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May 2017

  • Tuesday, May 23rd Should Canada develop a list of essential medicines?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 23, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The World Health Organization recommends that each state define its own list of essential medicines. Essential medicines lists generally contain hundreds of medicines including treatments for acute conditions (e.g. pneumonia, anaphylaxis, sprained ankles) and chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes, HIV-AIDS, hypertension). Lists of essential medicines can help governments ensure adequate healthcare services are delivered by identifying the medications that are needed by people.

    More than 100 countries have developed essential medicine lists. Canada is not one of them.

    Should Canada develop a list of essential medicines? We will learn from two international experts about the benefits and challenges of creating an essential medicines list: Dr Nicola Magrini from the World Health Organization’s Essential medicines group and Professor Lars Gustaffson from the Swedish “Wise List”. Then we will hear the reactions of Canadian decision makers before we open up the discussion to involve all participants.

    This event is supported by the WHO Collaborating Center for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector.


    Speakers

    Nicola Magrini
    Secretary of the Expert Committee on the Selection and Use of Essential Medicines Policy, Access and Use Team Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products (EMP/PAU) World Health Organization

    Lars Gustaffson
    Professor, senior consultant Division of Clinical Pharmacology Department of Laboratory Medicine Karolinska Institutet Karolinska University Hospital


    Sponsors

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 23rd RELIGION, ETHNO-NATIONALISM, AND VIOLENCE: PROBING THE INTERSECTIONS

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 23, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Co-organized by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and the University of Toronto’s Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies, this event explores the intersections of religion, ethno-nationalism, fascism, antisemitism, and violence in the era of the world wars. By analyzing the ways in which religious groups, institutions, and networks engaged political and social upheaval in and beyond Europe, we hope to identify broader patterns that can deepen our understanding of the dynamics shaping the roles of religious actors before and during the Holocaust.

    By bringing together scholars, teachers, students, and community members, the Mandel Center’s outreach symposia seek to enrich campus dialogue and forge connections with diverse audiences that will ensure the vitality of Holocaust studies in an increasingly interdisciplinary and multicultural academic landscape. The Mandel Center’s Programs on Ethics, Religion, and the Holocaust focus on the history of the churches’ response to the Holocaust, the roles of different religious communities during that period, and the ways in which religious institutions, leaders, and theologians have addressed this history and its legacy since 1945.

    The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies is located within the Department of History and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. Its goals are to produce and promote world-class scholarship on the Holocaust, to train undergraduate and especially graduate students in Holocaust Studies, and to connect researchers in Canada with their international counterparts. In keeping with its commitment to making high-quality research widely accessible, the Wolfe Chair welcomes the public at many of its events.


    Speakers

    Susannah Heschel
    Speaker
    Dartmouth College

    Victoria Barnett
    Speaker
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Doris Bergen
    Moderator
    University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    Hoffberger Family Foundation

    Department of History

    Konstanty Reynert Chair in Polish History

    John Yaremko Chair in Ukrainian Studies

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 25th Soccer as an Agent of Integration: Sport in Expellee and Refugee Camps in Germany after World War II

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 25, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In September 1945, a few months after the end of World War II, a group of young soccer enthusiasts founded a soccer association in the largest refugee and expellee camp in southwestern Germany. Through the meandering history of this remarkable soccer association, special attention is paid to the reciprocal effects of two mass phenomena: sports and migrant camps. The paper highlights the relevance of sports in the long-term process of integration of 12.5 million refugees and expellees into postwar German society.


    Speakers

    Prof. Dr. Mathias Beer
    University of Tübingen


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 29th Finding Common Ground: Inter-Local Cooperation in Canada in Theory and Practice

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 29, 201710:00AM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Municipal governments across Canada are increasingly looking to inter-municipal agreements as a way to share the costs and delivery of some local services. As this practice increases, it is important to have a better understanding of the benefits and consequences of service sharing in Canadian communities. How well are these agreements working? What challenges do municipalities face? What are the pitfalls of entering into these arrangements? This half-day conference brings together academics and practitioners to examine inter-municipal agreements and service sharing in Canadian municipalities and Indigenous communities.

    Seating is limited and registration is required.

    Contact

    Deborah McKeon
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Zachary Spicer
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Brock University

    Christopher Alcantara
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Western Ontario

    Jen Nelles
    Visiting Assistant Professor, Urban Policy and Planning, Hunter College, City University of New York

    Dave Cash
    President and CEO, Cash and Associates Inc.

    Emily Harris
    Principal, Acclimatize Fiscal Consulting



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 30th Symposium: Reforming Criminal Justice and National Security

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 30, 201710:00AM - 5:00PMUniversity of Toronto Faculty of Law
    84 Queens Park, Solarium
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    Description

    Hosted by U of T Faculty of Law and Supported by the Trudeau Foundation. Co-sponsored by the Criminal Law Quarterly and the Counter-Terrorism Law and Policy Group, Global Justice Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    This symposium is designed to produce a special double issue of the Criminal Law Quarterly that will reflect on the processes and challenges of reforming criminal justice and national security.

    The aim is to examine specific contexts of pressing concerns that may be the subject of anticipated legislation including expected amendments to Ontario’s Police Services Act, expected amendments to the Criminal Code and expected amendments to the Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015 and related national security legislation.

    The symposium is designed to bring academics, policy-makers and practitioners together for frank and open discussion of matters of common concern and pressing importance.

    The symposium will end with a panel on general reflections about the process of criminal justice and national security reform.

    The Symposium is free but registration is required. To register, or for more information, please visit:
    https://www.law.utoronto.ca/events/criminal-justice-and-national-security-reform-symposium

    Co-Sponsors

    Faculty of Law

    Trudeau Foundation

    Criminal Law Quarterly

    Global Justice Lab


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2017

  • Thursday, June 8th Muslim Integration in France and Canada Compared

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 8, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Observatory Site, Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In this special panel discussion, experts from France and Canada will present and discuss recent survey research assessing the integration of Muslim minorities in France, Quebec and Canada.

    Program

    3:50-4:00 Registration
    4:00-4:05 Welcome address: Professor Randall Hansen, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    4:05-4:10 Opening remarks: Mr. Marc Trouyet, Consul General of France in Toronto
    4:10-4:40 Dr Patrick Simon, Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques (INED): “Muslims in France: Religion and the Experience of Exclusion”
    4:40-5:10 Professor Jeffrey Reitz, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto: “Muslims in France, Canada and Quebec: Inclusion and Exclusion across Settings”
    5:10-5:20 Professor Abdie Kazemipur, Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge
    5:20-5:30 Professor Valérie Amiraux, Department of Sociology, Université de Montréal
    5:30-6:00 Q&A
    6:00-7:00 Reception

    PATRICK SIMON is Director of Research at the Institut national d’études démographiques (National Institute for Demographic Studies; INED). He was a Visiting Scholar at the Advanced Research Collaborative program at CUNY (2015-2016) and at the Russell Sage Foundation in 2010-11. Trained as a sociodemographer at L’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences; EHESS), where he earned a doctoral degree in 1994, he has studied social and ethnic segregation in French cities, antidiscrimination policies, and the integration of ethnic minorities in European countries. He is one of the principal investigators of a large survey, Trajectories and Origins: The Diversity of Population in France, conducted by INED and the Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques (National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies).

    JEFFREY G. REITZ is a Professor of Sociology and Director of the R.F. Harney Program of Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Professor and former Chair in the University’s Department of Sociology. Professor Reitz has published extensively on immigration and inter-group relations; his work had emphasized the case of Canada in comparative perspective, and he also has written on policies for immigration, immigrant employment, and multiculturalism. Recent articles have appeared in the International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Social Science Research, and Patterns of Prejudice. He is a member of the Centre d’analyse et d’intervention sociologiques, L’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales; in 2017 he will be Visiting Fellow at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

    ABDIE KAZEMIPUR is the University Scholar research chair in social sciences at the Department of Sociology, University of Lethbridge; and as of next month, the Chair of Ethnic Studies at University of Calgary. Previously, he served as Stephen Jarislowsky Chair in Culture Change and Immigration at Memorial University of Newfoundland. He has also been the founding director of two research data centres at the University of Lethbridge and Memorial University. He conducts research on the socio-economic experiences of immigrants in Canada and the socio-cultural developments in the Middle East, on which he has published seven books. His most recent book, The Muslim Question in Canada: A Story of Segmented Integration (UBC Press, 2014), received the 2015 John Porter Excellence Award from the Canadian Sociological Association. He is currently working on a new book titled Sacred as Secular: Secularization under Theocracy in Iran. Commentaries and interviews about his works have appeared in The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, National Post, la Presse, Winnipeg Free Press, Vancouver Sun, Lethbridge Herald, Global TV, TVO, and Russia Today TV, among others.

    VALĒRIE AMIRAUX (valerieamiraux.com) is a full Professor of Sociology at the University of Montreal (on leave from her Senior Research Fellow position at the CNRS), where she holds the Canada Research Chair for the Study of Religious Pluralism. Her main fields are religious pluralism, the relationships between Muslim minorities and European and Quebecer societies, Islamophobia and discrimination. Her current research interests centre on an ethnographic analysis of the articulation between pluralism and radicalisation, with a special emphasis on the interaction between majority societies and Jews and Muslims as minorities in specific cities of Europe and Canada. Her most recent publications include: 2017 AMIRAUX V., “From the Empire to the Republic: ‘French Islam’”, in N. Bancel et al. (ed.), The Colonial Legacy in France, Indiana University Press (forthcoming), 2016, AMIRAUX, V., “Visibility, Transparency and Gossip: How did the religion of some (Muslims) become the public concern of other? ”, Critical religious Studies (special issue: The Muslim Question), vol. 4(1), pp. 37-56, AMIRAUX V., “Parler des autres pour dire qui nous sommes : Débat(s) européen(s) sur le port du voile intégral”, in D. Koussens, M.-P. Robert, C. Gélinas et al., La religion hors-la-loi : L’État libéral à l’épreuve des religions minoritaires, à paraître, AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS (dir.), “Droit et religion en contexte de pluralisme : alliance objective ou mariage de raison ? //Law and Religion in Plural Societies : Objective Alliance or Marriage of Convenience ? ”, Studies in Religion-Religious Studies, 45 (2), numéro spécial, 2015 AMIRAUX, V. ET F. DESHARNAIS, Salomé et les hommes en noir, Bayard Canada., 2014 AMIRAUX, V. ET D. KOUSSENS, Trajectoires de la neutralité, Presses de l’université de Montréal.

    Co-Sponsors

    R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies, DAAD

    Consulate General of France in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2017

  • Friday, September 22nd Dismantling Japanese Developmentalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMMassey College
    Unversity of Toronto
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Abstract

    Japan’s combination of economic success and conservative dominance from the 1950s into the early 1990s was the consequence of what Pempel calls “developmentalism.” The term involves more than the well-studied ‘developmental state.’ Most particularly, the Japanese success story relied on a specific and unusual socio-economic alignment; a positive sum relationship between state direction and corporate creativity; and Japan’s Cold War security and economic partnership with the United States. The combination unleashed a positive cycle of economic development and conservative political strength.

    Japan’s positive cycle was challenged by two external changes: first, the breakdown in diplomatic and security bipolarity that began with the Nixon visits to China and the Deng economic reforms; and second, the challenges from increased power of global finance and multinational production networks. These external global shifts undercut the Japan’s prevailing model and opened the challenge to find a suitable substitute. That search has continued for over twenty years resulting in some successes and many false starts. Professor Pempel’s talk will examine the relationship between this more complete understanding of developmentalism as the roots of Japan’s early successes and the subsequent difficulties of finding its adequate replacement.

    Biographical Sketch

    T.J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on Japan’s political economy, economic and security issues in East Asia, and Asian regionalism. His most recent book with Keiichi Tsunekawa is “Two Crises, Different Outcomes: East Asia and Global Finance” (Cornell University Press).

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    T. J. Pempel
    Speaker
    Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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