor, Master of Global Affairs program, Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Rupak Chattopadhyay
    President and CEO of the Forum of Federations, Ottawa


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Forum of Federations, Ottawa


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Tuesday, April 22nd Andrea Dworkin’s Queer Friendships: Anti-pornography Feminism and the Problem of Sexual Reputation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 22, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Andrea Dworkin’s many critics have characterized her as, at best, an opponent of erotic freedom and, at worst, of giving feminist cover to the conservative culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. This criticism has caused her to be misrepresented, both as an intellectual and as a lesbian. As part of Claire Potter’s work on late twentieth century radical feminism in the United States, she reanimates Dworkin’s history by understanding her through networks of friendship that offer alternative readings of this extraordinary intellectual as a proponent of the ethical, loving intimacy that would be possible outside the violence that adhered to gender.

    Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. Prior to that, she worked at Wesleyan University. She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender. She received her Ph.D. in History from New York University. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998), and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012). Since 2007, she has blogged at Tenured Radical, which moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011. With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, she edits a series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America (University of Georgia Press). Potter serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality, and is a co-director of OutHistory.org.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Claire Bond Potter
    Professor of History, The New School for Public Engagement, New York


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    the JHI Working Group: Gender and Global Scholarship, University of Toronto

    Berkshire Conference on the History of Women


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, April 23rd Does the European Welfare State have a future?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 23, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The European welfare state is under siege from demographic, labor market and family change, and from European legal and economic integration, particularly in the context of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). European welfare states would need to shift from risk compensation to risk prevention in order to remain viable in the medium term. However, implementing what has been called a “social investment strategy” is extremely costly, and thus increasingly unlikely in those European countries most hit by the sovereign debt crisis and ridden with austerity policies that depress growth and thus hinder fiscal consolidation. An unanticipated consequence of the failure to recognize systemic interdependencies in the EMU, welfare state divergence in the Eurozone can be already observed and is likely to increase. Without real social convergence, however, the EMU is unsustainable, therefore arrangements must be devised to address the consequences of such interdependencies.

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Stefano Sacchi
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, Department of Social and Political Sciences, University of Milan


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, April 23rd Ecology and the Politics of the Future in the 1970s

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 23, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    The 1973 OPEC Oil Embargo against the United States triggered long lines at American gas stations, and signaled the end of cheap oil in the American and global economies. High crude oil prices riled American consumers and fuelled conspiracy theories, while exacerbating stagflation and the painful economic recessions of the 1970s. The potential for a more scarce energy future also ignited a heated debate about the nature and future of America’s energy system, and the potential for its disintegration. Economists and pundits feared the erosion of America’s domestic economy and political power abroad. This paper examines discourses of the energy future that used the language of ecology to predict socioeconomic catastrophe unless America abandoned the ideal of economic growth in favour of the massive social reorganization needed to support a steady state economy. Such ecological discourse relied on a politically and affectively potent politics of anticipation that demanded action now to save the future. By the end of the decade, however, neoliberal imaginaries of the energy future began to emerge that also adopted this anticipatory stance, but posited the unregulated free market as a panacea for America’s energy and economic woes. Exploring these conflicting discourses allows for a deeper understanding of the anticipatory and affective dimensions of neoliberalism, which is often reduced to a set of economic principles that cannot explain its political power on their own.

    Caleb Wellum is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is entitled “Energizing the Right: Economy, Ecology, and Culture in the 1970s American Energy Crisis.” His research focuses on cultural history and the politics of anticipatory discourses. In particular, his work links the history of neoliberalism to debates about energy, ecology, and economy that surrounded the energy crises of the 1970s. This work is supported in part by a CSUS Graduate Research Grant and the Gerald Ford Presidential Library. Wellum has presented at NiCHE workshops, and the American Studies Association conference. Before coming to Toronto, he earned his BA (Hon.) and MA from McMaster University in Hamilton.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caleb Wellum
    Doctoral Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Thursday, April 24th Perception, Experience, and Imagining of Sacred Landscapes: A Spatial Analysis of the Pilgrimage Routes of Medieval Vijayanagara

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 24, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Institute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The inherent difficulties faced by archaeologists and contemporary geographers in mapping symbolically defined sacred space have led to the design of my package of thirdspace-inspired (Soja 1996) theoretical and methodological approaches for the analysis of the Vijayanagara pilgrimage landscape (AD 1336 to 1565) that I am using in my PhD dissertation. In my paper I will be discussing my approach to the sacred landscape and the obstacles encountered with data. In the methodology employed, the sacred landscape is treated as a tool for personal, social, and political transformation. An environment charged with political machinations, ritual actions, mnemonic devices, and mythological moments, infused into architectural and natural features along and visible from pilgrimage trails, made the environs of the capital city of the largest Hindu empire an excellent candidate for exploring how movement, imagination, and experience inform each other within the institution of Hindu pilgrimage. Configurational spatial analysis adopted from Hillier and Hanson’s work (1996) such as integration and connectivity, as well as isovist, network and cost path analyses, will be implemented using ArcScene (ESRI) 3D analyst and space syntax software. The spatial data generated in these programs will be queried based on parameters that can be selected from a wide range of data stored in the project’s geodatabase. The geodatabase will have two distinct models, or feature datasets, to address the biases inherent in interpreting either the archaeological data or the written data: a ‘general’ textual-image dataset informed by literature (religious and secular), iconography, and epigraphical evidence; and a ‘specific’ physical or material dataset informed by archaeological, architectural, and natural landscape features. Both datasets are grounded in the historical context so that a historical phenomenology can be developed from analyses set upon the data. To overcome the theoretical shortcomings of phenomenology (Brück 1998, 2001; Swenson 2011:3) and to transcend the binary opposition that will exist in the geodatabase organized by ‘general’/textual-image and ‘specific’/material datasets, at the time of interpretation Soja’s thirdspace model will inform the approach taken.

    In part, my research program will address the journey/pilgrimage half of the tirtha-yatra by devising a meaningful historical phenomenological methodology that blends the cognitive geographic archaeological work of Darling (2009) in an examination of landscape, movement and space; exploring the application of various types of spatial syntax studies and line-of-sight studies that can be found in Fogelin’s work (2006); and the isovist landscape research done by Shaw (2009).

    CANDIS HAAK is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and her research interests focus on issues of space and ritual practice which has led her to explore interpretive uses of GIS for landscape analysis, cognitive geography, and space syntax built on material culture, historical, religious, mytho-religious and philosophical data. Principally, her research addresses how perceptions and experiences shape and become reflected in sacred geography engendered through the institution of pilgrimage of the medieval Hindu empire of Vijayanagara.

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Candis Haak
    PhD candidate in Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Thursday, April 24th The Infrastructure Funding Gap: How Are Municipalities Managing?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 24, 20144:30PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Infrastructure is essential in enabling cities to deliver services, stimulating the growth of our economy and improving the quality of life in our communities. Yet, in 2007, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities released a report estimating that the municipal infrastructure funding gap was $123 billion. How are cities managing? This seminar will explore the infrastructure asset management tools used by municipalities in Canada. Daniella will profile the City of Mississauga and the strategies it has implemented to address the deficit.

    Daniella Dávila Aquije is a graduate student at the School of Public Policy and Governance. She graduated from Queen’s University with a Bachelor of Arts (Honours), and will be pursuing a Master’s in Evidence-Based Social Intervention and Policy Evaluation at the University of Oxford next year. Daniella has worked as a policy intern in the City Manager’s Office at the City of Mississauga. She is the 2013-14 Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow at the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Daniella Davila Aquije
    Blanche and Sandy van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance for 2013-14; Masters of Public Policy student at the University of Toronto.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Thursday, April 24th 2014 Gelber Prize Award Ceremony

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 24, 20145:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was established in 1989. It seeks to deepen public debate on significant global issues by broadening the readership of important non-fiction books on international affairs.

    The Gelber Prize is presented annually by The Lionel Gelber Foundation in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of and Foreign Policy Magazine.

    2014 Gelber Prize Winner:
    The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, And A Forgotten Genocide by Gary J. Bass

    A riveting history—the first full account—of the involvement of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger in the 1971 atrocities in Bangladesh that led to war between India and Pakistan, shaped the fate of Asia, and left in their wake a host of major strategic consequences for the world today.

    Giving an astonishing inside view of how the White House really works in a crisis, The Blood Telegram is an unprecedented chronicle of a pivotal but little-known chapter of the Cold War. Gary J. Bass shows how Nixon and Kissinger supported Pakistan’s military dictatorship as it brutally quashed the results of a historic free election. The Pakistani army launched a crackdown on what was then East Pakistan (today an independent Bangladesh), killing hundreds of thousands of people and sending ten million refugees fleeing to India—one of the worst humanitarian crises of the twentieth century.

    Gary J. Bass is a professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. Professor Bass has previously authored Freedom’s Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention and Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crime Tribunals.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Gary J. Bass
    Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University


    Sponsors

    The Lionel Gelber Foundation

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Foreign Policy Magazine


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, April 25th The Liberal Order in a Post-Western World: A Report by the German Marshall Fund

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 25, 20149:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Each year, the German Marshall Fund through its Washington office elects a small number of Transatlantic Fellows. These fellows are at the peak of their professions in the academy, journalism, and business. Over eight months, they work intensively on a joint report. This year’s report examines threat to the liberal world order (understood as the institutions of Western Europe and North America) posed by the rise of China, the spread of cyber-terrorism, protectionism, and the west’s own economic decline. The report will be presented and discussed, and the floor will be open to questions.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Commentator
    CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Ronald Deibert
    Commentator
    The Canada Centre for Global Security Studies and the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    German Marshall Fund of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Monday, April 28th "Gandhi before India": Ramachandra Guha Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 28, 20145:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Gandhi Before India:
    The first volume of a magisterial biography: the definitive portrait of the life and work of one of the most abidingly influential–and controversial–men in modern history.

    Here is a revelatory work of biography that takes us from Gandhi’s birth in 1869 through his upbringing in Gujarat, his 2 years as a student in London, and his 2 decades as a lawyer and community organizer in South Africa. Ramachandra Guha has uncovered a myriad of previously untapped documents, including: private papers of Gandhi’s contemporaries and co-workers; contemporary newspapers and court documents; the writings of Gandhi’s children; secret files kept by British Empire functionaries. Using this wealth of material in a brilliantly nuanced narrative, Guha describes the social, political and personal worlds in which Gandhi began his journey to become the modern era’s most important and influential political actor. And Guha makes clear that Gandhi’s work in South Africa–far from being a mere prelude to his accomplishments in India–was profoundly influential on his evolution as a political thinker, social reformer and beloved leader.

    Ramachandra Guha has previously taught at the universities of Yale and Stanford, the University of Oslo, the Indian Institute of Science and the London School of Economics. His books include a pioneering environmental history, an award-winning social history of cricket, and the award-winning India After Gandhi. He writes regularly on social and political issues for the British and Indian press, including columns in the Telegraph and the Hindustan Times and has also appeared in the New York Times. The author lives in Bangalore, India.

    http://www.bookclubs.ca/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780307357922

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Ramachandra Guha
    Author


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, April 30th Rethinking “the Confucian Transformation” Thesis: Household Registration and Women Householders in the Late Chosŏn Period

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 30, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    It is widely accepted that a “Confucian transformation” occurred in the late Chosŏn period, rather than the first part of the dynasty. Even though we accept the argument that, by the late Chosŏn, Korea had undergone “Confucianization”, it is not immediately clear how, through what processes, and to what extent this transformation occurred. It is not enough to explain that the culture and ideas of the Yangban elite were diffused over time. In this presentation I would like to suggest that it is necessary to rethink the Confucian transformation in the late Chosŏn period in relation to the role of the government policies and people’s multilayered and unpredictable reactions to them. Focusing on the differences manifested in each social standing – of yangban, commoner, and low class– this presentation analyzes the household registration policy of the state, the composition of a household, the changes in the ways of the succession of householder, and the position of widows. Based on an analysis of household registries between 1678 and 1789, I argue that the process in which the Confucian order of society became the major aspect of postwar Chosŏn was neither linear nor obvious. Rather, it witnessed rifts and produced unevenness. Critical to my argument is a deeper understanding of the ways in which modern knowledge uses the imagined ‘family’, ‘women’, ‘Confucian practice’ of the Chosŏn period related to the modernist traditionalism and how the ‘state of Chosŏn’ did not become a major subject of historical research while ‘Confucianism’ in terms of tradition was emphasized.

    JI YOUNG JUNG is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s Studies at Ewha Womans University, Korea. She received degrees in history from Sogang University, Korea (B.A., M.A., Ph.D.). Her areas of research expertise is gender history, with a focus on the construction of gender and marginal women -widows, concubines, remarried women, single women in late Chosŏn, Korea. Recently her research focuses on the process of knowledge construction and consumption in the modern Korea regarding “women in Chosŏn”. She is the co-author of Women and Confucianism in Chosŏn Korea (SUNY Press, 2011). Buddhist Nuns and Laywomen: Hidden Histories, Enduring Vitality (SUNY Press, 2011). She has also published widely on the gender studies, cultural history, and memory in East Asia.

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ji Young Jung
    Associate Professor of Department of Women’s Studies, Ewha Womans University, Korea


    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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May 2014

  • Thursday, May 1st The Past Before Us: The Past Before Us : Historical Traditions and Practices in Early Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 1, 201411:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How might early societies express history differently from present times? According to distinguished historian, Romila Thapar, India is a particularly significant site through which to pose this question. For this celebrated scholar of ancient India, the claim that ancient Indian civilization lacked a sense of history opens a broader, and more pertinent question: how to recognize the historical sense of societies whose past is recorded in ways very different from European conventions. Elaborating on her recent book, The Past Before Us, Professor Thapar will address the many genres of writing in early India that bear evidence of a historical tradition and later of historical writing. Interested in the practices as well as narratives of recording time and social change, Professor Thapar delves into Vedic corpus, the epics, the Buddhist canon and monastic chronicles, inscriptions, regional accounts, and royal biographies and dramas afresh—not as sources to be mined for factual data but as genres that disclose how Indians of ancient times represented their own past to themselves.

    ROMILA THAPAR is the pre-eminent historian of ancient India. A prominent public intellectual and voice on the politics and mechanics of historical interpretation and writing, she held the Chair in Ancient Indian History at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she is now Emeritus Professor in History. She has been Visiting Professor at Cornell University and the University of Pennsylvania as well as the Collège de France. In 1983 she was elected General President of the Indian History Congress and in 1999 a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. Professor Thapar is an Honorary Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. She holds honorary doctorates from the University of Chicago, the Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales in Paris, the University of Oxford, the University of Edinburgh (2004) the University of Calcutta (2002) and recently (in 2009) from the University of Hyderabad. In 2004 the U.S. Library of Congress appointed her as the first holder of the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South in 2008 she received the prestigious Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanity. She was Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009. Among her extensive publications are Ashoka and the Decline of the Mauryas (Oxford 1961, 1988); The History of India volume 1 (Penguin 1966); Ancient Indian Social History: Some Interpretations (Orient Longman 1978), From Lineage to State: Social Formations in the First Millenium BC (Oxford 1985); Early India (Penguin 2002); Somnath: The Many Voices of History (Verso 2005), andIndia: Historical Beginnings and the Concept of the Aryan (National Book Trust 2006).

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Romila Thapar
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus in History, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    Stella Sandahl
    Moderator
    Professor Emeritus in Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Associate Professor in Department of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, May 2nd Globalizing Archipelago The Galapagos Islands

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 2, 201410:00AM - 11:00AMLeslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, PB850
    144 College Street, Toronto ON
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    Description

    Seminar Overview: Johann Besserer will explore the intersection between socio-­‐economic
    development, science and conservation in one of the world’s most pristine and fragile ecosystems,
    the Galapagos Islands. He will specifically discuss how tourism offers an alternative to
    unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy yet has created a new set of pressures on
    the people and the environment

    Biography: Mr. Besserer is the President and Executive Director of the Intercultural Outreach
    Initiative (IOI), a Florida based non-­‐profit organization operating in the small community of
    Puerto Villamil, on the Island of Isabela, in the archipelago of the Galapagos, Ecuador. He is in
    charge of overseeing IOI’s research, education and outreach programs as well as finding and
    administering funding for such operations.

    Mr. Besserer holds a Bachelor’s degree in International Business Administration and a Masters in
    Marine Policy from the University of Miami. He is currently pursuing a PhD in International Studies
    at the University of Miami.

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy

    Initiative for Drug Equity and Access


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Thursday, May 8th Death & War: Sigmund Freud, Bertrand Russell, and Romain Rolland Confront the First World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 8, 20145:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    1914-1918: The Making of the Modern World

    Description

    Three remarkable individuals encountered ‘Total War’ and struggled to understand the catastrophe in 1914. The Industrial Revolution? The Nature of Man? The failure of the elites? Railway schedules? Incompetence? Or somethingmore profound? To comprehend this tragedy is to touch a terrible truth.

    William Thorsell is currently a Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs. He spent 25 years in newspaper journalism, where he served for more than 10 years as Editor in Chief of The Globe and Mail in Toronto. Mr. Thorsell served as Director and CEO of the Royal Ontario Museum from 2000 to 2010. While Editor in Chief of The Globe and Mail, Mr. Thorsell led the newspaper through a complete redesign and revised circulation and marketing strategy. During this tenure, The Globe’s staff of 320 won significant awards for design, journalistic excellence, public service and marketing. As a member of The Globe’s editorial board between 1984 and 2000, Mr. Thorsell specialized in national politics, law and constitution, economics and culture. He also wrote monthly book reviews for Report on Business Magazine. He continues to write as an occasional contributor to The Globe and Mail. At the ROM, Mr. Thorsell led the museum’s Renaissance ROM project, which saw the construction or renovation of more than 350,000 square feet of galleries, education facilities and public amenities by its final completion in 2010. This includes renovation of several heritage buildings, and the construction of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal, designed by Daniel Libeskind on Bloor Street. Twenty-seven new galleries were created through Renaissance ROM, covering both its mandates of World Cultures and Natural History. Mr. Thorsell was invested into the Order of Ontario in January 2008. He was also invested as Chevalier, Order of Arts and Letters, France, 2010.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    William Thorsell
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, May 16th – Saturday, May 17th 8th Tamil Studies Conference / In Many Worlds: Kudi/Kudiyurimai, Belonging, and Citizenship in the Tamil Imaginary

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 16, 20149:00AM - 6:00PMUniversity of Toronto
    Saturday, May 17, 20149:00AM - 6:00PMUniversity of Toronto
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    Description

    In Many Worlds: Kudi/Kudiyurimai, Belonging, and Citizenship in the Tamil Imaginary

    The objective of the conference is to explore how the notion of belonging (together with entitlement, empowerment, dispossession) has functioned in the past and the present. While papers that deal specifically with the etymology of “Kudi/Kudiyurimai” are welcome, the larger concern is with how belonging has been defined, upheld, or questioned. From the relatively circumscribed spatial units of the Sangam Period, to the reframing of Kudi/Kudiyurimai as republican citizenship, and on to more porous classifications of the diasporic and global present, Kudi/Kudiyurimai and belonging have contained shifting and multiple meanings. Whereas citizenship is often contrasted to the state of slavery, the genealogies of Kudimai in Tamil offer a perspective from which to think beyond these binaries.

    We invite papers from diverse disciplines about the many ways in which belonging has been conceptualized, practiced, or reconfigured. What does it mean to belong to a country, a community, a region, or the world? What does it mean to inhabit, dwell, or reside in a place? How has the tension between an existential belonging measured as restraint or duty to kin and claims to citizenship constituted practices of democracy? How can alternative concepts of belonging be used to challenge dominant definitions of the citizen? Potential submissions might chart the connections between citizenship and belonging, activism, community, family, sexuality and intimacy, feminism, ethnicity, migration and labour, literary and cultural texts, religion, caste, memory, nationalist movements, movements for social reform and change, the law, and military power.

    We welcome individual or panel proposals from all disciplines and from scholars, students, artists, writers, and activists. Papers can range beyond the theme of the conference, though preference will be given to those that do engage the theme more directly.

    Submission Deadline: August 31, 2013

    More information about the conference can be found here: www.tamilstudiesconference.ca/index.html

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Tuesday, May 20th Cooperation, Coordination, and Competition: The Mechanics of Formalizing Inter-Municipal Agreements in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 20, 20144:30PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Municipalities in Canada partner in the delivery of many services, such as emergency services, water delivery, and sanitation. Yet, our understanding of why and how Canadian municipalities enter into these agreements is not well formed. This talk will examine the policy and fiscal aspects of inter-local cooperation agreements in six Canadian metropolitan areas—Toronto, Saskatoon, Regina, Winnipeg, Edmonton, and Calgary.

    Zachary Spicer is the IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow for 2013-14. Dr. Spicer received his PhD in Political Science in 2013 from The University of Western Ontario. His research has appeared in a variety of academic journals, including the Journal of Urban Affairs, Canadian Public Administration, and the Canadian Journal of Urban Research.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Zachary Spicer
    PhD, IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow for 2013-14



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, May 21st Of Unknown Histories and Small Archives: The Fragility of Women's Lives & Screening - "A Quiet Little Entry"

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 21, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture 2013/2014

    Description

    Professor Uma Chakravarti explores questions about individual lives and dramatic historical events, the ‘small’ personal archive, and women’s quests for freedom through a poignant filmic journey. The protagonist in her film ‘A Quiet Little Entry’ is Subbalakshmi who lived out her life on the fringes of history on the salt pans of the Cholamandalam coast of South India. She was and remains an ‘unknown’ woman except perhaps for a brief period of association with the illustrious and scholarly Chattopadhyaya family –Mrinalini, Harindranath, and his wife Kamaladevi. A quirk of fate in early childhood gave her the written word which became her window into the wider world when social and domestic imperatives cut off her participation in the national movement. For the rest of her life, Subbalakshmi continued to mark her resistance in small ways and left behind fragments of paper as her archive.

    BIO:
    Uma Chakravarti is a feminist historian, teacher, democratic rights’ activist, and theorist of caste. She taught history at Miranda House, University of Delhi from 1966-1998. She has written widely on ancient India, women in the 19th century, and on contemporary issues specially caste, gender and democratic rights. Prof Chakravarti has published 7 books and more than 50 papers including Gendering Caste: Through a Feminist Lens and Rewriting History: The Life and Times of Pandita Ramabai in which she contextualised gender issues within the larger framework of caste contestations, class formation and legal changes. She has been involved in the Indian women’s movement for more than 40 years. As an activist, Prof. Chakravarti has also been part of collaborative academic and democratic interventions on community strife and the complicity of the state in violence against particular segments of society. She is also a filmmaker; her first film was ‘A Quiet Little Entry.

    Contact

    Lisa Qiu
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Uma Chakravarti
    Filmmaker and Feminist Historian



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Friday, May 23rd Radical Texts & Political Acts: Forty Years of Reading Margaret Randall

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 23, 201410:30AM - 3:00PMHart House
    East Common Room
    University of Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Radical Texts & Political Acts: Forty Years of Reading Margaret Randall
    A Panel, Poetry Reading, and Film

    This event is part of “History on the Edge,” the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women.

    Margaret Randall is a feminist poet, writer, photographer, and social activist. Her classic work of oral history, Cuban Women Now, was published in Toronto by Women’s Press in 1974. Since then she has published over a dozen other works of oral history, 35 books of poetry, and scores of edited anthologies, translations, and articles. Margaret lived among New York’s abstract expressionists in the 1950s and early ’60s, participated in the Mexican student movement of 1968, shared important years of the Cuban revolution (1969-1980), the first four years of Nicaragua’s Sandinista project (1980-1984), and visited North Vietnam during the last months of the U.S. war in that country. She has written about some of these experiences in her recent autobiography To Change the World: My Years in Cuba (Rutgers UP, 2009).

    For more information on this event: . For information on how to register for the Berks conference, please visit the website at: http://berks2014.com/2013/10/04/registration/.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Margaret Randall


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Berkshire Conference on the History of Women

    JHI Working Group: Gender and Global Scholarship, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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  • Wednesday, May 28th Labatt Presents: THE WALRUS TALKS WATER

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 28, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street West, Toronto
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    Description

    Eighty minutes of lively, thought-provoking ideas about our relationship to water.

    BUY YOUR TICKETS
    Adults: $20, Students: $12

    The Walrus Foundation is a charitable non-profit organization with an educational mandate to support public debate on matters vital to Canadians. The foundation is dedicated to promoting Canadian writers, artists, readers, and ideas.
    We achieve these goals, first and foremost, by publishing The Walrus, the most awarded magazine in Canada, named Magazine of the Year at the National Magazine Awards in June 2007. The Walrus is a monthly publication of ideas, sophistication, and wit, and a place where readers, writers, and artists meet. It is supported by TheWalrus.ca, which offers both archives and original content, and Walrus TV, which features exclusive documentaries inspired by stories from the magazine.
    In addition, the Walrus Foundation runs an intensive editorial, art, and publishing internship program for aspiring editors, writers, designers, and digital media and publishing professionals selected from across Canada.
    Through national events, the Walrus Foundation is committed to the public square, to celebrating Canadian talent, and to increasing participation in our democracy through spirited and intelligent debate—by lifting the magazine off the page and onto the stage in public forums.
    The Walrus Foundation is supported by individuals, foundations, partnerships, corporate donors, and public sector grants. The Walrus magazine is supported by advertisers, corporate sponsors, subscribers, and newsstand sales. The magazine’s charitable status depends on its editorial content, which must make up 70 percent of its pages, and is required to be 80 percent educational and 80 percent Canadian.
    A volunteer Educational Review Committee, composed of academics from universities across Canada, assists the foundation in fulfilling its mandate.
    The Walrus Foundation and The Walrus magazine are grateful to both the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council for their support, expertise, and dedication.
    We would like to express our deep gratitude to the Chawkers Foundation for its generous ongoing support. The Walrus also acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada, the Trillium Foundation, and the Ontario Arts Council.

    Speakers

    Joe MacInnis
    Author, physician, and explorer

    Sherri Mason
    SUNY Fredonia

    Mark Mattson
    Lake Ontario Waterkeeper

    John L. Riley
    Nature Conservancy of Canada

    Katarina Soukup
    Filmmaker

    Kim Sturgess
    Alberta Watersmart

    Marq de Villiers
    Author

    Rob Williams
    Oceans Initiative co-founder and marine biologist

    Chris Wood
    Author and reporter


    Sponsors

    Labatt

    The Walrus

    The Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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June 2014

  • Thursday, June 12th Becoming a Better Leader - Strengths Based Leadership for Lawyers

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 12, 20149:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs - 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Leadership can take on many forms for lawyers including becoming a partner, managing staff, leading executive committees, and/or being a key decision-maker. As lawyers advance in their careers they are not always prepared for these challenges. This workshop, led by Career Coach & Leadership Consultant, and former lawyer, Lianne Krakauer, introduces participants to the concept of strengths-based leadership and its application for becoming a better leader in the legal profession. Building awareness of different leadership styles, participants will learn how to leverage their own strengths to better manage their practice and career direction, improve relationships, gain trust, communicate and influence clients, colleagues and senior leaders.

    Improve your leadership strengths & complete your CPD Professionalism Hours for 2014!
    To register email kim.snell@utoronto.ca Cost: $395 plus HST
    Hurray – space is limited!

    Contact

    Kim Snell


    Speakers

    Lianne Krakauer
    Career Coach & Leadership Consultant, Former Lawyer


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Legal Profession, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.


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