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September 2017

  • Thursday, September 21st The Grandparent Project: Inter-generational Conversations about Family, Mobility and Identity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20171:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Come join us as 10 outstanding student researchers who have participated in The Grandparent Project present their final projects, which combine oral histories of mobility from Asia to Canada with personal reflections. Over the summer, these students have been working in the Asian Pathways Research Lab to investigate the mobility histories and practices of their own family members in order to reflect on how their own life pathways are both similar and different from those of older generations. The stories presented encourage new kinds of inter-generational conversations about the changing meanings of home, belonging, mobility, identity, diaspora and citizenship. This event will be structured as a literary short story reading, and free copies of our inaugural publication Pathways will be distributed at the event. This event is open to the public and ideal for students who may be interested in getting involved in the Asian Pathways Research Lab.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2003, Environics pollster Michael Adams wrote a bestselling book entitled Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values. That book was based on surveys of the evolving social values of Canadians and Americans his firm had been conducting in Canada since 1983 and the United States since 1992. In 2016, Environics conducted 8,000 interviews in the United States and 4,000 in Canada to bring the comparative tracking data up to date which will be the basis of his new presentation: Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau. He promises his research will surprise, disturb and reassure.

    Michael Adams is the president of the Environics group of research and communications consulting companies which he co-founded in 1970. In 2006, he founded and serves as president of the non-profit Environics Institute for Survey Research.
    Michael is also the author of six books, including: Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values, (2003); and American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States (2005).
    Environics Institute projects include the first major survey of Muslims in Canada, the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study and, most recently, the Black Experience Project in the Greater Toronto Area.
    Michael holds an Honours B.A. in Political Science from Queen’s University (1969) and a M.A. in Sociology from the University of Toronto (1970).
    In 2009, he received an honorary Doctor of Letters from Ryerson University in Toronto.
    In December 2016, Michael was one of 100 leading individuals to be awarded the Order of Canada, the country’s highest domestic honour.
    Outside the field of research, he is a partner in the Robert Craig Winery in Napa Valley, California.


    Speakers

    Michael Adams
    President, Environics Institute



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Understanding the 2017 German Election

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMUpper Library, Massey College
    University of Toronto
    4 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany, the Toronto Branches of the Canadian International Council (CIC) and Young Professionals in Foreign Policy (YPFP) invite you to learn more about the upcoming 2017 German Federal Election. These elections, to be held on September 24, will see the Bundestag elect a new Chancellor who will form a new government. Joined by a moderator, our panellists will provide depth, background and insight into the elections. While open to questions from our moderator, the speakers will focus their remarks on two main themes: the German political system, and changes–particularly conservative shifts–taking place among the political parties.

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Germany in Toronto

    Canadian International Council

    Young Professionals in Foreign Policy


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Book Launch: The Economization of Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 8:00PMGladstone Hotel
    Second Floor Reception Gallery
    Toronto, ON
    RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1722923654676992/
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Please join us to celebrate the publication of Michelle Murphy’s book, The Economization of Life (Duke University Press 2017) on Thursday, September 21 from 5pm – 8pm. This is Michelle’s third single-authored book but only her first launch! To kick-off the TRU’s 2017-18 events, many of her peers and collaborators want to celebrate her latest achievement, and to honor her as a colleague, co-conspirator, mentor and friend. The event will take place in the Second Floor Reception Gallery of the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto. We’ll have a cash bar, light refreshments, and, of course, copies of the book for sale.

    Up-to-date information and RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1722923654676992/

    What is a life worth? In the wake of eugenics, new quantitative racist practices that valued life for the sake of economic futures flourished. In The Economization of Life, Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy, pinpointing the spread of a potent biopolitical logic: some must not be born so that others might live more prosperously. Resituating the history of postcolonial neoliberal technique in expert circuits between the United States and Bangladesh, Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice.
    More here: https://www.dukeupress.edu/the-economization-of-life

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Faculty of Information, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Book Launch "Jihad and Co.: Black Markets and Islamist Power" by Aisha Ahmad

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON M5S 0A7
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For two decades, militant jihadism has been one of the world’s most pressing security crises. In civil wars and insurgencies across the Muslim world, certain Islamist groups have taken advantage of the anarchy to establish political control over a broad range of territories and communities. In effect, they have built radical new jihadist proto-states.

    Why have some ideologically-inspired Islamists been able to build state-like polities out of civil war stalemate, while many other armed groups have failed to gain similar traction? What makes jihadists win? In Jihad & Co., Aisha Ahmad argues that there are concrete economic reasons behind Islamist success. By tracking the economic activities of jihadist groups in Afghanistan, Somalia, Pakistan, Mali, and Iraq, she uncovers an unlikely actor in bringing Islamist groups to power: the local business community.

    To illuminate the nexus between business and Islamist interests in civil war, Ahmad journeys into war-torn bazaars to meet with both jihadists and the smugglers who financed their rise to power. From the arms markets in the Pakistani border region to the street markets of Mogadishu, their stories reveal a powerful economic logic behind the rise of Islamist power in civil wars. Behind the fiery rhetoric and impassioned, ideological claims is the cold, hard cash of the local war economy. Moving readers back and forth between mosques, marketplaces, and battlefields, Ahmad makes a powerful argument that economic savvy, as much as ideological fervor, explains the rise of militant jihadism across the modern Muslim world.

    Aisha Ahmad is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Co-Director of the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Her work explores the political economy of Islamist power in weak and failed states. She has conducted field research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and Kenya. In 2012, she was a fellow at the Belfer Center on Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School.

    Contact

    Samantha Smith


    Speakers

    Aisha Ahmad
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto and Co-Director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 22nd – Saturday, September 23rd Reframing Family Photography (conference)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20178:00AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
    Saturday, September 23, 20178:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 22nd Dismantling Japanese Developmentalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMMassey College
    University of Toronto
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Abstract

    Japan’s combination of economic success and conservative dominance from the 1950s into the early 1990s was the consequence of what Pempel calls “developmentalism.” The term involves more than the well-studied ‘developmental state.’ Most particularly, the Japanese success story relied on a specific and unusual socio-economic alignment; a positive sum relationship between state direction and corporate creativity; and Japan’s Cold War security and economic partnership with the United States. The combination unleashed a positive cycle of economic development and conservative political strength.

    Japan’s positive cycle was challenged by two external changes: first, the breakdown in diplomatic and security bipolarity that began with the Nixon visits to China and the Deng economic reforms; and second, the challenges from increased power of global finance and multinational production networks. These external global shifts undercut the Japan’s prevailing model and opened the challenge to find a suitable substitute. That search has continued for over twenty years resulting in some successes and many false starts. Professor Pempel’s talk will examine the relationship between this more complete understanding of developmentalism as the roots of Japan’s early successes and the subsequent difficulties of finding its adequate replacement.

    Biographical Sketch

    T.J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on Japan’s political economy, economic and security issues in East Asia, and Asian regionalism. His most recent book with Keiichi Tsunekawa is “Two Crises, Different Outcomes: East Asia and Global Finance” (Cornell University Press).

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    T. J. Pempel
    Speaker
    Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, September 24th Election Brunch - German Federal Election

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, September 24, 201711:00AM - 2:00PMRicarda's Restaurant
    134 Peter Street
    Toronto, M5V 2H2
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    Description

    On September 24, the federal elections for the 19th Bundestag will be held. Forty eight parties compete for the votes of almost 62 million registered voters; roughly three million are voting for the very first time. The German Consulate General in Toronto and the Canadian German Chamber of Industry and Commerce invite you to follow the election forecast and first projections live on German TV / Deutsche Welle TV during our election brunch, starting at 11:00 a.m. at Ricarda’s Restaurant. A rich brunch, live broadcast from Germany’s public broadcasting stations in English and German, and a cheerful vibe will add an element of fun to this political event.

    This is a family friendly event. Ricarda’s is welcoming youngsters with a kid’s corner including a bouncy castle.

    Two options to join:

    Brunch Reservation: Adult-Ticket: $20.17 (+ HST), Kids-Ticket: $12.99 (+ HST), 5 years and below (FREE)

    The Brunch buffet includes Scrambled, Fried, Boiled Eggs a la minute, Selection of cured and smoked cold cuts, accompanied by a variety of cheeses; Ricarda’s Homemade variety of bread and rolls, a choice of our homemade jams; Yoghurt with seasonal fresh berry compote; An array of fresh juice, coffee and tea (Further breakfast options such as Waffles, Pancakes, Muesli, Oatmeal, and more are available at regular a la carte prices on site).

    Please reserve your seat until September 17, 2017. CANCELLATION: eligibility for a refund must be submitted no later than September 17, 2017.


    Speakers

    Prof. Randall Hansen
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Catherine Tsalikis
    OpenCanada.org

    Prof. Kai Arzheimer
    University of Mainz, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Germany in Toronto

    Canadian German Chamber of Industry and Commerce


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, September 24th Next Steps for the Global Left: Post-Election Panel Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, September 24, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    As the polls close on 2017 elections in Germany and New Zealand, the Friedrich-Ebert Foundation, the Foundation for European Progressive Studies, the Munk School of Global Affairs, and the Broadbent Institute invite you to join us for a unique panel discussion.

    Next Steps for the Global Left

    Trump, Brexit, climate change, an ongoing refugee crisis — there are no small problems facing the world right now. How should progressives respond? What does securing a just and democratic future look like, here in Canada, in Europe and around the globe?

    Sabina Dewan, Executive Director, JustJobs Network

    Angella MacEwen, Senior Economist with Canadian Labour Congress

    Stewart Wood (Lord Wood of Anfield), Chair of the United Nations Association UK, British Parliamentarian, Former Advisor to Ed Miliband

    Moderated by Randall Hansen, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Washington Office

    Broadbent Institute

    Foundation for European Progressive Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th DPS Meeting

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20179:00AM - 1:00PMBloor - Round Room, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sean Willett
    416-946-8904


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th Constitutionalism and Democracy in Latin America: Celebrating and Taking Stock of Ana Maria Bejarano’s Scholarly Legacy

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20171:00PM - 6:00PM1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After her untimely passing in April 2017, Professor Ana Maria Bejarano’s colleagues and co-authors take stock of her contributions to scholarship on Latin American politics. This is a private event.

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th The Cultural Contexts of Indigeneity in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the past century, ‘indigenous’ as a political concept has become internationalized and, more recently, has risen in vogue as environmental protection movements worldwide are increasingly framed as Indigenous resistance to the enduring ills of settler colonialism. However, despite its trendiness, ‘indigeneity’ remains poorly defined, historically contingent, and the answers to its most basic questions (such as ‘who is Indigenous?’) remain in flux. In Southeast Asia, both Western and internal colonialism have been instrumental in the legal and political construction of Indigeneity and its application to specific populations. Meanwhile, Indigenous concepts of indigeneity typically diverge widely from State definitions, especially where territorial sovereignty is at stake. Drawing on my field research in the Philippines (and the work of others in Southeast Asia), I will discuss the cultural and political conundrums perpetuated by this nebulous term, and why grappling with ‘Indigeneity’ – as well as pondering its future – matters more than ever today.

    OONA PAREDES is Assistant Professor in the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, and is the author of A Mountain of Difference: The Lumad in Early Colonial Mindanao (Cornell SEAP, 2013).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Oona Paredes
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, National University of Singapore Inaugural Strom Visiting Professor

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 26th Sex and Islam: From LGBTQ Rights to Muslim Feminists

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 26, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative

    Description

    From marriage equality to wearing the veil, some of the most controversial questions about Muslims in Canada focus on their bedrooms and their wardrobes. But what exactly is the conflict between Islamic and liberal ideas about sex, love, and gender?

    Muslim women are typically the topic of this conversation, but rarely have a voice in it. Instead, patriarchal Muslims and Islamophobic white supremacists alike characterize Muslim women as either victims or villains, both equally excluding Muslim women from debates about themselves.

    LGBTQ Muslims have also been excluded from these crucial conversations. The horrifying anti-gay hostilities in Indonesia, Chechnya, and Iraq clearly show that LGBTQ persons in these countries are at terrible risk. Closer to home, in a 2016 study, a majority of Canadian Muslim households surveyed said it was not possible to be an observant Muslim and in a same-sex relationship. Living at the intersection, LGBTQ Muslims are therefore confronted with both homophobia and Islamophobia.

    When it comes to sex and gender issues in Islam, there is much controversy and little consensus. But what do we actually know about the bedrooms and the values of Muslims? How have Islamic ideas about sex shaped social and political realities of Muslims around the world? Are these Muslim beliefs about gender, sexuality, and family incompatible with widely accepted liberal democratic ideals?

    Understanding sex in Islam is an essential part of the conversation about human rights and fundamental freedoms. Do LGBTQ Muslims have any hope for inclusion, both here in Canada and around the world? And how does the field of Islamic feminism challenge patriarchal visions of Islam, as well as white supremacist and Islamophobic beliefs about Islam and Muslims?

    To tackle these tough questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative is pleased to host this dynamic panel event, featuring four distinguished leaders.

    Speakers:
    Ayesha S. Chaudhry is the Canada Research Chair in Religion, Law and Social Justice and an Associate Professor of Islamic studies and Gender studies at the University of British Columbia, where she also serves on the Board of Governors. She is the author of Domestic Violence and the Islamic Tradition: Ethics, Law, and the Muslim Discourse on Gender (Oxford University Press, 2014).

    Shereen El-Feki is a Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School, an Associate Fellow of Chatham House, a Senior Fellow with Promundo, and Co-Chair of the Gender-Based Violence Hub at the Joint Learning Initiative for Faith and Local Communities. She is the author of Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World (Penguin Random House, 2013).

    El-Farouk Khaki is the Imam of the LGBTQ-affirming mosque El-Tawhid Juma Circle in Toronto, the founder of Salaam: Queer Muslim Community, the co-founder of the Muslim AIDS Project, and an award-winning speaker and activist on Islam and human rights.

    Mohammed Fadel is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto, with a specialization in Islamic Law. He has published extensively in leading legal journals on family law in the Islamic tradition, international human rights law, and the compatibility between Islamic and liberal democratic legal traditions.


    Speakers

    Ayesha S. Chaudhry
    Canada Research Chair in Religion, Law and Social Justice Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Gender Studies University of British Columbia

    El-Farouk Khaki
    Imam, El Tawhid Juma Circle

    Shereen El-Feki
    Professor of Global Practice, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mohammad Fadel
    Associate Professor & Canada Research Chair for the Law and Economics of Islamic Law, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 27th Sport and the French: An Erratic Trajectory from Du Guesclin to Coubertin

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 27, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    John McLelland
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 28th Internationalization in Action: Transformative Student Research at the Asian Insitute

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 28, 201710:00AM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Student Led Research Project Presentations from the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge, Global Taiwan Projects and CAS450H: Asian Pathways Research Practice

    The Asian Institute at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs is one of North America’s leading centres of Asian research and teaching. AI’s approach to Asia balances regional specialization rooted in local knowledge with transnational, global, and interdisciplinary conversations that contextualize and transects local viewpoints on contemporary issues.
    The Asian Institute prides itself on offering innovative teaching programs, as well as distinctive hands-on international learning experiences for students. In their future careers, our students will navigate a knowledge economy shaped by globalization that requires fluency across cultural, business, social, and political spheres. In order to develop this fluency, spending time on the ground in Asia is a crucial complement to classroom learning. The AI aims to offer as many of its students as possible the opportunity for an academically rooted, life-changing field research experience in Asia at least once during their studies. To that end, the AI has designed unique extracurricular programs that are on the vanguard of supporting the University’s wider goals of internationalization, redesigning undergraduate teaching, and increasing student mobility. Programs such as ITAC and Global Taiwan are uniquely on campus and are important vehicles in achieving those goals.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th "Lazy Japanese" and "Degraded Koreans": Does Culture Matter in Explaining Economic Development?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMUniversity College, room 179
    15 King's College Circle
    Toronto, M5S3H7
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    Description

    Culture has been frequently mentioned as an explanation for Asian successes in economic development. Typical is the comment by Samuel Huntington, the author of the controversial book, The Clash of Civilisations, offered as an explanation of the economic divergence between South Korea and Ghana, two countries that were at similar levels of economic development in the 1960s, argued: “Undoubtedly, many factors played a role, but ... culture had to be a large part of the explanation. South Koreans valued thrift, investment, hard work, education, organisation, and discipline. Ghanaians had different values. In short, cultures count”.
    In this talk, Ha-Joon Chang will argue that those arguments trying to explain international differences in economic development in terms of cultural differences are often ignorant, usually fail to take a dynamic view of culture, and are invariably based on simplistic theories.

    Professor Ha-Joon Chang is the economist at the University of Cambridge. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, he has published 16 authored books (five co-authored) and 10 edited books. His main books include The Political Economy of Industrial Policy (Palgrave Macmillan UK, 1996), Kicking Away the Ladder (Anthem Pr, 2002), Bad Samaritans (Bloomsbury Press, 2009), 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (Bloomsbury Press, 2012), and Economics: The User’s Guide (Bloomsbury Press, 2014). By 2018, his writings will have been translated and published in 41 languages and 44 countries. Worldwide, his books have sold 2 million copies. He is the winner of the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize and the 2005 Wassily Leontief Prize. He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ha-Joon Chang
    Speaker
    Economist & Author Reader, Department of Political Economy of Development, University of Cambridge

    Paul Kingston
    Chair
    Director, Political Science and IDS, University of Toronto

    Nick Li
    Commentator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Critical Development Studies, UTSC

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto

    Department of Political Science, UTSG


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th Aga Khan Foundation -- Getting to Work: Women’s Economic Empowerment in Pakistan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 201712:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    MGA - Program

    Description

    Getting to Work: Women’s Economic Empowerment in Pakistan

    Aga Khan Foundation Canada (AKFC) and the Master of Global Affairs Program, Munk School of Global Affairs invite you to join a conversation about women’s empowerment in Pakistan as part of AKFC’s annual University Seminar Series.

    Women’s economic empowerment is fundamental to sustainable and inclusive economic growth. Lack of access to economic resources and opportunities impacts women’s ability to participate and succeed in economic activities. In Pakistan, despite important progress in access to education, health, and participation in community life for women, many women still face significant barriers accessing economic opportunities. Many young women lack the skills, confidence and support to make key life decisions, including those related to employment and livelihoods. Within the labour market, the institutions intended to facilitate women’s participation are often weak and unable to implement laws meant to ensure women’s safety and security. This lack of a supportive environment discourages women from pursuing a wider range of employment opportunities – particularly those outside traditional income‐generating roles.

    On September 28, join Yasmin Karim, Programme Manager with the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme Pakistan, for a conversation about women’s empowerment in challenging contexts and how vocational and skills training in Pakistan is challenging social norms and transforming women’s roles in their household and their communities. By working through a case study, participants will explore how some of approaches, challenges and lessons learned implementing women’s economic empowerment programs.

    Yasmin Karim is the Programme Manager, Gender and Development with the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme (AKRSP) Pakistan. Since 2011, Yasmin has worked with AKRSP to design and implement community development programs that drive women’s social and economic empowerment. Previously, she has worked for the International Rescue Committee, and the Aga Khan Development Network Multi-input Earthquake Reconstruction Programme. In 2005, Yasmin was one of 1000 women collectively nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize through the 1000 Peace Women initiative, and in 2012 she was awarded the Human Rights Defender Award by the Prime Minister of Pakistan.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Yasmin Karim
    Programme Manager, Gender and Development with the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme (AKRSP) Pakistan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th The Fight Against Impunity, An Ongoing Series: The Narco State, the Witness, the Victims, the Investigators

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 20176:30PM - 8:30PMJackman Humanities Building
    University of Toronto
    170 St. George St., first floor, JHB 100
    NW corner of St. George St. and Bloor
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Award-winning novelist and journalist, Francisco Goldman is a regular contributor to The New Yorker, where he has published an eight-part series on the missing students of Ayotzinapa, Mexico. He is the author of the novels: The Long Night of White Chickens, The Ordinary Seaman, The Divine Husband: A Novel, The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop? and Say Her Name. His most recent book is The Interior Circuit: A Mexico City Chronicle.

    For additional information, please contact Berenice Villagomez: las.coord@utoronto.ca.


    Speakers

    Francisco Goldman


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Latin American Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Jackman Humanities Institute Program for the Arts

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

    Institute for Creative Exchange of the Americas

    Department of Spanish and Portuguese

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2017

  • Tuesday, October 3rd U. S. Economic Strategy in Asia in the Trump Era: From Pivot to About-Face?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 3, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2016, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies began preparation of a brief for the next U.S. Administration on what the American strategy should be. President Obama talked about a “Pivot to Asia” and championed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). With incoming President Trump’s announcement that the USA would be withdrawing from TPP negotiations, that strategy needed an update. Join the co-author of the CSIS report “Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific: Recommendations for the Incoming Administration”, Scott Miller, as he brings us up to date on the U.S. economic agenda in Asia, and how Congress is looking at trade negotiations in the post-TPP era.

    Scott Miller has been a senior adviser and the William M. Scholl Chair in International Business at CSIS since 2012. The Scholl Chair focuses on key issues in the global economy, such as international trade, investment, competitiveness, and innovation. He has led many campaigns supporting U.S. free trade agreements and has been a contributor to U.S. trade and investment policy over many years. Mr. Miller advised the U.S. government as a liaison to the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiations, and he is a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy. He was the founding chairman of the Department of Commerce’s Industry Trade Advisory Committee (ITAC) Investment Working Group. He is one of the authors of the CSIS report Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific https://www.csis.org/events/reinvigorating-us-economic-strategy-asia-pacific>


    Speakers

    Scott Miller
    Speaker
    Senior Advisor and Scholl Chair in International Business, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington

    Jonathan T. Fried
    Discussant
    Coordinator for International Economic Relations, Global Affairs Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Finding the Third Way

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Raised in a Buddhist household, “the Third Way” describes the path that Kristyn Wong-Tam has found to lead to move forward in new and challenging projects. As a queer, Asian woman, who left home as a teenager, she has forged a path to becoming a successful entrepreneur, realtor, community activist, and now politician. In each stage of her life, she has utilized the principles of finding a Third Way to develop creative solutions to complex problems. Leading with values of social justice and equity, she will share her experiences of bringing people together to find collaborative, community-responsive solutions to many challenges facing Toronto residents.

    Kristyn Wong-Tam is Toronto’s only openly gay, racialized City Councillor. She was elected in 2010 and has been a champion for social justice, equity. She has championed the development of Gender-Responsive Budgeting at the Municipal level, Toronto’s first LGBTQ youth shelters, and initialized comprehensive, sustainable planning policies in the downtown. She has led the way in ensuring Toronto’s downtown communities are liveable and sustainable for all residents.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 926-8996


    Speakers

    Emily Hertzman
    Moderator
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Councillor Kristyn Wong -Tam
    Speaker


    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th The Land is Full: Addressing Israel's Population Challenge

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Alon Tal founded the Israel Union for Environmental Defense, Israel’s leading green advocacy organization and the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, a regional center for Arabs and Israelis. Between 2010 and 2013 he served as chair of Israel’s Green Party. Haaretz newspaper selected him as the country’s most effective environmental leader and Israel’s Ministry of Environment gave him a life achievement award at age 48. In 2005 he was the winner of the prestigious Bronfman prize, and international humanitarian award. Today he chairs the Tel Aviv University’s department of public policy.

    The lecture is based on a Professor Tal’s award winning book “The Land is Full”, published this year at Yale University Press.

    Contact

    Emanuel Adler
    (416) 946-8931


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Identity Politics of Stateless Ethnic Groups. The Case of Carpatho-Rusyns and Silesians.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The meaning of the struggle for recognition and identity politics or politics of difference in Central and Eastern European countries has gained significance after the political transformation of the nineties, with the appearance of demands for the emancipation of many ethnic groups aiming to recognize their differences and specificity of culture. The lecture will describe two of such groups: Silesians and Carpatho-Rusyns, for which the democratization of social life opened the way to fight for recognition by the states in which those groups live. The aim of the presentation is to reconstruct the strategies of the struggle for recognition and identity politics of Carpatho-Rusyns and Silesian activists in relation to the signalized by Thomas H. Eriksen universal “grammar of identity politics”. Simultaneously, basing on analysis of states policy towards aspirations of Silesians and Carpatho-Rusyns it will show the fundamental difficulties in achieving legal recognition and protection, which involve groups of unknown status, stateless minority, divided in terms of identity, whose right to emancipation is challenged by various social actors.

    Ewa Michna PhD habil., is a sociologist associated professor at the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora, Jagiellonian University, Cracow. Her research interests focus around ethnic and national minorities in Central and Eastern Europe, the struggle of minority communities for their recognition and the identity politics of ethnic leaders. Authors of Łemkowie. Grupa etniczna czy naród? (The Lemkos. An Ethnic Group or a Nation?), Kwestie etniczno-narodowościowe na pograniczu Słowiańszczyzny wschodniej i zachodniej. Ruch rusiński na Słowacji. Ukrainie i w Polsce (Ethnic and National Issues in the Borderlands of Eastern and Western Slavic World. The Rusyn Movement in Slovakia, Ukraine and Poland).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ewa Michna
    Speaker
    Associate professor at the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora, Jagiellonian University, Cracow

    Paul Magocsi
    Chair
    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Piotr Wrobel
    Commentator
    Associate Professor; Kostanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    The Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Metaphor, Memory: a workshop with Dr. Shahid Amin

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
    Room SS 2098
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    Description

    Dr. Shahid Amin (A.M. Khwaja Chair at Jamia Millia University, New Delhi; Visiting Professor of History, Columbia University), a prominent historian of South Asia and member of the Subaltern Studies Collective, will hold a masterclass for graduate students moderated by Prof. Natalie Zemon Davis (Professor Emerita, University of Toronto). The masterclass, based on Prof. Amin’s research, will examine the ‘event’ as a way of thinking about the archive, memory, historical consciousness, and larger methodological questions about ethnography and textuality in the early modern and modern periods.
    All graduate students in the Department of History are encouraged to attend, as well as graduate students and faculty from other units.
    In preparation for the masterclass, participating graduate students will have read in advance three articles by Prof. Amin available for download here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/no1qrn79tdptv24/AAAx2VmPFvn6fUDONbg1Zz8aa?dl=0

    The session will be dedicated to an open conversation, giving students and faculty a chance to engage with Professor Amin about his research and his understanding of the discipline.
    Please RSVP below by Sept. 30th. To register please visit the following page
    http://history.utoronto.ca/events/event-metaphor-memory-workshop-dr-shahid-amin

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shahid Amin
    A.M. Khwaja Chair at Jamia Millia University, New Delhi Visiting Professor of History, Columbia University

    Natalie Zemon Davis
    Professor Emerita at Princeton University and University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Department of Historic Studies, University of Toronto at Mississauga

    Institute for Islamic Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Populism and the Politics of Membership: A Research Agenda

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 20176:00PM - 7:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After Brexit and Trump, everyone is into “populism,” not only the few specialists who had previously studied the radical right. Populism usually has two targets, “experts” and conspicuous “others.” Concentrating on the latter aspect, this talk lays out an agenda for studying the effects of populism on the law and politics of “membership” in the liberal state, understood as the regulation of immigration, citizenship, and majority culture.

    Christian Joppke holds a chair in sociology at the University of Bern (CH). He is also a Visiting Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at Central European University, Budapest, and an Honorary Professor in the Department of Political Science and Government at Aarhus University (Denmark). He is a Member of the German Expert Council on Integration and Migration (SVR). He recently published Legal Integration of Islam (with John Torpey) (Harvard UP 2013), and The Secular State Under Siege: Religion and Politics in Europe and America (Cambridge: Polity 2015), and Is Multiculturalism Dead? Crisis and Persistence in the Constitutional State(Cambridge: Polity 2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Joppke
    Speaker
    Universität Bern

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th Conquest and Community: Historical Writing in Troubled Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    170 St George Street
    Room 100
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    Description

    Short reception to follow

    The fourth biennial conference on South Asian religions (CSAR) is proud to announce a special roundtable discussion titled “Conquest and Community: Historical Writing in Troubled Times.” Drawing from their collective experience in the field, historians Shahid Amin (A.M. Khwaja Chair at Jamia Millia University, New Delhi; Visiting Professor of History, Columbia University), Natalie Zemon Davis (Emerita, Princeton University; University of Toronto), and Rosalind O’Hanlon (University of Oxford) will reflect on the stakes of writing histories of contested events, figures, and narratives that exert enormous political capital in the present, taking as their starting point Dr. Amin’s latest book, ‘Conquest and Community, the Afterlife of Warrior Saint Ghazi Miyan.’ While historical writing is arguably always saturated with the politics of the present, histories of contested figures and events are often explicitly so. What is the role of the historian in moments of ascendant majoritarianism in South Asia and elsewhere? How can historical writing respond to popular impulses to avenge supposed ‘historical wrongs’? And how do historians navigate the often tactile consequences of writing against the contemporary popular? Join us for a rich and lively discussion with three prominent historians as they reflect on their research in light of these enduring dilemmas and questions.

    RSVP by Oct. 2 on our Eventbrite page: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/conquest-and-community-writing-history-in-troubled-times-tickets-37755828700

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Malavika Kasturi
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, UTM Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute

    Shahid Amin
    Discussant
    A.M. Khwaja Chair at Jamia Millia University, New Delhi Visiting Professor of History, Columbia University

    Natalie Zemon Davis
    Discussant
    Emerita, University of Toronto

    Rosalind O'Hanlon
    Discussant
    Professorship of Indian History and Culture, University of Oxford


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Historical Studies, UTM

    Institute for Islamic Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Following the capitalist crisis in 1997/98, Indonesia’s economic and political reforms led to increased incorporation into global capitalism. This paper examines three major issues related to such capitalist development after reformasi. First, the motor behind the development of capitalism is a remarkable exploitation of labor. Second, the accumulation of capital through land-based industries has seriously assaulted the mass of independent poor producers. Third, evidence indicates that the appropriation of nature has become the underlying feature of capitalist development. In response to such development there is a growing anti-capitalist movement in the country. Thus this paper also examines the anti-capitalist tendencies in the country. I will restrict my attention to two major tendencies among Indonesian activists today. The first is “reformist anti-capitalist” activists who advocate for a more regulated capitalism and demand a role for the state in regulating the market. The second is “revolutionary anti-capitalist” activists, whose concerns go beyond reforms to the capitalist system.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arianto Sangadji
    Speaker
    Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Programme in Geography, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th The Place of the Baltic in the French Atlantic Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This talk explores ways in which the Baltic region enabled the rise and consolidation of the French colonial empire in the Americas. The Baltic, a supplier of masts, tar, hemp, iron, planks, and other naval stores, has long been viewed as central to early modern European expansion overseas. Nevertheless, its particular association with French empire building remains little studied. Drawing on data from the Danish Sound Toll Registers and French consular records, the talk delineates how French colonization began as an attempt to secure commercial independence from the Baltic, only to produce the opposite effect of binding the French colonial enterprise and the Baltic ever closer together.

    Pernille Røge is Assistant Professor of French and French Colonial History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarly interests focus on interconnections between eighteenth-century political economic theory and colonial policy and practice. Her publications on the French, British, and Danish colonial empires have appeared in edited volumes and peer reviewed journals, including Dix-huitième Siècle, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, and History of European Ideas. She is co-editor of a collection of essays entitled The Political Economy of Empire in the Early Modern World (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Her book manuscript Reinventing the Empire: Political Economy, France, and the African and Caribbean Colonies, c. 1750-1800 is currently under review with Cambridge University Press.


    Speakers

    Pernille Roege
    University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th Wives, Intellectuals, and Ascetics: the Braham scholar household in early-modern India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    100 St. George Street
    Room 100
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    Description

    While there is an enormous body of work on Brahman scholars as intellectuals within the Mughal world, their social histories are less well developed, particularly their lives within one of the essential prerequisites for intellectual labour—the lineage and its practical locale in the scholar household. This keynote will offer a tentative exploration of the domestic world of the scholar household, where marriage provided for the social reproduction of scholar families, and brought new connections and resources within a wider world of scholastic competition. Even some ascetic lineages, with their own quasi-familial patterns of recruitment, were a part of this extended domestic world, and the worlds of the intellectual and the domestic, the household and the ascetic, look to be rather more connected than they sometimes appear in our familiar understandings of them.

    Reception to follow, no registration required

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rosalind O'Hanlon
    Professorship of Indian History and Culture, University of Oxford


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Buddhist Studies

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Historical Studies, UTM

    Institute of Islamic Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 10th Home Is Where the Heart Is: A Story of Emigration from Serbia to the EU

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 10, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Prof. Danica Šantić
    Speaker
    Faculty of Geography, University of Belgrade

    Prof. Robert Austin
    Chair
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 11th Jihadist Violence and Security Markets: A Celebration of Award-Winning Research

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 11, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs and the Department of Political Science are delighted to announce an event to celebrate the International Studies Association’s Best Security Article Award to Professor Aisha Ahmad for her International Security article, “The Security Bazaar: Business Interests and Islamist Power in Civil War Somalia.”

    Professor Ahmad’s article investigates the reasons why radical Islamist groups sometimes gain political power in civil war contexts. Ahmad arrives at the counterintuitive conclusion that Islamist rule is sometimes preferred by the business community because Islamists are able to provide security for business activities at a lower cost than local warlords’ protection rackets or fragile public governments. Based on extensive field work and a mix of qualitative and quantitative analysis, Ahmad tests her theory in civil war Somalia. She finds that economic interests better explain support for Islamist security networks than either clan or Islamic identity. Her work carries important implications for international policy aimed at stabilizing public government in areas prone to Islamist radicalism.

    After a presentation of the award by Professor Robert Keohane on behalf of the International Studies Association, this event will celebrate Professor Ahmad’s ideas through a lively panel discussion among leading scholars of international relations.

    About the Speakers

    Aisha Ahmad is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Co-Director of the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Her work explores the political economy of Islamist power in weak and failed states. She has conducted field research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and Kenya. In 2012, she was a fellow at the Belfer Center on Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School. She is currently working on a book on the relationship between clandestine business and Islamist movements in civil wars across the Muslim world.

    David B. Dewitt is a University Professor in the Department of Political Science at York University. His principal focus is on international relations, notably covering the Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Canadian foreign, security and defence policies, and international and regional security and conflict management. Active in t2 and t1.5 diplomacy, along with consulting with government departments and international institutions. Visiting scholar at the Canadian Forces College, Tel-Aviv University, and the Korean Institute for Defence Analysis (KIDA). Member of the International Studies Association (ISA), the International Institute of Strategic Studies (IISS) and the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP). Chair, Partnership for International Strategies in Asia (PISA – Washington, DC). Publications covering Canadian foreign, security and defence, Asia Pacific security, Middle East security, arms control and proliferation, human security, international relations theory. Teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels in these areas; also the PhD core course in international relations. At York, Associate VP Research, Director, York Centre for International & Security Studies (YCISS); also on leave as VP Research & Programs, Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI).

    Antoinette Handley is the Chair of the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto where she teaches comparative, developing country politics, including African politics and government, African political economy, and the politics of epidemics. Prior to her appointment at the University of Toronto, Handley served as the director of studies at the South African Institute of International Affairs in Johannesburg, South Africa, where she led the institute’s research and publications division. Handley’s research focuses on the nature of the private sector, specifically, business as a political actor and the role of these actors in the political economy of development more broadly. More recently, her work has focused on how African economic elites respond to moments of national social or political crisis.

    Randall Hansen is Interim Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Full Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He works on Immigration and Citizenship, Demography and Population Policy and the Effects of War on Civilians. His published works include Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after Operation Valkyrie (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014), Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Penguin, 2009), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (Oxford University Press, 2000). He has also co-edited Immigration and Public Opinion in Liberal Democracies (with David Leal and Gary P. Freeman) (New York: Routledge, 2012), Migration States and International Cooperation (with Jeannette Money and Jobst Koehler, Routledge, 2011), Towards a European Nationality (w. P. Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe (w. P. Weil, Berghahn, 2002), and Immigration and asylum from 1900 to the present.

    Robert O. Keohane is Professor of International Affairs, Princeton University. He is the author of After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy (1984) and Power and Governance in a Partially Globalized World (2002). He is co-author (with Joseph S. Nye, Jr.) of Power and Interdependence (third edition 2001), and (with Gary King and Sidney Verba) of Designing Social Inquiry (1994). He has served as the editor of the journal International Organization and as president of the International Studies Association and the American Political Science Association. He won the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, 1989, and the Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science, 2005. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and Science Po in Paris, and is the Harold Lasswell Fellow (2007-08) of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    Barnett Rubin is a Senior Fellow and Associate Director of CIC, where he directs the Afghanistan Pakistan Regional Program. He has worked at CIC since July 2000. During 1994-2000 he was Director of the Center for Preventive Action, and Director, Peace and Conflict Studies, at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Rubin was Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for the Study of Central Asia at Columbia University from 1990 to 1996. Previously, he was a Jennings Randolph Peace Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace and Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University. From April 2009 until October 2013, Dr. Rubin was the Senior Adviser to the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan in the U.S. Department of State. In November-December 2001 Rubin served as special advisor to the UN Special Representative of the Secretary General for Afghanistan, during the negotiations that produced the Bonn Agreement. He subsequently advised the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan on the drafting of the constitution of Afghanistan, the Afghanistan Compact, and the Afghanistan National Development Strategy.

    Stephen M. Saideman is the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University. His research interests focus on the causes and consequences of intervention into intra-state conflicts. His latest book, Adapting in the Dust: Learning Lessons from Canada’s War in Afghanistan, comes out in early 2016. His current research focus is on the role of legislatures in democratic civil-military relations. He teaches courses on Contemporary International Security, Civil-Military Relations and US Foreign and Defence Policy.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Introductions
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Aisha Ahmad
    Keynote
    Co-Director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Barnett Rubin
    Moderator
    Associate Director, Senior Fellow, Center on International Cooperation, New York University

    Robert Keohane
    Panelist
    Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs, Princeton University

    David Dewitt
    Panelist
    University Professor, Department of Political Science, York University

    Stephen Saideman
    Panelist
    Paterson Chair in International Affairs, Norman Paterson School of International Relations, Carleton University

    Antoinette Handley
    Conclusion
    Chair, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 11th Magic Realism in South Asian Vernaculars:‎ a global literary trend as an asset of the global South?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 11, 20175:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    While social realism dominated the scene in South Asian prose for much of the 20th century, we have been witnessing the constant rise of a new mode of writing in the last forty years or so. Blending realism with supernatural elements, Magic Realism was mostly received as world literature from South America (Márquez, Borges, etc.). Ever since Rushdie‘s Midnight’s Children (1980), Magic Realism has become a strong presence in South Asian literatures, both English and vernacular.
    The paper will sketch the recent genealogy of Magic Realism from South Asia and outline, through a number of examples from Hindi, Bengali and Urdu literatures, how strategies of this literary mode are deployed in South Asia. It will also look at how some Bengali authors and critics position this production. Has Magic Realism, as some critics argue, always been a part of South Asian literary heritage? Is it an invention and cultural property of the global South? What do such patterns of appropriation mean for our thinking about world literature?

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hans Harder
    Speaker
    Professor, Modern South Asian Languages and Literatures (Modern Indology), Heidelberg

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 12th Professional Development: A Seminar for Graduate Students and Junior Faculty Members

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 12, 201712:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Graduate students discuss their career opportunities with a great deal of gallows humour. Student lounges and faculty meeting rooms echo with stories about the saturated job market and sorrowful accounts of classmates and former students caught on the dreaded sessional treadmill. It is true that there is, in most academic fields and particularly in the social sciences and humanities, a mismatch between the number of tenure-track faculty positions and the number of PhD graduates. It is not true, however, that recently minted PhDs are destined for penury and a professional life of long-term underemployment.

    This half-day seminar examines key stages and strategies in the professional lives of individuals who are completing or have completed their PhDs. It reviews the nature of academic employment in North America and internationally, and covers such topics as:

    * Making the most of your time in graduate school;
    * Establishing an academic and professional persona;
    * Professional engagement and creating contacts outside the academy;
    * Converting your PhD research into scholarly interest in your career;
    * Is there a “publish and prosper” strategy?
    * Breaking out of the (academic) comfort zone: considering jobs in non-traditional places.
    * Knowing when to switch to a non-academic career.
    * Succeeding in the academy: from tenure-terror to professional success.

    The seminar aims to provide graduate students and junior faculty members with a practical guide to managing expectations and developing strategies for career success.

    , former President of the Japan Studies Association, with assistance from Dr. Carin Holroyd, University of Saskatchewan, and Dr. David Welch, University of Waterloo. Dr. Coates is currently the Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, University of Saskatchewan. He has held senior administrative roles at the University of Waterloo, the University of Saskatchewan, the University of New Brunswick at Saint John, the University of Waikato and the University of Northern British Columbia. He has diverse and interdisciplinary interests in such fields as Japan studies, science, technology and society, Indigenous rights, northern development, and Northern Canadian history.

    Lunch will be provded.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    Ken Coates
    Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, University of Saskatchewan

    Carin Holroyd
    Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan

    David Welch
    Dean's Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Endowed Chair Program in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs, University of Toronto; CIGI Chair of Global Security and Professor of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 12th "Hybrid Censorship" During the "Hybrid War": Freedom of Speech and Expression in the Post-Euromaidan Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 12, 20175:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Within the past few years, the Ukrainian authorities have been heavily critisized by international watchdogs and independent observers for some legal steps and practical policies that allegedly curtail freedom of speech and access to information in the country. The government and its supporters argue, however, that the policies are justified by the actual situation of war waged by the neigboring Russia against Ukraine and have nothing to do with a censorship in a conventional sense but, rather, represents a defensive measure against the enemy’s propaganda, subversion, and provocative disinformation. The debate represents a partiular case of a broader controversy between the demand for unrestrained freedom of speech indispensable for modern democracy and the need of those very democracies to protect themselves from the rogue individials, groups, and regimes that increasingly learned how to weaponize media and (dis)information for their malevolent goals.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Mykola Riabchuk
    Speaker
    Senior research fellow at the Ukrainian Center for Cultural Studies, Kyiv, co-founder and member of the editorial board of Krytyka.

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 12th – Sunday, October 15th Future Uncertain: Economic, Environmental, Social and Political Challenge

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 12, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    Friday, October 13, 20178:30AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    Saturday, October 14, 20178:30AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    Sunday, October 15, 20178:30PM - 12:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Description

    The University of Toronto—in conjunction with the new Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School, and the Japan Futures Initiative—is pleased to host the 2017 Japan Studies Association of Canada Annual Meeting, October 12-15, 2017.

    The theme of the conference will be Future Uncertain: Economic, Environmental, Social and Political Challenges Facing Japan. Panels and presentations will draw from a full range of social science and humanities approaches to understanding Japan’s past, present, and future. Speakers will come from across Canada, Japan, the United States and Europe. Presentations will provide the most recent updates on political, social and economic events and trends occurring in Japan. Speakers will address a diverse range of topics that place Japan at its centre, including lifetime employment in the 21st century, agricultural policy, popular culture, infrastructural aid to developing countries, science and technology policy, Tohoku’s recover from the 3/11 disaster, and Japan’s relationship with the U.S. A major theme of this year’s conference will be Japan’s approach to environmental and energy issues. Concerns about climate change, nuclear energy, Japan’s disaster risk and the country’s economic future have sparked a concerted effort in the development of renewable energy, smart communities and smart cities, and the integrated policymaking necessary to support these initiatives.

    Although designed for academics with a serious interest in Japan, JSAC is a welcoming and warm conference that encourages attendance from not only undergraduate and graduate students, but also the general public.

    FOR TICKETS: CLICK LINK AT THE END OF THE PROGRAM

    PROGRAM [draft 8.22.17]

    Thursday, October 12

    12:00–16:00 Professional development: A Seminar for Graduate Students and Junior Faculty Members [Registration required: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csgj/event/23594/]

    15:00–18:00 JSAC Conference Registration

    18:00–21:00 Opening Reception

    Welcoming Remarks
    • Professor Randall Hansen (Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs)
    • Professor Louis Pauly (Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto)
    • Professor Carin Holroyd (President of JSAC)
    • Consul‐General of Japan in Toronto

    Opening Keynote

    Maria Toyoda (Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences and Professor of Government, Suffolk University)
    “The Political Economy of Things: Some Considerations for Japan’s Infrastructure Aid to Developing Economies”

    Friday, October 13

    08:30–09:00 Breakfast

    09:00–10:30 Session 1: Keynote

    Joseph Caron (Former Ambassador of Canada to Japan)
    “Being Ambassador to Japan”

    10:30‐10:45 Break

    10:45–12:15 Session 2A: Society and Culture (I)

    Mark Rowe (Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, McMaster University)
    “Ghosts and Spirits in Contemporary Japanese Buddhism”

    Josh Trichilo (Ph.D. Candidate, Humanities, York University)
    “3.11, Interspecies Trauma, and Kawakami’s ‘Kami‐sama’ Story(ies): Mobilizing Limits to (Not) Represent What it is Like to Whisper Across Finitudes”

    James X. White (Ph.D. Candidate, School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffield, UK)
    “Josei no(!) osake no(!) nomikata‐‐How Women Drink: The Perception and Evaluation of Women’s Alcohol Consumption in popular media”

    Sheri Zhang (Professor, Department of Modern Languages and Literature, University of Ottawa)
    “Inspiration of Japan: Silence, Avoidance and Positive Approach Tackling Prejudice and Racial Discrimination”

    Session 2B: Politics

    Scott Harrison (Project Specialist, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada)
    “Canada and Japan‐Canada Relations”

    Jacob Kovalio (Associate Professor of History, Carleton University)
    “Japan in the 21st Century: A Model Pacifist Liberal‐ Democracy Coping with a Corporatist Chinese Regime’s Lebensraum Foreign Policy”

    Matthew Linley (Designated Professor, International Education and Exchange Center, Nagoya University)
    “Explaining the Gap in the Provision of Disaster Preparedness Information to Foreign Residents in Japanese Cities”

    Yves Tiberghien (Associate Professor of Political Science, UBC)
    Title TBA

    12:15–13:30 Lunch

    13:30–15:00 Session 3: Keynote

    Atsushi Sunami (Vice President and Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS))
    ‘‘Society 5.0’ as Japan’s Science and Technology, Innovation Strategy”

    15:00–15:15 Break

    15:15–16:45 Session 4A: Disaster Recovery

    Millie Creighton (Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia)
    “Difficulties, Disasters, Dams and the Backside of Japan: Re‐Ordering People, Place, and Pollution in Precarious Times”

    David Edgington (Professor, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia)
    “The Road Back: Arrangements for Recovery of Population and Jobs in the Futaba District of Fukushima Prefecture”

    Shinya Nagasaki (Professor and Canada Research Chair in Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University)
    “Uncertainty in nuclear policy in Japan: A Comparison of Japanese and Ontarians’ Opinions on Nuclear Energy”

    Maxine Polleri (Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, York University)
    “Commodifiable Phantasm: The Politicization of the Native Land in a Post‐Fukushima Context of Radioactive Contamination”

    Session 4B: Art and Language

    Norio Ota (Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University)
    “Uncertainties of the future of the Japanese language: A Case Study of Conditionals”

    Cary Takagi (Adjunct Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University)
    “Future Uncertain for the Early Japanese Diaspora in Canada: Challenges and Responses to Religious Identity”

    Noriko Yabuki‐Soh (Associate Professor, Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University)
    “Images of Japanese women: An Analysis of Language Use in Advertisements”

    X. Jie Yang (Professor, School of Languages, Linguistics, Literatures and Cultures, University of Calgary)
    “Life Scenes in Classical Painting: A Research Approach with Digital Technology”

    19:00–21:00 Dinner and Keynote
    John Nilsson‐Wright (Fuji Bank University Senior Lecturer in Modern Japanese Studies, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Cambridge University)
    Title TBA

    Saturday, October 14

    08:30–09:00 Breakfast

    09:00–10:30 Session 5: Keynote

    Patricia Maclachlan (Associate Professor, Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin)
    “Cultivating Institutional Change in Japan: Globalization, Demographic Decline, and the Future of Farming”

    10:30‐10:45 Break

    10:45–12:15 Session 6A: Education and Tourism

    Teri Bryant (Associate Professor Emerita, Haskane School of Business Leighton Wilks Instructor, Haskane School of Business)
    “Developing Cross‐Cultural Skills in Undergraduate Students through a Group Study Program to Japan: Design and Implementation Issues”

    Atsuki Hashimoto (Department of Geography and Tourism Studies, Brock University)
    David Telfer (Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Tourism Studies)
    “A Comparison of Historic Tourism at the Villages of Shirakawa‐go and Gokayama”

    Saeko Suzuki (Ph.D. Candidate, University of British Columbia)
    “Digital Humanities: Electronic Resources or Print Resources”

    Gregory Wheeler (Assistant Professor, Center of Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University)
    “Morality or Neo‐nationalism? Examining Concerns Over the Implementation of
    Moral Education as an Official Subject in the Japanese Elementary and Junior High Schools”

    Session 6B: Roundtable on the Japan Futures Initiative
    • Ken Coates (Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, Johnson‐Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan)
    • Carin Holroyd (Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan)
    • Seung Hyok Lee (Adjunct Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto)
    • Masayuki Tadokoro (Professor of International Relations, Keio University)
    • David Welch (CIGI Chair of Global Security and Professor of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo)

    12:15–13:30 Lunch and Business Meeting

    13:30–15:00 Session 7: Keynote

    Andrew DeWit (Professor, School of Policy Studies, Department of Economics, Rikkyo University)
    “Japanese Smart Communities as Industrial Policy”

    15:00–15:15 Break

    15:15–16:45 Session 8: Greening Japan

    Teri Bryant (Associate Professor Emerita, Haskane School of Business, University of Calgary)
    Iain Macpherson (Assistant Professor, MacEwan University)
    “Colouring Japanese Organizations Green: Environmental Image‐Making Strategies for the 21st Century”

    Jay Goulding (Professor, Department of Social Sciences, York University)
    “Tokugawa’s Environmental Philosophy”

    Sachiyo Kanzaki (Department of Anthropology, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM))
    “Yusuhara: regional autonomy, revitalization and green energy”

    Thomas Waldichuk (Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies)
    “Green Space and Suburban Planning”

    Sunday, October 15

    08:30–09:00 Breakfast

    09:00–10:30 Session 9: Society and Culture (II)

    Fumiko Ikawa‐Smith (Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology, McGill University)
    Title TBA

    Evan Koike (Ph.D. Candidate, University of British Columbia)
    “‘If the Top Changes’: Nonprofit Organizations’ Attempts to Raise Japan’s Low Birthrate by Educating Company Managers”

    Brian Pendleton (Professor Emeritus of Asian Studies, Langara College)
    “‘My Generation are Lost Sheep ... We Must Worship Democracy’: The 1961 Garden
    Club of America Tour to Japan”

    Bill Sewell (Associate Professor, Department of History, Saint Mary’s University)
    “Realism and Recollection: the Perils of Recalling Historical Figures”

    10:30–10:45 Break

    10:45–12:15 Session 10: Economy and Business

    Dick Beason (Professor of International Business and Business Economics, Alberta School of Business, University of Alberta)
    “Lifetime Employment in 21st Century Japan: Employment Trends in Research Intensive Firms”

    Derek Hall (Associate Professor of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University)
    “Japanese Overseas Agricultural Investments”

    Shigenori Matsui (Professor, Peter A. Allard School of Law, UBC)
    “AirBnB and Uber in Japan: Is Law Killing the Development of New Technology?”

    James Tiessen (Associate Professor and Director, School of Health Services Management, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University)
    “Strategies of Japanese for‐Profit Long Term Care Providers: How do Firms Compete?”

    12:15–12:30 Closing Remarks
    Carin Holroyd (President, JSAC)

    Contact

    Eileen Lam

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Japan Studies Association of Canada

    Japan Futures Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    School of the Environment

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Japan Foundation

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Royal Ontario Museum

    Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 13th Being Ambassador to Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 13, 20179:00AM - 10:30AMMunk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Description

    This keynote is a part of the 2017 JSAC Conference. A limited number of seats will be available to students and the public, free of charge.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Joseph Caron
    Speaker
    Former Ambassador of Canada to Japan

    Ken Coates
    Moderator
    Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, Johnson‐Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 13th CSK Brown Bag Series Event

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 13, 201712:00PM - 3:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 13th Society 5.0’ as Japan’s Science and Technology, Innovation Strategy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 13, 20171:30PM - 3:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Description

    This keynote is a part of the 2017 JSAC Conference. A limited number of seats will be available to students and the public, free of charge.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Atsushi Sunami
    Speaker
    Vice President and Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)

    Carin Holroyd
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 14th Cultivating Institutional Change in Japan: Globalization, Demographic Decline, and the Future of Farming

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 14, 20179:00AM - 10:30AMMunk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Description

    This keynote is a part of the 2017 JSAC Conference. A limited number of seats will be available to students and the public, free of charge.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Patricia Maclachlan
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin

    Dick Beason
    Moderator
    Professor of International Business and Business Economics, Alberta School of Business, University of Alberta



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 14th Japanese Smart Communities as Industrial Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 14, 20171:30PM - 3:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    2017 JSAC Conference

    Description

    This keynote is a part of the 2017 JSAC Conference. A limited number of seats will be available to students and the public, free of charge.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Andrew DeWit
    Speaker
    Professor, School of Policy Studies, Department of Economics, Rikkyo University

    Teri Bryant
    Moderator
    Associate Professor Emerita, Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 17th Book Launch: Neda Maghbouleh and Clayton Childress

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 17, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Please join us to celebrate the publication of Neda Maghbouleh’s book, The Limits of Whiteness, and Clayton Childress’ book, Under the Cover. The authors will attempt a non-traditional format, in which each will present and discuss the other’s book, followed by Q&A. This is not their first attempt at a joint venture: Maghbouleh and Childress are colleagues in the U of T Department of Sociology, spouses, and parents of the very same 3-year-old daughter. The talk will be followed by a reception, and copies of the books will be for sale.

    The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race (2017, Stanford University Press) shares the under-theorized and sometimes heartbreaking story of how Iranian American young adults and teenagers move across a white/not-white colour line. By contextualizing ethnographic data with a century’s worth of neglected historical and legal evidence, the book offers new evidence for how a “white” American immigrant group might become “brown,” and what such a transformation says about race in North America today. Born in New York City and raised in Portland, Oregon, Neda Maghbouleh is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research integrates the study of immigration with the study of race by examining settlement and discrimination-related challenges faced by Middle Eastern-heritage immigrants in North America.

    Under the Cover: The Creation, Production, and Reception of a Novel (2017, Princeton University Press) follows the life trajectory of a single work of fiction, going behind the scenes to reveal how a novel is shepherded across three interdependent fields—authoring, publishing, and reading—and how it is transformed by its journey. Drawing on original survey data, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic fieldwork in the U.S., the book reveals how decisions are made, inequalities are reproduced and novels are built to travel in the creation, production, and consumption of culture. Born and raised in Berkeley, California, Clayton Childress is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. His research interests are most squarely in the sociology of the culture, with a focus on meaning and decision making as it relates to social organization and cultural objects.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Neda Maghbouleh
    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Clayton Childress
    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Dept. of Sociology, UTM

    Dept. of Sociology, UTSC

    Graduate Dept. of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 19th Eugenics, Racial Science and Nazi Biopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The widespread complicity of German racial scientists in Nazi eugenic and racial policy is well documented. By contrast, the question of what influence these scientists had on the shaping and radicalization of Nazi biopolitics is more difficult to answer. Wetzell challenges the thesis that Nazi racial science “created the conceptual framework” for Nazi racial policy. Racial science could not have provided a coherent conceptual framework because the field was characterized by competing conceptions of race and heredity, which frequently led to controversies and conflicts, three of which will be examined in this presentation. Instead of using “race” as an analytical category for understanding Nazi Germany, historians must investigate how both scientists and Nazi officials deployed competing conceptions of race for various strategic purposes at different points in the development of the Nazi regime.

    Richard F. Wetzell is a Research Fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington DC and Adjunct Associate Professor at Georgetown University. His most recent publication is the co-edited volume Beyond the Racial State: Rethinking Nazi Germany (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming fall 2017). His other publications include Inventing the Criminal: A History of German Criminology, 1880-1945 (2000), Engineering Society: The Role of the Human and Social Sciences in Modern Societies, 1880-1980 (co-edited, 2012), and Crime and Criminal Justice in Modern Germany (2014).


    Speakers

    Richard Wetzell
    Speaker
    German Historical Institute - Washington, DC

    James Retallack
    Chair
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 20th Durdy Bayramov “Through the Eyes of Durdy Bayramov: Turkmen Village Life 1960s-80s”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 20, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Durdy Bayramov “Through the Eyes of Durdy Bayramov: Turkmen Village Life 1960s-80s”.
    Free Art Exhibition in the Munk School of Global Affairs cloister | Oct 16 – Nov 16
    Reception October 19 4-6pm in Rm 208N
    Presentation hosted by Keya Bayramova (daughter) October 20 12-2 pm in Rm 108N
    Additional speakers include: TBD

    The Durdy Byramov Art Foundation in partnership with the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies will be hosting a free exhibition allowing visitors to experience life in Soviet era Turkmenistan from behind the lens of one of Eurasia’s preeminent artists.
    Durdy Bayramov was raised as an orphan in Soviet Turkmenistan but rose to become widely recognized as one of Eurasia’s preeminent artists. During a prolific career that spanned nearly six decades, Bayramov created more than 5000 artworks, many of which were acquired by prominent museums around the world. His work has been featured in over 100 solo and group exhibitions, a number that continues to grow with every passing year. Bayramov worked and traveled extensively within Turkmenistan and around the world, a practice he continued until his final years.
    These photographs were selected from Durdy Bayramov’s personal archive. Although he took great pleasure in photography, Bayramov used it primarily as a tool in his artistic process and never expected that others would find them fascinating in their own right. The images provide a rare and intimate glimpse into the customs and material culture of Turkmen villagers during this period, and at the same time reflect the profound human spirit shared by all communities.

    More of Durdy Bayramov’s story & art can be found at www.durdybayramov.org

    Please join us October 19 from 4-6 pm for the reception Rm 208N,
    October 20 from 12-2 pm to learn more about the legacy of a great artist Rm 108N,
    and any time throughout October 16 and November 16 in the Munk School cloister.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 20th CSAS Faculty Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 20, 20174:00PM - 5:00PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 26th Igniting the Internet: South Korea’s Internet-Born Protests and Popular Politics, 2002 to 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 26, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In late 2016, South Korea saw a series of Internet-born street protests demanding that then-President Park Geun-hye step down, eventually leading to her impeachment in March of 2017. These candlelight protests were only the newest iteration of the youth-driven candlelight protest that originated online in 2002, which has now become a standard repertoire for activism. Drawing on Kang’s recent book Igniting the Internet (2016), this presentation attends to the cultural dynamics that allowed the Internet to so rapidly bring issues to public attention and exert influence on South Korea’s domestic and international politics. Kang will discuss the cultural dynamics of online politics and media-driven popular politics, situating them in the legacies of South Korea’s authoritarian and post-authoritarian eras. This presentation will consider the interplay among local historical context, structural variation across different societies, and the role of chance in the dynamics of mass movements and the “cultural ignition process”—speculating about the future of Internet-driven youth activism in South Korea and beyond.

    Jiyeon Kang is an associate professor of Communication Studies and Korean Studies at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include South Korean social movements, Internet activism, youth culture, globalization, and the mobility of Asian university students.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jiyeon Kang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Communication and Korean Studies, University of Iowa

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 26th Beau Monde on Empire's Edge: State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 26, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During her talk, 2012-2013 Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow Professor Mayhill Fowler will present her recently published book. In Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge, Mayhill C. Fowler tells the story of the rise and fall of a group of men who created culture both Soviet and Ukrainian. This collective biography showcases new aspects of the politics of cultural production in the Soviet Union by focusing on theater and on the multi-ethnic borderlands. Unlike their contemporaries in Moscow or Leningrad, these artists from the regions have been all but forgotten despite the quality of their art. Beau Monde restores the periphery to the center of Soviet culture. Sources in Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, and Yiddish highlight the important multi-ethnic context and the challenges inherent in constructing Ukrainian culture in a place of Ukrainians, Russians, Poles, and Jews. Beau Monde on Empire’s Edge traces the growing overlap between the arts and the state in the early Soviet years, and explains the intertwining of politics and culture in the region today. The book has been published with University of Toronto Press.

    Dr. Mayhill C. Fowler (Ph.D., Princeton) is assistant professor of history at Stetson University, where she also directs the program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. She teaches and researches the cultural history of Russia and Eastern Europe, with a focus on Ukraine, and is interested in how social and political structures shape entertainment, representation, and live performance. She has published widely on culture in Ukraine. Her first book– Beau Monde at Empire’s Edge: State and Stage in Soviet Ukraine (Toronto, 2017)—tells the story of how a very rich cultural center became a cultural periphery through a collective biography of young artists and officials in the 1920s and 1930s. Her second project investigates how we entertain soldiers, through the lens of the former Red Army Theater in Lviv. She also thinks about the Soviet actress, Yiddish theater, and 19th century itinerant theater clans. She was the Petro Jacyk Postdoctoral Fellow at Toronto in 2012-2013, held a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard’s Ukrainian Research Institute, and taught cultural history at the Catholic University in Lviv.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Mayhill Fowler
    Speaker
    Assistant professor of history at Stetson University

    Maxim Tarnawsky
    Chair
    Professor at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 28th Munk School Graduate Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 28, 201710:00AM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    Come learn more about the graduate programs at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Representatives from the following programs will be on hand:

    Master of Global Affairs
    Master of Arts in European and Russian Affairs
    Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies
    Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Register here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/munk-school-graduate-programs-open-house-tickets-38085516806

    An information session for the MGA program only will be held from 12-1pm. Please register here for the information session: https://www.eventbrite.ca/o/master-of-global-affairs-7494195707

    For more information please contact: mga@utoronto.ca


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 30th Anne Applebaum Presents "Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 30, 20177:00PM - 10:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C8
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    Description

    Author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gulag and the National Book Award finalist Iron Curtain, Anne Applebaum presents her new book, Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, a revelatory history of one of Stalin’s greatest crimes.

    In 1929 Stalin launched his policy of agricultural collectivization—in effect a second Russian revolution—which forced millions of peasants off their land and onto collective farms. The result was a catastrophic famine, the most lethal in European history. But instead of sending relief the Soviet state made use of the catastrophe to rid itself of a political problem. In Red Famine, Anne Applebaum argues that millions of Ukrainians perished not because they were accidental victims of a bad policy but because the state deliberately set out to kill them.

    Applebaum proves what has long been suspected: after a series of unsettling rebellions, Stalin set out to destroy the Ukrainian peasantry. The state sealed the republic’s borders and seized all available food. Starvation set in rapidly, and people ate anything: grass, tree bark, dogs, corpses. Red Famine captures the horror of ordinary people struggling to survive extraordinary evil.

    Today, Russia, the successor to the Soviet Union, has placed Ukrainian independence in its sights once more. Applebaum’s compulsively readable narrative recalls one of the worst crimes of the twentieth century, and shows how it may foreshadow a new threat to the political order in the twenty-first.

    Anne Applebaum writes on history and contemporary politics in Eastern Europe, Ukraine, and Russia. She is a columnist for The Washington Post, a Professor of Practice at the London School of Economics, and a contributor to The New York Review of Books. Formerly a member of the Washington Post editorial board, she has also worked as the Foreign and Deputy Editor of the Spectator magazine in London, as the Political Editor of the Evening Standard, and as a columnist at Slate and at several British newspapers, including the Daily and Sunday Telegraphs. From 1988-1991 she covered the collapse of communism as the Warsaw correspondent of the Economist magazine and the Independent newspaper.
    Her previous books include Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, which won the 2012 Cundill Prize for Historical Literature and the Duke of Westminster Medal.

    She is also the author of Gulag: A History, which narrates the history of the Soviet concentration camps system and describes daily life in the camps, making extensive use of recently opened Russian archives as well as memoirs and interviews Gulag won the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction in 2004.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Anne Applebaum
    Author


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2017

  • Thursday, November 2nd Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Handbook--Born in Japan, Flourishing Around the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 2, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract

    The Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Handbook was created in Japan about 69 years ago. Because the MCH Handbook promotes the continuum of maternal and child health care by improving MCH services without high-technology medical equipment, 39 countries and areas have introduced the MCH Handbook in their health programs, Many studies revealed the evidence of the impact of MCH Handbook.

    The MCH Handbook is an indispensable tool to crystallize the idea of leaving no one behind. Each country or region has its own culture and customs. We should respect the worth of culture, share good practices and lessons learned, and promote the MCH Handbook for the benefit of larger numbers of population. We hope strongly that the MCH Handbook will contribute to the happy and healthy lives of mothers, children and families around the world!

    Biographical Sketch

    Dr. NAKAMURA Yasuhide is a Professor of School of Nursing and Rehabilitation, Konan Women’s University and Professor Emeritus of Osaka University. He is the president of Japan Association for International Health (JAIH), and the representative of International Society of Volunteer Studies. Graduated from the University of Tokyo, he started global health to encourage maternal and child health in Indonesia as a Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and to promote refugee health program in UNHCR Pakistan Office.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Yasuhide Nakamura, MD, PhD
    Speaker
    Professor, Konan Women's University; Professor Emeritus, Osaka University; President, Japan Association of International Health (JAIH)

    Shafi Bhuiyan, MD, MPH, MBA, PhD
    Chair
    Distinguished Visiting Professor, Faculty of Community Health and G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University

    Faculty of Community Services, Ryerson University

    Faculty of Health, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 4th Chinese Experience in Canada: Past, Present and Future

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 4, 20178:30AM - 2:00PMRoyal Ontario Museum
    Signy and Cheophee Eaton Theatre
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    Description

    As part of Canada 150 at the ROM, the Bishop White Committee is holding a one-day symposium on November 4, 2017.
    The program will explore the history of the Chinese community in Canada, the experiences of young Chinese-Canadians from business and the arts, the role of the university in educating international students , and highlights from the ROM’s Chinese collection and the East Asia Department’s current projects locally and abroad.

    Cost: ROM members $ 65
    Public $ 75

    To purchase your tickets, please call Programs at 416.586.5797 or on line www.rom.on.ca/programs

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Royal Ontario Museum, Bishop White Committee

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 7th CERES Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 7, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 8th "To keep alive the emigrants' affection for the home country": State-driven diaspora politics in early 20th century Southeastern Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 8, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:
    At the end of the 19th century, large parts of Southeastern Europe began to see massive emigration to North America and other overseas destinations. At a time of intense nation building, governments in the region could hardly ignore the fact that so many of their citizens were leaving. On the contrary, some of them discovered the usefulness of emigration for fostering nation-building. In my talk I will discuss the emerging politics of diaspora, focussing on three caste studies (Kingdom of Hungary, Greece, and interwar Yugoslavia). These efforts to project symbolic sovereignty across the Atlantic can elucidate new visions of the nation and its relation to territory, and heralded new forms of governmentality.

    Speaker:
    Dr. Ulf Brunnbauer is director of the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies and chair of Southeast and East European History at the University of Regensburg.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 8th Challenging the Establishment: Mykhailo Hrushevsky, Lviv, and the Writing of Volume 4 of the History of Ukraine-Rus’

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 8, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk will explore the political and cultural battles fought by Mykhailo Hrushevsky from his appointment to the chair of Ukrainian history in Lviv in 1894 to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. In these years he fought battles of varying degrees of intenstity against various establishments: the Austrian government in Vienna; the Polish authorities in Lviv; the Polish-dominated University of Lviv, and the Polish cultural and historical establishments in Galicia and beyond its borders. He also played a central role in transforming the Ukrainian cultural establishment in Galicia, sometimes in conflict with its leaders; sometimes in collaboration with them. Against this background of struggle, and the worsening state of Polish-Ukrainian relations in Galicia, Hrushevsky conceived and wrote volume 4, in the years between 1901 and 1907. It covers the period of Polish-Lithuanian rule of Ukraine, from the collapse of the principality of Galicia-Volhynia in 1340 to the 1569 Union of Lublin, when Ukraine was incorporated into the kingdom of Poland. Volume 4 was written when the young Hrushevsky was at the height of his powers as a historian and was unconstrained by the censorship which limited what he could write in the Soviet years. The talk will explore the connection between his political, social, and cultural activities after 1894 and his radical reconceptualization of the relationship between Ukraine, Lithuania, and Poland in the years in which the Polish-Lithuanian union was formed. It will suggest that Volume 4 contains some of Hrushevsky’s finest writing on political history.

    The session will be chaired by Professor Piotr Wróbel, University of Toronto. Professor Frank Sysyn, University of Alberta, will serve as a discussant. The session will include a presentation of Mykhailo Hrushevsky, History of Ukraine-Rus’, Vol.4 Political Relations in the Fourteenth to Sixteenth Centuries, translated by Andrij Kudla Wynnyckyj. Ed. Robert Frost, Yaroslav Fedoruk, and Frank E. Sysyn with the assistance of Myroslav Yurkevich (Edmonton-Toronto: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press, 2017). The publication is a project of the Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta. Volume 4 was sponsored by the Ukrainian Canadian Foundation of Taras Shevchenko.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Robert Frost
    Speaker
    Professor, University of Aberdeen

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto

    Frank Sysyn
    Discussant
    Professor, University of Alberta


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 9th International Humanitarian Law Conference: The Evolution of International Humanitarian Law

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 9, 20171:30PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join us for a discussion on the evolution of the laws regulating armed conflict with a focus on tribunals and International Human Rights Law. This conference will bring together experts from the field of IHL including academics, practitioners and representatives from the Red Cross Red Crescent Movement.

    Featuring Marco Sassoli from the University of Geneva as Keynote.

    Date: Thursday, November 9th 2017
    Registration: 12:45pm – 1:30pm
    Conference: 1:30pm – 5:30pm
    Informal Reception: 5:30pm – 6:30pm

    Location: Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7

    To register, please click here: http://tinyurl.com/IHLToronto

    For more information, please email IHLconference@redcross.ca

    This conference is eligible towards the Law Society of Upper Canada’s (LSUC) CPD requirements as Substantive Hours only. Please note that this program is not accredited for Professionalism Hours or the New Member Requirement.

    Please Visit the LSCU’s CPD Eligible Educational Activities webpage for more information: http://www.lsuc.on.ca/

    Co-Sponsors

    Canadian Red Cross

    Master of Global Affairs Program (MGA)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 10th CSK Brown Bag Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 10, 201712:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 11th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: Masala Chai

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 11, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    India/Germany 2017
    76 minutes
    Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Bihari with English subtitles
    PG • North American Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Marco Hulser

    CAST
    Yogesh Pavan, Mohammad Khan, Gouri Mahato, Sushanta Thapa, Subodh Pramod

    In the world’s second most populated country—characterized by centuries-old caste systems, more than 2000 ethnic groups, and large sects of all major religions—the one thing that seems to connect the diverse citizens of India is their constant need for piping hot masala chai.

    The documentary follows the lives of five different tea makers: Yogesh, a US educated business owner of a posh teahouse in Pune; Mohammad, an elderly tea-maker who has worked in film production for 40 years; Gouri, an outspoken teen assisting with her family tea stall in Kolkata; and Sushanta and Subodh, who run small tea stalls in Darjeeling and Delhi, respectively.

    Masala Chai offers a warm glimpse into the personal struggles of some of India’s most common and relied-upon vendors. The film is also a captivating exploration of the vast class differences of a diverse nation that is steeped in ancient traditions and societal difficulties, many of which are being rebuffed by its younger generation.

    Marco Hülser was born 1992 in Hamburg and gained his “Abitur” in 2011. After a voluntary service 2011/2012 in India, Tamil Nadu Marco started the studies „Motion Pictures“ at the „Hochschule Darmstadt“, which he completed in 2016. During his studies, he directed the short film „Zusammen Allein“ which was nominated at several festivals as „Max-Ophüls-Preis“ and received the rating „valuable“ by „Deutsche Film- und Medienbewertung“. Since mid-2015, he is working on his first documentary “Masala Chai” which will be released 2017.

    The film screening will be followed by a conversation between the film maker and ProfessorKajri Jain.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 13th Transnational Domesticity in the Making of Modern Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Modern domesticity in colonial-era Korea has generally been understood using the twin parameters of nationalism and colonialism. Much less attention has been paid to the impact of a transpacific network, mainly between the US and Korea through the Christian missionary societies, on the formation of modern domesticity before, during and after Japanese colonial rule. In this presentation, I examine the ways in which Korea’s modern domesticity was shaped by not only Japanese colonial policies but also the notion of modernity that was transmitted, reinterpreted and performed through the transpacific network that had formed among the Korean elite and American missionaries. Taking the idea of “modern home” as a key locus where national, colonial and missionary projects converged, I demonstrate how the intimate private sphere was rendered as one of the most dynamic sites for uncovering the confluence of interaction between the local, the national and the global.

    Hyaeweol Choi is Professor of Korean Studies at the Australian National University. Her research interests are in the areas of gender history, religion, and transnational studies. She is the author of Gender and Mission Encounters in Korea: New Women, Old Ways and New Women in Colonial Korea: A Sourcebook among others.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hyaeweol Choi
    Speaker
    Professor Korean Studies, Australian National University

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 16th Making the Skyscraper Soviet: A Global History of Red Moscow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 16, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In the early 1930s, Soviet architects and engineers began work on a series of large-scale urban development projects in Moscow. Brought together in 1935 under the banner of the Moscow General Plan, these projects included the Moscow-Volga Canal, the Moscow Metro, and a building that, had it been completed, would have stood as the tallest state headquarters in the world: the Palace of Soviets. This talk explores the global networks and ideas that shaped the Palace of Soviets construction effort and were key more broadly to Moscow’s “socialist reconstruction” during the Stalin era.

    Dr. Katherine Zubovich is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MA from the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Dr. Katherine Zubovich
    Ryerson University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 18th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: A Piece of Paradise

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 18, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    Canada 2017
    81:00
    English, Tagalog and Bisaya with English subtitles
    PG • World Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Patrick Alcedo

    CAST
    Norlyn, Em-Em, Betsy, Darrell

    Canada is a nation of immigrants, and it comes as no surprise that many Canadians share more than one homeland. For many Filipinos, family members living and working overseas is commonplace, and yet the strain of being apart is never easy. When your heart is torn between two places you love, how do you find your piece of paradise?

    For five years, director Patrick Alcedo captures the everyday life of Norlyn, Em-Em, and Betsy as they navigate living and working in Toronto while dreaming of the day they can visit the Philippines again. Alcedo’s film follows Betsy as she juggles multiple different contract jobs each day, Em-Em as she cares for a Jewish family’s children while working on her papers, and Norlyn as she raises her moody teenage son on her own. Their struggles are real but the women are resilient, knowing that their faith, community and especially their sense of humour, will help them through the challenges.

    A tribute to countless foreign domestic workers, A Piece of Paradise is a film for anyone who understands that home can be made in two places, and the yearning for it can cause a homesickness that may never be fully remedied.

    Patrick Alcedo is an associate professor in the Department of Dance at York University, and is a recipient of the Government of Ontario’s Early Researcher Award. Currently, he is working on a short documentary film about the lives of underprivileged ballet dancers living in poor urban districts of Manila, who dream of dancing professionally abroad.

    The film screening will be followed by a conversation between the film maker and Professor Rachel Silvey, Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 18th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: A Whale of a Tale

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 18, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    Japan 2017
    95:00
    English, Japanese with English subtitles
    PG • Canadian Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Megumi Sasaki

    CAST
    Jay Alabaster

    In the once quiet seaside village of Taiji in Wakayama prefecture, the local whaling practice has become synonymous with animal abuse since Louie Psihoyos’s film The Cove won the 2009 Oscar for Best Documentary.

    Years later, filmmaker Megumi Sasaki offers a more balanced examination of the small fishing community, focusing on points of contact and communication between both sides of the conflict—environmentalism versus tradition—in ways that The Cove did not.

    A Whale of a Tale does not attempt to resolve what will remain an ideological deadlock between the foreign activists who have devoted years to their cause, and agricultural workers who have developed a long-standing tradition passed on to the next generation. Instead, in a global climate where opposing sides are communicating at each other instead of with each other, Sasaki succeeds in allowing us to give pause—and listen to what the other side has to say.

    Prior to becoming a filmmaker, Megumi Sasaki was an anchor, reporter and news director for NHK Television, Japan’s public broadcasting network. Her first feature-length documentary Herb & Dorothy (2008), about legendary New York art collectors Herb and Dorothy Vogel, won top honors at the Hamptons International Film Festival, Philadelphia Film Festival, SILVERDOCS and others. In 2013, she directed a follow-up documentary titled Herb & Dorothy 50X50, which had nationwide theatrical distribution in the U.S. and Japan. A Whale of a Tale is her third feature-length documentary.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 29th Escape Velocity? How to Overcome Secular Stagnation in Japan and Abroad

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 29, 20172:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan Inaugural Symposium

    Description

    For over two decades now, Japan has found itself at the forefront of economic policymaking. The bursting of the bubble economy ushered in an era of zero interest rates and unconventional monetary policy, long before such measures were widely adopted elsewhere during the Global Financial Crisis. Japan’s demographic trends presage continental Europe’s future. Many policy choices have been copied, even though their effectiveness continues to be debated in Japan as abroad. This events brings together leading members of the policy community from Japan and North America to discuss Japan’s experience. The purpose is not to take stock of Japan’s (alleged or real) malaise, but to identify common themes that provide useful lessons for other countries.

    Innovation and Economic Growth in Japan: Firm-Level Approach by Nobuyuki Kinoshita

    Slowdown in TFP and capital stock accumulation are the two main causes of Japan’s long-term economic stagnation. I analyze this problem on the firm-level approach. Nowadays ICT innovation has changed our way of lives everywhere in the world. Under this circumstance, Japanese firms do invest in ICT and R&D too, but something is weighting down on TFP growth. Actually, they stick to their own R&D and collaborate less with other organizations. Besides, entry of innovative entrepreneurs and exit of unproductive firms are remarkably weak in Japan. As a result, Japanese firms all in all get older and less active. My presentation gives the policy implication that the Japan’s enterprise system should be reformed and that the speed up of the industries restructuring is particularly critical.

    Nobuyuki KINOSHITA (Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo), Noboyuki Kinoshita, formerly with the Ministry of Finance and then the Bank of Japan, is an expert on corporate governance reforms in Japan and their macroeconomic implications. He served as Executive Director at the Bank of Japan from 2010 to 2014. He is currently senior advisor to Aflac (Columbus, GA), a leading supplemental insurance provider in the US and Japanese markets. He regularly presents to academic and professional audience on Japanese macroeconomic policies.

    Aging in Japan: A Fiscal and Macroeconomic Conundrum by R. Anton Braun

    Japan is in the midst of a demographic transition that is both rapid and large by international standards. Aging is already placing a burden on government finances. Public expenditures on pensions, medical care and long-term care are rising. At the same time, low fertility rates in conjunction with longer life expectancies are increasing the old-age-dependency ratio and workers are facing higher tax burdens. Moreover, Japan’s ability to confront the negative fiscal implications of future aging is constrained by its very high debt-GDP ratio. In my presentation I will detail the size of the fiscal imbalances created by aging, explain how Japan’s fiscal situation is creating a drag on macroeconomic activity and discuss the efficacy of alternative strategies for stabilizing the fiscal situation and boosting economic growth.

    R. Anton Braun is a research economist and senior adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and a visiting professor of economics at Keio University. His research topics include fiscal and monetary policy and aging. Before joining the Bank in 2010 he was a professor of economics at the University of Tokyo where he taught from 2001-2010.

    Symposium chaired by Mark Manger

    Mark Manger (Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto). Professor Manger is an Associate Professor of Political Economy and Global Affairs at the Munk School and the Department of Political Science. He received his doctorate from UBC and joined the Munk School in 2012 following tenure-track appointments at McGill University and the London School of Economics. Professor Manger’s field of specialization is international political economy, with emphasis on trade and finance, and the political economy of East Asia and Japan. He has been a visiting researcher at the Institute of Social Science, University of Tokyo, in 2003 and in 2010, and is an alumnus of the Program on US-Japan Relations at Harvard University, where he was a fellow in 2007-2008.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    R. Anton Braun
    Speaker
    Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, GA

    Mark Manger
    Chair
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Nobuyuki Kinoshita
    Speaker
    Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Japan NOW Lecture Series


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 30th Paying Lip-Service to Peace: Dissent and the Public in the Early Cold War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 30, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Katie Davis
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2017

  • Friday, December 8th Outcasts of Empire: Japan's Rule on Taiwan's "Savage Border," 1874-1945

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In his new book Outcasts of Empire, Paul D. Barclay probes the limits of modern nation-state sovereignty by positioning colonial Taiwan at the intersection of the declining Qing and ascending Japanese empires. Outcasts chronicles the lives and times of interpreters, chiefs, and trading-post operators along the far edges of the expanding international system, an area known as Taiwan’s “savage border.” In addition, Barclay boldly asserts the interpenetration of industrial capitalism and modern ethnic identities.

    By the 1930s, three decades into Japanese imperial rule, mechanized warfare and bulk commodity production rendered superfluous a whole class of mediators—among them, Kondo “the Barbarian” Katsusaburo, Pan Bunkiet, and Iwan Robao. Even with these unreliable allies safely cast aside, the Japanese empire lacked the resources to integrate indigenous Taiwan into the rest of the colony. The empire, therefore, created the Indigenous Territory, which exists to this day as a legacy of Japanese imperialism, local initiatives, and the global commoditization of culture.

    Paul D. Barclay teaches East Asian history at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the general editor of the digital repository East Asia Image Collection and author of Outcasts of Empire: Japan’s Rule on Taiwan’s “Savage Border,” 1874-1945(University of California, 2017). Barclay’s research has received support from the National Endowment from the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the Japanese Council for the Promotion of Science, and the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul D. Barclay
    Speaker
    Chair, Asian Studies Professor, Department of History, Lafayette College

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Thursday, January 25th Silent Cities: Rachel Carson and the Imagination of U.S. Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caroline Holland
    PhD Candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2018

March 2018


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