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January 2017

  • Wednesday, January 18th Zero Waste: Fictional or Achievable Goal?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series & Environment Seminar Series

    Description

    All countries, large or small, rich or poor, suffer waste problems to various degrees. If not properly dealt with, waste issues could impose heavy environmental burdens which not only hinder economic growth but also lead to social discomfort. A sound strategic approach for effective waste management therefore is critical to finding an economically viable and environmentally sound solution.

    Recently, a zero-waste concept has emerged worldwide as a new initiative to curtail the worsening waste problem. Realization of such a concept, however, necessitates the prevention and/or making the best use of the waste via workable mechanisms. Plausible measures include: waste minimization, waste reduction, reuse, recycle and recovery, cleaner production, eco-industrial networking, sustainable consumption and production, etc. The application of these measures, on the other hand, is case and location specific, requiring a careful consideration of many inter-related technical, regulatory, economic and social factors.

    This presentation will review the background and challenges of the waste problem, ways and means of planning and implementing a zero-waste society, paradigm shift from waste to resource management, innovation and partnership, and key elements of success or failure with discussion on the exemplary case of Taiwan.

    Zero waste: is it a fictional or achievable goal? This is an open question that we must address, to help build a sound foundation for pursuance of sustainability.

    Professor Chih C. Chao is a former Vice President of Tunghai University, Taiwan and received his PhD from the University of Montreal. Trained as a chemical and environmental engineer, Dr. Chao has a grave concern over the social and environmental impacts that are caused by un-thoughtful economic activities. Recently, he has worked extensively with natural and social scientists to search for and implement feasible approaches that will lead to establishment of sustainable low-carbon circular economic systems. Dr. Chao has over 40 years’ experience in North America, EU and Asia, covering a wide spectrum of sustainability driven issues. His most recent focal interest is in facilitating the development of value-added zero-waste systems, with a goal of maximizing material and energy use efficiency and minimizing the natural resource exploitation, towards a low-carbon society.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Chin C. Chao
    Speaker
    Honorary Professor, Tunghai University, Taiwan

    John Robinson
    Chair
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and School of the Environment; Adjunct Professor, Copenhagen Business School


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    School of the Environment

    Co-Sponsors

    Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA)

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 18th BOOK LAUNCH THE HARPER ERA IN CANADIAN FOREIGN POLICY

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 18, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    To both critics and defenders, Canadian foreign policy under Stephen Harper was seen as representing a sharp break with what had gone before. Was this true, and why or why not? The Harper Era in Canadian Foreign Policy, edited by Adam Chapnick and Christopher J. Kukucha, brings together an outstanding roster of analysts to assess the conduct of Canadian foreign policy under Stephen Harper in a variety of its aspects. The Graham Centre is pleased to sponsor a launch of this provocative volume, at which coeditor Adam Chapnick and contributors John English, Kim Richard Nossal, and Hugh Segal will speak.
    Books will be available for purchase.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 19th New Possibilities and the Remaking of American Politics: The Policy Implications of a Trump Presidency

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMRoom 3130, Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Registration is not required for this event, but seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Speakers: Ryan Hurl, Carolyn Tuohy, Louis Pauly, Randall Hansen, Sara Hughes
    Chair: Robert Vipond

    Organized by the Graduate Association of Political Science Students.
    Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 19th War of Decolonization? The Russian Empire and the Great War, 1914-1918

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Joshua Sanborn is Professor and Head of the Department of History at Lafayette College (Pennsylvania, USA). He is a historian of violence, society, and politics in modern Russia. His most recent monograph is Imperial Apocalypse: The Great War and the Destruction of the Russian Empire (Oxford UP, 2014), which argues that the process of state failure, social collapse, violent transformation, and imperial disintegration experienced by Russia between 1914 and 1918 is analogous to processes of decolonization in Africa and Asia in the period after World War II. His most recent co-authored work is Gender, Sex, and the Shaping of Modern Europe: A History from the French Revolution to the Present Day (with co-author Annette Timm) which just came out in a revised and expanded second edition from Bloomsbury in 2016 (the first edition was published in 2007). He is also one of the charter contributing members of the Russian History Blog, which just celebrated its fifth anniversary of existence.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Joshua Sanborn
    Lafayette College



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 19th The Crisis of Postnationalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    For years, the mainstream liberal opinion, shared by many social scientists, was that nationalism is a transient phenomenon that will either disappear or become marginal in the course of general development. However, what we see everywhere, including the most developed parts of the world, is the rise of nationalism. This often causes shock and bewilderment. But what we need is to analyze what were the theoretical premises on which the expectations of the coming decline of nationalism were based, and what was wrong about them.

    Ghia Nodia is professor of politics and director of the International School of Caucasus Studies in Ilia Chavchavadze State University in Tbilisi, Georgia. He is also a founder of the Caucasus Institute for Peace, Democracy and Development (CIPDD), an independent public policy think tank in Tbilisi, Georgia and member of the Forum’s NDRI think tank network, which he has led since August 2009 and in 1992-2008. In February–December 2008, he served as the minister for education and science of Georgia.
    Prof. Nodia has published extensively on democratization; state-building, security, and conflicts in Georgia and the Caucasus; theories of nationalism; and democratic transition in the post-cold-War context. He has been involved in pro-democracy advocacy efforts in Georgia and internationally and has been a frequent participant of international congresses and conferences on related topics.


    Speakers

    Ghia Nodia


    Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 19th Film screening and talk: Les liaisons dangereuses

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 19, 20177:30PM - 10:30PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Description

    Les liaisons dangeureuses (1988; dir. Stephen Frears)
    Speaker: Paul Cohen (Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto)

    In collaboration with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Prof. Paul Cohen
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Alliance Française Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 23rd *POSTPONED* Isaac Julien: Artist's Talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 23, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Ave.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    *** THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED. I NEW DATE WILL BE ANNOUNCED SHORTLY. ***

    Registration is not required for this event, but seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Isaac Julien is a Turner prize nominated artist and filmmaker. Earlier works include Young Soul Rebels (1991), which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), and Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996). Julien has pioneered a form of multi-screen installations with works such as Western Union: Small Boats (2007), Ten Thousand Waves (2010), andPlaytime: Kapital (2014).

    Julien was a participant in the 56th Biennale di Venezia, curated by Okwui Enwezor (2015). He has exhibited his work in major museums and institutions across the world including the nine screen of Ten Thousand Waves at Museum of Modern Art, New York, at Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and more recently Playtime and Kapital at El Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City. Julien’s work is included in the collections of institutions around the globe. In 2013, a monographic survey of his career to date, Riot, was published by MoMA, NY.

    Julien is currently producing a new work that is a poetic meditation on aspects of the life and architecture of Lina Bo Bardi, entitled 7 Songs for Lina Bo Bardi. The first chapter of this work, Stones Against Diamonds was shown during 2015’s La Biennale di Venezia, Art Basel, and Art Basel Miami Beach. Julien was Chair of Global Art at University of Arts London (2014-2016), and is the recent recipient of the 83rd James Robert Brudner Memorial Prize and Lecture at Yale University (2016).

    Presented by: Cinema Studies Institute, Centre for Women and Gender Studies & Innis College
    Co-sponsors: Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs; Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies; Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Isaac Julien
    artist and filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    Centre for Women and Gender Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 25th Unpacking the ‘Core Content’ of Essential Medicines under the Right to Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 25, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Access to essential medicines is part of the right to health and a cornerstone of an equitable health system. Enshrined in the ICESCR, the right to health offers a set of standards, principles and duties to guide its realisation. Global health and development initiatives increasingly embrace a right to health approach, particularly for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health.

    Authoritative entities such as the WHO and the former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health maintain that national governments should give legal recognition in domestic law to essential medicines as part of the right to health. Legal recognition offers a framework for national policy makers and health workers to implement these rights while providing a foothold for their enforcement. In particular, universal health coverage (UHC) enshrined in domestic law can advance health rights by making essential medicines affordable and available to all.

    Currently, it is unclear to what degree domestic legal rules providing for essential medicines mirror right to health principles and how such legal approaches are framed. This research maps the domestic legal terrain governing access to essential medicines in middle income countries. Through comparative legal analysis, this multidisciplinary study determines how domestic legal texts articulate the public health dimensions of access to medicines (i.e. Who are the beneficiaries? Which medicines are provided? What are the direct costs to patients?) through a human rights lens that considers provisions for non-discrimination and vulnerable groups. This research reflects on how national policy makers have made explicit use of the norms and standards in the right to health when forming pharmaceutical benefits in national UHC schemes. It will outline potential ‘best practice’ legal approaches to express rights- sensitive provisions for universal access, offering tools for prospective domestic policy learning to advance the SDG for health.

    Katrina Perehudoff M.Sc. LL.M. is a PhD candidate at the University of Groningen where she studies model domestic law for universal access to medicines through a human rights lens under the supervision of prof. Hans V. Hogerzeil (Faculty of Medical Sciences) and prof. Brigit Toebes (Faculty of Law). As a Research Fellow at the Global Health Law Groningen Research Centre, Katrina coordinates the Essential Laws for Medicines Access project and the Centre’s 2016 Summer School. Katrina has 5 years of experience advocating for access to medicines and their rational use at the NGOs Health Action International and The European Consumer Organization. She will join the CPHS as a Temporary Health & Human Rights Fellow in 2017.


    Speakers

    Katrina Perehudoff
    Visiting Health and Human Rights Fellow (University of Groningen)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 26th – Friday, January 27th R.F. Harney Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (Special 10th Anniversary Event)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 26, 20179:00AM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    Friday, January 27, 20179:00AM - 3:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    10th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies will be held on January 26 and 27, 2017 at the Munk School of Global Affairs (Observatory Site, 315 Bloor Street West).

    All sessions as well as the keynote lecture will take place in the boardroom (first floor). Open to the public.

    Conference website:
    http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ethnicstudies/graduate-conference/

    Thursday January 26, 2017 (Registration starts at 8:45)
    9:00-9:05am Opening remarks
    9:05-10:35am Session 1 “Nationalism and Representation”
    10:40am-12:00pm Session 2 “Religion and Integration”
    1:00-3:00pm Keynote lecture by Senator Ratna Omidvar (see below)
    3:10-4:40pm Session 3 “Temporary Workers and Precarious Labor”

    Friday January 27, 2017
    9:00-10:45 am Session 4 “Human Capital and Economic Integration”
    10:50am-12:10pm Session 5 “Multiculturalism and Social Support”
    1:00-2:00pm Session 6 “Counter-radicalization and Policy”
    2:05-3:35pm Session 7 “International Crisis and Response”
    3:40-5:00pm Special session “The Fire Next Door: The 1967 Detroit Uprising in the Canadian Imagination”

    5:00-6:30pm Reception (Library)

    Keynote speaker: The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, C.M., O. Ont. (Senator, The Senate of Canada, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Global Diversity Exchange (GDX) at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University)

    Keynote Lecture Title: “Reflections on Belonging and Inclusion”

    Ratna Omidvar is an internationally recognized expert on migration, diversity and inclusion. In April 2016, Prime Minister Trudeau appointed Ratna to the Senate of Canada as an independent Senator representing Ontario.

    Ratna is the founding Executive Director and currently a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Global Diversity Exchange (GDX), Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. GDX is a think-and-do tank on diversity, migration and inclusion that connects local experience and ideas with global networks.

    Ratna is a director at the Environics Institute, and Samara. She is the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council’s Chair Emerita and was formerly the Chair of Lifeline Syria.

    Ratna is co-author of Flight and Freedom: Stories of Escape to Canada (2015), an Open Book Toronto best book of 2015 and one of the Toronto Star’s top five good reads from Word on the Street.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 27th ‘Le petit oeil de cristal, lui, ne cillait pas’: Jean Rouch and the camera eyewitness

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 27, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Further information to follow

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Will Fysh
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 27th EPS Graduate Research Conference Special Session "The Fire Next Door: The 1967 Detroit Uprising in the Canadian Imagination"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 27, 20173:30PM - 6:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    This talk will take place in a special session during the R.F. Harney 10th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (January 26-27, 2017), featuring Harney Program alumni Wendell Adjetey. The presentation aims to illuminate Canadians’ perceptions and fears of U.S. racial violence.

    Speaker’s bio:
    Wendell Nii Laryea Adjetey is a doctoral candidate in the Departments of History and African American Studies at Yale University, where he holds numerous awards and prizes, including the Falk Foundation, Felix G. Evangelist, and Douglass R. Bomeisler Fellowships. He is writing a dissertation on twentieth-century black activism and freedom linkages between Canada and the United States. Wendell is a Trudeau Scholar and a SSHRC Doctoral Fellow. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Toronto.

    Reception to follow in the Library.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Wendell Adjetey
    Speaker
    Doctoral Candidate, History and African American Studies, Yale University

    Prof. Akwasi Owusu-Bempah
    Discussant
    Sociology, University of Toronto

    Prof. Ian Radforth
    Discussant
    History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, January 29th International Holocaust Remembrance Day Program

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, January 29, 201711:00AM - 12:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Doors open at 10:30am.

    The Evidence Room
    Robert Jan van Pelt (and co-authors tbc)

    Join the Neuberger for the annual IHRD lecture and a book launch of this companion piece to the critically-acclaimed exhibition at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Prof. Robert Jan van Pelt, a pivotal witness at the libel trial against Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, incorporates some of the compelling visuals and testimony he used at the 2000 trial. Using a multi-layered approach, he demonstrates through forensic science the reality that Auschwitz-Birkenau was purposely designed as a factory of death.

    The book will be available for purchase ($30) and author signing.

    Generously supported by the Esther Bem Memorial Fund and presented in partnership with the New Jewish Press and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto.

    Open to the public; no registration required.

    About International Holocaust Remembrance Day
    January 27 marks the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest Nazi death camp. In 2005, the United Nations General Assembly designated this day as International Holocaust Remembrance Day (IHRD), an annual day of commemoration to honour the victims of the Nazi era.

    Sponsors

    SARAH AND CHAIM NEUBERGER HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTRE UJA FEDERATION OF GREATER TORONTO


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 30th "The More We Did, the More We Were Able To Do: A New Look at the Legacy of Charter 77 and Václav Havel"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 30, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “The More We Did, the More We Were Able To Do”: A New Look at the Legacy of Charter 77 and Václav Havel.”

    Chair: Robert C Austin, CERES

    Discussant: Veronika Ambros, Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Panelists

    David Dusek

    David Dusek is founding partner and managing director of a consultancy firm specializing in legislative process. At the same time, due to his family heritage, he became amateur archivist and publisher. He is also the grandson of one of Vaclav Havel’s closest friends, the Czech translator and writer Zdenek Urbanek. Two years ago, David discovered a lost notebook kept by Havel when he was imprisoned in 1977 for his leadership in Charter 77. He helped to organize its publication in Prague last year. In January David published the first chapter of the “lost” report on first days of Charter 77 written by Vaclav Havel and then lost.

    Martin Palous
    Martin Palouš studied Natural Science, Philosophy and International Law. In 1974 he received Doctorate of Natural Sciences (RNDr). In 2001 he earned Higher Doctorate in Political Science/Philosophy (Associate Professorship) at Charles University. In 2007 he got PhD in Public International Law.
    Since January of 2011, Martin Palous is Senior Fellow and Director of Vaclav Havel Program for Human Rights and Diplomacy at School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University. He is also President of Vaclav Havel Library Foundation and President of International Platform for Human Rights in Cuba.
    He belonged to the original signatories of Charter 77, served as its spokesperson in 1986 and participated at the creation of Civic Forum during the Velvet Revolution (November 1989). After the fall of Communism he was a member of Parlament (1990), Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs (1990-1992, 1998-2001), Ambassador of the Czech Republic to the United States (2001-2005) and Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to the United Nations (2006-2011).

    Martin Simsa
    Martin Šimsa teaches philosophy at Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Jan Evangelista Purkyně in Ústí and Labem, Czech Republic. The main topics of his research and teaching is political philosophy, deliberative theory of democracy, philosophical hermeneutics and Czech philosophy. He cooperated with conscientious objectors of compulsory military service and he signed the human rights document Charter 77 in 1978. He took part in protest activities in Brno along with other signatories of Charter 77, was active in the underground and among young Christians. He participated in seminars of professor Božena Komárková and philosopher Ladislav Hejdánek. He printed and distributed an illegal newsletter titled Information about Charter 77 (INFOCH) and as well as samizdat literature. He presented human rights topics at synods of the Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren as a representative of youth in 1985, 1987 and 1989, which took place during the time of the Velvet revolution 1989. On November 18 at 0:30 hours The Church Synod condemned the brutal police attack against students and young people on Národní třída and challenged the government to lead a dialogue with the human rights activists groups. He studied philosophy after Velvet Revolution (1990-1995) at Charles University and in 2001 he received a Ph.D. in philosophy there.

    Paul Wilson
    Paul Wilson lived and worked in Czechoslovakia for ten years, from 1967-1977, when he was expelled during the regime’s campaign against Charter 77. Since then, he has translated the work of many Czech writers, including Josef Škvorecký, Bohumil Hrabal, Ivan Klíma, and Václav Havel. He co-authored Fifty-seven Hours, about the Moscow theatre siege in 2002. A collection of his essays on Czech subjects, Bohemian Rhapsodies, was published in Prague in 2011. His most recent translation is a collection of short stories by Bohumil Hrabal, Mr. Kafka and Other Takes from the Time of the Cult. (New Directions, 2015)

    Sponsors

    Rudolf and Rosalie Cermak Fund
    CERES
    Robert C Austin
    CERES – Munk School of Global Affairs
    University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 31st Fracking: the Future of American Energy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 31, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The technological innovation of hydraulic fracturing drilling, commonly known as ‘fracking’, has revolutionized global energy markets overnight, but it quickly became a victim of its own success as global oil prices plunged in late 2014. This industry went from boom to bust in only a few short years. Despite this, it is still the future of American energy and soon to spread throughout the entire world. This presentation serves as an introduction to fracking, answering the following questions: What is it? How it did it come about? Why is it so important? And what are the implications—economic, social, and environmental—for the local communities where it occurs?

    Austin Zwick is a Ph.D. Candidate in Planning at the University of Toronto. He previously obtained a BSc in Industrial Relations and an MPA in Public Finance from Cornell University. Austin’s research interests focus on the intersection between energy and economic development, quantifying job growth generated by upstream and downstream business linkages. His dissertation research concentrates on how the natural resource boom of fracking has affected patterns of urban decline and revitalization in the American Rust Belt. His research uses quantitative methods, statistics, and measures of public finance. Zwick also works with Evergreen CityWorks in measuring the fiscal health of Ontario’s cities over time.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Austin Zwick
    Ph.D. Candidate in Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2017

  • Thursday, February 2nd One Belt One Road Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20171:30PM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the fall of 2013, China’s President Xi Jinping proposed a global effort known as “One-Belt-One-Road” (OBOR). Unlike many other Chinese proposals currently on the table such as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) which has multi-national economic development as underpinning, the implication and potential impact of OBOR appears to be deeper and broader. Roughly speaking, the upstream of OBOR is what President Xi refers to as CULTURAL COMMUNICATION (文化相通). It is an initiative to culturally (and economically as a spin-off) revitalize the Ancient Silk Routes (ASR), be they land-based or maritime-based. However, unlike ASR, OBOR’s success places unprecedented demand on China to profoundly understand other cultures and civilizations. For the maritime OBOR, India, being next door to China, geographically situated in South Asia, and with 1.2 billion people, is an unavoidable challenge. If OBOR is successful, measured not by years but decades and maybe centuries, it could initiate a neo-Renaissance to allow humanity to meet unprecedented challenges.

    Da Hsuan Feng received his physics BA from Drew University (1968) and his PhD the University of Minnesota (1972). He joined Drexel University in 1976, where in 1990 he became M. Russell Wehr Chair Professor. In 1996, Feng became a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has been named an honorary professor at fifteen Chinese universities. He was a consultant for three National Laboratories in the United States: Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Brookhaven, and has served on a number of academic advisory boards and university Boards of Trustees throughout Asia. In 2000, Feng became Vice President for Research and Professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Dallas. From 2007 to 2014, he brought significant change to Taiwan as Senior Executive Vice President of National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) and National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). Since 2007, Feng has lectured widely throughout Asia on challenges of higher education. In 2014, he assumed his current position at the University of Macau. In the past year has lectured extensively on One-Belt-One-Road in Singapore, Malaysia, Mainland China, and Taiwan.

    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of Asian Politics.  Her research examines the relationship between popular contention, state power, and civil society, with an emphasis on contemporary China.  Her book manuscript, “Mobilizing Without the Masses in China” examines state control and civil society contention under authoritarian rule.  Based on two years of ethnographic research that tracks the development of informal labor organizations, the book explores counterintuitive dynamics of organized contention in post-1989 China. Articles that are part of this broader project have appeared in Governance (Forthcoming), Comparative Political Studies (2016) and Modern China (2009) among others.  Her research has been supported by the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Chiang Ching Kuo Foundation, and the Rhodes Trust, Prior to joining the department, she was a Walter H. Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University and a Predoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Political Science.   She holds a D.Phil. In Politics and an M.Phil. In Development Studies with distinction from Oxford University, where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. 

    Lynette Ong is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, jointly appointed by the Department of Political Science and the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. She was An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University’s Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies in 2008-09. She received her PhD from the Australian National University. Professor Ong’s theoretical interests are authoritarian politics and the political economy of development. She studies contentious politics and repression in China, particularly with respect to land acquisition and housing demolition, and has a broader interest in how social mobilization take shape in authoritarian countries, and the nexus between protest and repression in non-democratic settings. Her book, Prosper or Perish: The Political Economy of Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China was published by Cornell University Press in 2012. Her publications have appeared in Comparative PoliticsInternational Political Science ReviewChina QuarterlyPacific AffairsAsian Survey and the Journal of East Asian Studies. Professor Ong’s opinion pieces have also appeared in the Foreign AffairsFar Eastern Economic ReviewChina Economic ReviewChina Economic QuarterlyEast Asia ForumAsia-Pacific Foundation of CanadaAsia SentinelNew Mandala and Asia Times Online.

    Yong Wang is Professor at School of International Studies, and the Director of the Center for International Political Economy, Peking University. He is also Professor at Party School of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of China, and Former Visiting Chevalier Chair Professor at Institute of Asian Research(IAR), University of British Columbia(UBC). Member of the World Economic Forum (WEF) Global Agenda Council on Global Trade and FDI, Asia Society Regional Trade Architecture Commission and Economic Diplomacy Expert Working Group of China Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM). He has published numerous books and articles focusing on the topics of Chinese political economy, foreign policy, China-US relations, regional cooperation, international political economy, World Trade Organization (WTO) and global governance. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Global Asia, the Journal of Global Governance, the journal of Contemporary Politics and the Journal of Human Security. His recent article on political economy of One Belt One Road is published by UK-based journal of Pacific Review.


    Speakers

    Da Hsuan Feng
    Keynote
    Special Assistant to the Rector and Director of Global Affairs, University of Macau; Former Senior Vice President, National Tsing Hua University

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute

    Yong Wang
    Discussant
    Professor, School of International Studies; Director, Center for International Political Economy, Peking University, Beijing


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 2nd Making Postindustrial Cities in North America

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Contemporary narratives of the decline of basic industry make the postindustrial transformation of old manufacturing centers seem inevitable, the product of natural business cycles and neutral market forces. Using Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Hamilton, Ontario, as case studies, this talk offers a different interpretation, one in which local political and business elites collaborated to create postindustrial places well in advance of the economic malaise of the 1970s. As public resources dwindled, city officials made harsh calculations about whose needs they would no longer meet, rather than seeking to better meet the needs of all residents. They faced difficult choices and, seeing no other way forward, made decisions about how to allocate resources in a way that exacerbated inequality and sacrificed the well-being of large portions of urban populations in order to “save” cities. Mayors, planners, and business and civic leaders fostered a shift from cities as pluralistic places where skilled, high-wage manufacturing took place alongside commercial and financial enterprises to urban centers that served as entertainment zones, where white and middle-class suburbanites went for a convention or for dinner and a baseball game.

    Tracy Neumann is an Assistant Professor of History at Wayne State University. She specializes in transnational and global approaches to twentieth-century U.S. history, with an emphasis on cities and the built environment. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, and she is the author of Remaking the Rust Belt: The Postindustrial Transformation of North America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tracy Neumann
    Assistant Professor of History, Wayne State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography & Planning


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 2nd Grab, Dump, Capture: Screenshot Genealogies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMFaculty of Information
    University of Toronto
    140 St. George Street, Room 728
    *Registration is NOT required for this event.*
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The screenshot is today a ubiquitous object for the preservation of information, a digital snapshot that documents the visual output of a computer and its operations both extraordinary and mundane.

    Screenshots are an important tool for the archiving of digital environments, and remain central to the visual methods of both film studies and art history. The nature of the screenshot as a method for capture has transformed radically over the past forty years. What began as an analog process of photographing a screen or display has become an entirely digital operation, produced by software and stored as files to be transferred, uploaded, shared, and archived. Yet the screenshot itself as photo-object has gone largely unremarked, its complex genealogy collapsed into a single button: PrtScn. This talk will examine the history of the screenshot from its origins in computer graphics labs in the 1960s to contemporary methods for digital archiving and preservation, asking what this history tells us about the materiality of the digital, the history of the computer screen, and the ways in which visual artifacts efface the complexity of complex systems.

    Jacob Gaboury is Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Visual Culture at Stony Brook University.

    *Registration is NOT required for this event.* For additional information, please contact Prof. Patrick Kielty at: p.keilty@utoronto.ca.

    This talk is generously supported by the Knowledge Media Design Institute, JHI Digital Humanities Network, Comparative Literature, Art History, Sexual Diversity Studies, Cinema Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States.


    Speakers

    Jacob Gaboury
    Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Visual Culture at Stony Brook University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Faculty of Information, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 2nd JALANAN, a Film by Daniel Ziv

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 2, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, Robarts Library, 3rd Floor, 130 St George St
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    Series

    Film Screening

    Description

    Documentary Screening............... 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
    Commentary and Discussion....... 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

    JALANAN (“Streetside”) is an award-winning documentary that tells the captivating story of Boni, Ho, and Titi, three street musicians in Jakarta. Directed by Canadian Daniel Ziv, the film follows these musicians as they seek to secure their livelihoods by busking on Jakarta’s streets and navigate the city’s complex social and legal landscape. Jalanan is not only an intimate portrait of Jakarta, it is a glimpse into the lives of marginalized urban communities facing the pressures of globalization.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Joshua Barker
    Associate Professor of Anthropology, St. George Campus; Vice-Dean, Graduate Education & Program Reviews; and expert on urban Indonesia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 3rd – Saturday, February 4th Behind Closed Doors: Trafficking Labour, Sex, Art

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 3, 20176:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Saturday, February 4, 201710:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    11th Annual Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies Conference

    Description

    Behind Closed Doors will shed light on modern day slavery and the trafficking of cultural legacies — two issues whose human and economic impact cannot fully be quantified due to its clandestine nature. The forum will set the tone for the day through an overview of the current actions undertaken by national and international actors to deal with sex and labour trafficking. The workshop will provide the audience with the opportunity to engage in informal activities through the guidance of local experts, practitioners, and scholars. Lastly, the debate will ask both participants and audience members alike to confront the ethical dilemma that surrounds trafficked art.

    Contact

    Tea Cimini


    Speakers

    Michele Clark
    Executive Director of Artworks for Freedom and adjunct faculty at the George Washington University

    Bonnie Czegledi
    Czegledi Art Law

    Jacqui Linder
    Associate professor at City University

    Antonela Arhin
    Executive officer and sessional lecturer, University of Toronto

    Shelley Gilbert
    Legal Assistance of Windsor


    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 8th Re-Conceptualizing Mental Health Services for Women Who Have Experienced IPV: Responding to Intersecting Experiences of Trauma

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Despite the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its devastating effects on Canadian women, there is a gap in empirically-supported mental health interventions for IPV. Specifically, despite wide acknowledgment of the links between IPV and trauma, there is a research gap in understanding how IPV interventions address trauma. Also problematic is that Canadian IPV interventions have mainly been informed by the 1980s experiences of white, cis-gendered, middle-class, heterosexual women from Duluth, Minnesota, rather than representing women’s diverse experiences of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, socioeconomic status, religion, and immigration experiences. Interventions for IPV need to shift from a view of gender-based oppression as the root cause of IPV, to a view that encompasses the multiple ways in which identity-based oppressions and traumatic experiences can impact IPV. Informed by critical feminist intersectional and trauma-informed approaches, this qualitative study aims to build theory to address these gaps, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Theoretical sampling and semi-structured interviews with women in Ontario who have accessed mental health services for IPV will be employed to: 1) understand how trauma is conceptualized and addressed within IPV services; and 2) compare differences in women’s service experiences based on intersecting identities and oppression. Through comparative analysis, this study aims to identify service inequities based on women’s complex identities, and to understand how trauma on multiple levels (childhood adversities, racism, classism, homophobia, etc.) impacts IPV-related trauma. Findings will provide knowledge necessary to reduce inequities in the future design of mental health care for IPV survivors.

    Stephanie Baird is a PhD candidate at Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at University of Toronto. Her research interest in trauma and intimate partner violence builds on her community and clinical social work practice with people who have been impacted by experiences of trauma and violence. Her dissertation, which is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship, will explore the intersectional experiences of trauma of women who have been abused by a partner.


    Speakers

    Stephanie Baird
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 8th Minority Report: A Sociological Account of Muslim Immigrants in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201711:00AM - 1:00PMHart House, North Dining Room
    7 Hart House Circle, 2nd floor
    University of Toronto
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    Description

    The Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies and the SD Clark Chair of Sociology are pleased to invite you to attend a seminar on Muslim immigrants in Canada led by Professor Abdie Kazemipur, University Scholar Research Chair in Social Sciences at the University of Lethbridge and winner of the Canadian Sociological Association’s John Porter Prize for the outstanding book in Canadian sociology, 2015.

    Debates about Canadian Muslims have focussed on theology or culture; treated Muslims as a monolithic population; and paid little attention to the specificities of local contexts. As a result, they have oversimplified complex social realities and offered poor guides to policy. Professor Kazemipur overcomes these problems by employing a wide range of socio-economic data to argue for a sociologically grounded account of Muslims in Canada.

    Professor Kazemipur’s The Muslim Question in Canada: A Story of Segmented Integration (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2014) won the John Porter Prize of the Canadian Sociological Association for the outstanding book in Canadian sociology, 2015.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Professor Abdolmohammad Kazemipur
    University of Lethbridge



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 8th Curative Violence: How to Inhabit the Time Machine with Disability

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This presentation explores “folded time” in which the present disappears through the imperative of cure in South Korea. By folding time, cure demands temporal crossings to a past through “rehabilitation” and “recovery” and to a future without disabilities and illnesses. By thinking about the imperative of cure as a time machine, Kim explores the possibility of inhabiting in the present with disability and illness. Cure appears as an attempt at category-crossing from otherness to normality, which reveals the multiplicity of the boundaries that divide “human” and “inhuman” as well as “life” and “nonlife.” Kim also discusses the temporal trap into which discussions of non-Western societies in Western academic contexts might fall, one that denies coevalness or universalizes disability experiences across different cultural and historical contexts. In this analysis, cure is reframed, not as unequivocally beneficial nor politically harmful, but as a set of political, moral, economic, emotional, and ambivalent negotiations.

    Eunjung Kim is Assistant Professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program at Syracuse University. Her research and teaching involve transnational feminist disability studies, visual cultures, Korean cultural history of disability and activism, humanitarian communications, asexuality theories, and queer inhumanism.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Eunjung Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and Disability Studies Program, Syracuse University

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Acting Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 9th The Plot to Save American Democracy: Project Narrative, Story Science and the Plan to Hack Hollywood

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 9, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This talk will explore how Project Narrative’s new empirical methods for studying democracy and storytelling have generated a half-dozen new film and TV projects at various Hollywood studios.

    Angus Fletcher is a Full Professor of English and Film at Ohio State and Core Faculty at Project Narrative, where he teaches in both the MFA and PhD programs. He’s also a Blacklist and Nicholl award-winning screenwriter who has sold or optioned six pilots and feature screenplays in the past three years to Disney, Universal, and other studios, for directors such as Michael Apted, James Strong, and four-time Oscar-nominee Gary Ross. His work on narrative and democracy has appeared in Critical Inquiry, and two-dozen other academic journals. His most recent book was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2016.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Angus Fletcher
    Professor of English and Film at Ohio State, and Core Faculty at Project Narrative


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

    Department of English, University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 13th From Modernity to Postmodernity: Malaysian Art in a Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the key narratives in the development of Malaysian modern art in the last 100 years. It will start with a discussion on Low Kway Song’s “Portrait of Man in Three Piece Suit with Orchid on Lapel” produced in 1917 and the art scene in Malaya prior to its Independence. Post Independence saw an exposure of Western Abstract Expressionism, albeit in a localized manner, on Malaysian art pioneered by newly returned Malaysian artists from their studies abroad. Such influence could be observed in the works of Syed Ahmad Jamal and Latiff Mohidin. However, the period of late 1970s and throughout 1980s has changed the previous trend, which marked a new turning point in Malaysian art, due to the implementation of the National Cultural Policy and Islamization Policy. Tis was followed by the decade of the 1990s that witnessed a growing Malaysian art scene that led to the produce of artworks that were indirectly conditioned by the ‘postmodern situation’. This paper will conclude with the works of selected Malaysian artists in the current Singapore Biennale: An Atlas of Mirrors (2016).

    Sarena Abdullah is a Senior Lecturer at the School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), where she teaches Art History subjects for both undergraduate and graduate class. She has an MA in Art History from the State University of New York, Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A., and a PhD in Art History (2010) from the University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. Her research interests are contemporary Malaysian and Southeast Asian Art. She has numerous papers published both locally and abroad, and has presented at conferences in Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, the United States and China. She is one of the Field Leader for “Ambitious Alignments: New Histories of Southeast Asian Art,” a research project led by the Power Institute, The University of Sydney and funded by the Getty Foundation in 2015. She was the recipient of the 2016 CAA-Getty Travel Grant as part of the CAA-Getty International Program and will be part of the 2017 CAA-Getty International Reunion Program in February as well.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sarena Abdullah
    Senior Lecturer, School of the Arts, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM)


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 15th The ‘Transnationalization’ of Ukrainian Dissent: Human Rights and Ukrainian Diasporas in the 1960s-1980s

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk will be an account of my ongoing research project on the relationship between Ukrainian diaspora communities and their original homeland during and after the Cold War. It will focus on the reception of the Ukrainian dissent by the younger generations of the Ukrainian diaspora (especially in the US) and on the ways these younger Ukrainian-Americans tried to change the relationship with Soviet Ukraine. The analysis will address the question of the multiculturalism of these second-generation Ukrainian Americans aiming at a working definition of otherwise ambigous concepts such as “transnationalism” and “diaspora.”

    Simone Attilio Bellezza completed two PhDs: the first one at the University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, where he defended a dissertation on the German civil administration of Dnipropetrovs’k region during World War II, and the second at the University of the Republic of San Marino, where he wrote a dissertation on the Ukrainian dissent during the 1950s and 1960s. He specialized in Soviet and particularly Ukrainian history, and the fil rouge of his work is the study of national identity and its relationship with other kinds of loyalty (social, political, cultural, and religious). He is now working on a new research project, whose aim is to verify to what extent the human rights activism of the 1970s and 1980s constituted the basis for the new-born foreign policy of post-Soviet Ukraine, by creating numerous networks of international relationships. His first objective will be to investigate the relationship between Ukrainian diaspora communities and their original homeland in the emergence of the human rights movement.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director

    Simone Bellezza
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Research Award Recipient


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 16th The Immigrant Experience in Canada in the Context of Growing Inequality and Austerity

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Canada has an impressive historical track record of successful immigrant incorporation, and continues to serve as a global model in a time of growing anti-immigrant sentiment in other countries. Yet growing inequality and austerity have contributed to a changing context of settlement in Canada, and raises potential concerns. This talk will discuss these trends and present some case study evidence from research in Toronto and Vancouver as well as policy recommendations to address emerging challenges and improve outcomes.

    Dr. Daniyal Zuberi is RBC Chair and Associate Professor of Social Policy at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto.
    Prior to his appointment at the University of Toronto, he was the William Lyon Mackenzie King Research Fellow at Harvard University and a faculty member in the Department of Sociology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. In 2015, he was elected as a member of the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. He is author of three books, Differences that Matter (Cornell University Press, 2006), Cleaning Up (Cornell University Press, 2013) and Schooling the Next Generation (University of Toronto Press, 2015) He is currently completing research projects on social policy and urban poverty, health policy, education, immigrant access to services and settlement experiences, and hospital employment.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Daniyal Zuberi
    RBC Chair and Associate Professor of Social Policy at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 16th Lumumba (2000; dir. Raoul Peck)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20177:30PM - 9:30PM Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Julie MacArthur
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 17th Munk One Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 17, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Will you be beginning your first year at the University of Toronto in September 2017? Join us for an opportunity to talk with Munk One professors, students, and staff to find out about the program and if it’s right for you.

    To make the most of your time with us, we kindly ask that you arrive promptly at 10:00am. During the first hour, Professor Teresa Kramarz, Director of Munk One will present a brief overview of the program, and you will have the opportunity to meet with Munk One professors, students, and staff who will be happy to answer any questions. Following that, from 11:00am, Munk One students will take you on a short campus tour.

    If you want to find out more about the program, please visit our website: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/one/

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 21st The Rise of the Hybrid Domain: Collaborative Governance for Social Innovation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 21, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernbandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Yoku Aoyama, PhD
    Professor Henry J. Leir Faculty Fellow of Geography Graduate School of Geography Clark University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 22nd We’re Here: Understanding Subjugation and Resistance among Older Gay Men Seeking and Receiving Care in Medical Settings

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 22, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In recent years, a growing body of literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging has highlighted the systemic exposure of older sexual and gender minorities to complex expressions of stigma and discrimination across a variety of social contexts, the confluence of which tends to adversely affect the social conditions and health outcomes of these groups. Older gay men have specifically been recognized as a population of concern, given this group’s exposure to the unique social history of HIV, and therefore the unique features of stigma and discrimination that are likely to typify the realities of these older adults as they access health care and social services (Addis et al., 2009). Informed by this literature, my research seeks to examine how older gay men experience the production of subjugation at the intersection of older age, gay sexuality, and HIV stigma, specifically when they access health care systems, and how they resist these systemic issues in their interactions with health services. In this qualitative study, I aim to interview 30 gay men who are 50 years of age or older with recent experience accessing health care services, 15 of whom will be HIV-positive. In these interviews, I will ask participants to discuss their overall experiences of accessing health care services as older gay men, and how they believe they navigate potential barriers to access in these contexts. Drawing on these accounts, I will infer how intersectional subjugation is produced and resisted as older gay men, including those living with HIV, enter and interact with systems of care. The results of this study will be used not only to further insight in the growing field of LGBT aging, but also to develop health care policy and practice implications that seek to address access to care in a key subpopulation of aging and sexual minorities.

    Hannah Kia is a third year PhD Candidate in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences Division of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She is also a member of the Re:searching for LGBTQ Health Team, led by Dr. Lori Ross. Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Hannah was a clinical social worker in British Columbia, where she gained practice experience in palliative care and other health care specialty areas. During her time as a social worker, she conducted research on the experiences of care-giving partners of gay men, and assisted with a Metropolis BC-funded study that examined the experiences and service needs of sexual minority newcomers. Hannah holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work from the University of British Columbia. At this time, Hannah’s research interests centre on examining health care access among older LGBTQ adults. In pursuing her doctoral studies, she hopes to gain a better understanding of how older LGBTQ adults, particularly those living with HIV and other chronic illnesses, experience stigma and discrimination as barriers to accessing care. In April 2015, Hannah was awarded a Doctoral Research Award by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to support her work in this area.


    Speakers

    Hannah Kia
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2017

  • Friday, March 3rd Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 3, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street, Room 318
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    Series

    Southeast Asia Seminar Series; Lecture in the Arts, Histories, Literatures and Religions of Burma

    Description

    THE LEGAL HISTORY OF BURMA over the course of the second millennium CE offers a series of literary, juridical, and intellectual contributions that are unique when considered in relation to the wider Buddhist world of South, Central, and East Asia. From the 13th through 19th centuries upper Burma was a regional center for the production of a distinctive genre of Buddhist legal literature known as dhammasattha (“treatise on law”), whose laws claimed jurisdiction over all members of society, including monks and laypersons, and kings, commoners, and slaves. Prose and verse dhammasattha texts were composed in Pali and vernacular languages (Burmese, Mon, Arakanese, Shan, etc.), as well as in
    bilingual gloss versions (nissaya), and there is extensive testimony, dating from the mid-13th century onward, for their utilization by judges in contexts of dispute resolution. Aspects of the early history of this genre can be gleaned from lithic epigraphy, vernacular poetry, and bibliographic catalogues (piṭakat samuiṅḥ), although surviving dhammasattha treatises, transmitted in palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, can be dated no earlier than circa 1637, whereas the youngest examples of the tradition were written under British colonialism around 1900.

    For the past decade Christian Lammerts has been involved in the first major study of this genre—its textual histories, laws, and shifting modes of reception and jurisprudence—on the basis of extensive fieldwork in Burma and close investigation of the epigraphic corpus and manuscript archive, which preserves hundreds of discrete texts in multiple, sometimes highly variant, versions. In this presentation Lammerts will discuss the results of this project, drawn from his forthcoming book, Buddhist Law in Burma: A History of Dhammasattha Texts and Jurisprudence, c. 1250–1850 CE (University of Hawai’I Press).

    D. CHRISTIAN LAMMERTS is Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies at Rutgers University. He is interested in the cultural and intellectual histories of Buddhism and religious law in Burma and Southeast Asia, and is currently at work on a study of
    juridical curses, oaths, and ordeals around of the Bay of Bengal from the late first
    millennium CE up to the early colonial era.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lammerts
    Assistant Professor, Buddhist and Southeast Asian Studies, Rutgers University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 7th Cities, Immigrant Diversity and Complex Problem Solving

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Cities play host to residents hailing from a wide range of countries. Theory suggests such immigrant diversity can influence worker productivity, both positively and negatively. Benefits flow from the idea that people born in different countries complement each other in problem solving and innovation, by enabling the combination of different skills, ideas and perspectives. But heterogeneity can also inhibit productivity by raising the costs of co-operation and spurring rent-seeking behavior. This project makes several contributions to a growing body of empirical work exploring these claims. First, it leverages a rich matched employer-employee dataset for the U.S. that enables us to better account for bias from non-random worker selection, while distinguishing between impacts flowing from diversity manifested at city- and workplace-scales. Second, we ‘stress-test’ motivating theory, examining the extent to which any benefits from diversity are concentrated among workers engaged in complex problem solving and innovation. Results suggest that the benefits of immigrant diversity outweigh the costs. Consistent with theory, the association is concentrated among workers engaged in industries where complex problem solving is particularly important. In light of continued controversy about the economic implications of immigration, this project suggests an additional channel by which immigration improves overall economic well-being.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Thomas Kemeny
    Department of Geography and Environment University of Southampton



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 8th In the Image of a Woman: Spirited and Embodied Interpellations Along the Betsiboka River

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 16th Music of Survival: The Story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 16, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMMedia Commons Theatre, John P. Robarts Research Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    The story of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus is one of courage and true grit – a vivid chronicle that celebrates the human spirit. This is the triumphant story of the original 17 members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus who survived World War II as a musical ensemble. The film brings out the deepest roots of a fragile tradition, celebrating the resiliency of a music culture that has survived centuries. Set against the backdrop of the war itself, the story reveals the ways that music and musicians are used and abused by political regimes.

    It provides an educational, informative and compelling perspective – the personal stories of the last two survivors inter cut with the collective history of the bandura throughout the ages. Interwoven with contemporary musical performances, the film illustrates the bandurist as bard, as seer, as spiritual emissary for the soul of the Ukrainian people, then and now, in Ukraine and beyond.

    Orest Sushko is a member of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus, following in the footsteps of his father Makar Sushko, the first Canadian member of the Chorus in 1949 – and grandfather Paul Stepowy, a bandura craftsman and honorary patron of the Chorus. As an Emmy award-winning Re-recording mixer in both film and television, Orest has worked with a broad range of directors from David Cronenberg to Barry Sonnenfeld to Guillermo del Toro – television series including Orphan Black and documentaries from David Suzuki, to The North Face, The Patagonia and Alan Doyle of Great Big Sea.

    See http://musicofsurvival.com/ for more information about the film (includes the trailer)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Orest Sushko
    producer/director



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 22nd Socioeconomic inequalities across birth outcome distributions: A comparative study of Canada and its peer nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 23rd The West in search of its identity in three simultaneous states of mind: Pre-modern, modern and post-modern

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 23, 20175:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Thanos Veremis is Professor Emeritus of Political history at the University of Athens, Department of European and International Studies and Founding Member of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP).

    He has been Research Associate, at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London 1978-79; Visiting Scholar, Center for European Studies, Harvard Univ. 1983; Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton Univ. 1987; Visiting Fellow, St. Antony’s College, Oxford 1993-94; Constantine Karamanlis Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Medford Massachusetts (2000-2003); and more recently President of the National Council of Education, 2004-2010 .


    Speakers

    Professor Thanos Veremis
    ELIAMEP Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy, Athens, Greece


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 24th Religion and the Modern Self: Discussing J. Barton Scott's Spiritual Despots

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 24, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Book Launch

    Description

    Historians of religion have examined at length the Protestant Reformation and the liberal idea of the self-governing individual that arose from it. In Spiritual Despots, J. Barton Scott reveals an unexamined piece of this story: how Protestant technologies of asceticism became entangled with Hindu spiritual practices to create an ideal of the “self-ruling subject” crucial to both nineteenth-century reform culture and early twentieth-century anticolonialism in India. Scott uses the quaint term “priestcraft” to track anticlerical polemics that vilified religious hierarchy, celebrated the individual, and endeavored to reform human subjects by freeing them from external religious influence. By drawing on English, Hindi, and Gujarati reformist writings, Scott provides a panoramic view of precisely how the specter of the crafty priest transformed religion and politics in India.

    J. Barton Scott is assistant professor of Historical Studies and the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. His research bridges the study of modern South Asian religions and the cultural history of the study of religion, with particular attention to questions of colonialism, media, and public culture. He is the author of Spiritual Despots: Modern Hinduism and the Genealogies of Self-Rule (Chicago, 2016) and the co-editor of Imagining the Public in Modern South Asia (Routledge, 2016), and his published articles have appeared in journals including Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East and the Journal of the American Academy of Religion. His current research clusters around several themes and questions, including the history of liberalism in colonial India, the mediation and legal regulation of religious controversy, and the global travels of the Victorian self-help book.

    Malavika Kasturi teaches South Asian history in the Department of Historical Studies, and is graduate faculty at the Departments of History and the Centre for the Study of Religion. Her past research analysed the reconstitution of the family and martial masculinities amongst elite lineages in British India, against the backdrop of colonial ideologies, political culture and material realities. Malavika Kasturi is currently finalising a book manuscript which explores the intersection of monasticism with a host of political bodies espousing visions of the Hindu ‘nation’.

    Ruth Marshall is associate professor, at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research and teaching engage with contemporary intersections of religion, politics and public life, interrogating articulations of religion, secularism and democratic theory from an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective. Ruth Marshall’s past research covers a range of empirical issues based on many years of fieldwork in West Africa with a theoretical interest in questions of subjectivity, citizenship, political exclusion and violence.

    Srilata Raman is associate professor of Hinduism at the University of Toronto and works on medieval South Asian/South Indian religion, bhakti, historiography and hagiography, religious movements in early colonial India from the South as well as modern Tamil literature. Srilata Raman’s academic interests include Sanskrit and Tamil intellectual formations in South India from pre-colonial times to modernity, neo-Hinduism, Colonial Sainthood and modern Tamil literature. Her current work focuses on early colonial Tamil Saivism and the reformulations of religion, linked to notions of the body.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    J. Barton Scott
    Speaker
    Assistant professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Historical Studies

    Malavika Kasturi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies

    Ruth Marshall
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion and Department of Political Science

    Srilata Raman
    Speaker
    Associate professor, Department for the Study of Religion



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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