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October 2014

  • Thursday, October 30th Jain Engagements with the Rāmāyaṇa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2014-2015 Shri Roop Lal Jain Lecture Series

    Description

    The story of Rāma, first told in Vālmīki’s Rāmāyaṇa, has made a considerable impact on the social, political, cultural and religious life in South Asia and beyond. Though the Sanskrit epic Rāmāyaṇa is the oldest surviving, and in many ways normative Rāma story, it is just one of a plethora of tellings, adaptations of the Rāma narrative by artists and composers from different social, geographical and ideological backgrounds who rework the story in accordance with their own particular agendas. Jain authors too engaged with this story. This lecture will look at the two different ways in which Jains confronted the Rāma story and its growing popularity: by openly rejecting it on the one hand, and by appropriating it on the other.

    Eva de Clercq received her PhD in Oriental languages and cultures from Ghent University (Belgium) in 2003 with a thesis “Critical study of Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu”, a Jain adaptation of the Rāmāyaṇa in Apabhraṃśa. Since then, she has worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Ghent University, SOAS London and the University of Würzburg (Germany) with projects on the Jain adaptations of the Sanskrit epics and Apabhraṃśa literary culture. In 2010 she was appointed assistant professor at Ghent University, where she teaches Sanskrit, Prākrit, Hindi (esp. Brajbhāṣā), Indian literature and Religious traditions of India.

    For questions please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Eva de Clercq
    Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent University, Blandijnberg


    Sponsors

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Religious Genealogies of Contemporary South Asia Colloquium

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 30th The United States and Israel in a Rapidly Changing Middle East

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 30, 20145:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs - 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Dr. Migdal is the Robert F. Philip Professor of International Studies at the University of Washington’s Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Dr. Migdal was formerly an associate professor of Government at Harvard University and senior lecturer at Tel-Aviv University. Among his books are Peasants, Politics, and Revolution; Palestinian Society and Politics; Strong Societies and Weak States; State in Society; Through the Lens of Israel; The Palestinian People: A History (with Baruch Kimmerling); and, Boundaries and Belonging.


    Speakers

    Derek J. Penslar
    Chair
    Samuel Zacks Professor of Jewish History, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Professor Joel Migdal
    Speaker
    Robert F. Philip Professor of International Studies at the University of Washington’s Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies


    Sponsors

    Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 31st Centennial Workshop on France and World War I

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 31, 20142:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event will be held in English.

    Moderator, Eric JENNINGS, University of Toronto

    Bruno CABANES (Ohio State University). “Sortir de la Grande Guerre”: New Perspectives on the Transition from War to Peace

    Nicolas OFFENSTADT (Université Paris I) “Memory and Memories of the French Veterans of the First World War in the Public Sphere, 1919-2014 : a global reappraisal”

    Richard FOGARTY (University at Albany, SUNY) “Empire, Race, and Religion in the Great War”

    Leonard SMITH (Oberlin College, USA) French Historiography of the Great War and the ‘Return to Experience’

    Olivier WIEVIORKA (ENS Cachan), “One Memory for Two World Wars?”

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Commission du Centenaire (French Government)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 31st QWERTY is Dead, Long Live QWERTY! Lin Yutang, the MingKwai Chinese Typewriter, and the Birth of Input in Twentieth-Century China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 31, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In China, the QWERTY keyboard and traditional typing practices are dead and have been reborn as innovative technolinguistic-cum-exstitential condition of writing referred to as “input”, or “Shuru”. In contrast to traditional typing methods, in which the typer relies on onto that we now refer to as “input” (shuru). In contrast to the world of “typing,” in which the typer relies on onte-to-one correspondence between symbols-upon-the-keys and symbols -upon-the-screen, “input” is more a form of telecommunication than inscription: the user sends out alphabetically coded transmission to onboard software known as an Input Method Editor (IME). The IME then returns to the user a menu of Chinese characters known as “candidates”. Thus, the Chinese computer user uses the QWERTY keyboard in an iterative process of code, candidacy, and confirmation.

    The input system in China, however predates computers. The first input system was a 1940′s mechanical typewriter called MingKwai Chinese typewriter, invented by noted liguist and cultural commentor Lin Yutang. In this talk, historian Thomas S. Mullaney will chart out the historical origins of input and its evolution alongside evolving technologies.

    Thomas S. Mullaney is a Professor of Chinese History at Stanford University. He is the author of Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China and Critical Han Studies: The History, Representation and Identity of China’s Majority.
    His current book project, The Chinese Typewriter: A Global History, examines China’s development of a modern, nonalphabetic information infrastructure encompassing telegraphy, typewriting, word processing, and computing. This project has received three major awards and fellowships, including the 2013 Usher Prize, a three-year National Science Foundation fellowship, and a Hellman Faculty Fellowship.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Thomas S. Mullaney
    Professor, Chinese History, Stanford University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2014

  • Saturday, November 1st Munk School Undergraduate Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 1, 201411:00AM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs - 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Thinking about applying to the University of Toronto? Are you a UofT student interested in studying global affairs? Join us on November 1, 2014 and learn what opportunities for research and learning the Munk School of Global Affairs offers undergraduate students.

    Why an undergraduate program at the Munk School?

    The Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto undertakes advanced research and education on the challenges, organizations, and ideas that are reshaping the global landscape.Its scholars, practitioners, and students tackle global problems in state-of-the-art research labs on the geopolitics of cyberspace, digital diplomacy, global economic policy, global justice, and more. From research centres such as the Citizen Lab and the Social Innovation Lab, to teaching programs like the Contemporary Asian Studies program and the Peace, Justice, and Conflict Studies program, students at the Munk School have the opportunity to explore virtually any topic in global affairs.

    Why attend the Open House?

    The Open House will have three lectures given by three faculty members here at the Munk School of Global Affairs: Professor Rob Austen from European Studies, Professor Rachel Gordon from American Studies, and Professor Dylan Clark from Contemporary Asian Studies. Attending one of these “mini-seminars” will allow you to see what a class is like in these programs, and demonstrate the scope of the trans-disciplinary teaching and learning practiced in Munk School programs.

    There will also be an information session about the extra-curricular activities that our students participate in, delivered by the students themselves. These activities range from student unions, to international trips, to case competitions, and student-run conferences.

    Finally, if you are interested in Munk ONE or Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies, there will be admissions information sessions, which will teach you everything you need to know to submit a stellar admissions application.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd – Wednesday, November 5th Global Health Summit: Creating a Pandemic of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20148:00AM - 4:30PMMaRS, 101 College Street, Toronto
    Tuesday, November 4, 20148:00AM - 6:00PMMaRS, 101 College Street, Toronto
    Wednesday, November 5, 20148:00AM - 6:30PMMaRS, 101 College Street, Toronto
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    Description

    Equitable creation and spread of health, not just the more traditional focus on the fight against disease and avoidable causes of death, must be the main purpose of public health. Accelerating this shift is more urgent than ever, now that humans are becoming an urban species plagued by non-communicable diseases, financial crises, social disparity, global climate change and ineffectual polarized political structures that are threatening the sustainability of the species.
    The Global Health, Equity and Innovation Summit will bring together thought leaders, who will explore how best to create a pandemic of health. The program of the Summit will develop from a foundational theme, “Creating and Spreading Health”. A groundbreaking scholarly agenda will emanate through the following five sub-themes (“Virus strains”):
    Preventing the Preventable, Treating the Treatable, Transcending the Inevitable: What is the Gold Standard for Health Systems?
    Urbanism, Health, and the Growth of Megacities: When is more, more?
    Politics, Privilege and Power: What Really Determines Global Health Inequities?
    Achieving Convergence: What Kind of Life should Future Generations Experience?
    Global Big Data: How can Big Data Accelerate Global Health Progress?

    Each subtheme will focus on the ‘sweet spot’ located at the intersection of three fundamental areas: ‘health’; ‘equity’; and ‘innovation’.

    For more information and to register, please visit https://pandemicofhealth.ca/


    Speakers

    The Hon. Marc Lalonde
    PC, OC, QC, Former Minister of Health and Welfare, Government of Canada



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Examining the Proposed Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20149:30AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The provincial Ministers responsible for securities regulation in British Columbia, Ontario, Saskatchewan and New Brunswick and the Minister of Finance Canada released a memorandum of agreement on September 8, 2014 setting out the terms and conditions to establish a Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System. Consultation drafts of the proposed provincial and federal legislation that are key elements of the legislative framework for the Cooperative System were also released for public comment until November 7, 2014.

    The Centre for the Legal Profession at the University of Toronto invites you to attend a Program entitled “Examining the Proposed Cooperative Capital Markets Regulatory System” on Monday, November 3, 2014, moderated by Professor Anita Anand, Academic Director of the Centre for the Legal Profession. Representatives from the participating governments, academics and securities practitioners will be participating in this timely and important discussion.

    Details:

    Monday, November 3, 2014 9:30am – 12pm
    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    (1 Devonshire Place, Toronto)

    9:30am Registration and light breakfast
    10:00am Panel discussion
    12:00pm Light lunch

    Cost: $65 (No fee for academics and students however registration is mandatory). This Program provides LSUC substantive CPD credits; please calculate and claim your credits based on time attended. To register for this event, please email:
    angelina.Schliephake@mail.utoronto.ca

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Legal Profession, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Beyond Humanitarian Assistance: The Challenges of Speaking out about the Atrocities that Humanitarian Actors Witness

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders will be delivering a presentation on MSF case studies that openly examine and analyse the organisation’s actions and decision-making process during humanitarian emergencies that have led it to speak out. What are the ethical challenges met by an organisation witnessing mass crimes? Should we speak out? How? What are the consequences of speaking out with regard to the neutrality of a humanitarian organisation? A long-term member of MSF will make a presentation that will be followed by a Q & A period.

    You will also have a chance to ask questions about life as a field-worker and the intricacies of one of the most reputed NGOs.

    Contact

    Reina Shishikura
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Medecins Sans Frontiers



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Warlords & Coalition Politics in the Post-Soviet Wars

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    The breakup of the USSR was unexpected and unexpectedly peaceful. Though a third of the new states fell prey to violent civil conflict, anarchy on the post-Soviet periphery, when it occurred, was quickly cauterized. Driscoll argues that this outcome had very little to do with security guarantees by Russia or the United Nations and a great deal to do with local innovation by ruthless warlords, who competed and colluded in a high-risk coalition formation game. The research design for the forthcoming book, which shall serve as the basis for the talk, combines ethnography and game theory, quantitative and qualitative methods, and presents a revisionist account of the post-Soviet wars and their settlement. Most of the empirical material was gathered over many years of fieldwork in Georgia and Tajikistan, but speculative policy conclusions draw on recent observations from Ukraine.

    Jesse Driscoll holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University. He was an OCV fellow at Yale and a GAGE fellow at the University of Virginia, and most recently a member of the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies from 2009-2013. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His work has been published in The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Research and Politics, and The Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology, and his book is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press in the Comparative Politics series.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. Jesse Driscoll
    University of California, San Diego



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Politics and Media in Ukraine After the Maidan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20145:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The talk will discuss the role of the Ukrainian mainstream media in reporting crises in the context of extensive social media, the use of Russian TV domestically and abroad, the role of international media (traditional and new web outlets), and the pro-Ukraine and pro-Russia narratives in Western elite and public opinion. It will touch as well on civic pressure for structural reforms (and against corruption), citizens and political parties, and the role of art in the Ukrainian revolution.

    Nataliya Gumenyuk is a Ukrainian journalist, co-founder of Hromadske.TV (Public TV), an Editor-in-Chief of Hromadske International – Hromadske English/Russian newsroom. Hromadske.TV is a civic initiative of the Ukrainian journalists to create public broadcasting system in Ukraine. It has no ties to the Ukrainian government or business groups. Launched on the eve of some of the most tumultuous days in the country’s history, Hromadske.TV has become the go-to medium for the Ukrainians — the place to discover and a way to make sense of what was happening in the country. Nataliya had also worked as the head of Foreign News Desk of INTER, the biggest Ukrainian TV channel. She has reported on major political and social events from nearly 50 countries, with a particular focus on post-Arab spring developments in the Arab world. She has been giving commentaries on events in Ukraine for a number of international media. Nataliya also teaches at the Master Programme of Kyiv Mohyla School of Journalism.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Nataliya Gumenyuk
    Speaker
    Ukrainian journalist, co-founder of Hromadske TV

    Marta Dyczok
    Chair
    Professor of History and Political Science, University of Western Ontario


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20146:00PM - 8:00PMCouncil Chambers
    (AA 160)
    University of Toronto, Scarborough Campus
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    Description

    The Indian Ocean was global long before the Atlantic, and today the countries bordering the Bay of Bengal-India, Bangladesh, Burma, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Malaysia-are home to one in four people on Earth. Crossing the Bay of Bengal places this region at the heart of world history for the first time. Integrating migration and environmental history Sunil Amrith gives an account of the Bay and the diasporas who have inhabited it, with a particular focus on the Tamil diaspora.

    Sunil Amrith is Reader in Modern Asian History at Birkbeck College, University of London. His work focuses on the circulation of people, ideas, and institutions between South and Southeast Asia. His most recent book is Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (Harvard, 2013). He is currently working on the environmental history of India’s eastern seaboard, supported by the European Research Council.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Sunhil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Commentator
    Associate Professor, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Donna Gabaccia
    Chair
    Professor, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    Sponsors

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Co-Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in South East Asia

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    The Department of History

    Religious Materiality in Indian Ocean Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 3rd Ta-Nehisi Coates: The Case for Reparations

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 3, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria College
    University of Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Tickets for U of T students and community members may be obtained here:

    http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/the-case-for-reparations-ta-nehisi-coates-at-u-of-t-tickets-13500080103

    The Arts and Science Students’ Union in partnership with the Centre for Study of United States at the Munk School, the Faculty of Arts and Science, the University of Toronto Students’ Union and the History Department at U of T are proud to present, The Atlantic magazine writer and essayist, Ta-Nehisi Coates, on November 3rd, 7-9 pm, at the Isabel Bader Theatre.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, is a critically acclaimed writer and national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine. He has written extensively on issues of race relations, culture and politics in the contemporary United States. This past summer, Coates published a landmark piece in The Atlantic dealing with the issue of reparations from the state to African Americans for years of oppression. To read his blog: http://www.ta-nehisi.com/.

    There will be a Q&A session after the lecture moderated by Peter Loewen, Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States and the American Studies Undergraduate Program, at the Munk School of Global Affairs, and Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Mississauga.

    For more information or media enquiries, contact the Arts and Science Students’ Union at: http://assu.ca/tanehisi/.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Peter J. Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States and the American Studies Undergraduate Program, and Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto

    Ta-Nehisi Coates
    Speaker
    "The Atlantic" magazine writer and essayist


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, U of T

    University of Toronto Student Union

    Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto

    Arts and Science Students Union, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 4th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 4th The South Asian Monsoon: A History for the Anthropocene

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 4, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Where does the call for new, “planetary” humanities leave area studies? What does “South Asia” mean, in the Anthropocene? A partial answer to that question lies in the South Asian Monsoon. Crucial to food and human security, changes in the monsoon are an uncertain outcome of planetary warming. But does South Asia shape the monsoon as much as it is shaped by the monsoon? Long before global recognition of anthropogenic climate change, the uncertainties of the monsoon stimulated thinking about poverty and inequality in South Asia. The paper examines how monsoon-related dreams and fears shaped Indian meteorology. The quest to “liberate” South Asia from the monsoon inspired repeated attempts to conquer nature and harness water, with unintended consequences—consequences that suggest the need for a more flexible definition of the region: one that overlays ecological and cultural maps to incorporate spaces like the Bay of Bengal or the terrain of the Himalayan rivers, which transcend political borders.

    Sunil Amrith is Reader in Modern Asian History at Birkbeck College, University of London. His work focuses on the circulation of people, ideas, and institutions between South and Southeast Asia. His most recent book is Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants (Harvard, 2013). He is currently working on the environmental history of India’s eastern seaboard, supported by the European Research Council

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Sunil S. Amrith
    Speaker
    Department of History, Classics & Archeology, Birkbeck University of London

    Ritu Birla
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto-Scarborough


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 5th Scientist Entrepreneurship

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 5, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT: Most of the studies measuring and analyzing technology transfer and knowledge spillovers from universities turn to the databases collected by the universities which report the activities of the Offices of Technology Transfer. This paper instead examines university scientist entrepreneurship not by asking the University Technology Transfer Offices what they do in terms of entrepreneurial activities, but rather university scientists directly what they do in terms of entrepreneurial activities. The results from this study are as startling and novel as they are revealing. While the Offices of Technology Transfer databases suggest that new firm startups by university scientists are not particularly a frequent occurrence, this study instead finds exactly the opposite. Most striking is that using a large database of scientists funded by grants from the United States National Foundation, this study finds that around 13 percent of the scientists have started a new firm. These findings would suggest that university scientist entrepreneurship is considerably more prevalent that would be indicated by the data collected by the Offices of Technology Transfer and compiled by the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM).
    In addition, the propensity for a university scientist to be engaged in entrepreneurial activity apparently varies considerably across scientific fields. In certain fields, such as computer and network systems, the prevalence of entrepreneurship is remarkably high, 23.8 percent. Similarly, in civil, mechanical, and manufacturing innovation, over one in five of the university scientists report starting a new business.
    By contrast, in other scientific fields, the prevalence of entrepreneurship is considerably more subdued. For example, in environmental biology, only 4.6 percent of the university scientists report having started a new business. Similarly, in particle and nuclear astrophysics 6.2 percent of the scientists have started a new firm, and in biological infrastructure 8.2 percent of the scientists have started a new firm.
    There is also considerable evidence that university scientist entrepreneurship mirrors the entrepreneurial activity for the more general population in certain important ways, while in other ways scientist entrepreneurship clearly differs from more general entrepreneurial activity. In sharp contrast to what has been found in the entrepreneurship literature for the general population, certain personal characteristics of university scientists, such as age and experience, do not seem to influence the likelihood of a scientist becoming an entrepreneur. However, gender influences the entrepreneurial decision of university scientists in much the same way it does for the general population. Males have a greater likelihood of starting a new business, both for university scientists as well as for the more general population. Similarly, access to resources and high social capital, in the form of linkages to private companies, encourages entrepreneurial activity among university scientists, just as it does for the overall population.
    The empirical evidence from this study indicates that the determinants of university scientist entrepreneurship apparently are not constant across scientific fields. Rather, what is important in influencing scientific entrepreneurship in some scientific fields is less important in other scientific fields. For example, the extent of social capital has no statistically significant impact on the entrepreneurial activity of university scientists in scientific fields such as environmental biology, while it has a positive and statistically significant impact on entrepreneurial activity in civil, mechanical, and manufacturing innovation, as well as in computer and network systems.
    While the age of the university scientist generally does not play an important role, the empirical evidence does point to a negative relationship between age and entrepreneurial activity that is more radical and less innovative in nature. In particular, those university scientists starting a new business for products that are highly innovative tend to be younger.
    Thus, the findings of this paper based on asking university scientists about their entrepreneurial activities suggest that entrepreneurship is considerably more prevalent among a broad spectrum of university scientists than had been previously identified using databases reporting what Offices of Technology Transfer are doing in terms of entrepreneurship. The results from this study would suggest that the spillover of knowledge from universities for commercialization, innovation and ultimately economic growth, employment creation and global competitiveness is substantially more robust than had been previously thought.

    BIO: David Audretsch is a Distinguished Professor and Ameritech Chair of Economic Development at Indiana University, where he is also serves as Director of the Institute for Development Strategies. He also is an Honorary Professor of Industrial Economics and Entrepreneurship at the
    WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management in Germany. In addition, he serves as a Visiting Professor at the King Saud University in Saudi Arabia, Honorary Professor at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena in Germany, and is a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London.
    Audretsch’s research has focused on the links between entrepreneurship, government policy, innovation, economic development and global competitiveness. His research has been published in over one hundred scholarly articles in the leading academic journals.
    His books include Valuing the Entrepreneurial Enterprise (with Link, Albert N.), (2013), Oxford University Press; Creating Competitiveness: Entrepreneurship and Innovation Policies for Growth (with Walshok, Mary L.), (2013), Edward Elgar Publishing; Handbook of Research on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (with Oliver Falck, Stephan Heblich and Adam Lederer), (2011), Edward Elgar Publishing
    Entrepreneurship and Openness (with Robert Litan and Robert Strom), 2009, Edward Elgar Publishing; The Entrepreneurial Society. (2007). Oxford University Press, Inc.; Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth, with Oxford University Press in 2006 and The Entrepreneurial Society, also with Oxford University Press in 2007.
    He is co-founder and co-editor of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal. He was awarded the 2001 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research by the Swedish Foundation for Small Business Research. In 2008, he received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Augsburg, and in September, 2010 he received an honorary doctorate degree from Jonkoeping University.
    He is a member of the Advisory Board to a number of international research and policy institutes, including the Deutsches Institut fuer Wirtschaftsforschung (German Institute for Economic Analysis), the Basque Institute for Competitiveness, and the Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    David Audretsch
    Distinguished Professor, Ameritech Chair of Economic Development Director, Institute for Development Strategies Indiana University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 5th The Many and the Few

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 5, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Association of Political Science Students is hosting its first of a series of three panel discussions this year on the international rise of authoritarian regimes and what authoritarianism means for different regions throughout the world. In light of this theme, students will be able to gain a comparative perspective on a particular regime type, in understanding different political cultures, ideologies, and histories associated with authoritarian states.

    Contact

    Emily Tsui


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Associate Professor, University of Toronto Department of Political Science

    Paul Kingston
    Associate Professor, University of Toronto Department of Political Science

    Donald Kingsbury
    Lecturer, University of Toronto Department of Political Science

    Lucan Way
    Associate Professor, University of Toronto Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Association of Political Science Students


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Three Worlds of Relief

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The 2014-2015 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity

    Description

    Cybelle Fox is Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley. Her main research interests are in race, immigration and the American welfare state.

    She received her B.A. in history and economics from UC San Diego and her PhD in sociology and social policy from Harvard University. Her most recent book, Three Worlds of Relief (Princeton University Press, 2012), compares the incorporation of blacks, Mexicans, and European immigrants in the American welfare system from the Progressive Era to the New Deal. Fox won six book awards for Three Worlds of Relief, including the 2012 C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Fox’s work has appeared in the American Journal of Sociology, American Behavioral Scientist, Sociology of Education, Political Science Quarterly, and Sociological Methods and Research. She is also co-author of Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings (Basic Books, 2004).

    OPEN TO THE PUBLIC – NO REGISTRATION NECESSARY


    Speakers

    Cybelle Fox
    Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of California Berkley



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Learning (South) Korea: A Thought on Risk Society, Violence and Mourning (Over the Sewol Ferry Disaster)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20141:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor in Asia Pacific Series

    Description

    Haejoang Cho will be speaking as a ‘native anthropologist’ about her whirlwind journey experiencing South Korea’s compressed modernity since the 1980’s. The discussion begins with the recent 4/16 Sewol Ferry Disaster in Jindo, that has resonated with 9/11 and the 3/11 Disaster in Fukushima. Professor Cho will focus on the split of South Korean public responses into disparate antagonistic groups; those who say to “never forget”, and those who urge to “forget and go back to normal life”, The discussion will elaborate on concepts of ‘risk society’ and ‘reflexivity’ and ‘mourning’ and ‘violence’ in its analysis of compressed modernity and global capitalism as the lived experiences of people in South Korea.

    Haejoang Cho is cultural anthropologist in training and feminist in faith. She is a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, Seoul. Her early research focused on gender studies in Korean modern history; her current interests and research are in the area of youth culture and modernity in the global/local and post-colonial context of modern day Korea. Cho is the founding director of Haja center (The Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) which is an alternative educational and cultural studio for the teenagers since 1999. The Haja project has been launched as a part of ‘action research’ of solving the problems of youth from the perspectives of feminism, cultural studies and ecological studies in the rapidly globalizing East Asian context.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Book Launch: The Coming Swarm: DDoS, Hacktivism, and Civil Disobedience on the Internet

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20143:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In her new book, The Coming Swarm: DDoS, Hacktivism, and Civil Disobedience on the Internet, Molly Sauter examines the history, development, theory, and practice of distributed denial of service actions as a tactic of political activism. During this event, hosted by the Citizen Lab’s Director Ron Deibert, Molly will discuss the use of disruptive tactics like DDoS, online civil disobedience, and the role of the internet as a zone of political activism and speech. There will be a book signing following the discussion.

    Molly Sauter is a research affiliate at the Berkman Center, and a doctoral student at McGill University in Montreal. She holds a masters degree in Comparative Media Studies from MIT, where she is an affiliate researcher at the Center for Civic Media at the Media Lab. Her research is broadly focused on hacker culture, transgressive digital activism, and depictions of technology in the media. Her research is situated in socio-political analyses of technology and technological culture. She is author of The Coming Swarm, an analysis of the history and development of activist distributed denial of service actions, published by Bloomsbury. She blogs at oddletters.com and tweets @oddletters.

    Contact

    Irene Poetranto
    (416) 946-8903


    Speakers

    Molly Sauter
    Research affiliate at the Berkman Center, and a doctoral student at McGill University in Montreal


    Main Sponsor

    Citizen Lab


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 6th Looted Art, Looted Culture: Provenance and Memory after the Holocaust

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 6, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Holocaust Education Week

    Description

    This session focuses on artwork plundered, sold under duress, and confiscated in the Shoah. Whether represented in news reports of the over 1400 paintings discovered in the newly revealed “Munich art trove”; the attempt of Hollywood filmmakers to capture the dramatic work of provenance and rediscovery in the recent film The Monuments Men; or the high politics of negotiations involving Germany, Poland, Russia, the Council of Europe, the Jewish Claims Conference, and art markets worldwide, increased attention is being paid to looted and plundered art as part of historical, legal, and political narratives of crime, loss, memory, and restitution. Panelists will provide an overview of current and ongoing legal cases, legal struggles over ownership and restitution, and the relationship between legal claims, provenance research, and collective memory.
    Dr. Wesley A. Fisher, Director of Research for the Claims Conference, will give a keynote presentation, followed by a panel discussion chaired by Munk School of Global Affairs Academic Programs Director, Ron Levi, featuring Professors Janice Stein (Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs) and Michael R. Marrus (Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies).

    Wesley A. Fisher is Director of Research for the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany and is responsible for the Claims Conference/World Jewish Restitution Organization Looted Art and Cultural Property Initiative. Previously a senior member of the founding staff of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., he was Deputy Director of the Washington Conference on Holocaust-Era Assets in 1998. From the 1970s to the early 1990s he was the administrator of virtually all scholarly exchanges, joint research and conferences between the United States and the former Soviet Union in the humanities and social sciences. For many years a professor at Columbia University, Dr. Fisher holds a B.A. degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Sociology and a Certificate of the Russian Institute (now Harriman Institute) from Columbia University.

    Ron Levi is Associate Professor of Global Affairs and Sociology at the University of Toronto, where he holds the George Ignatieff Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies. He is cross-appointed to the Departments of Political Science and Criminology and Sociolegal Studies. Trained in law and in sociology, Professor Levi focuses on the internationalization of law and on the role of law during unsettled times, and is launching the Global Justice Lab in the Munk School of Global Affairs. He focuses on international criminal law, human rights, and responses to atrocities and mass violence.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and the Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. She was the Massey Lecturer in 2001 and a Trudeau Fellow. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.

    Michael R. Marrus is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor Emeritus of Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto. He is a Canadian historian of France, the Holocaust and Jewish history. He was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2008.

    Thursday, November 6, 2014, 4:00pm
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Registration required at munkschool.utoronto.ca.

    Sponsors

    Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, UJA Federation of Greater Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 7th China’s New Urbanization Blueprint and Hukou Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Room SS2125
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    China released its first national urbanization plan in March 2014. The plan outlines a bold move to grant urban hukou (household registration) to 100 million people in the next six years. If successfully implemented, the plan will help China to achieve genuine urbanization and alleviate some major social and economic problems. The plan has also brought forth a new vision of urbanization with an emphasis on the human aspect. This presentation examines the relationship between urbanization and hukou reform, the feasibility of the plan and the problems.

    Kam Wing Chan is Professor of Geography at the University of Washington. His main research focuses on China’s cities, migration, employment, and the household registration system. He is the author of Cities with Invisible Walls: Reinterpreting Urbanization in Post-1949 China, and some 60 articles and book chapters. He has served as a Consultant for the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, United Nations, and McKinsey & Co. and worked with the Chinese Government on a number of policy projects. His recent commentaries and interviews have appeared in the public media such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, The Economist, South China Morning Post, BBC, CBC, Caixin, and China Daily. He is a graduate of the University of Hong Kong and the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Kam Wing Chan
    Professor of Geography, University of Washington


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Program in Planning

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 7th Haja Story: Youth, Learning, and Survival Politics in East Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 7, 20143:00PM - 6:00PMOISE
    Nexus Lounge
    252 Bloor Street West
    12th Floor
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders in Asia Pacific Studies

    Description

    This lecture will focus on the precarious youth at the Haja Center (the Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) and their survival politics based on Professor Haejoang Cho’s pedagogical and socio-political experiments. In the rapidly globalizing East Asian context, the project has evolved responding proactively to national and global crises; the 1997 Asian financial crisis, the 2008-2009 global financial crises, and the 2011 Fukushima disaster. Interested in a pedagogy that connects life and learning, Cho has endeavored to create platforms that enable new types of learning in various forms including a youth center, an alternative school, an after-school community, and a transition town. This discussion will explain the launching of these platforms and the discussion of anticipated new projects. As Ulrich Beck termed as “emancipatory catastrophism”, the power of transformation is coming from a keen awareness of recent economic, social, and natural crises. It is unprecedented, fundamental, and globally shared, rather than as isolated and unique. Hence, the youths would be able to bring their experiences and observation of crises into an “epochal transformation” of learning through actively connecting platforms of various kinds, creatively turning their connections into a new one.

    Haejoang Cho is cultural anthropologist in training and feminist in faith. She is a professor Emeritus of Yonsei University, Seoul. Her early research focused on gender studies in Korean modern history; her current interests and research are in the area of youth culture and modernity in the global/local and post-colonial context of modern day Korea. Cho is the founding director of Haja center (The Seoul Youth Factory for Alternative Culture) which is an alternative educational and cultural studio for the teenagers since 1999. The Haja project has been launched as a part of ‘action research’ of solving the problems of youth from the perspectives of feminism, cultural studies and ecological studies in the rapidly globalizing East Asian context.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    HaeJoang Cho
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Yonsei University, Seoul


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Hope 21 (Korean Progressive Network in Canada)

    Department of Anthropology

    Asian Institute

    Adult Education and Community Development

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th Book Launch: "Two Days in June: John F. Kennedy and the 48 Hours That Made History" by Andrew Cohen

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 201412:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In June 1963, John Fitzgerald Kennedy has been president of the United States for almost two and a half years. That spring he is grappling with the two seismic forces of the early 1960s: the proliferation of nuclear arms and the struggle for civil rights. On two consecutive days, in two lyrical addresses, he appeals to Americans to see both the Russians and the “Negroes” as human beings. His speech on June 10 leads to the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963, the first arms agreement of the Cold War. His speech on June 11 leads to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a watershed in American history.
    Andrew Cohen presents a president at a tipping point as he pivots dramatically and decisively on the two biggest issues of his time. Based on new material – hours of recently uncovered film shot in the White House and Justice Department, fresh interviews, and a rediscovered draft speech – Two Days in June elegantly captures Kennedy at the high noon of his presidency in startling, rich, granular detail.
    Moment by moment, JFK’s feverish forty-eight hours unspool in suspenseful, cinematic clarity as he addresses “peace and freedom.” Here Kennedy faces down George Wallace over the integration of the University of Alabama, which Cohen shows was not scripted, as some argue. Here Kennedy attends a private dinner party in Georgetown, where he talks obsessively – and ominously – about sex and politics. Here Kennedy recoils at a photograph of the ghastly self-immolation of a Buddhist monk in Saigon, which forces him to recast his policy in Vietnam. Here is the untold story of his civil rights address, written in a frantic two hours and unfinished when JFK delivers it, partly extemporaneously.
    In this tick-tock of the presidency, we see Kennedy up close as never before: signing a bill on pay equity, planning a secret diplomatic mission to Indonesia, reeling from the murder of Medgar Evers. Big issues converge while smaller ones emerge – open immigration, lower taxes, physical fitness, space exploration – that will flower in the future.
    There were 1,036 days in the presidency of John F. Kennedy. This is the story of two of them.

    “Because of his signal achievement in Two Days in June, no one will be able to write about — no one will be able to think about — John F. Kennedy ever again in quite the same way. Channeling Theodore White and William Manchester, Andrew Cohen has changed the way we regard JFK in Two Days as much as JFK changed the presidency and the world in those two days.”

    David M. Shribman, Editor and Columnist,
    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

    Andrew Cohen is an award-winning journalist and former Washington correspondent whom the New York Times has called one of “Canada’s most distinguished authors.” A native of Montreal, he attended Choate Rosemary Hall, McGill University, and the University of Cambridge. Among his best-selling books is While Canada Slept: How We Lost Our Place in the World, a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction. He has written for UPI, Time, and the Globe and Mail from the United States as well as London, Berlin, Toronto, and Ottawa, where he is a professor of journalism and international affairs at Carleton University. He writes a nationally syndicated column and is a regular commentator on television and radio.


    Speakers

    Andrew Cohen
    Associate Professor, Carleton University


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Centre for the Study of United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th PCJ Graduate Fellow Speaker Series - With a Vow to Defend: Indigenous Direct Action in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Direct mobilization of indigenous peoples – including protests, blockades and occupations – has recently appeared on the main stage of political life in Canada. Despite this, it has been the subject of only limited explanatory social science. What provokes individuals to take on risks and mobilize in defiance of the institutions of Canadian law, in defence of their nations? This project examines flashpoint conflict events that have emerged from Indigenous direct action, in order to contribute to the theoretical debate between material and moral motivations for participation.

    Contact

    Reina Shishikura
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Michael Morden



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 11th Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 11, 20144:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since the end of the Cold War, China has become a global symbol of disregard for human rights, while the United States has positioned itself as the world’s chief exporter of the rule of law. How did lawlessness become an axiom about Chineseness rather than a fact needing to be verified empirically, and how did the United States assume the mantle of law’s universal appeal?

    In a series of wide-ranging inquiries, Teemu Ruskola investigates the history of “legal Orientalism”: a set of globally circulating narratives about what law is and who has it. For example, why is China said not to have a history of corporate law, as a way of explaining its “failure” to develop capitalism on its own? Ruskola shows how a European tradition of philosophical prejudices about Chinese law developed into a distinctively American ideology of empire, tracing back to the first Sino–U.S. treaty in 1844 authorized the extraterritorial application of American law in a putatively lawless China., creating a kind of legal imperialism causing enduring damage to legal Orientlalism to this day. .

    Teemu Ruskola is Professor of Law at Emory University. His scholarship addresses questions of legal history and theory from multiple perspectives, comparative as well as international, frequently with China as a vantage point. Most recently, he is the author of Legal Orientalism: China, the United States, and Modern Law (Harvard, 2013).

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Teemu Ruskola
    Professor, Faculty Associate in Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, and Studies in Sexualities, Emory University School of Law


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 12th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 12, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Laura Bisaillon
    Senior Academic Fellow, CPHS



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 12th Political Corruption in Ukraine: Before and After Maidan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 12, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Petro Jacyk Program seminar

    Description

    Oksana Huss (Petro Jacyk Visiting Young Scholar) is a PhD Candidate in Political Science at Institute for Development and Peace, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany. The topic of her thesis is “Political Corruption in Competitive Authoritarian Regimes of post-Soviet Countries: The case of Ukraine.” Previously, she graduated in Political Science, Law and Anthropology from Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Mag.) and in International Relations from State University of Transkarpatia, Ukraine (M.A.). She has been awarded a scholarship from the Hanns-Seidel-Foundation. At CERES, Oksana Huss works on conceptual issues, connecting dynamics of political corruption in Ukraine to different regime trajectories.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Oksana Huss
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar

    Lucan Way
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 15th Polanyi Conference on Science and Social Responsibility

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 15, 20141:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Polanyi Conference on Science and Social Responsibility presents an exceptional opportunity to hear Dr. John C. Polanyi speak and to engage in a meaningful and informed discussion about nuclear weapons and their role in our Canadian society. The Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and tireless public intellectual will be joined by experts from diverse backgrounds to discuss the role of nuclear weapons in the 21st century. Professor Polanyi’s efforts to inform and influence the Canadian public on key social issues in the sciences have largely inspired this conference, which will be an annual event reflecting on a wide range of topics in the intersection of science and society. This inaugural conference will provide a forum for meaningful debate about the pressing issue of nuclear proliferation.


    Speakers

    John C. Polanyi
    Speaker
    Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto

    M.V. Ramana
    Speaker
    Nuclear Futures Laboratory and Program on Science and Global Security, Princeton University

    Adele Buckley
    Moderator
    Canadian Pugwash Group

    Robert Bothwell
    Speaker
    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jack Cunningham
    Speaker
    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Nancy Doubleday
    Speaker
    Department of Philosophy, McMaster University

    Tom Nichols
    Speaker
    U.S. Naval War College


    Sponsors

    Department of Physics, University of Toronto

    Department of Chemistry

    Department of History

    Victoria College in the University of Toronto

    Student Initiative Fund

    Science for Peace

    Canadian Pugwash Group

    The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 18th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 18, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 18th Glimpses of a Global Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 18, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMWilliam Doo Auditorium
    45 Wilcocks Street
    New College
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    Description

    Sir Shridath ‘Sonny’ Ramphal has lived a long and global life. He is a lawyer and international diplomat who led the Commonwealth of Nations as the association’s longest serving Secretary- General during its crucial years as an international player. Sir Sunny will discuss his long and global career in conversation with the Honourable Bill Graham, Chancellor of Trinity College.

    Leaders from every continent engaged with him as he worked alongside them on issues such as ending apartheid in South Africa; laying the foundations for global concerns about the environment; the reform of global governance; and the resolution of conflicts.

    The book is also a remarkable account of the Caribbean’s ambivalence about integration. As an insider, Ramphal recounts the opportunities for integration, the failures to act on them, and the triumphs when regional governments acted together.

    Glimpses of a Global Life, Sir Sunny’s memoir, is an analysis of major problems and challenges that dominated the Caribbean, the Commonwealth and the World in the 20th century, and that continue to shape the contours of the 21st.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is jointly housed at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Trinity College in the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Sir Shridath Ramphal
    Speaker
    Commonwealth Secretary-General (1975-1990)

    The Hon. Bill Graham
    Moderator
    Chancellor, Trinity College



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 19th The Territory of Loss

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    “The Territory of Loss” will interrogate the significance of loss in the modern history of Japan’s contested territories, focusing on the nation’s dispute Korea — Dokdo/Takeshima — islands that today are beyond Tokyo’s reach, yet increasingly central to the government and its supporters’ sense of self. Doing so zeroes in on what Japanese control over this space and forfeit thereof have meant in broad terms to the national narrative during the 20th century. Moreover, to restore some of the history that took place there when these pieces of land were indisputably Japanese by paying attention to broader changes to the meaning of islands in international law.

    Alexis Dudden is professor of history at the University of Connecticut. She has written extensively about Japan and Northeast Asia, publishing recently in Dissent, The Diplomat, and Huffington Post among other venues. Dudden has numerous articles in print, and her books include “Troubled Apologies Among Japan, Korea, and the United States” (Columbia) and “Japan’s Colonization of Korea” (Hawaii), and she is currently writing a book about Japan’s territorial disputes and the changing meaning of islands in international law.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alexis Dudden
    Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 19th Métropole du Grand Paris: Planning and Integrating the Paris Netropolitan Region

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 19, 20146:30PM - 8:00PMVictoria College Building
    (Old Vic and Alumni Hall)
    University of Toronto
    73 Queens Park Crescent East
    Toronto, ON M5S 1K7
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    Series

    Big City, Big Ideas lecture series

    Description

    Big City, Big Ideas is a public lecture series being held at University of Toronto that features global leaders in urban and regional planning, policy, and finance. Attendees will be inspired by some of the biggest minds working on the development, sustainability, and livability of cities today.

    Jointly presented by the Consulate General of France in Toronto and the Bousfield Distinguished Visitorship in Planning at the Department of Geography and Program in Planning, in association with its BCBI partners and supported by Institut français.

    Join us for a discussion with Catherine Barbé, the Director of Strategic Partnerships for the Société du Grand Paris, about some of her experience and strategies with the implementation of the Grand Paris project, and insights and lessons on further integrating the Paris metropolitan region.

    The Métropole du Grand Paris (Grand Paris) is an initiative launched in 2007 by former French President Nicolas Sarkozy for “a new global plan for the Paris metropolitan region,” which aims to improve the quality of life for the 12 million inhabitants in the Ile-de-France region, reduce intra-regional inequalities, and improve economic competitiveness of the region that accounts for almost a third of French GDP. At the heart of the scheme lies an ambitious project to modernize and expand the regional rail, metro, and light rail network in the Paris metropolitan region. The Société du Grand Paris is the state agency commissioned to design and implement the transit network expansion, and oversee urban development around the future stations of the network.

    Prior to joining the Société du Grand Paris, Catherine served as the Executive Director of the City of Paris’s Department of City Planning. Earlier in the Ministry of Public Works, she led the development of a national planning and housing strategy, and transformed planning regulations and procedures of public urban development in France. Catherine is an architect, and is a graduate of the Institut d’études politques de Paris (Institute of Political Studies in Paris) and the National School of Administration (ENA). She is also a member of the Scientific Committee of an urban solutions think-tank, La Fabrique de la Cité (the City Factory).

    Moderated by Michel Trocmé, Partner at Urban Strategies Inc., with comments by Theresa Enright, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Larry Clay, Assistant Deputy Minister, Ontario Growth Secretariat in the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing.

    RSVP the event at: http://grandparis.eventbrite.com

    Follow the conversation on twitter with #BCBI

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Catherine Barbé
    Speaker
    Director of Strategic Partnerships, Société du Grand Paris

    Michel Trocmé
    Moderator
    Partner, Urban Strategies Inc.

    Theresa Enright
    Commentator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Larry Clay
    Commentator
    Assistant Deputy Minister, Ontario Growth Secretariat, Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Bousfield Distinguished Visitorship in Planning, Department of Geography & Planning

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Martin Prosperity Institute

    Global Cities Institute

    Urban Strategies Inc.

    Consulate General of France in Toronto

    Institut français


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 20th The Piggies and the Market: Hollywood’s Global Accounting

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 20, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In the aftermath of the economic collapse of 2008, postrecession U.S. culture has been saturated by mathematical forecasting and data visualization. Reasserting its metacultural prominence, cinema theorizes that saturation in light of its own challenging political economy. At the blockbuster scale, Pacific Rim takes its place in a sustained allegorical investigation of the emerging Chinese marketplace. At the indie scale, Upstream Color literalizes the problems of thinking economically. Between them we find Contagion, and Thomas Piketty, Nate Silver, and Rick Santelli. To prepare for this lecture, it would be recommended to watch the following films: Upstream Color, Pacific Rim, or Contagion.

    J.D. Connor teaches media studies and art history at Yale. He received his Ph.D. from the Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins. His book The Studios after the Studios: Neoclassical Hollywood 1970–2010 will be published by Stanford University Press next year. He is currently completing Hollywood Math and Aftermath. He is also in the midst of a history of tape recording and transcription called “Archives of the Ambient.” A portion of that project, on Glenn Gould, was published in nonsite. He is also a member of the steering committee of Post45.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    J.D. Connor
    Assistant Professor, History of Art, Yale University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Art History, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 20th Book launch: Rethinking Heritage Language Education

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 20, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Rethinking Heritage Language Education
    by
    Peter Pericles Trifonas, OISE – University of Toronto
    and
    Themistoklis Aravossitas, CERES – Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    This newly released book brings together emerging and established researchers in the field of Heritage Language Education to negotiate concepts and practices and to investigate the correlation between culture, language and identity from a pedagogic and socio-political point of view. The book addresses the multilingual context of education in different national and international settings, including issues of mainstreaming plurilingualism, identifying ideologies of pedagogical practice, mapping cultural and linguistic assets and empowering learners, teachers and communities. Rethinking Heritage Language Education re-examines the dimensions of traditional interpretations of language education in relation to the principles of equity, social justice, and linguistic rights in the new millennium.

    Peter Pericles Trifonas is a Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. His areas of interest include ethics, philosophy of education, cultural studies, literacy and technology. Some of his books are: Revolutionary Pedagogies: Cultural Politics, Instituting Education, and the Discourse of Theory, The Ethics of Writing: Derrida, Deconstruction, and Pedagogy, Ethics, Institutions and The Right to Philosophy (with Jacques Derrida), Roland Barthes and the Empire of Signs, Umberto Eco and Football, Pedagogies of Difference, Deconstructing the Machine (with Jacques Derrida), International Handbook of Semiotics and Counter Texts: Reading Culture.

    Themistoklis Aravossitas teaches Modern Greek Language and Culture at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, andhe specializes in Heritage Language Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. His research investigates the role of community education in preserving linguistic and cultural diversity. His current research is entitled “The Hidden Schools: Mapping Greek Heritage Language Education in Canada”.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Themistoklis Aravossitas
    CERES - Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Peter Pericles Trifonas
    OISE - University of Toronto

    Jim Cummins
    OISE - University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 21st Socialist Legacy and Economic and Political Development in Bulgaria since 1989

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 21, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Georgy Ganev is a program director for economic research at the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia and an assistant professor at Sofia University’s Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, where he teaches courses in introductory macroeconomics, money and banking, and new institutional economics. His interests are related to issues of macroeconomics, monetary theory and policy, political economy, transition, development and growth economics, new institutional economics, and social capital.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 21st J.D. Connor Graduate Student & Faculty Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 21, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This workshop is open to graduate students (MA or PhD) and Faculty Members only.

    In the aftermath of the economic collapse of 2008, postrecession U.S. culture has been saturated by mathematical forecasting and data visualization. Reasserting its metacultural prominence, cinema theorizes that saturation in light of its own challenging political economy. At the blockbuster scale, Pacific Rim takes its place in a sustained allegorical investigation of the emerging Chinese marketplace. At the indie scale, Upstream Color literalizes the problems of thinking economically. Between them we find Contagion, and Thomas Piketty, Nate Silver, and Rick Santelli. To prepare for this lecture, it would be recommended to watch the following films: Upstream Color, Pacific Rim, or Contagion.

    J.D. Connor teaches media studies and art history at Yale. He received his Ph.D. from the Humanities Center at Johns Hopkins. His book The Studios after the Studios: Neoclassical Hollywood 1970–2010 will be published by Stanford University Press next year. He is currently completing Hollywood Math and Aftermath. He is also in the midst of a history of tape recording and transcription called “Archives of the Ambient.” A portion of that project, on Glenn Gould, was published in nonsite. He is also a member of the steering committee of Post45.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    J.D. Connor
    Professor, Yale University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Art History, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 21st PCJ Graduate Fellow Speaker Series - Kiran Banerjee

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 21, 20142:00PM - 4:00PMRigby Room
    St. Hilda's College
    44 Devonshire Pl.
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Reina Shishikura
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Kiran Banerjee
    Trudeau Centre Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 21st Europe 25 years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 21, 20142:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies together with the European Cultural Institutes in Canada are inviting eminent Czech, French, German, and Polish scholars to discuss (Eastern and Western) Europe’s hopes and expectations 25 years ago and compare them with European and global realities today.

    Panelists:

    Libor Žídek is an associate professor at Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. His main field of interest is economic transformation from centrally planned to market economies in Central and Eastern Europe. He has published several articles on this topic, and his book about the transformation process in Central Europe is in print (CEU Press, Hungary). He has given lectures and courses about the topic in the UK, Germany, and Hungary and is invited to Poland and Macedonia.

    Frédéric Bozo is a professor in the Department of European Studies at the Sorbonne (University of Paris III). His research focuses have included the end of the Cold War and German reunification.

    Jörn Mothes was born 1962 in Stralsund. He is a German theologian and an East German civil rights activist. He was actively involved in the dissolution of the East German State Security secret police. Mothes helped establish the Stasi Archives in the new province of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, where he was State Commissionerfrom 1998-2008. Today he is the head of division in the Ministry of Education in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.

    Adam Reichardt is the editor-in-chief of New Eastern Europe, a bimonthly magazine dedicated to Central and Eastern European affairs. He previously spent eight years in public policy in Washington DC, as well as a large portion of his studies in Kraków, Poland, where he now permanently resides.


    Speakers

    Prof. Libor Žídek
    Panelist
    Masaryk University

    Prof. Frédéric Bozo
    Panelist
    Sorbonne (University of Paris III, Department of European Studies)

    Jörn Mothes
    Panelist
    Former commissioner for Stasi (East German secret police) records in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

    Adam Reichardt
    Speaker
    Editor-in-Chief of New Eastern Europe



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 24th The Diffusion of Internet Voting

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 24, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Why vote if it takes me more than 30 minutes? The impact of internet voting on reducing the cost of electoral participation. Declining levels of turnout have become characteristic in most of the developed world while the use of internet voting is expected to alleviate the problem. A particular feature of internet voting is convenience: instead of voting at the polling station, people can comfortably choose the time and place to cast their votes. Making voting more convenient, thus, eases political participation, especially among those for whom it is relatively costly.


    Speakers

    Kristjan Vassil
    Marie Curie / ERMOS post-doctoral research fellow, Institute of Government and Politics, University of Tartu



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 24th – Tuesday, November 25th CBC IDEAS: The Sharing Economy and the Public Good

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 24, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, November 25, 20147:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Sharing Economy and the Public Good

    Who wins, who loses and what’s destined to change if a sharing economy is sustainable: business, society or the state? Join IDEAS Host Paul Kennedy for a special 2-part event produced by IDEAS in partnership with THE MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS. Featuring economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, author of The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism, along with a stellar panel of economic and political thinkers, including lawyer, mediator and political leader Bob Rae, economist and author Anita M. McGahan, and moderator Janice Stein, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Contact

    Samantha Smith
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Paul Kennedy
    Chair
    Host, IDEAS

    Jeremy Rifkin
    Speaker
    President, TIR Consulting Group LLC Founder and President, The Foundation on Economic Trends

    The Honourable Bob Rae
    Speaker
    Lawyer, Mediator, Speaker, Writer

    Anita McGahan
    Speaker
    Associate Dean, Reasearch, Rotman School of Management University of Toronto

    Janice Stein
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 25th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 25, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 25th Income and Longevity: Evidence from pension incomes of Confederate Veterans

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 25, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    How does differences in pension income effect longevity? Mayvis Rebeira answers this question by investigating Confederate pensions for veterans who fought for the South in the Civil War in the late 19th and early 20th century. She makes use of the exogenous variation in income levels between states as a result of differences in pension laws in two adjacent states – Texas and Oklahoma. Since longevity is defined by life expectancies, she investigated differences in mortality rates between these two groups of veterans to find the impact of differences in pension income levels on longevity. To date, the vast majority of studies on pension income effects on mortality, chronic conditions or onset of diseases during the Civil War period have focused on Union Army veterans. Rebeira developed a novel database on Confederate pension income that was created through primary data collection detailing dates of birth and death of Confederate veterans residing in the two states. Using regression to estimate the mean differences in additional years of life gained by the veterans from the two states and controlled for the year of birth (as many diseases degenerate with age) and other county-level socio-economic variables (e.g. state of the economy, population, literacy), the results show a statistically significant difference in age of death between veterans in Texas and Oklahoma. The difference in pension income levels between the two states was wide in 1926-1927. The results of this study point to some evidence to policy-makers on the use of cash transfers in the form of pension income as a possible health intervention tool to reduce mortality rates.

    Mayvis Rebeira is currently a doctoral candidate in health economics at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include the economics of longevity, economic history, income inequality and economic evaluation. Mayvis obtained her M.A in economics from the University of Toronto and is currently a fellow at the Canadian Centre for Health Economics.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Mayvis Rebeira
    Doctoral Candidate, Health Economics at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 25th Kasyanov talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 25, 20144:00PM - 6:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 26th Transnational Conversations about Abortion Stigma

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 26, 201410:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    This talk asks why and how abortion is stigmatized. It explores possible responses by analyzing transnational developments in abortion law. It will illustrate various dimensions of the transnational enterprise including the transnational influence of religious teachings, social movements and technological innovations on the stigmatization of abortion.

    Rebecca J. Cook, J.D., J.S.D., is Professor Emerita in the Faculty of Law, the Faculty of Medicine and the Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto; Faculty Chair in International Human Rights; and Co-Director, International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Program, University of Toronto. She is ethical and legal issues co-editor of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Professor Cook was appointed as a Member of the Order of Canada “for her achievements as a legal scholar on issues of women’s rights, and on sexual and reproductive health law.” She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and has been recognized for her “Outstanding Contributions to Women’s Health” by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Her most recent book, Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014, forthcoming in Spanish) is co-edited volume.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Rebecca Cook
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 27th Did Land Transfer Tax Affect Housing Sales in the Greater Toronto Area?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 27, 20144:30PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Haider will explore the impact of the Land Transfer Tax (LTT) on housing sales in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Previous research has shown that housing sales declined after the implementation of the LTT but Dr. Haider’s research concludes that the negative impact on housing sales was not statistically significant. His findings build on previous research by including condominiums as well as single-family homes in the analysis, accounting for the influence of the great recession on housing prices, and comparing the decline in sales in Toronto to the increase in sales in the suburbs.

    Murtaza Haider is a Visiting Scholar at IMFG for 2014-15. He is an associate professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. Prof. Haider specializes in applying statistical methods to forecast demand and/or sales.

    Space is limited and registration is required.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Murtaza Haider
    IMFG Visiting Scholar; associate professor at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th CCR2P Year-End Board Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Multispecies Infrastructure: Infrastructural Inversion and Involutionary Entanglements in the Chao Phraya Delta, Thailand

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 201412:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific; Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The focus of this talk is a rather strange relationship between rice, water management infrastructure and farmers in the Chao Phraya Delta in Thailand. Floating rice is a type of rice that has the ability to grow its stem rapidly, keeping pace with the rise of the floodwater. Since the 1970s, the role of floating rice in water management infrastructure in the Chao Phraya Delta has increasingly attracted attention from government officials, area studies scholars and hydrologists. Morita will argue that this particular interspecies relation facilitates a reconsideration of the notion of infrastructure and its relationship with nature. Operating in the background of everyday activities, infrastructures often remain largely invisible to the actors that rely on them. However, unusual events such as breakdowns and accidents bring about what STS scholars have denoted “infrastructural inversion”, in which the workings of infrastructure become highly visible to people. In moments of infrastructural inversion, it has often become apparent that the water management infrastructure of the Chao Phraya Delta is entangled with floating rice cultivation. By following the travels of people, ideas and technologies, this talk traces how the concerned parties have delineated this multispecies infrastructure in moments of infrastructural inversion in partly overlapping and partly divergent ways. At the core of this multispecies infrastructure is an involutionary relation between farmers and rice species. In this relationship the care of farmers and the unpredictable variation of rice create a condition for the development and constant variation of divergent but mutually dependent ways of life in the watery environment of the delta.

    Atsuro Morita teaches anthropology at Osaka University. He has done ethnographic research on technology development in Thailand focusing on how ideas, artifacts and people travel in and out Thailand. In his recent research on Environmental Infrastructures (funded by Japan Society for Promotion of Science), he studies the co-existence of heterogeneous components–including cosmological, scientific and multispecies ones–of water management infrastructures in the Chao Phraya Delta. The Environmental Infrastructures project (http://eiam.hus.osaka-u.ac.jp) is an international project based on collaboration between Japanese and Danish scholars, among others. The project is focusing on the intersections of a variety of practices in the making of infrastructures for knowing and managing environmental change.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Atsuro Morita
    Professor of Anthropology, School of Human Sciences, Osaka University


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Non-Alignment and Afro-Asianism: The Difficult History of Two Sibling Movements

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Scholars often confuse the Non-Aligned Movement with the Afro-Asianism Movement. Although both were rooted in Nehruvian thinking, they had different, though overlapping, sets of members and goals. In three parts, the current article explores how the movement emerged. From 1946-56, Jawaharlal Nehru conceived the Non-Alignment motion and eventually convinced Iosip Broz Tito and Gamal Abdel Nasser of his ideas. In the five subsequent years, the Yugoslav and Egyptian leaders promoted the ideas of establishing a formal movement. Finally, from 1961 to 1965, during its first four years as a movement,the Non-Alignment struggled and eventually emancipated itself from Afro-Asianism. The article uses archival documents from India, former Yugoslavia, former East Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, the People’s Republic of China, and Australia.

    Lorenz Lüthi is an Associate Professor for the History of International Relations at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. His first book, The Sino-Soviet Split: Cold War in the Communist World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008. The book has been released in a Polish translation by Dialog in Warsaw in 2011; a Chinese translation is in preparation. Lüthi has widely published on the Cold War in East Asia, Sino-Soviet relations, and the Vietnam War. He is currently working a second book project on the regional Cold Wars in Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East. Lüthi’s research has led him to work in archives in China, Australia, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Serbia, Italy, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Lorenz Lüthi
    Associate Professor, History of International Relations, McGill University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 28th Reflections on the 1 per cent: Ruling Class Failure in Old Regime France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 28, 20143:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Svitlana Frunchak
    416-946-8945


    Speakers

    Jonathan Dewald
    Departement d'Histoire State University of New York at Buffalo


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2014

  • Monday, December 1st Hopes, Fears, and the Impact of the New Centers of Islamic Theology at German Universities

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 1, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The 2014-2015 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity

    Description

    Muslims represent approximately five percent of the German population, making them the third largest religious group. Since Germany’s public schools include religious instruction for Catholic and Protestant Christians, the decision was made to extend this privilege to Muslim children as well, which in turn required the establishment of teacher training centers. Four Centers for Islamic Theology at German universities were opened in 2011/2012. The lecture will discuss this new development in the context of Germany’s specific brand of secularism, the hopes and fears it evokes, and what it says about the country’s shifting self-understanding in the European context.

    SPEAKER BIO:
    Monique Scheer is a Professor of Empirische Kulturwissenschaft (Historical and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Tübingen.
    Her interests include cultural histories of popular forms of Christianity in modern Germany as well as questions of religious diversity and secularism.


    Speakers

    Monique Scheer
    Professor of Empirische Kulturwissenschaft (Historical and Cultural Anthropology) at the University of Tübingen



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 2nd “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 2, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 3rd Institutional Design and the Geography of Rural-Urban Water Conflict in Mumbai

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 3, 20142:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Water security in metropolitan cities is increasingly important in the developing world. In Mumbai, for example, rapid urban growth has dramatically increased the demand for water, which has resulted in serious consequences for the water entitlements of rural communities located near the sources of water. This presentation focuses on the regional dimensions of water delivery, and looks at the role of institutions and the impact of local laws, agencies, and governance on how water is shared between rural and urban areas.

    Bharat Punjabi is the IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow for 2014-15, and is completing his Ph.D. in Geography from Western University in London. His dissertation is on “Canal Bureaucracy: Institutions and the Politics of Inter-Sectoral Water Competition in the Mumbai Region.” His research interests include urban governance and water management in large city-regions in India and Canada.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, December 6th Melodic Harmony: Classic to K-POP 2014 Korea Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, December 6, 20141:00PM - 6:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street West,
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 2C7
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    Description

    On December 6, 2014, the Centre for the Study of Korea in partnership with the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto and the University of Toronto Korean Students Association will host the second annual UofT Korea Day. This lively and interactive event is aimed at promoting Korean studies and culture by providing to students, faculty and general Canadian audience, as well as members of the Korean- Canadian society an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of traditional and modern Korean culture. The event features performances by renowned musicians, a Korean cuisine reception, and a K-pop
    contest.

    This year promises to be especially entertaining and educational as the world-renowned Gayageum player Grace Jong Eun Lee joining us for a delightful performance. Gayageum is a traditional Korean instrument with 12 strings with a rich history through time. It is capable of producing the micorotonal ornamentations of pitch and wide vibrato that is common and highly venerated in Korean music.

    The 2014 UofT Korea Day reflects the University of Toronto’s commitment to multiculturalism and diversity, as well as the growing importance of Korean culture in our world today. Please join us for a day of beautiful Gayageum traditional music and moving K-pop performances featuring the talents of skilled musicians

    E-registration to be released shortly.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Grace Jong Eun Lee
    Composer & Performer, Recipient of Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Award, 2008


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto

    Asian Institute

    University of Toronto Korean Students Association (UTKSA)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 9th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 9, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 16th “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” Public Viewing

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 16, 20149:30AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs, Observatory Site is pleased to offer public viewings of “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” occurring Tuesdays, from 9:30 – 11:30am, until December 16, 2014. The Exhibition takes place in the Board Room on the main floor, and admission is free.

    Susan Roth was born in Valley Stream, New York and studied painting at Syracuse University, New York. She has lived in nearby Canastota with her husband, painter Darryl Hughto since the 1970′s. The exhibition at the Munk School coincides with a retrospective survey “Susan Roth Form, Frame, Fold” at the Luther Brady Art Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, October 22, 2014 – January 30, 2015. Her work is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Edmonton Art Gallery, and the Everson Museum. The Agnes Etherington Art Gallery has permanently installed a large painting in the Cancer Research Institute at Queen’s University, Kingston, ON.

    “Susan Roth: Paintings in the Board Room” has been arranged with the generous support of David and Audrey Mirvish, Toronto.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2015

  • Wednesday, January 14th Realizing the Aspirations of the Right to Health Care in Canada: A Comparative Assessment of Methods of Implementing the Right

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 14, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Legal scholars and philosophers increasingly recognize the right to health care. It clearly exists as a matter of international human rights law as a subset of the right to health enshrined in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and other international human rights law documents. Nations arguably have the right to use different methods for implementing the right to health care as a matter of both law and ethics. They accordingly take a variety of methods of achieving the salutary effects of such a right, including constitutional recognition of rights to health and/or health care in constitutional documents, judicial recognition of constitutional rights to health and/or health care as part of broader rights (to e.g., security of the person and dignity) and non-constitutional statutory guarantees of health care entitlements. Yet it is worth examining which modes best realize the salutary effects the right to health care is designed to provide. If another method of implementation better realizes those effects and fits within a nation’s existing legal framework, this arguably provides reason for a nation to change its method of implementation.

    It can, however, be difficult to assess different nations’ methods of implementing a right to health care in the absence of a shared standard of comparison. This presentation will accordingly argue that international human rights law can be used to identify the core components of a right to health care and that scrutiny of these components can provide metrics for identifying the extent to which different nations’ methods of implementation achieve the salutary effects the right to health care is designed to provide. First, it will describe how international human rights law presents the core components and how one can use these methods to identify metrics for success. Then, it will present preliminary findings on how Canadian constitutional law fares as a method of implementation. Finally, it will point to other methods of implementation that will be studied in later chapters of my doctoral dissertation.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Michael Da Silva
    Senior Doctoral Fellow, CPHS


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 19th In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    Room 100
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    Based on videotaped oral histories conducted with Jews living in small-towns throughout Ukraine, this multimedia presentation discusses Jewish life and death under Communism and Nazism.

    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 170 St. George Street

    Co-sponsors: the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies

    This event is free and open to the public. No registration required. Please arrive early as seating is limited.

    Contact

    Emily Springgay
    (416) 978-1624


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Veidlinger
    University of Michigan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 21st NGO Organizational Logistics and Shifting Aid Mandates: The Field As Site of Authority and Power

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 21, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Emily Scott
    Lupina/OGS Doctoral Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Nation and Family: Personal Law, Cultural Pluralism, and Gendered Citizenship in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Narendra Subramanian
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 27th Playing as Living: Goldiggers and Con Artists As Vital Theatrical Subjects in Modern American Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Given the early twentieth century’s continued association with aesthetic modernism, critical engagements with the theatre and theatricality in this period are usually positioned in terms of anti-theatricality. Theatre scholar Martin Puchner has argued (Stage Fright) that in fact the key to modernism’s overall aesthetic lies specifically in its opposition to the theatre. Rothstein’s paper reads against the grain by drawing attention to representations of theatricality as vitality, as something positive rather than suspect. Using Henri Bergson’s contemporaneous conception of vitalism as a creative force encompassing intuition, will, and feeling, together with his theories of comedy, in which the “living” being is one who (unlike a machine) is able to change, she fashions a picture of the ways that characters in Anita Loos’s novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925) and Ernst Lubitsch’s film Trouble in Paradise (1932) offer models of living with creativity, passion, and vigour. Both Loos and Lubitsch make a link between theatricality and an understanding of what lies behind appearances, the consciousness and mastery of which are essential to their characters’ success. This success is frequently tied to social mobility, with the con artist presented as a working class hero trying to improve his or her position in the class hierarchy. No apologies are made for Lorelei Lee and Gaston Monescu, their role playing and playing with language are held up for pleasure and admiration, their energy and creativity enlivening both themselves and others. Because the vital theatrical subject is often most visible in comedy, these works provide a place to begin to frame a more nuanced discussion of theatricality beyond its frequent dismissal as “inauthentic” and excessive.

    Jackie Rothstein is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Acting Up: Theatricality as Vitality in Modern American Literature” looks at novels, plays, and films in the period 1920–1950 for the way in which they present theatricality as a way of living life with energy, creativity, and passion. Sitting at the intersection of cultural and affect studies, Jackie’s project exhibits her interest in issues of gender, class, and ethnicity, and in blurring the boundaries between “high,” “middlebrow,” and “low” culture. Jackie earned her MA from Columbia University. Prior to returning to university to complete her PhD, she worked as an in-house book editor, as a writer for design and communications firms, and as a project manager and editor on art catalogues and exhibitions.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jackie Rothstein
    PhD Candidate in the Department of English, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th – Friday, January 30th 8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, January 29, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th Sola Scriptura?: Book History and Religious Authority in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, January 29, 20156:00PM - 7:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Protestantism has been the dominant influence shaping both American religious history and the history of American book culture, as the drive for widespread literary, mass book dissemination, and the public school movement were each significantly driven by the religious imperative to access the Word. The Protestant doctrine of sola scriptura energized the first large-scale publishing project in North America, John Eliot’s Algonquin Bible of 1663. From these beginnings, through the nineteenth-century Bible and tract societies, to the Christian Booksellers Association of the present, the story of Protestantism in the United States has been inseparable from the drive to control and disseminate print. Yet all along, print has also served as a site of religious conflict and a tool of religious innovation and dissent, as examples ranging from Tom Paine and the Book of Mormon to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Oprah Winfrey make clear.

    This lecture will attend to this dynamic of authority, to the role of print in the interplay of establishment and dissent in American religious life. Three themes structure the analysis: the relationship between scriptural and non-scriptural forms of print; the gendered dimensions of reading, literacy, and authorship; and the nature of print as commodity, and therefore as a site where market dynamics shape religion with particular potency. Through an examination of key examples across four centuries, this talk aims to consider a basic historiographical question: how do the frameworks of book history sharpen our understanding of authority in American religious history.

    Matthew Hedstrom is a historian of the United States specializing in religion and culture in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His overarching research interests are the social history of religious sensibilities and the cultural mechanisms of their production and propagation. His particular areas of teaching and research thus far have been religious liberalism, spirituality, the cultures and politics of pluralism, religion and race, and print culture. His first book, The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century, employs novel sources in book history to tell the surprising story of religious liberalism’s cultural ascendancy in the twentieth century. The religious middlebrow culture of mid-century, Professor Hedstrom argues, brought psychological, mystical, and cosmopolitan forms of spirituality to broad swaths of the American middle class. He has also authored various articles, reviews, and reference works in American studies and American religious history. He is beginning work on a new book project on race and the search for religious authenticity from the Civil War through the 1960s.

    For additional information:

    http://bhpctoronto.com/event/matthew-hedstrom-university-of-virginia-sola-scriptura-book-history-and-religious-authority-in-the-united-states/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hedstrom
    Professor, University of Virginia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Centre for the Book, University of Toronto

    Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Professionalizing Perfume in Eighteenth-Century Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Kirsten James
    Doctorante en Histoire Universite de Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2015

  • Thursday, February 5th Tony Fong talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Tony Fong is a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, for 2014-15. Fong recently received his PhD in English at the University of Toronto, and works on issues of contemporary literature and film, focusing especially on life writing, ethics, and gender/sexuality studies.

    His dissertation, “Authoring Death: Mourning Masculinity in American Autobiography,” for which he received the A.S.P. Woodhouse Prize for the best dissertation defended in the Department of English, probes representations of the “unhealthy” male bodies that permeate American personal narratives. By exposing the different ways the auto-biographical text manifests the writer’s failing corporeality—even when he struggles to conceal it—“Authoring Death” challenges the myth of the self-made and invulnerable man of American autobiography. Fong’s next book-length project,” Starving Art: Sacrifice, Ethics, and American Hunger Narratives,” examines the centrality of hunger within American culture by studying how literary and visual narratives diminish the body and its appetites. By approaching hunger as a sacrificial act, this project posits an ethics of self-deprivation. Fong’s writing can also be found in Philip Roth Studies, Kitchen Daily, and The Huffington Post.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tony Fong
    Tony Fong is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs; PhD in English from the University of Toronto.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 11th Birthing Culture: Indigeneity and Biomedicalization of Childbirth in Yucatan, Mexico

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Sarah Williams
    Lupina/OGS Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 12th Rachel Gordan talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Rachel Gordan received her Ph.D. from Harvard and her BA from Yale College. She teaches a course in American religious history, and is currently working on a book manuscript about post-World War II American Judaism.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rachel Gordan
    Lecturer and Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto; PhD from Harvard University.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 18th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 24th Job shortages, Care shortages: The U.S. nursing workforce and the crisis of American health care

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The United States has suffered from nursing shortages since at least the 1970s. As a result, rural and inner-city hospitals struggled to properly and consistently staff, offering signing bonuses, and recruiting nurses from abroad. Nursing schools also increased enrollment, and a new generation of nurses—lured by the good job market and salary—entered the profession. As the early stages of the recession began in the mid-2000s, however, the job market changed drastically. Fewer positions exist, and health care facilities are only hiring nurses with experience. On average, new nurses search for work for over a year before finding a position. Yet, nurse-to-patient ratios have remained similar to the days of the labour shortage. This paper investigates this situation, arguing that a new normal in nursing and health care in the U.S. has arrived. By interrogating the recent switch from a shortage to surplus of nurses over the past decade, this paper investigates the impacts of states and federal policies aimed at alleviating the shortage of the late 1990s/early 2000s through growing the domestic labour supply, as well as changing expectations around nurse-to-patient ratios. As this new era of labour surplus and job shortage will show, shortages and surpluses in social reproductive labour involve the manipulation of expectations around care and the value ascribed to it. The new normal in health care and nursing arises through various types of crisis—oversupply of nurses, shortage of nurses, general economic crisis—but in the end is a crisis of neoliberal health care.

    Caitlin Henry is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography, at the University of Toronto. Her research works towards a political definition of health by placing the work of health care at the centre. Her dissertation investigates the impacts of labour surplus and shortage on the nursing workforce, the work of nursing, and the geography of health care by drawing on the everyday practice of nursing, state-driven hospital closures, and federal health and immigration policy since the early 1980s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caitlin Henry
    PhD candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8997


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee, United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia; Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide; and Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Asociation



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2015

  • Wednesday, March 4th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women's Health and Human Rights

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Paolo Sesia

    Jeannie Samuel


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Ethnology and Resistance in Vichy France: A Genealogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Alice L. Conklin
    Departement d'Histoire Ohio State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 24th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Departement d'Histoire University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st Austerity as Epidemic: The New Political Economy of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Faraz Shahidi
    Lupina Research Associate



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 1st Les occupations et les liens entre les deux guerres mondiales

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Annette Becker
    Departement d'Histoire Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Invisible Fences and the Aesthetics of Austerity in Thoreau’s "Walden" (1854)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In this paper, D’Amico examines Henry David Thoreau’s distaste for accumulation in “Walden” (1854), focusing on Thoreau’s peculiar desire for property and ownership unimpeded by materiality. She suggests that Walden’s inchoate philosophy of property offers insight into the contradictory position of property in the circuit of capitalist exchange; more specifically, that Thoreau’s dread of over-accumulation and desire for Spartan simplicity reflects capital’s abstract desire for unfettered exchange and circulation. Indeed, throughout “Walden” Thoreau describes physical property as waste, excess, and spiritual pollutants, cultivating an aesthetic of austerity that privileges “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.” Lauding the poet’s ability to enclose the landscape within verse, “the most admirable kind of invisible fence,” Thoreau articulates a theory of ownership that eschews material forms of possession in favour of a higher law (Gilmore 1985; Newman 2010). By placing “Walden” in conversation with Lockean social contract theory and its discontents (Rousseau and Marx), she read Thoreau’s text as part of the history of political philosophy. “Walden” figures property as both excess and insufficiency, and it is the goal of this paper to draw out the implications of this contradiction for contract theory. Importantly, she does not characterize “Walden” as an easy example of bourgeois ideology. Instead, following Rob Nixon’s (2011) claim that representational strategies have serious political weight, she argues that Thoreau’s text is useful because it performs, in aesthetic terms, the contradictory elements of the social contract under capitalism.

    Cristina D’Amico is a fourth year PhD candidate in the department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation reads nineteenth-century American literature’s attempts to address – in formal, aesthetic, and philosophical terms – the limitations of “possessive individualism,” C.B. Macpherson’s useful term for describing what he calls “the proprietary logic of western political ontology.” She is especially interested in representations of unorthodox houses in American fiction as alternative expressions of political subjectivity. She has contributed academic writing to Esquire: Journal of the American Renaissance and The Howellsian: Journal of William Dean Howells Studies. She currently holds a SSHRC CGS- Doctoral Fellowship (2011-2014).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Cristina D'Amico
    PhD candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 22nd Social Justice and Public Health: Policy-Maker Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 22, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Maxwell Smith
    Lupina Research Associate


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th CPHS Policy workshop

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 201510:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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