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April 2015

  • Tuesday, April 28th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 28, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 28th Ukraine's Southwest/Odesa Living Through the Year of Revolution, Elections, War, Economic Crisis, Struggle for Reforms and More

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 28, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Ukraine has had a turbulent year. It has experienced yet another massive popular movement – Maidan II, which has led to a new opening with a chance to cleance the system and introduce real reforms. That has been followed by Russian annexation of Crimea and its aggression in Donbas; Ukraine has become a country in war. The protracted economic recession, Yanukovich’s legacy and the war expenditures have brought the country to the edge of a default. The tasks at hand are formidable: withstand an aggression, reinvigorate economy and introduce reforms.

    The last year has proved wrong the simplistic picture of Ukraine as divided in West and East. It has turned out to be much more diversified. In the so-called “East” we saw Northeast, Donbas, Southwest, Crimea, – all of them different from each other. The Southwest of Ukraine emerged without V. Yanukovich and his Party of regions – its most frequent electoral choice previously. Geostrategically it has found itself locked between Russian occupied Crimea and pro-Russian breakway region of Transnistria. Economically the region had to cope with the consequences of Crimean annexation, war situation, lack of investment, slowdown in number of visitors and other factors. Culturally the fight was now in full scale for the “soul” of the region: is it, indeed, a part of the “Russian world” or “Novorossiya” (as Mr.Putin would imply) or is it rather a specific, but yet loyal and integral part of the Ukrainian nation-state? Can it be a former considering its predominantly Russophone character?

    The city of Odesa – regional hub of trade, industry, culture, education, politics – had to define itself in these extraordinary circumstances. Some fights are verbal and others are physical (like the events of May 2, 2014 have shown). These struggles of Ukraine, its Southwest and city of Odesa are, of course, far from being over.

    Volodymyr Dubovyk has graduated from the history department of the Odessa State University in 1992. He has received his Ph.D. (Candidate of Sciences) in political science/international relations from the same university in 1996 and has remained with OSU (now ONU – Odessa National University) in various positions up to the present day. V. Dubovyk has been an Associate Professor and Assistant Chairperson at the Department of International Relations since 1996 and, also, a Director of the Center for International Studies since 1999. Among his teaching and research interests are U.S. foreign policy, U.S.- Ukraine relations, theory of international relations, Black Sea regional security, international conflict studies, foreign policy of Ukraine. He has had his fellowships at the Kennan Institute, W. Wilson International Center for Scholars in 1997 (RSEP), at the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM), University of Maryland in 2002 (CI program) and again at the Kennan Institute in 2006/07 (Fulbright). Volodymyr has been a visiting scholar/faculty at the University of Washington in January-June, 2013. Over years V. Dubovyk has been a member of the ISA, ECPR SGIR, CEE ISA and various other professional associations. He participates in PONARS Eurasia (New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia), project based in George Washington University since 2003.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Volodymyr Dubovyk
    Speaker
    Associate Professor and Assistant Chair at the Department of International Relations, Odesa State University; Director of the Center for International Studies in Odesa, Ukraine

    Peter Solomon
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th – Thursday, April 30th 2nd Annual Creating Digital Opportunity Partnership Network Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 20158:00AM - 5:00PMPanorama Room
    Delta Ottawa City Centre
    Ottawa, ON
    Thursday, April 30, 20158:00AM - 5:00PMPanorama Room
    Delta Ottawa City Centre
    Ottawa, ON
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    Description

    CREATING DIGITAL OPPORTUNITY PARTNERSHIP 2ND ANNUAL NETWORK MEETING

    A G E N D A – DAY ONE – Wednesday, April 29, 2015

    8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast – Penthouse Foyer
    9:00 – 9:15 Welcome
    9:15 – 9:30 Introduction and Update on Status of the Project – David Wolfe, Project Coordinator
    9:30 – 10:15 Update on the Results of the Policy Day

    Overview: Pierre Therrien/David Wolfe
    Research Area 1: Joe Wong
    Research Area 2: Tijs Creutzberg/Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay
    Research Area 3: Peter Phillips/Peter Warrian
    Research Area 4: Ken Coates/David Wolfe

    10:15 – 10:30 Refreshment Break – Penthouse Foyer

    10:30 – 12:30 The Policy Context for the ICT Sector in Canada

    David Watters, Global Advantage – Ottawa
    The Canadian Innovation Ecosystem with Reference to the ICT Sector

    Aled ab Iorwerth, Council of Canadian Academies – Ottawa
    The State of Industrial R&D in Canada

    Anik Lacroix, Investment Science and Technology Division, Statistics Canada – Ottawa
    Digital Economy Statistical Framework

    David Ticoll, ITAC Talent – Toronto
    Labour Supply/Demand Dynamics of Canada’s ICT Sector and Beyond

    12:30 – 1:30 Lunch – Penthouse Foyer

    1:30 – 3:00 Partner Session I

    Michael Turner, Wesley Clover- Ottawa
    Creating Digital Companies — Challenges and Opportunities

    Mark Kuess, Celestica – Toronto
    Innovation in Canada – A Global Perspective

    Adam Froman, Delvinia and Asking Canadians – Toronto
    The Changing Face of Market Research in a Consumer-Centric Society

    3:00 – 3:15 Refreshment Break – Penthouse Foyer

    3:15 – 4:45 Partner Session II

    Bill Hutchison, CATA-iCanada – Toronto
    From iWaterfront to iCanada — the Role of Intelligent Communities in Canada’s Digital Opportunity

    Andrew Robertson, CDMN – Ottawa
    CDMN: Harnessing Canada’s Digital Media Potential

    Scott McKinnon, MEDEI – Toronto
    Partnerships for Jobs and Growth Act: Ontario’s Digital Cluster Opportunities

    4:45 – 5:00 Summary and wrap up of Day One

    NETWORK DINNER – Panorama Room
    6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
    (Cash Bar – Guest Registration Required – Cost $50)

    A G E N D A – DAY TWO – Thursday, April 30, 2015

    8:00 – 9:00 Breakfast – Penthouse Foyer

    9:00 – 10:45 Research Results – Theme 1

    Doug Fuller – Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China (/w Joe Wong, Toronto)
    Politics in Command: Political Economy and China’s Innovation Prospects

    Deanna Horton – Toronto
    Mapping Canada’s Presence in Asia’s Digital Economy

    Patrick Galvin – Toronto (/w David Wolfe)
    Canada’s ICT Industry: Global Production Networks or Outsourcing & U.S. Continentalism

    Vasudave Daggupaty – Toronto
    A Strategic Investment Framework for Economic Development in the ICT Sector: Cisco Systems Canada – A Case Study

    10:45 – 11:00 Refreshments – Penthouse Foyer

    11:00 – 12:30 Research Results – Theme 2

    Catherine Beaudry – Montreal (/w Mélik Bouhadra)
    Insights into ICT hardware networks in Quebec: A focus on university-industry networks and their location

    Yves Bourgeois – Moncton/St. John
    To what extent is the maturation process a spatial process among Atlantic Canadian digital industry startups?

    Adam Holbrook – Vancouver (/w Ben Anderson)
    Creating Digital Opportunity: a study of digital industries in Vancouver and their competitiveness in global markets.

    Tara Vinodrai – Kitchener-Waterloo (/w Ben Spigel – Edinburgh, UK)
    Did they stay or did they go? Digital talent and ICT anchor firm restructuring in Waterloo region

    12:30 – 1:30 Lunch – Penthouse Foyer

    1:30 – 3:00 Research Results – Theme 3

    David Doloreux – Ottawa (/w Richard Shearmur and Anika Laperrière)
    External sourcing strategies, service innovation and location? Empirical evidence from Canadian KIBS firms

    Peter Phillips – Saskatoon
    The digital opportunity in Canadian Agriculture

    Peter Warrian – Toronto
    Digital Manufacturing: Linking advanced materials and software

    3:00 – 3:15 Refreshment Break – Penthouse Foyer

    3:15 – 4:45 Research Results – Theme 4

    Ken Coates – Saskatoon
    Innovation and the Future of Rural and Northern Areas: Where does ICT fit in Community Economic Development Strategies

    Adam Froman/David Wolfe – Toronto
    Open Government and the Voice of e-Democracy: Harnessing the power of digital technologies to engage citizens in public policy

    Mark Kleinman – London, UK/Toronto
    The Smart London (UK) Plan: Using the creative power of new technologies to serve London and improve Londoners’ lives

    4:45– 5:30 Wrap-up and what we have learned to date
    Dates for Spring 2016 Annual Network meeting and location

    REGISTRATION REQUIRED/Fee $30 recovery each meeting day – $50 Dinner
    Contact: ipl.munkschool@utoronto.ca

    Contact

    Deborah Huntley
    416-946-8933

    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    SSHRC


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th Social Justice and Public Health: Policy-Makers' Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    ‘Social justice’ is central to the vocabulary of public health and is considered by many to be foundational to the ethics of public health practice. Yet, it is often unclear what a commitment to social justice requires in the context of public health and how this ought to translate into policy, practice, and research. This is troubling, as it is unlikely that ‘social justice’ has a single (or simple) interpretation or application given its rich conceptual and theoretical pedigree in moral and political philosophy. If social justice is intended to serve as a core value for public health, then its features ought to be critically explored and understood so that it may provide robust, consistent, and practicable ethical guidance for public health policy, practice, and research. While some philosophical accounts have recently been proffered to specify the contents of social justice in the context of public health, these works lack a morally significant empirical component that should be considered integral to any account of social justice in public health; that is, how social justice is understood, negotiated, and pursued in practice. This presentation outlines the extent of this ethical issue and reports findings from a qualitative study that sought to understand how social justice is conceptualized and negotiated in practice by public health policy-makers and decision-makers in Canada.

    Maxwell J. Smith is a CPHS Research Associate Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto. He is a CIHR Fellow in Public Health Policy, a CIHR Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholar, and a Junior Fellow at Massey College. Max received an Honours Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from the University of Toronto and a Master of Science in bioethics from Union Graduate College and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

    Solomon R. Benatar, MBChB, DSc (Med) is Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of Cape Town, and Founding Director of the University of Cape Town Bioethics Centre. Dr. Benatar was an invited academic annually at the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics from 2000- 2014.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Maxwell Smith
    Speaker
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow

    Dr. Solomon R. Benatar
    Discussant
    Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of Cape Town



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th “Splendor of Display," “From the Shadows to the Front Page,” and “The Ottoman Empire’s Entry into World War I”

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    This will be the final meeting of the Seminar in Ottoman & Turish Studies for this academic year. No registration is required.

    Sharon Mizbani, University of Toronto, “Splendor of Display: Fountains and the Transformations of Public Space in Late Ottoman Istanbul”

    Abstract
    Prior to the 18th century, Istanbul’s fountains were generally appended to Mosque complexes or hidden within the city’s landscape.
    However, in the 18th century with the reintroduction of the court into Istanbul and the proliferation of gardens, promenades and a general recreational culture, the fountain gained a novel position in the urban landscape as a free-standing, highly ornate monument that became the focus of public squares. This paper will analyze this change in the role of the fountain, and how it relates to the transformations occurring within Istanbul’s urban fabric.

    Erik Blackthorne-O’Barr, University of Toronto, “From the Shadows to the Front Page”

    Abstract
    The nineteenth century witnessed the proliferation of new media in the Ottoman Empire, including the novel, the newspaper, the photograph, and the easel painting. These new forms each carried with them notions of cultural value, and there was a deep ambivalence in Ottoman society regarding the displacement of traditional media by ‘prestigious’ and ‘modern’ Western art forms. With the lifting of heavy censorship in 1908, the printed cartoon became a highly pervasive format for political expression and social critique. Yet as a medium with relatively low cultural prestige, and in an era when newspapers were commonly read aloud to an illiterate audience, to what extent did political cartooning interact with and take inspiration from live satirical forms, such as shadow puppet performances, coffeehouse storytelling, and Orta Oyunu theatre?

    Shahryar Pasandideh-Gholamali, University of Toronto, “The Ottoman Empire’s Entry into World War I”

    Abstract
    In 1914 the Ottoman Empire made a fateful decision to enter the First World War through an alliance with Germany. The Ottoman decision has frequently been explained as the result of the machinations of a handful of Committee of Union and Progress personalities. This paper contends that it was geopolitical circumstance and a failed search for security, not personalities, that put the Ottoman leadership in a position which made entry into the First World War an attractive proposition.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Sharon Mizbani
    University of Toronto

    Erik Blackthorne-O’Barr
    University of Toronto

    Shahryar Pasandideh-Gholamali
    University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th MISSING LINKS: Infrastructure Financing and Smart Growth Outcomes

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 20154:30PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Over the last two decades, many governments across North America have embraced “smart growth.” Most of these governments have done so primarily through the instruments of urban planning, often without considering the growth implications of other tools including infrastructure financing. Are infrastructure financing tools underutilized when it comes to planning for smart growth? Do we run the risk of undercutting our “smart growth” efforts if we assume infrastructure financing tools to be growth-neutral? In this talk, we examine key findings from the academic literature and early statistics following the implementation of the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe to lay the foundation for a discussion on these challenging policy questions.

    Dave Marshall is the IMFG’s 2014-15 Blanche & Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow. He completed his B.A. in Political Science and International Development at McGill University, prior to spending a short time as a reservist in the Canadian Forces and starting law school in Montreal. Dave developed an interest in alternative infrastructure financing, and came to the University of Toronto in 2013 to complete his law degree concurrently with studies in public policy as the University’s first joint J.D.-M.P.P. candidate. Dave has previously worked as a summer student in the Ontario Growth Secretariat, and plans to investigate the private-side of infrastructure finance this summer as a student at the law firm of Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP. His primary areas of research include alternative infrastructure finance and procurement, civil procedure reform, public administration pedagogy, and public sector recruitment.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Dave Marshall
    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance 2014-15 Blanche & Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 30th The German Foreign Office and its Nazi Past: A Book, a Debate, and the Problems of Commissioned History

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Department of History
    Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    This seminar will be take place in the Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room, Department of History, Sidney Smith Hall Room 2098, 100 St. George Street, University of Toronto

    Eckart Conze holds the chair for Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Marburg (Germany). He received his Ph.D. at the University of Erlangen in 1993, taught at the University of Tübingen, and was a Visiting Professor at the Universities of Bologna (2006), Cambridge (2007/08) and Toronto (2000/01). His research covers German and International History (19th and 20th centuries), the history of the Federal Republic, and the history of elites and the aristocracy. Between 2005 and 2010 he was Chair of the Independent Historians Commission of the German Foreign Office.

    His books include Von deutschem Adel. Die Grafen von Bernstorff im 20. Jahrhundert (2000), Die Suche nach Sicherheit. Eine Geschichte der Bundesrepublik von 1949 bis zur Gegenwart (2009), Das Amt und die Vergangen¬heit. Deutsche Diplomaten im Dritten Reich und in der Bundesrepublik, with Norbert Frei, Peter Hayes, Moshe Zimmermann (2010), and Das Auswärtige Amt. Vom Kaiserreich bis zur Gegenwart (2013).

    Professor Conze is currently working on the Paris Peace Conference and the Versailles Treaty of 1919.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Eckart Conze
    University of Marburg


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 30th Big City, Big Ideas: Cities, Museums, and Soft Power

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 30, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMGardiner Museum
    Terrace Room
    111 Queen's Park
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    Series

    Big City, Big Ideas lecture series

    Description

    Museums are the sleeping giants of cities – fast becoming a major urban force, helping cities to attract people and investment, and address challenges such as inequality, social exclusion and sustainability.This is the Big Idea from internationally renowned cultural planners Gail Lord and Ngaire Blankenberg, in their new book Cities, Museums and Soft Power. Join them to discuss how and why museums and cities can work together to activate their soft power – influence through attraction, persuasion and agenda-setting.

    • Museums occupy (and create) some of the most prestigious real estate in the city;
    • They are city place-makers;
    • They are public and trusted spaces, attracting and bridging diverse people around common interests.
    In their talk, Lord and Blankenberg will also touch on the soft power opportunities for Toronto, a city that hovers at the edge of global leadership.

    5 pm – 6 pm reception and cash bar
    6 pm – 7:30 pm lecture and discussion
    7:30 pm – 8 pm book sale and signing

    Gail Dexter Lord is Co-President of Lord Cultural Resources – the world’s largest museum and cultural planning consultancy, which she founded with Barry Lord in Toronto in 1981. Lord Cultural Resources has completed more than 2,100 assignments in 55 countries on 6 continents. Gail’s clients have included the Toronto International Film Festival, Toronto’s Luminato Festival, Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Museo Guggenheim Bilbao, Tate Britain and Tate Modern, Louvre Lens, The Smithsonian Institution, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Lowry in Salford, the Museum of the African Diaspora, and the Chicago Cultural Plan. In 2014, Gail was appointed Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters by the Minister of Culture of France.

    Ngaire Blankenberg is a Principal Consultant at Lord Cultural Resources. She has been a youth worker, jazz poet, cartoonist, documentary-maker, television producer and is co-founder, with Stephanie Nolen, of the Museum of AIDS in Africa. She has advised clients such as the Canadian Museum of History, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Parlamentarium, the Nigerian National Museum, Constitution Hill (Johannesburg), the King Abdulaziz Centre for World Culture (Dharhan), National Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, WTown Beijing, the Historic District of Dubai and Barangaroo, Sydney. Ngaire grew up in Winnipeg, Harare and Christchurch, and has lived and worked in Johannesburg, Toronto, Paris and Barcelona.

    Registration is Required. Please register at: https://eventbrite.com/event/16287293734/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ngaire Blankenberg
    Principal Consultant, Lord Cultural Resources

    Gail Dexter Lord
    Co-President, Lord Cultural Resources


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Urban Strategies Inc.

    School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto

    Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Global Cities Institute

    Martin Prosperity Institute, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Friday, May 1st "Reading the World's Mail": British Communications Intelligence and Economic Warfare, 1914-18

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 1, 20151:00PM - 3:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room (Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098)
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    Description

    Between July 1914 and November 1918, signals intelligence was born. The type and number of messages intercepted every month for purposes of communications intelligence swelled from thousands of enciphered telegrams to and from foreign offices, to millions of cables, letters and radio dispatches, from diplomats, soldiers, sailors, airmen, and civilians, mostly in plain language or commercial codes. The best known element of signals intelligence during the First World War is work against the operational traffic of armies and navies, centring on cryptanalysis and traffic analysis, but overwhelmingly its largest form, and the area where it was most frequently used, lay in blockade and economic warfare. This instance also was perhaps the case in history where communications intelligence worked most fruitfully without the aid of cryptanalysis, and
    where open source material was most central to analysis. It is closer to the modern practice of communications intelligence than were the actions
    of naval and military siginters between 1914-18. This presentation addresses hgow communications intelligence affected economic warfare
    during the First World War, and victory in that struggle.

    John Ferris is Professor of History at The University of Calgary, Honourary Professor in The Department of International Politics at The University of Wales, Aberystywth, and Adjunct Professor at The Department of War Studies, The Royal Military College of Canada. He was Cryptologic Scholar in Residence at The National Security Agency, 2008-09, and Killam Residential Professor at The University of Calgary, 2013-14. He has published widely in international, intelligence, military and diplomatic history, and strategic studies. He currently is completing books on the theory of intelligence, on economic warfare during the First World War, on British signals intelligence, 1890-1919, and on Anglo-American intelligence, Japanese deception, and the outbreak of the Pacific War.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    John Ferris
    University of Calgary


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 1st Russia and the Ukraine Crisis: Thinking beyond Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 1, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Annual Munk Lecture on European Affairs

    Description

    Western specialists and practitioners have struggled to explain why Russia has been ready to challenge Ukrainian sovereignty so graphically since the Maidan Revolution. For many the default explanation lies with the shifting tectonic plates of geopolitics and the prospect of Ukraine engaging deeply with the EU and NATO. However, Russian officials and analysts cast the crisis as a struggle not merely over power relations, but over the identity of Russian communities and even historically and culturally defined territories. More fundamentally, acute observers point to the Russian fixation on threats arising from ‘regime change’ and to domestic sources of Russian foreign policy and strategic conduct. Given fears of renewed conflict and deeper Russian intervention in Ukraine or beyond, with all the implications of that for collapsing Russian-Western relations, this lecture argues that it is essential to think beyond simple geopolitical categories to explain Russian actions and the severity of the challenge to European stability.

    Prof. Allison joined the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies (SIAS) in 2011 from a Readership in International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was previously a doctoral student and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford; a Lecturer and Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham (1987-99) and Head of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) (1993-2005). Between 2001 and 2005, Prof. Allison was also a Senior Research Fellow attached to the Centre for International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University. His broad research interests include the international relations, foreign and security policies of Russia and Eurasia and has travelled extensively there for research projects under his direction.


    Speakers

    Prof. Roy Allison
    University of Oxford



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 4th Buddhism, religious affiliation and social visibility in contemporary Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This presentation addresses the contemporary ambition of Buddhist actors and institutions to redefine and affirm their place in South Korean society. On the basis of ethnographical and sociological data, it presents how Buddhist temples in Seoul have undertaken massive development projects and broadened their activities in order to adapt to the population’s demands and to promote a formal religious adhesion both on individual and collective basis. In a context of strong concurrence among religious groups, and especially between Buddhist temples and Protestant churches, many Buddhist leaders aim at strengthening their religious denomination by developing a more “conscious”, “proud” and “collective” affiliation among the believers, with the explicit aim that religiously educated and socialized Buddhists would contribute to represent Buddhism in society and subsequently to its influence. By analyzing this phenomenon, this paper will explore the ambivalent relationship of Buddhism with the Protestant “megachurch” model and the new positioning of temples in Seoul.

    Florence Galmiche’s research interest lies in examining the place and roles of religion in contemporary Korean society. She received her Ph.D in sociology at the EHESS in 2011 with a dissertation on urban Buddhism in South Korea. She is now maître de conférence (associate professor) in Korean Studies at the University Diderot-Paris 7. She is a member of the research units CESSMA (Centre d’études en sciences sociales sur les mondes africains, américains et asiatiques) and CCJ (Chine, Corée, Japon).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Florence Galmiche
    Associate Professor, Korean Studies, University Diderot-Paris 7


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 4th Big City, Big Ideas: Data Innovation and City Governance: How London (UK) and Toronto Are Responding to the Opportunities and Challenges of Digital Technologies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 4, 20155:00PM - 6:30PMKoffler House
    SDM Auditorium
    569 Spadina Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 2J7
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    Series

    Big City, Big Ideas lecture series

    Description

    This event is part of the Big City, Big Ideas lecture series, organized by the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance, in collaboration with its BCBI Partners, and co-hosted by the Innovation Policy Lab, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    Worldwide, city governments are increasingly playing an active role in supporting economic growth. At the same time, they are under pressure to respond more quickly and individually to the needs of citizens. Rapid developments in digital innovation and in the availability and application of large-scale data sets create opportunities both for new economic activities and jobs, and for new and cheaper ways of delivering city services. They also hold out possibilities for new ways that governments can engage with citizens, while at the same time raising concerns about data privacy. In his talk, Mark Kleinman will look at how these issues are being addressed in both London (UK) and Toronto, two cities with strong ‘knowledge economy’ characteristics which are also growing rapidly.

    Mark Kleinman is a Visiting Scholar for three months at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, on sabbatical leave from his role as Director of Economic and Business Policy for the Mayor of London (UK). Mark began his career as an academic, teaching for eleven years at the London School of Economics before becoming Professor of International Social Policy at the University of Bristol. He subsequently took a number of roles in government, including a year in the UK Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit working on migration policy, and Director of Urban Policy for the UK Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.He is the author or co-author of four books and more than 100 published papers, and has been a consultant to the OECD, the European Commission, the UK Film Council, and many government departments and local authorities. He gave the keynote presentation at the Jane Jacobs Prize Ceremony in Toronto in 2009, as well as lectures and seminars in New York, Boston, Paris, Rome, Bologna, Madrid, Barcelona, Bilbao, Kyoto, and Osaka. Mark is a Policy Fellow at the Centre for Science and Policy, at the University of Cambridge, UK.

    This event is free of charge. Registration is required to attend. Please register at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/big-city-big-ideas-data-innovation-and-city-governance-registration-16585215827

    Doors open at 4:30 pm.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Mark Kleinman
    Visiting Scholar at the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance, Munk School of Global Affairs, and Director of Economic and Business Policy for the Mayor of London (UK)


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto

    Urban Strategies Inc.

    Global Cities Institute

    Martin Prosperity Institute

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 4th – Tuesday, May 5th Much Ado about Magna Carta

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 4, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, May 5, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and CBC IDEAS

    Description

    It’s been hailed as the cornerstone of our justice system. From property rights to women’s rights, the rule of law, equality before the law and defined roles for judges: all roads, it seems, lead us back to Magna Carta Libertatum. But is this entirely true? In celebration of the 800th Anniversary of this great charter of liberty, IDEAS in partnership with the MUNK School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto presents sparkling legal minds and scholars, along with our very own Magna Carta Chorus, to reveal the meaning – and relevance – of the charter today.

    May 4, 2015, Part One:
    David Cole, legal scholar, author and commentator; Nathalie Des Rosiers, Dean, Faculty of Law (Common Law Section) at the University of Ottawa; Bob Rae, lawyer, mediator and political leader; and moderator Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs, probe property rights and the rule of law to see how they play out today, legally and politically.

    May 5, 2015, Part Two:
    David Cole, legal scholar, author and commentator; Nathalie Des Rosiers, Dean, Faculty of Law (Common Law Section) at the University of Ottawa; the Honourable Stephen T. Goudge, Q.C., former judge of the Ontario Court of Appeal; and moderator Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs, consider the lingering influences (or not) of the Magna Carta on criminal law and the role of judges.


    Speakers

    Paul Kennedy
    Chair
    Host, IDEAS, CBC Radio ONE

    Stephen J. Toope
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    David Cole
    Panelist
    Hon. George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy, Georgetown University Law Center

    Nathalie Des Rosiers
    Panelist
    Dean, Faculty of Law (Common Section), University of Ottawa

    The Honourable Stephen T. Goudge, Q.C.
    Panelist
    Former Judge, Ontario Court of Appeal

    The Honourable Bob Rae
    Panelist
    Lawyer, Mediator, Writer, and Political Leader

    Sharry Flett
    Speaker
    Actor, The Magna Carta Chorus

    Barry MacGregor
    Speaker
    Actor, The Magna Carta Chorus



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 5th BIG CITY, BIG IDEAS: The Role of Big Cities in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20155:00PM - 6:30PMDesautels Hall
    (2nd floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management
    105 St. George St.
    University of Toronto
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    Series

    Big City, Big Ideas lecture series

    Description

    His Worship Mayor Don Iveson of Edmonton will be in conversation with Professor Richard Florida on a number of topics and issues related to the Role of Big Cities in Canada. This event is part of the Big City, Big Ideas series, which features global leaders in urban and regional policy.

    This event is presented by the Martin Prosperity Institute in partnership with the School of Public Policy & Governance as part of the “Big City, Big Ideas” (BCBI) partnership.

    BCBI is a series that features global leaders in urban and regional planning, policy, and finance presented in partnership by:

    • Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance;
    • School of Public Policy & Governance;
    • Martin Prosperity Institute;
    • Department of Geography and Planning;
    • Innovation Policy Lab;
    • Global Cities Indicator Facility; and
    • Urban Strategies

    PLACE: l.
    FEE: no fee to attend. All are welcome. Please register using the link below.

    CLICK HERE TO REGISTER: http://www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/may5/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    His Worship Don Iveson
    Speaker
    Mayor of Edmonton, AB.

    Richard Florida
    Speaker
    Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute, and Professor of Business & Creativity, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto.

    Linda White
    Moderator
    Interim Director, School of Public Policy and Governance; Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 7th A self-assured Canada: strategic approaches to influence and security

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 7, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMTrinity College, Combination Room, 6 Hoskin Avenue
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    Description

    As a young country and despite early military action overseas, Canada came of age on the world stage through an unwavering commitment to peace in the 20th Century. A self-assured Canada entered the new Millennium with a clear understanding of the threats of terrorism and other risks menacing its security. Nevertheless, our country remains firmly resolved to protect its people while developing opportunity and prosperity through trade and business development, the top priority of our government’s policies and foreign diplomacy. To achieve these goals, Europe – starting with France – is a strategic ally Canadians can’t ignore.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    The Honourable Lawrence Cannon
    Canadian Ambassador to France



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 12th – Wednesday, May 13th Critical Theory Conference

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 12, 20152:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Wednesday, May 13, 201510:00AM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    PROGRAM:

    Tuesday May 12, 2015

    2:00 Opening Remarks

    2:10 Lambert Zuidervaart, University of Toronto
    Creating a Disturbance: Art, Social Ethics, and Relational Autonomy

    3:10 Lydia Goehr, Columbia University
    Music De-Tuned and Works Dis-Composed

    4:10 Espen Hammer, Temple University
    Happiness and Pleasure in Adorno’s Aesthetics

    5:10 David Suchoff, Colby College
    Dissonant Lineages: Beckett, Blanchot, Kafka, Rosenzweig

    Wednesday May 13, 2015

    10:10 Martin Morris, Wilfried Laurier University
    Negative Dialectics and Popular Music

    11:10 Sherry Lee, University of Toronto
    Dissonant Opera, Dissident Fragments

    12:10 Rebecca Comay, University of Toronto
    Disappearance and Dissonance in Contemporary Sculpture (Doris Salcedo)

    1:00 Lunch Break

    2:10 Asaf Angermann, University of Toronto
    The Ghosts of Normativity: On Law, Form, and the Law of Form

    3:10 Willi Goetschel, University of Toronto
    Heine’s Aesthetics of Dissonance

    4:10 Open Round Table Discussion


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 13th – Friday, May 15th Canadian Foreign Policy: Traditions and Transitions

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    Description

    This conference will focus upon the traditions of Canadian policy and assess their impact today and their relevance for the future. Scholars, practitioners, and former political leaders will lead the discussions in an event sponsored by the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History and the Canadian International Council.

    Two new book series associated with the Graham Centre will be launched at the conference: the C.D. Howe Series in Canadian Political History with the University of British Columbia Press and the Contemporary Canadian Issues Series with Dundurn Press.

    To register and for more information, please visit http://billgrahamcentre.utoronto.ca/canadian-foreign-policy-traditions-transitions/

    Contact

    Nina Boric

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Canadian International Council

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Canadian Arab Institute

    Dundurn Press

    Department of History, University of Toronto

    UBC Press


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 14th IMFG BOOK LAUNCH: Is Your City Healthy? Measuring Urban Fiscal Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 14, 201512:00PM - 1:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Thursday, May 14, 20151:00PM - 2:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    IMFG BOOK LAUNCH:
    Is Your City Healthy? Measuring Urban Fiscal Health
    Edited by Richard M. Bird and Enid Slack

    In an era when all large cities are struggling to maintain balanced budgets and pay for increased services and infrastructure, Is Your City Healthy? is a timely publication that explores the elements of fiscal health, how we measure it, and why it is important. In the book, eight experts in the field look at a range of fiscal health measures in Canada, the United States, and some OECD countries and ask if they are always or necessarily a signal of municipal health.

    Join the editors Richard Bird and Enid Slack and chapter author Kyle Hanniman for an engaging presentation and roundtable from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. on some of the key themes of the book, followed by a reception and signing.

    Copies of the publication will be available for purchase after the roundtable. Space is limited and registration is required.

    Where to purchase this publication:
    Is Your City Healthy? Measuring Urban Fiscal Health is published in association with the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC). Copies can be purchased at the University of Toronto bookstore, located at 214 College Street in Toronto, or online through IPAC at: www.ipac.ca/knowledge/Publications.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Kyle Hanniman
    Policy Associate at the Mowat Centre, Toronto, former post-doctoral fellow at the IMFG, and Assistant Professor (beginning in July, 2015), Department of Political Studies, Queens University.

    Enid Slack
    Director of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance, and Adjunct Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    Richard M. Bird
    Professor Emeritus of Economics, Rotman School of Management, and Adjunct Professor& Senior Fellow of the Institute on Municipal Governance and Finance, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute of Public Administration of Canada


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, May 16th – Sunday, May 17th The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA)

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 16, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Sunday, May 17, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA),

    This is an international festival with a difference, truly reflecting the diversity of Toronto. Over 30 writers from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Tanzania, and of course all across Canada will be present. Saturday night dance performance by Hari Krishan and InDance. African guitar by Tichaona Maradze. There will be panels on a variety of subjects, including New Theatre in Canada, East Asian Writing, South Asian Writing, Writing in Languages Other than English.

    Admission is free except for the Saturday night event. It is advisable but not essential to pre-register.

    The event runs May 15-17, 2015, for more information and the full program click the link below.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 19th Reparations and the Human

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 19, 20153:00PM - 5:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100
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    Description

    This presentation comes from his forthcoming book, Reparations and the Human, which investigates the problem of reparations and human rights in Cold War Asia. Following the devastating violence of World War II, an emerging discourse of reparations and human rights sought to articulate new precepts against state harm of individuals. Traditionally, reparations could be claimed by one state from another as compensation for the “costs of war.” For the first time, however, the idea of reparations was extended to encompass individual and group claims for redress for state-sponsored violence in the name of human rights and in the interests of protecting the sanctity of human life.

    His approach to the topic is fundamentally interdisciplinary. Reparation is a key term in political theory, but it is also a central concept in psychoanalysis specifically, object relations yet the two are rarely discussed in relation to one another. Reparations and the Human focuses on unexamined links between political and psychic genealogies of reparation in order to explore the possibilities and limits of repairing the injuries of war, violence, and colonialism in the Transpacific region. Here, he investigate three interlocking events: the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki ending that war; and contemporary legal claims of “Comfort Women,” girls and women conscripted by the Japanese Imperial Army into sexual slavery.

    From this larger perspective, he analyzes the postwar ascension of reparations and human rights not only as a moral response to but also, and indeed, as a form of continued state violence.

    In this talk, he focuses specifically on the afterword to his book, “Absolute Apology, Absolute Forgiveness,” which explores the history of uranium mining and “Little Boy,” the atomic bomb detonated by the U.S. military over Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Much of the world¹s uranium supply is mined from indigenous lands, and the uranium for Little Boy, too, came in part from the lands of the Sahtu Dene, an indigenous people in Great Bear Lake, Canada. Ignorant at the time of how their mining efforts would be applied and the destination of the ore, the Sahtu Dene nonetheless felt implicated once they learned of Hiroshima¹s fate. In response to the disaster, they sent a delegation to Hiroshima to apologize. He will discuss the Sahtu Dene’s response to the atomic bombing in order to propose an alternate concept for reparations and the human. Here, he extends Jacques Derrida¹s notion of “absolute forgiveness” to develop a corollary concept: “absolute apology.”
    David L. Eng is Richard L. Fisher Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also Professor in the Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory and the Program in Asian American Studies.

    Eng is author of The Feeling of Kinship: Queer Liberalism and the Racialization of Intimacy (Duke, 2010) and Racial Castration: Managing Masculinity in Asian America (Duke, 2001). He is co-editor with David Kazanjian of Loss: The Politics of Mourning (California, 2003) and with Alice Y. Hom of Q & A: Queer in Asian America (Temple, 1998). In addition, he is co-editor of two special issues of the journal Social Text: with Teemu Ruskola and Shuang Shen, “China and the Human” (2011/2012), and with Judith Halberstam and José Esteben Muñoz, “What’s Queer about Queer Studies Now?” (2005). His current book project, Reparations and the Human, investigates the relationship between political and psychic genealogies of reparations in Cold War Asia. Eng is the recipient of research fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and the Mellon Foundation, among others. Last year, he helped to organize a Penn Mellon Sawyer Seminar on “Race, Across Time and Space,” focusing on race as a fungible yet persistent feature of human history and as a global phenomenon with long and diverse histories.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    David Eng
    Professor, University of Pennsylvania


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Geography and Program in Planning (Intersections Speakers Series)

    Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto

    Department of English


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 21st Gala Performance of Asian Canadian Artists:Silk Roads Ii – Mongolia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 21, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College Town Hall
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FESTIVAL 2015

    Opening Address: Mr. Justin Poy, Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI
    “Photographic Images of Magnificent Mongolia” by Dr. Neville Poy and The Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy

    Keynote and Performance:

    “A Rare Instrument From China: Hongkou 箜篌”by Professor Chan Ka Nin
    Hongkou Performance by Liu Xuanyi

    “Magnetic Fields” (An Excerpt) – Contemporary Dance by Yvonne Ng and tiger princess dance projects

    Mongolian Music on Morin Khuur (Horsehead Fiddle) (Tbc) Traditional Mongolian Dances for the Grand Feast Event by Chi‐Ping Dance Group & dancers of Chinese Collective Arts Association

    Middle Eastern Music on 3 Different Instruments: Bouzouki, Oud And Saz by Yiannis Kapoulas

    RECEPTION FOLLOWS
    Free admission, please register at asianheritagecanadian@yahoo.ca.

    Note: Event starts at 7:00 p.m., please be seated by 6.45 p.m.
    Map at http://www.utoronto.ca/townhall/contact.html (St. George Stn)

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI


    Sponsors

    Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, May 23rd – Sunday, May 24th Doors Open Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 23, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S 0A7
    Sunday, May 24, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S 0A7
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs will once again be participating in Doors Open Toronto. Visitors will have the opportunity to freely roam throughout the public spaces at the Munk School of Global Affairs’ historic 315 Bloor Street West Observatory Site. The halls, library, and unique meeting spaces all feature exceptional art by artists from Canada and around the world. Guided tours will be offered at three times during the day for members of the public, and staff will be available on site to answer questions about the Munk School and Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects’ (KPMB) beautiful renovation.

    About Doors Open Toronto
    Since its inception in 2000, Doors Open Toronto has attracted more than two million visits in nearly 600 unique locations across the city. It is Canada’s largest Doors Open event and one of the three largest Doors Open events in the world.

    The 16th annual Doors Open Toronto is scheduled for May 23-24, 2015 and will offer residents and visitors an opportunity to take a peek behind the doors of 150 architecturally, historically, culturally and socially significant buildings across the city.

    For more information, and to see other buildings participating in Doors Open Toronto, please click on the link below.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 27th Evergreen Tree Film Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 27, 20156:30PM - 8:30AMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
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    Series

    4th Annual Toronto Korean Film Festival 2014

    Description

    Evergreen Tree (상록수)
    SHIN Sang-ok | Classics, Drama | 141 min | Korea 1961
    CANADIAN PREMIERE

    Korean language finds itself strangled under Japanese colonial rule during the 1930s. Lack of education and will to progress plagues those living in the more rural areas of the peninsula. A story about two lovers and a goal to promote education amid political suppression, ‘Evergreen Tree’ was directed by the legendary Shin Sang-ok and is based on the 1935 novel of the same name by prolific screenwriter Shim Hoon.

    *There will be a post-screening discussion and Q&A session with Janet Poole, author of the book ‘When The Future Disappears’ and Professor in the East Asian Studies Department at the Centre For The Study of Korea, University of Toronto

    For more information visit the website below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Janet Poole
    Associate Professor, Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Department of East Asian Studies Affiliated Faculty


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2015

  • Monday, June 1st The Outlook for Nuclear Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
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    Series

    Special Chair's Seminar Speaker

    Description

    Prior to joining the Carnegie Endowment, Levite was the principal deputy director general for policy at the Israeli Atomic Energy Commission from 2002 to 2007. He also served as the deputy national security adviser for defense policy and was head of the Bureau of International Security and Arms Control in the Israeli Ministry of Defense.

    Speakers

    Ariel E. Levite
    Speaker
    Senior Associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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