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February 2017

  • Monday, February 27th Aspirations to Live: the Politics of Transnational Welfare Citizenship among Older Sakhalin Koreans

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 27, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since 1990, when the Soviet Union and South Korea established diplomatic ties, over 4,000 Koreans from Sakhalin Island (Russia) have “returned” to their so-called ethnic homeland, now in South Korea. This return migration program has been supported by the Japanese and South Korean governments, named a humanitarian aid, with older Sakhalin Koreans being granted citizenship in South Korea. Based on ethnographic fieldwork on Sakhalin in South Korea (2010-2011, 2016), I present everyday experiences of citizenship among older Sakhalin Koreans in a transnational setting. This return project, offering a range of material and social assistance, has provoked new aspirations to live; at the same time it entails a new sense of unfairness, moral discourses around dependency, contested claim-making practice, and reflections of self through Others. These experiences show the ways older Sakhalin Koreans negotiate moral and political personhood as they reconfigure historically shaped relations to key nation-states including Japan, Russia, and South Korea. Situating the practices and imaginaries of citizenship of older Sakhalin Koreans within the shifting geopolitics of Northeast Asia, this study offers an analysis and understanding of subjectivities in the times of post-colonial and post-cold war transformations.

    Sungsook Lim completed her Master’s degree in Anthropology at Hanyang University in Korea in 2004, and continued to study anthropology in the Ph.D. program at the University of British Columbia. Her PhD research project considered return mobility among older Sakhalin Koreans, specially focusing on their kinship and citizenship practices. Sungsook completed her PhD degree in 2016, and is currently a post-doctoral fellow of the Korea Foundation.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sungsook Lim
    Post-doctoral fellow, Korea Foundation

    Jesook Song
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Korea


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2017

  • Wednesday, March 1st Social Changes and Public Opinion in Central Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 1, 201711:00AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Twenty-five years after independence, Central Asian societies are witnessing the emergence of new demographics, social and cultural changes that confirm the end of the “post-Soviet” period and the entry into another phase of history. In this presentation Professor Laruelle will analyze these changes and explore their possible meaning in terms of domestic and foreign policies for the region’s countries.

    Marlene Laruelle is Research Professor of International Affairs andAssociate Director of the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES) at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University. She explores contemporary political, social and cultural changes in Russia and Central Asia through the prism of ideologies and nationalism. She is the editor in chief of Central Asian Affairs and a member of the executive editorial board of Demokratizatsiya. The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization. As director of the Central Asia Program she oversees about 30 events a year, monthly publications, and works on several programs of visiting fellows from Central Asia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marlene Laruelle
    Speaker
    Director, Central Asia Program; Co-Director, PONARS-Eurasia at George Washington University

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 2nd Aegean, The Sea of Peace, Civilization and Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 2, 20177:00PM - 8:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Street,Toronto ON
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Program

    1. Candle Dance from the Island of Lesvos
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    2. Welcome and Opening Remarks
    (Maria Xenikakis and Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    3. Short Documentary Film, 4.1 Miles
    (About the refugee crisis in Europe)

    The documentary is based on the life of a captain in the Greek Coast Guard, who is caught in the struggle of refugees fleeing the Middle East and traveling the short distance from the coast of Turkey to the island of Lesvos. Despite having limited resources, the captain and his crew attempt to save lives during the immense humanitarian crisis. The film is directed by Daphne Matziaraki and was nominated (Short Subject Documentary) for Oscars 2017.

    4. Dance Theatre Performance “The Aegean- the Sea of Humanity”
    (Melisakia Dance Theatre – Director Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    5. Lecture – Odysseas Elytis, The Poet of the Aegean
    (Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas)

    6. Parade of Aegean Traditional Costumes
    (Melissakia Dance Theatre)
    (Costumes from the private collection of Nancy Athan-Mylonas)

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Mr. John Dagonas


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 3rd Pipelines, Paris, and Decarbonization: The Future of Canadian Energy and Climate Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs in partnership with the Law School at the University of Toronto are convening a discussion exploring the implications and implementation of recent national and provincial climate and energy policies and discussing the future of Canadian energy and climate policy in an uncertain global context. Our goal is to further the national and provincial conversations by bringing together multiple stakeholders and sectors. The panel include speakers with deep knowledge of the national and global policy history and context, carbon pricing, First Nations experiences and concerns, and fossil fuel industry dynamics. The event will include a moderated discussion amongst panelists as well as a question and answer session with the audience.

    Contact

    Alexa Waud


    Speakers

    John Drexhange
    Drexhage Consulting, formerly Climate Director at International Institute for Sustainable Development

    Erin Flanagan
    Director of Federal Policy at Pembina Institute

    Nancy Olewiler
    Professor Simon Fraser University

    Ben Powless
    Climate Justice and First Nations Rights Activist



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 3rd Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street, Room 318
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    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series; Lecture in the Arts, Histories, Literatures and Religions of Burma

    Description

    THE LEGAL HISTORY OF BURMA over the course of the second millennium CE offers a series of literary, juridical, and intellectual contributions that are unique when considered in relation to the wider Buddhist world of South, Central, and East Asia. From the 13th through 19th centuries upper Burma was a regional center for the production of a distinctive genre of Buddhist legal literature known as dhammasattha (“treatise on law”), whose laws claimed jurisdiction over all members of society, including monks and laypersons, and kings, commoners, and slaves. Prose and verse dhammasattha texts were composed in Pali and vernacular languages (Burmese, Mon, Arakanese, Shan, etc.), as well as in
    bilingual gloss versions (nissaya), and there is extensive testimony, dating from the mid-13th century onward, for their utilization by judges in contexts of dispute resolution. Aspects of the early history of this genre can be gleaned from lithic epigraphy, vernacular poetry, and bibliographic catalogues (piṭakat samuiṅḥ), although surviving dhammasattha treatises, transmitted in palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, can be dated no earlier than circa 1637, whereas the youngest examples of the tradition were written under British colonialism around 1900.

    For the past decade Christian Lammerts has been involved in the first major study of this genre—its textual histories, laws, and shifting modes of reception and jurisprudence—on the basis of extensive fieldwork in Burma and close investigation of the epigraphic corpus and manuscript archive, which preserves hundreds of discrete texts in multiple, sometimes highly variant, versions. In this presentation Lammerts will discuss the results of this project, drawn from his forthcoming book, Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE (University of Hawai’I Press).

    D. CHRISTIAN LAMMERTS is Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He is interested in the cultural and intellectual histories of Buddhism and religious law in Burma and Southeast Asia, and is currently at work on a study of
    juridical curses, oaths, and ordeals around of the Bay of Bengal from the late first
    millennium CE up to the early colonial era.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lammerts
    Assistant Professor, Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies, Rutgers University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 4th Return to Innocence – The Taiwanese Amis and the Work to Return, Recover and Reclaim their Heritage

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 4, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMInnis College
    Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue (at St. George, south of Bloor)
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Director Hu Tai-Li’s film “Returning Souls” tells the story of the Taiwanese indigenous people, the Amis, recovering their land, restoring customs and reclaiming their ancient artifacts.

    Following the film, Professor Scott Simon of the University of Ottawa’s School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies, based on two decades of ethnographic work in Taiwan, will discuss issues of indigenous rights and cultural change among the Amis and other indigenous peoples in order to understand Hu Tai-li’s film in the wider socio-political context.

    Professor Cara Krmpotich of University of Toronto’s iSchool Museum Studies program will draw on her ethnographic research with Canadian indigenous experiences of repatriation to discuss central themes of Director Hu Tai-Li’s film of indigenous Taiwanese efforts to repatriate material and ancestral remains, with a focus on the social, cultural, spiritual, museological and political issues evoked.

    Bart Testa, of University of Toronto’s Cinema Studies Institute, will moderate.

    PLEASE REGISTER AND ARRIVE 20 MINUTES BEFORE SCREENING TO ENSURE A SEAT

    Program:

    5:30 Doors open
    6:00 Welcome
    Remarks by Director-General Y.M. Catherine Hsu, Taipei Economic and Culture Office in Toronto
    6:05 Film screening of Returning Souls directed by Hu Tai-Li
    7:35 Presentations by Professor Scott Simon and Professor Cara Krmpotich
    8:05 Panel discussion and Q&A Moderated by Professor Bart Testa
    8:45 Reception

    Bios:

    Cara Krmpotich is Associate Professor, Museum Studies, at the iSchool. She researches and teaches in the areas of indigenous & museum relations; cultural property; critical collections management; and material culture and kinship. She leads a program that encourages hands-on artefact handling as a vehicle for collective memory work with urban Aboriginal seniors and has a long-term research partnership with the Haida Repatriation Committee.

    Scott Simon is Professor and Co-Chair in Taiwan Studies. He specializes in the anthropology of indigeneity in Taiwan, including issues of political autonomy, legal pluralism, and hunting rights. He continues to conduct ethnographic research in Hualien and Nantou, more recently by collaborating with hunters to study human-animal relations. His most recent book was published by Presses de l’Université Laval.

    Bart Testa is Associate Professor (teaching) at the Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto. His teaching includes courses on Chinese Cinemas, European, Asian and European auteurs, narrative theory and cinema, urbanism and film, experimental cinema, Science Fiction movies and other popular genres.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Scott Simon
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Ottawa

    Bart Testa
    Moderator
    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cara Krmpotich
    Speaker
    Faculty of Information (i-School), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    imagineNATIVE

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU)

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, March 5th Birth of a Notion: The Vimy Idea, 1917-2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, March 5, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, Trinity College
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    Description

    Vimy is more than a battle from the First World War. It is common to hear that Vimy marks the “birth of a nation,” a claim repeated in school textbooks, by politicians, and in the news. Yet what is meant by this phrase? Do Canadians actually believe that Canada was born at Vimy, 50 years after Confederation? How did the four-day battle of Vimy in April 1917 transform into an origin story? This was no militarist plot. While not all Canadians believed in Vimy’s importance, enough did, and the idea of Vimy was invigorated with the building of Walter Allward’s monument on the ridge. The monument’s unveiling in 1936 by King Edward VIII was attended by more than 6,000 Canadian veterans who crossed the Atlantic. Since then, Vimy has been incorporated into Canadian history, although its meaning has changed with each generation. In this year, the 100th anniversary of the battle, Dr. Tim Cook will explore the emergence of the Vimy idea, its changing meaning, and its endurance as a symbol of Canadian service and sacrifice.

    Dr. Tim Cook is a historian at the Canadian War Museum. He was the curator for the museum’s First World War permanent gallery, and he has curated numerous temporary, travelling and digital exhibitions. He has also authored tens books, most of which have been longlisted, shortlisted or awarded prizes, including the C.P. Stacey Prize for Military History (twice), the Ottawa Book Award (twice), the RBC Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction, the BC National Book Award, the J.W. Dafoe Book Prize, the Canadian Authors Association Literary Award and the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing. His newest book is Vimy: Battle and Legend (2017).
    In 2012, Dr. Cook was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contributions to Canadian history and in 2013 he received the Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media: The Pierre Berton Award. Dr. Cook is a Member of the Order of Canada.


    Speakers

    Dr. Tim Cook, C.M.
    Historian at the Canadian War Museum



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 7th Cities, Immigrant Diversity and Complex Problem Solving

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Cities play host to residents hailing from a wide range of countries. Theory suggests such immigrant diversity can influence worker productivity, both positively and negatively. Benefits flow from the idea that people born in different countries complement each other in problem solving and innovation, by enabling the combination of different skills, ideas and perspectives. But heterogeneity can also inhibit productivity by raising the costs of co-operation and spurring rent-seeking behavior. This project makes several contributions to a growing body of empirical work exploring these claims. First, it leverages a rich matched employer-employee dataset for the U.S. that enables us to better account for bias from non-random worker selection, while distinguishing between impacts flowing from diversity manifested at city- and workplace-scales. Second, we ‘stress-test’ motivating theory, examining the extent to which any benefits from diversity are concentrated among workers engaged in complex problem solving and innovation. Results suggest that the benefits of immigrant diversity outweigh the costs. Consistent with theory, the association is concentrated among workers engaged in industries where complex problem solving is particularly important. In light of continued controversy about the economic implications of immigration, this project suggests an additional channel by which immigration improves overall economic well-being.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Thomas Kemeny
    Department of Geography and Environment University of Southampton



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 7th The Road to Maidan: Contentious Politics in Ukraine, 1989-2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Revolution of Dignity was, beyond doubt, the product of the earlier Ukrainian protest events. From the eve of independence to Maidan of
    2013-2014 Ukrainian civil society developed rich repertoire of predominantly non-violent contentious tactics, passed directly – by the veteran activists, and indirectly – through media- from earlier to later events. The state was also learning to handle the protests in its own way, introducing a variety of repressive measures with the gradual development of authoritarian tendencies and possession of more effective coercive mechanisms. At the same time, the unprecedented violence that sparked in the winter of 2014 took many by surprise. The protest event seemed to get a causal power of its own, and previous experience provided little guidance to participants. In my presentation, I shall go through the main elements of EuroMaidan protest and suggest what can be traced back and what should be considered an innovation, and discuss the chances of these to repeat in the future cycles of contention in Ukraine.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Olga Zelinska
    Speaker
    PhD student in Sociology at the Graduate School for Social Research, Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences; Petro Jacyk Visiting Graduate Student

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 7th Prosecuting Sexual Violence in Conflict: Lessons from International Criminal Tribunals

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the past two decades, international criminal tribunals have adopted groundbreaking judgments convicting individuals for rape, sexual slavery and forced marriage committed during armed conflict and genocide in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and elsewhere. At the same time, these tribunals have had some very public setbacks, with sexual violence cases dismissed, charges acquitted, and investigations failed. What lessons can be learned from these experiences that can inform future cases at the International Criminal Court and other tribunals?

    This session will feature a keynote address by Michelle Jarvis, Deputy to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY), on her new book, “Prosecuting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence at the ICTY”. Responses will be provided by Linda Bianchi (formerly of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, now Department of Justice) and Valerie Oosterveld (Western Law) on whether the ICTY’s lessons can be applied on a global scale.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Western University

    Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada Partnership Grant


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 8th HIV Prevention, American Homonationalism in LGBT Rights Talk, and the Making-Up of the Medicalized MSM Malagasy Subject

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    CPHS Administrator
    416-946-0104


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 8th Understanding International Mining

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How does the mining industry impact global issues of development, human rights, and the environment, and what role can the industry, government, academia, and civil society play in addressing these impacts?
    The second annual student-led conference on Understanding International Mining will bring together leading actors to discuss how we understand this important issue. The conference will consist of two panels which will each focus on a different aspect of the overarching theme: the global mining industry.

    Panel 1: Human Rights & Development (10:00 – 11:30AM)

    LUNCH (60 MINS)

    Panel 2: Economic & Environmental Sustainability (12:30 – 2:00PM)

    Panel Speakers

    Human Rights & Development

    Bonne Lyn de Bartok – CEO and Founder of MacCormick IMC
    Shin Imai – Faculty of Law Professor at Osgoode Hall
    Jeffrey Davidson – Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor
    James Yap – Business and Human Rights Lawyer
    Moderator: Paul Cadario – Distinguished Fellow at Munk School of Global Affairs

    Economic & Environmental Sustainability

    Nolan Watson – President and CEO of Sandstorm Gold
    Chris Adachi – Manager, Sustainability Implementation & Carbon Strategy at Teck Resources Limited
    Tamara Brown – Engineer and VP Corporate Relations at Primero
    Alec Crawford – Senior Researcher at International Institute for Sustainable Development


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 9th Bulgarian Politics in the Post-Accession Era: The First Decade.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 9, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Distinguished Leaders in Bulgaria Lecture Series

    Description

    Venelin I. Ganev (Ph.D. University of Chicago, 2000) is a Professor in Political Science and a faculty associate of the Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies at Miami University of Ohio. His main fields of interest are postcommunist politics, democratization studies, constitutionalism, and modern social theory. His publications have appeared in East European Constitutional Review, American Journal of Comparative Law, Journal of Democracy, East European Politics and Societies, Communist and Postcommunist Studies, Slavic Review, Europe-Asia Studies and Comparative Studies in Society and History. He has also contributed chapters to several volumes that explore various aspects of institution-building in contemporary Europe. His first book, Preying on the State: The Transformation of Postcommunist Bulgaria was published in 2007 by Cornell University Press.

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Venelin Ganev
    Miami University, Oxford, Ohio


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Mr. and Mrs Daniel and Elizabeth Damov


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 10th INDePth Conference 2017: Worlding South Asia Beyond Borders

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 201710:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Interrogating Notions of Development and Progress (INDePth) is an annual undergraduate conference hosted by the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Founded by Contemporary Asian Studies major students, the series has held conferences on Indonesia, China, Korea and Japan. Our aim is to foster dialogue on Asia through interdisciplinary analysis. INDePth utilizes research methodologies offered by courses from the Asian Institute to unpack the prism of ‘Asia’ through notions of ‘development’ and ‘progress’.

    The theme for this year’s conference is South Asian Worlds. Dominant discourse within mainstream agencies such as the World Bank and IMF, domestic national programs and academic discourse imagine South Asia as an active site of intervention. Discourse that is embedded into the imagining and practice of institutions characterize ‘developing’ space as ‘backward’, ‘lacking’ or otherwise a systematic ‘standard’. Participants will engage with how such South Asian Worlds are simultaneously constructed through the human imagination and physically materialized through uneven processes of development practice. We aim to emphasize South Asia as a conceptual site of research that extends beyond national borders and traditional ‘area studies’.

    By doing so, we look at the ways in which the concept of Worlding challenges notions of ‘third world’ development discourse and helps to understand the region.

    Join us on March 10th for the 2017 Conference to debate and take part in workshops with fellow delegates, the executive members of the INDePth team, and academic speakers from leading universities in Canada and the United States.

    Keynote Address:

    Professor Chandrima Chakraborty, Department of English & Cultural Studies, McMaster University

    Moderators:

    Professor Rachel Silvey, Interim Director of the Asian Institute, Geography & Planning, University of Toronto
    Dr. Antonela Arhin, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto
    Professor Francis Cody, Department of Anthropology

    Schedule:

    10:30 AM – 11:00 AM Registration and Informal Lunch

    11:00 AM – 11:15 AM Conference Introduction

    11:15 AM – 12:00 AM Keynote Speech

    12:00 AM – 1:00 PM Panel 1: Remapping Boundaries

    1:00 PM – 1:45 PM Breakout Workshops

    1:45 PM – 2:10 PM Coffee Break

    2:10 PM – 2:30 PM Dance Performance

    2:30 PM – 4:00 PM Panel 2: Worlding Beyond Borders

    4:00 PM – 4:15 PM Conclusion

    4:15 PM – 6:00 PM Reception

    Contact

    Jae Park

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Woodsworth College Student Association

    Hart House Good Ideas Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 10th Green Japan: Combining Technological Innovation, Economic Growth and Environmental Sustainability

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    National governments the world over face the formidable challenge of figuring out how to sustain or enhance economic prosperity while contributing to the global effort to ensure environmental sustainability. The Government of Japan, together with the business community and civil society, have been wrestling with this issue for several decades. Japan has promoted the development and implementation of new products and services, urged commercial exports of environmental technologies and implemented stringent environmental protection measures. While far from the only nation seeking to produce “Green Growth,” the Government of Japan has encouraged a wide range of technological innovations, from electric and fuel cell vehicles and smart grid implementations to futuristic technologies designed to convert energy from outer space into electricity on earth. The Green Growth strategy remains largely untested, in part because of the inherent contradictions of seeking to expand economic activity while conserving energy, reducing pollution, and constraining the environmental impact of human beings. This presentation examines Japan’s commercial developments service innovations and explores the lessons to be learned from the Japanese approach to the promotion of Green Growth.

    Speaker Bio:

    Dr. Carin Holroyd is President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan. She has published extensively on aspects of Japan’s international trade, commercial relations with Canada, and national innovation policies in Japan. Her books cinclude Government, International Trade and Laissez Faire Capitalism: Canada, Australia and New Zealand’s Relations with Japan (McGill-Queen’s) and co-authored with Ken Coates, Japan and the Internet Revolution (Palgrave-Macmillan), Innovation Nation: Japanese Science and Technology in the 21st Century (Palgrave¬ Macmillan), Digital Media in East Asia: National Innovation and the Transformation of a Region. (Cambria Press) and The Global Digital Economy (Cambria). Her most recent book, Green Japan, Environmental Technologies and Economic Growth, will be released by the University of Toronto Press in 2017.

    * * *
    Save the Dates: October 12-15, 2017
    For an important conference on GREEN JAPAN organized by the Japan Studies Association of Canada (JSAC) and hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Carin Holroyd
    Speaker
    President, Japan Studies Association of Canada and Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan

    Kimberley Strong
    Chair
    Director, School of the Environment and Professor of Physics, University of Toronto

    Louis Pauly
    Discussant
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    School of the Environment


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 10th On the subject of "kampung": Discursive notes from Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 10, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will cover the subject of kampung, its recent fate and fortune, and whether its change is desirable? And how might the current change of kampung be understood in the context of capitalist modernization, urban governance, and politics of the city. The materials for the talk will be drawn from an on-going collaborative research with a university and notes taken from recent visits to Jakarta.

    Abidin Kusno is a professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. His recent publications include The Appearances of Memory: Mnemonic Practices of Architecture and Urban Form in  Indonesia (2010); After the New Order: Space, Politics, and Jakarta (2013); Visual Cultures of the Ethnic Chinese in Indonesia (2016).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 14th How Guestworker Programs are Made: The U.S.-Ontario Tobacco Worker Movement, 1920s-1960s

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 14, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the late 1920s to the 1960s, almost 2,000 migrants from the Southern United States travelled annually to Ontario to work on tobacco farms. In its early years, this migration system was primarily organized by elite brokers and by previous migrants operating within kinship networks. Over time, and especially during the Great Depression and World War II, governments on both sides of the border struggled to gain control over the movement, an effort that was challenged by employers and migrants alike. This talk explores the character and evolution of this migration system, using it as a case study to gain a better understanding of how guestworker programs are made and change over time. Race, state policy, and political economy in both sending and receiving regions all played key roles in this history. This little-known labour movement complicates our understanding of U.S. migration, demonstrating that the U.S. was at once a migrant-receiving and migrant-sending country. Its also provides an example of some of the complex linkages between the U.S. and Canada in the realms of migration and political economy.

    Ed Dunsworth is a third-year PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation is a transnational history of tobacco farm labour in Ontario, 1925-1985.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ed Dunsworth
    PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 15th Return to China or Taiwan?: The Korean War Hijacked by Prisoners

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 15, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    The Korean War was in fact two wars: the first was fought over territory from June 1950 to June 1951; the second was over prisoners, especially the Chinese prisoners wishing to “return to Taiwan,” from late 1951 to July 1953. While the first war restored territorial status quo ante, the second war’s only visible outcome was the “defection” of 14,220 Chinese prisoners to Taiwan and 7,574 North Korean prisoners to South Korea—at the cost of doubling the length of the war and numerous casualties on all sides. Contrary to the Communist allegation of an American conspiracy, this outcome was unplanned. Two separately conceived U.S. policies—prisoner reindoctrination and voluntary repatriation—became intertwined and resulted in the rise of anti-Communist prisoners, who soon hijacked the war agenda. The U.S. government became hostage to its own moralistic but ultimately hypocritical policy and to prisoners—a reality so embarrassing that it has remained largely unknown to the American people. Using archival documents and oral histories, this talk will examine the interplay between policies and prisoners’ actions. It will also chart the extraordinary experiences of several prisoner leaders.

    Speaker Bio:

    David Cheng Chang (常成) is an Assistant Professor of History at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in modern Chinese history from the University of California, San Diego in 2011. He studies the Korean War, the Cold War, U.S.-China relations, and the history of war photography.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    David Cheng Chang (常成)
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 16th Music of Survival: The Story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, John P. Robarts Research Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    The story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is one of courage and true grit – a vivid chronicle that celebrates the human spirit. This is the triumphant story of the original 17 members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus who survived World War II as a musical ensemble. The film brings out the deepest roots of a fragile tradition, celebrating the resiliency of a music culture that has survived centuries. Set against the backdrop of the war itself, the story reveals the ways that music and musicians are used and abused by political regimes.

    It provides an educational, informative and compelling perspective – the personal stories of the last two survivors inter cut with the collective history of the bandura throughout the ages. Interwoven with contemporary musical performances, the film illustrates the bandurist as bard, as seer, as spiritual emissary for the soul of the Ukrainian people, then and now, in Ukraine and beyond.

    Orest Sushko is a member of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, following in the footsteps of his father Makar Sushko, the first Canadian member of the Chorus in 1949 – and grandfather Paul Stepowy, a bandura craftsman and honorary patron of the Chorus. As an Emmy award-winning Re-recording mixer in both film and television, Orest has worked with a broad range of directors from David Cronenberg to Barry Sonnenfeld to Guillermo del Toro – television series including Orphan Black and documentaries from David Suzuki, to The North Face, The Patagonia and Alan Doyle of Great Big Sea.

    See http://musicofsurvival.com/ for more information about the film (includes the trailer)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Orest Sushko
    producer/director



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 17th The Age of Three Emperors: The Direction of US Foreign Policy and the Future of US-Japan Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    First Floor Conference Room
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    Abstract:

    America’s 45th president, Donald J. Trump, was inaugurated in January of this year. His unexpected victory was a surprise to many and it became the second major global shock in 2016 after Brexit. As an individual who has never held public office, he came to power by adroitly harnessing the anger of the American voter. Despite comparisons to past US presidents such as Jackson, TR, Nixon, and Reagan, in many ways he is a new type of leader that America has not witnessed since the beginning of the Republic. Although it will require many more months to be able to fully assess the new president’s policies, one can assume that his policies will be quite different than those of his predecessor.

    In a world which an undercurrent toward a power transition can be witnessed, in which direction will President Trump lead the US? Moreover, as a leader devoid of any strong ideology besides “Making America Great Again,” his policies will surely be much vaguer and harder to pin down. However, he has surrounded himself with advisors and senior administration officials who do not necessarily tow the same foreign policy position toward such countries as China and Russia. Considering that he also does not have full support of a few senior GOP leaders on matters of foreign policy, how will this multilevel tug-o-war play out? And amid an era of ever increasing uncertainties, what can we expect the future course of US foreign policy be, particularly toward Asia? Will the previous Asia Pivot policy become an Asia Pullback policy similar to Nixon’s Guam doctrine of the 1970s? Furthermore, how should Japan and other nations deal with an increasingly inward America that will be much less predictable and perhaps even more reckless? Through this presentation, I would like to present a possible geopolitical scenario of the future that incorporates the major powers of US, Japan, China, Russia, and the EU.

    Speaker:

    Tosh Minohara is Professor of Diplomacy at the Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University where he holds a joint appointment with the Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies. He received his B.A. in International Relations from University of California, Davis, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science and Diplomatic History from Kobe University. In the past, he has had various visiting appointments with such universities as Harvard University, University of California at Irvine, University of Iowa (Noguchi Distinguished Fellow), University of Oxford, Leiden University, Stockholm University, Kuwait University, Seoul National University, and most recently, Inha University, ROK. His main research themes are, from a historical perspective, the diplomatic, political, and security dimension of US-Japan relations. He is currently interested in applied history. He has published widely and his first monograph, The Japanese Exclusion Act and US-Japan Relations [in Japanese], was awarded the Shimizu Hiroshi Prize in 2002. He is also the editor of Tumultuous Decade: Empire, Society, and Diplomacy in 1930s Japan (University of Toronto Press, 2016) and Decade of the Great War: Japan and the Wider World during the 1910s (Brill, 2014). He is also the English translation editor of the forthcoming,The History of US-Japan Relations: From Perry to Present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). He has several op-ed columns and comments frequently for major new outlets throughout the world. In addition to NHK in Japan, he regularly appears as a navigator in several National Geographic programs.

    Discussants:

    David A. Welch is CIGI Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo, and Senior Fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, where he has recently been working on Asia-Pacific Security.

    Aleksandra Babovic is currently a PhD student at Kobe University Graduate School of Law with a specialization in Diplomatic History. She earned her MA degree from Paris School of International Affairs. She is a Lecturer at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies and Osaka University. Her research interests include Japanese post-war history, international criminal law and justice, and more specifically the Tokyo Tribunal.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Tosh Minohara
    Speaker
    Professor of U.S.-Japan Relations, International History and Security Studies, Graduate School of Law and Politics, Kobe University

    David Welch
    Discussant
    Munk School Fellow; CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo

    Aleksandra Babovic
    Discussant
    Lecturer, Department of Global Affairs, Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Japan

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 21st Innovation Policy in International Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Taylor, drawing on his acclaimed book The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology? will open the panel with a keynote address setting the international stage for innovation policy. He will be followed by Dr. Munro, responding to his arguments and positioning Canada within the global league of innovative nations. Concluding the panel will be Sagi Dagan, reflecting on these arguments from a practitioner’s perspective by sharing the experience of what is arguably the most successful innovation agency in the world since the 1970s. Professor Breznitz will moderate the panel, which will conclude with lessons for Canada as the federal government launches its new Innovation Agenda.

    Contact

    Jennifer Colvin
    416-9465670


    Speakers

    Mark Zachary Taylor
    Speaker
    Professor & Author of The Politics of Innovation: Why Some Countries Are Better Than Others at Science and Technology?

    Dr. Daniel Munro
    Speaker
    Director of Public Policy at the Conference Board of Canada

    Sagi Dagan
    Speaker
    Head of Growth Financing in Israel’s Innovation Authority

    Dan Breznitz
    Moderator
    Professor, Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 21st The Crisis of “Society” and the Explosion of “The Social”: Social Construction Projects in South Korea and China

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 21, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper, which I wrote with Seung-Cheol Lee, gives attention to the coexistence between increasing concerns about the “crisis” of society and increasing “social construction” projects exercised in the name of “the social.” Under circumstances where neoliberal doctrines penetrate deep into a realm of subjectification, how can we understand the reality that “society” is central to state governance and, furthermore, reconstructed as an ethical field? With an eye to recent projects of social construction in South Korea and China, this study aims to answer the following inquiries. How can social construction projects be analyzed and contextualized in countries where the state did not go through the so-called stage of “social government” found in the Western welfare state? How does the state accomplish a double mission to disperse its functions to social realms and re-articulate managerial power when it intervenes in social construction projects? How do various participants in social construction projects in the two countries experience and react to the tensions between “society” as the assemblage of social rights, solidarities, and socialities, and “society” as the target of state governance and engineered projects?

    Mun Young Cho is an associate professor of the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Yonsei University, South Korea. Her research focuses on poverty, labor, development, and youth in China and South Korea. She is the author of the book The Specter of “The People”: Urban Poverty in Northeast China (Cornell University Press, 2013).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for the Study of Diaspora and Transnationalism, University of Toronto

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Mun Young Cho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, South Korea)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Diaspora and Transnationalism Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 22nd Socioeconomic inequalities across birth outcome distributions: A comparative study of Canada and its peer nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 22nd Writing the Commune: The Lived and the Conceived

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Further information to follow


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 23rd The Double: Dubbing Western Films in the Soviet Union

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    This presentation discusses the incorporation of Western films into Soviet cities and visual culture during the 1950s and 60s. In this talk, I will compare Soviet dubbing with various translation theories debated in the 1950s; describe how the process altered Western films to create what I call sensory forgery – the amalgam of foreign materiality and Russian language; and explore the implications of the incongruity between speech and image for audience reception.

    I am a historian of Russia and the Soviet Union. The enduring concern of my research is how texts, images, objects, and people move across geopolitical and ideological borders. This interest has led me to focus on translation practices and cultural diplomacy in my first book, Western Culture in the Soviet Union, a history of the Soviet opening to the West during the 1950s and 1960s. I am beginning research for a second book, Weary Sun, a history of tango in Russia and the Soviet Union. I teach at the University of Chicago.


    Speakers

    Eleonor Gilburd
    Department of History, University of Chicago



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 23rd From Belleville to Notre-Dame-des-Landes: Today's Communal Imaginary

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20173:00PM - 4:30PMSenior Common Room, Room 317
    Glendon College, York University
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    Description

    Further information to follow


    Speakers

    Kristin Ross
    Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 23rd The West in search of its identity in three simultaneous states of mind: Pre-modern, modern and post-modern

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20175:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Thanos Veremis is Professor Emeritus of Political history at the University of Athens, Department of European and International Studies and Founding Member of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP).

    He has been Research Associate, at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London 1978-79; Visiting Scholar, Center for European Studies, Harvard Univ. 1983; Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton Univ. 1987; Visiting Fellow, St. Antony’s College, Oxford 1993-94; Constantine Karamanlis Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford Massachusetts (2000-2003); and more recently President of the National Council of Education, 2004-2010 .


    Speakers

    Professor Thanos Veremis
    ELIAMEP Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, Athens, Greece


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - DAY 1

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20179:30AM - 3:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Conference Program (Day I):

    Panel 1: What Was the Revolution in Ukraine?
    9:45–11:45 a.m.

    “Ukrainians in 1917. Not so Rural and not so Russified”
    Stephen Velychenko. Research Fellow, Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    “‘The Most Unconquerable Stronghold of Our Rightlessness will be Captured:’ Jews between Emancipation, Ukrainization, and Pogroms in 1917”
    Mihaly Kalman. Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies, Central European University

    “‘Kievlianin’: Cultural Life in Kyiv between the February and October Revolutions of 1917”
    Roman Tashlitskyy, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

    Panel 2: Building the Soviet Ukrainian State in the 1920s and 1930s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Reconciling the Irreconcilable? Left-Wing Ukrainian Nationalism and the Soviet Regime”
    Christopher Gilley, independent scholar, Durham, U.K., and author of The “Change of Signposts” in the Ukrainian Emigration: A Contribution to the History of Sovietophilism in the 1920s

    “Heirs of Soviet Ukrainian Statehood: Children and Revolutionary Tutelage in Odesa”
    Matthew Pauly, Associate Professor, Department of History, Michigan State University

    “Chronicling the Jewish Attitude Toward Ukrainian Statehood: Writing and Rewriting Bolshevik History in the 1920s”
    Myroslav Shkandrij, Professor, Department of German and Slavic Studies, University of Manitob

    THE CONFERENCE CONTINUES ON MARCH 25. PLEASE REGISTER FOR DAY 2 SEPARATELY IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON BOTH DAYS

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Forget Chineseness: On the Geopolitics of Cultural Identification

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:

    Forget Chineseness provides a critical interpretation not only of discourses of Chinese identity—Chineseness—but also of how they have reflected differences between “Chinese” societies, such as in Hong Kong, Taiwan, PRC, Singapore and communities “overseas”. It asserts that identity has meaning not only in cultural, representational terms but is moreover a product of its embeddedness in specific entanglements of modernity, colonialism, nation-state formation, and globalization. By articulating these processes underlying institutional practices vis-à-vis public mindsets, it is thus possible to elucidate various epistemic moments that lay the basis for their socio-political transformation.
    From a broader perspective, this should have salient ramifications for prevailing discussions of identity politics. Not only has the concept of identity been predicated on flawed notions of ethnicity and culture in the social “sciences”, but it has been acutely exacerbated by polarizing assumptions that drive our understanding of identity “politics”.

    Speaker Bio:

    Allen Chun is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. His research interests include socio-cultural theory, (trans)national identity, and (post)colonial formations. Most of his work has dealt with Chinese-speaking societies, contemporary and late traditional. In addition to a monograph, Unstructuring Chinese Society: The Fictions of Colonial Practice and the Changing Realities of “Land” in the New Territories of Hong Kong (2000), he edited a special double issue of Cultural Studies (vol. 14, nos. 3–4), “(Post)Colonialism and Its Discontents”; a special issue of Social Analysis (vol. 46, no. 2), “Global Dissonances”; and co-edited a book, Refashioning Pop Music in Asia: Cosmopolitan Flows, Political Tempos and Aesthetic Industries (2004). His major articles have appeared in diverse journals, including Toung Pao, Late Imperial China, History and Anthropology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Journal of Historical Sociology, Current Anthropology, Theory Culture & Society, boundary 2, Communal/Plural, Cultural Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Critique of Anthropology, Anthropological Theory, and positions.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Allen Chun
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Indian Visual Culture and Contemporary Art, Department of Visual Studes

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 25th A Century of Ukrainian Statehoods: 1917 and Beyond - Day 2

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 25, 20179:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Conference Program (Day II):

    Panel 3: Soviet State-Building and Ukrainian Culture
    10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

    “What was Soviet and Ukrainian about Soviet Ukrainian Culture?”
    Mayhill C. Fowler, Assistant Professor of History, Stetson University

    “In Search of Own “Self”: Anticolonial Discourse of Soviet Ukrainian Cinema in the 1920s”
    Yana Prymachenko, Researcher, Institute of the History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences

    “Rehabilitating a Mythology: The Ukrainian SSR’s Foundational Myth after Stalin”
    Markian Dobczansky, Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Panel 4: Toward a Consolidated Statehood? The Ukrainian SSR in the 1960s–1980s
    1:30–3:30 p.m.

    “Corruption and Ideological Subversion: Soviet Ukrainian Political Elites in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the 1970s–80s”
    Olga Bertelsen, Research Fellow, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

    “Making Soviet Ukraine Ukrainian: Ideas of Ukrainian Statehood in the Ukrainian Diaspora of Canada and the USA (1960–80s)”
    Simone Attilio Bellezza, Research Fellow, Department of Humanities, University of Trento, and Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    “Building Socialism, Being a Professional: Everyday Life and Professional Identity in Late Soviet Ukraine”
    Oleksandra Gaidai, Senior Research Fellow, Museum of History of Kyiv

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS DAY II OF A 2-DAY CONFERENCE. IF YOU WISH TO ATTEND THE CONFERENCE ON DAY I (MARCH 24) AS WELL, PLEASE REGISTER FOR IT SEPARATELY.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    W.K. Lypynsky East European Research Institute

    Department of History

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 29th Putin’s War Against Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 29, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Taras Kuzio will give a presentation based on his book that will be published in February 2017. The West has woken up to the uncomfortable fact that Russia has long believed it is at war with them the most egregious example of which is Vladimir Putin’s hacking of the US elections. For Western governments, used to believing in the post-Cold War peace dividend, it came as a shock to find the liberal international order is under threat from an aggressive Russia. The ‘End of History – loudly proclaimed in 1991 – has been replaced by the ‘Return of History.’ Putin’s war against Ukraine came three years earlier when he launched an unprovoked war in the Donbas and annexed the Crimea. Putin’s war against Ukraine has killed 20,000 civilians, Ukrainian and Russian soldiers and combatants, forced a third of the population of the Donbas to flee, illegally nationalised Ukrainian state and private entities in the Crimea, destroyed huge areas of the infrastructure and economy of the Donbas, and created a black hole of crime and soft security threats to Europe. Putin’s war against Ukraine is the first book length study of how Russian nationalism, chauvinism, anti-Semitism and crime are driving Putin’s belief that Russians and Ukrainians are ‘one people’ forever united in the Russian World. Written by Taras Kuzio, a leading authority on contemporary Ukraine, Putin’s War Against Ukraine is a product of his long-term expertise in Ukrainian politics, fieldwork in the Russian-speaking eastern and southern Ukraine and his visits to the front lines of the Donbas combat zone. The book debunks the myths surrounding Europe’s biggest crisis since World War II and provides an incisive analysis for policy makers, journalists and scholars as to why Putin is at war with the West and Ukraine.

    Taras Kuzio has analysed crime, corruption, politics, and nationalism in the USSR, Ukraine, Russia and Eurasia for over three decades as a journalist, consultant and academic. Educated in the UK, he received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, MA in Soviet and Eastern European Studies from the University of London, and Phd in political science from University of Birmingham, UK. He was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale University. Currently a Senior Research Associate at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta, and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University. Previously he has held positions as a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, Japan, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Senior Fellow at the School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, Visiting Professor at the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University and Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. Taras Kuzio has been a consultant to different branches of the US government, including team leader on a USAID spring 2015 assessment of democracy, governance and human rights in Ukraine. He has prepared expert testimony in political asylum cases and consultancy on oligarchs, corporate raiding and due diligence for legal and business clients. As a public intellectual he has been a frequent guest on television, radio and print media, including during the Euromaidan, Russian invasion of the Crimea and the Donbas conflict. Over a 3-decade journalistic career he has authored 1, 400 articles on post-communist, Ukrainian and Russian politics and international affairs for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Al Jazeera, Financial Times, UPI (United Press International), New Eastern Europe, and specialist publications by Jane’s Information Group and Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty. His most recent book Ukraine: Democratization, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (June 2015) surveys modern Ukrainian political history from 1953 to the present. In 2013-2016, he undertook 15 visits to eastern Ukraine and the Donbas conflict zone to research the book Putin’s War Against Ukraine: Revolution, Nationalism, and Crime (2017). He is the author and editor of an additional 15 books, including Open Ukraine. Changing Course towards a European Future Democratic Revolution in Ukraine (2011), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007) and Ukraine-Crimea-Russia: Triangle of Conflict (2007). Dr. Kuzio has guest edited 12 special issues of academic journals Problems of Post-Communism, East European Politics and Society, Nationalities Papers, Journal f Communist Studies and Transition Politics and Communist and Post-Communist Studies and authored over 100 think tank monographs, book chapters, and scholarly articles.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Taras Kuzio
    University of Alberta


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 30th The Looming Illiberal World Order, Israel and World Jewry

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Yossi Shain is the Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University where he also serves as Head of TAU’s School of Political Science, Government and International Affairs, head of the Abba Eban Graduate Studies Program in Diplomacy and Director of the Frances Brody Institute for Applied Diplomacy. He is also a Full Professor of Comparative Government and Diaspora Politics at Georgetown University, and the Founding Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization (PJC) at Georgetown. In 2007, he served (pro-bono) as President of Western Galilee College. Shain earned his B.A. (Philosophy-1981 cum laude) and M.A. (Political Science-1983) degrees from Tel Aviv University and received his Ph.D. in Political Science (with distinction) from Yale University in 1988. Shain is the author and editor of 8 books which won wide acclaim, and published numerous articles in academic journals. He also writes newspaper columns including a regular Op-Eds to Yediot Achronot, Israel’s leading daily, and serves as commentator on Israeli and international media. In 2016 Shain was appointed as a member of Israel’s Council for Higher Educational, and he is now heading Israel’s National committee on rejuvenating the liberal arts and the humanities.

    Chemi Shalev is a senior columnist and U.S. analyst for the widely respected Haaretz news organization. He has recently returned to Israel after five years in New York, where he served as U.S. editor and correspondent, writing about U.S. politics, U.S.-Israeli relations and the American Jewish community. He will continue to cover these issues and to report and comment on Israeli politics and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process from his home near Tel Aviv. Mr. Shalev writes and lectures in both Hebrew and English. He is published in Haaretz’s print editions as well as on its website in Hebrew, Haaretz.co.il, and English, Haaretz.com. He has been covering Arab-Israeli conflict, US-Israeli relations, Israel’s internal politics and American Jewry for over thirty years. Previously he served as diplomatic correspondent and commentator for several major Israeli dailies, including Maariv, Davar, Yisrael Hayom and Jerusalem Post. Mr Shalev’s columns on American and Israeli affairs are frequently cited in major newspapers throughout the world. He has been a guest-commentator on CNN, BBC, Sky, CBS and other television networks during times of Middle East crisis and has served as CNN’s resident analyst during several Israeli election campaigns. For many years, Shalev was the Jerusalem correspondent for the New York-based Jewish weekly The Forward and has also served as associate editor of the Australian Jewish News. He is married, has three daughters and lives in Givatayim, Israel.


    Speakers

    YOSSI SHAIN
    Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University

    CHEMI SHALEV
    Haaretz news organization


    Sponsors

    Political Science, University of Toronto

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st Decoding the Digital Debate

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20178:00AM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    The digital realm is wired into our everyday lives. While the internet has offered information liberation, economic opportunity and increased global connection, our reliance on it exposes us to threats from state and non-state adversaries. Opinions on these threats are widely debated: some believe a Cyber Pearl Harbour is imminent, others argue there is current cyber threat inflation. On the civilian side, there exists a tug-of-war between the right to privacy and domestic surveillance.
    The Digital Debate is a highly contested arena, untangling the conflicting theoretical and practical debates requires thoughtful input from all sectors across each discipline.
    As states work to navigate various legal and normative frameworks in cyberspace, comprehension on the various challenges is necessary. This one-day event will bring together actors from academia, think tanks, government, private sector and civil society to engage on topics from cyber war and state censorship of information to international law.

    TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
    8:00am – 8:25am Breakfast
    8:30am – 10:00am PANEL 1
    10:05am – 10:15am Break
    10:20am – 11:50am PANEL 2
    11:55am – 12:40pm Lunch
    12:45pm – 2:15pm PANEL 3
    2:20pm – 2:30pm Break
    2:35pm – 4:05pm PANEL 4
    4:10pm – 4:20pm Concluding Remarks
    4:30pm – End of Event

    PANEL 1: UNTANGLING THE NARRATIVE
    The digital debate is a crowded space with contributors from each sector and discipline shaping emerging narratives. In evaluating the potential for cyber war, opinions vary greatly between imminent threat and unlikely skepticism. Media coverage can, at times, be sensationalist. The high technicality of cyberspace and computer networks leaves little room for general public expertise. Yet, productive policymaking regarding all areas – from education and business to security – requires cooperation. This panel will comb through the myriad of voices contributing to the field and attempt to identify points of intersection, which may be capitalized for greater collaboration.

    PANEL 2: SURVEILLANCE, CENSORSHIP & HUMAN RIGHTS ONLINE
    There are significant challenges facing the balance between government surveillance and use of data analytics and a citizen’s privacy and civil liberties. Digital whistleblowers have provided a platform for increased public knowledge on government intelligence operations. At the same time, not all governments use the Internet or information technology for good. Non-state actors, like ISIL, continue to use online networks for recuritment and information campaigns. This panel will hear from a variety of voices on the balance between national security and civil liberties.

    PANEL 3: UNDERSTANDING TECHNICAL CAPABILITIES IN CYBERSPACE
    Computer networks and infrastructure are vulnerable to attacks and intrusions by people and organizations across entirely different jurisdictions. Some claim that attributing these cyber attacks are difficult due to the technical nature of cyberspace, others argue that a lack of political will is the true obstacle. The military and intelligence communities are constantly concerned that adversaries can penetrate nuclear command, control, and communication systems, and policy-makers worry that hackers can shut down entire city grids. Many argue that cyber offense dominates cyber defense due to the numerous vulnerabilities in computer networks and critical infrastructure. This panel will attempt to address these technical complexities and seek to find ways in which computer networks and infrastructure can be more resilient to attacks and intrusions.

    PANEL 4: A FRAMEWORK FOR INTERSTATE RELATIONS
    Concerns over how states interact with and exploit each other’s software and cyber infrastructure have been around since at least the 1960s. From deterrence to cooperation, disagreements in international relations theory and practice about cyber security grow stronger, as progress in understanding the best path forward becomes weaker. On the legal side, understanding how domestic laws apply to cyber security is a difficult task for any state internally, understanding how a state’s cyber actions are governed by international law is even more challenging. This panel will explore the current theoretical and practical gaps in the cyber debate within international relations and evaluate the international legal frameworks applicable to cyberspace.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st A Remittance Forest in Java; Turning Migrant Labour into Agrarian Capital

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
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    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    lunch will be served in the Faculty Lounge at 12:00pm; talk begins at 12:30pm

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nancy Peluso
    UC Berkeley



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st Isaac Julien: Artist's Talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Ave.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This lecture was rescheduled from Jan. 23rd to March 31, 4-6 pm.

    Registration is not required for this event. Seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Isaac Julien is a Turner prize nominated artist and filmmaker. Earlier works include Young Soul Rebels (1991), which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), and Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996). Julien has pioneered a form of multi-screen installations with works such as Western Union: Small Boats (2007), Ten Thousand Waves (2010), andPlaytime: Kapital (2014).

    Julien was a participant in the 56th Biennale di Venezia, curated by Okwui Enwezor (2015). He has exhibited his work in major museums and institutions across the world including the nine screen of Ten Thousand Waves at Museum of Modern Art, New York, at Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and more recently Playtime and Kapital at El Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City. Julien’s work is included in the collections of institutions around the globe. In 2013, a monographic survey of his career to date, Riot, was published by MoMA, NY.

    Julien is currently producing a new work that is a poetic meditation on aspects of the life and architecture of Lina Bo Bardi, entitled 7 Songs for Lina Bo Bardi. The first chapter of this work, Stones Against Diamonds was shown during 2015’s La Biennale di Venezia, Art Basel, and Art Basel Miami Beach. Julien was Chair of Global Art at University of Arts London (2014-2016), and is the recent recipient of the 83rd James Robert Brudner Memorial Prize and Lecture at Yale University (2016).

    Presented by: Cinema Studies Institute, Centre for Women and Gender Studies & Innis College
    Co-sponsors: Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs; Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies; Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Isaac Julien
    artist and filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    Centre for Women and Gender Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Tuesday, April 4th The Making of a President and the Unmaking of Political Parties: France 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 4, 20174:30PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Arthur Goldhammer
    Senior Fellow, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 6th Performing Revolution: Violence and Dissent in China's Red Guard Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMFirst Floor Conference Room, Jackman Humanities Building, 262 Bloor St W
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    From 1966 to 1968, students and workers in urban China were embroiled in deadly factional battles in what many of them believed to be a revolution of a lifetime – the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the middle of factional violence, they also expressed radical ideas of political dissent. Based on the recently published book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that both violence and dissent were the results of the dramatic enactment of a revolutionary culture. The mechanism of this enactment was revolutionary competition. This conclusion has direct implications for understanding the role of political culture in collective violence in today’s world.

    Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols. 2003). He is the editor of Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Victor Pickard, forthcoming), China’s Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Guobin Yang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th The representation of 'Zainichi-Chosenjin'(Korean residents in Japan) in South Korea in the 1970s: Mass-media and representation of home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMMain Activity Hall, 2nd Floor
    Multi-faith Centre
    569 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    In this speech I would like to tell you how the ‘home-visiting project’ in 1975 has represented in the mass media in South Korea, and that this particular method of representation has been targeted. I want to talk about the representation of the Zainichi- Chosenjin(在日朝鮮人) in the 1970s reflect today’s South Korea rather than the realistic reconstruction of the surrounding home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan. The Zainichi-Chosenjin refer to ancestry of chosen(Korea) peninsula and their descendants who defected to Japan from colonial rule, regardless of nationality, belong to the Japanese colonial rule. In the 1970s, however, Zainichi-Chosenjin was understood as the image of ‘Pro-North Korea’ and ‘Converted chongnyeon (在日朝鮮人總聯合會)’ in South Korea. In 1975, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan began in the South Korean government’s intention to gain dominance over the North Korean regime. At the same time, it was an active national anti-communistic tourism project, which is distinguished from the “North Korea Repatriation Project”(歸國事業) in 1959.

    On the surface, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan appeared to be based on humanitarianism. By December 29, 1975, the number of visitors to South Korea was about 1,600. If the North Korea Repatriation Project was exodus for the settlement of paradise of socialism, home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan was the anti-communistic tourism for the purpose of denying the dark past as pro-North Korea by showing the rapid development of South Korea. In the 1970s, the mass media in South Korea represented Zainichi-Chosenjin as the converted to South Korea(“Total System converted collectively, 總轉向體制). However, the anti-communistic project planned by Yushin government, the National Intelligence Service, were not intended for Zainichi-Chosenjin. In Conclusion, the issue of dispersed family between North and South Korea, legal status concerning Zainichi-Chosenjin was not discussed. Instead converting of Zainichi-Chosenjin to South Korea was represented as victory of South Korea in competition of Cold War.

    Kim Won is an associate professor of political science at the Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies. Now he reserches at Hiroshima University in Japan for investigating memories of Zainichichosejin in era of cold war. Recently he presented “Stow away, border and nationality : Atomic notebook tial by Sohn Jin-doo victim of Korean atomic bomb”(2016). His interests include reemberinig of East Asia, labor history, and oral history. He is the author of several books including Factory Girl: Antihistory of Her (2006), Ghost of Park-Jung Hee Era(2011), Uprising June in 1987 (2009), The Disappearing Place of Politics (2008), Memories about the 1980s: Subculture and Mass Politics of Korean Students in the 1980s (1999).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Won
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies

    Jesook Song
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Bookish Transactions in the Countryside: Missionary Print in nineteenth-century rural India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle
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    Description

    Coinciding with the rise of Protestant missionary activity, the spread of print technology in nineteenth-century South Asia introduced the cheap, mass-produced book in Indian languages and led to a boom in religious print. Despite the considerable body of work on Christian missionaries’ pioneering role in vernacular printing and their use of print for proselytizing, little attention has been paid to the impact of Christian tracts in the low-literacy environment of rural India. This talk examines how missionaries used the printed tract as both an object of transaction and a tool of conversion in their encounters with prospective converts in the Indian countryside. It also explores the understudied role of Indian colporteurs and catechists in disseminating Christian tracts. In tracing the shifting status of the tract as gift and saleable object, I outline the challenges of the missionary print enterprise, while drawing attention to the material dimensions of the book.

    Ulrike Stark is Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history. She is the author of An Empire of Books: The Naval Kishore Press and the Diffusion of the Printed Word in Colonial India (2007) and is currently completing a biography of Raja Sivaprasad ‘Sitara-e Hind.’

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ulrike Stark
    Speaker
    Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Transcendence in a Secular World: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall
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    Description

    The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

    I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions—particularly of China and India– that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic: separating God or the human subject from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOS, quasi-governmental and inter-governmental agencies committed to to the inviolability or sacrality of the ‘commons’ will need to find common cause with these communities struggling to survive.

    Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. Born and educated in India, he received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was Professor of History and East Asian Studies at University of Chicago (1991-2008) and Raffles Professor and Director of Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

    His books include Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) winner of Fairbank Prize of the AHA and Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA, Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014; discussion of the book can be found in http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/world/asia/china-religion-prasenjit-duara.html?ref=world

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 13th Provisional Authority: Police, Order, and Security in India Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 13, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.

    Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.

    Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.
    Beatrice Jauregui is assistant professor at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Global Policing and Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies and Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute

    Frank Cody
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; and Department Of Anthropology, UTM

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, UTM

    Kevin O’Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 19th The Holodomor-Genocide against the Ukrainian Nation in the Context of World Genocides

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Myroslava Antonovych
    Visiting Professor at the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium; the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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