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March 2015

  • Monday, March 2nd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong; Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers; and Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography, and “Mail-Order’ Marriages.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Director, University Center for International Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 2nd The Politics of Peace in Israel

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20157:00PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    With earth-shaking changes taking place all over the Middle East and the peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians stalled, Israelis remain divided on how – and if – peaceful coexistence between Jews and Arabs in the region can be achieved. Michael Keren presents various attitudes and reactions in Israel towards the current threats and opportunities facing the country as reflected in public opinion polls as well as in contemporary Israeli thought and literature.

    Professor Michael Keren is an Israeli political scientist and holder of a Canada Research Chair at the University of Calgary. He is the author of many books including Ben-Gurion and the Intellectuals: Power, Knowledge and Charisma, The Pen and the Sword: Israeli Intellectuals and the Making of the Nation State, Professionals against Populism: The Peres Government and Democracy, The Citizen’s Voice: Twentieth Century Politics and Literature, We Are Coming, Unafraid: The Jewish Legions and the Promised Land in the First World War, International Intervention: Sovereignty vs. Responsibility, War Memory and Popular Culture, and others.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Michael Keren
    Canada Research Chair, Communication, Culture and Civil Society, University of Calagary.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 3rd Is the Government Fiscally Blind? An Empirical Examination of the Effect of the Compensation Requirement on Eminent Domain Exercises

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 201512:00PM - 2:00PMRoom 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Ronit Levine-Schnur is Visiting Scholar at the Faculty of Law. She is also a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Ethics and Munk School of Global Affairs. She is the recipient of the 2014-15 Halbert Exchange Post-Doctoral Award, the Arie Shachar Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Canadian Studies and the Rothschild Post-Doctoral Award. Her research focuses on property and contract law and theory, with particular emphasis on land ownership.

    No registration required.

    Speakers

    Ronit Levine-Schnur
    Visiting Scholar, Faculty of Law Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics and Munk School of Global Affairs


    Sponsors

    Centre for Ethics


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women's Health and Human Rights

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Dr. Sesia will present on the topic “Possibilities and Limitations of the Judicialization of Human Rights’ Violations in Maternal Health Care. A Preliminary Analysis of Current Experiences of Strategic Litigation in Mexico.”

    In today’s Mexico, we experience a new development: some victims and supporting activist organizations are taking cases of human rights’ (HR) violations that occurred in the provision of maternal health care within public hospitals to Court. Almost all victims are poor, underserved, and indigenous women. Judicialization may be a promising avenue for obtaining justice for the victims. Strategic litigation may also play a positive role in putting pressure on the Mexican health system to become more responsive, improve its quality, and become less discriminatory in the provision of maternal health care.

    Still, judicialization faces major hurdles in a country where the judicial system is not well-suited to HR litigation pursuing social justice and where the health system reproduces social inequalities and treats the mistreatment of poor women as something to be expected.
    The presentation will critically assess what judicialization may or may not accomplish in its attempt to improve maternal health care from a rights-based approach in contemporary Mexico.

    Dr. Samuel will present on the topic “Rights-Based Governance of Reproductive Health Service Delivery in Puno, Peru”:

    This presentation explores the complex process of how socially excluded women carry out rights-based governance in state-operated health facilities in the southern Peruvian Andes. It addresses a central tension: how can marginalized actors exercise a governance influence over institutions that have systemically excluded them? The presentation examines the efforts of a group of Quechua-speaking indigenous women in Puno, Peru who act as citizen monitors of their reproductive health services. In a country where profound inequalities are embedded in the health care system, the monitors (aided by a network of strategic allies) seek to combat abuse and strengthen health service provision. Key to their governance strategy is the use of a human rights-based approach to health, intended to influence monitors’ power by repositioning them as rights holders. The presentation outlines some of the gains made by the citizen monitors and also considers the practical challenges they encounter as marginalized actors attempting to democratize reproductive health service delivery in their local health facilities.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Paola Sesia
    The Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology, Mexico

    Jeannie Samuel
    The Dalla Lana School of Public Health



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th A Commemoration of the Service Rendered During World War II by the Canada-US “Devils Brigade” Recently Awarded the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20151:00PM - 3:00PMJunior Common Room
    Massey College
    4 Devonshire Place
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    “The United States is forever indebted to the acts of bravery and selflessness of the troops of the Force, who risked their lives for the cause of freedom” (H.R.324)

    On February 3, Canadian World War II veterans were given the singular honour of being awarded the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal. They fought in the First Special Service Force, a joint U.S.-Canada unit considered to be the precursor of the special operations forces on both sides of the border. Known as the “Devil’s Brigade”, this unit trained in martial arts, parachuting, and even mountain climbing. Many of them were lumberjacks, miners and other seasoned outdoorsmen. The University of Toronto will welcome FSSF veterans accompanied by serving members of the Canadian Special Operations Regiment (this regiment is currently serving in Iraq) on March 4. Come and meet the veterans and hear their history.

    To attend, please RSVP to smoritz@masseycollege.ca>/a>

    Co-Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Massey College

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th The Rise and Decline of Urban Economies: Los Angeles and San Francisco since 1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    ABSTRACT: In 1970, the metropolitan areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco had almost identical levels of income per resident. In 2010, the San Francisco Bay Area was almost one-third richer than Los Angeles, which had slipped from 4th rank among cities in the USA to 25th. The usual reasons for explaining such change – good or bad luck; different types of immigrants; tax rates, housing costs, and local economic policies; the pool of skilled labor — do not account for why they perform so differently. Instead, the divergence in economic development of major city regions is largely due to the different capacities for organizational change in their firms, networks of people, and networks of leaders. This in-depth study draws on economics, sociology, political science and geography to shed new light on the deep causes of economic development and challenges many conventional notions about development in general and urban regions around the world.
    Keywords: cities; urban economy; organizational change; economic specialization; innovation; economic networks; economic development; urban policy.

    BIO: Michael Storper is Professor of Regional and International Development and Director of Global Public Affairs at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs. He holds concurrent appointments in Europe, where he is Professor of Economic Sociology at the Institute of Political Studies (“Sciences Po”) in Paris and a member of its research Center for the Sociology of Organizations, and at the London School of Economics, where he is Professor of Economic Geography.
    Storper received his PhD in Economic Geography at the University of California at Berkeley. His research concentrates on regional economic development and policy, including such themes as globalization, technological change and global economic development, regional economies, and urban-metropolitan development. He is currently completing a five-year research project on the divergent economic development of the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay Area economies since 1970, which is the subject of his next book, forthcoming from Stanford University Press in September 2015.
    He is an internationally recognized scholar and author, particularly well known for his books which include The Capitalist Imperative: Territory, Technology and Industrial Growth (with R. Walker; Blackwell, 1989), Pathways to Industrialization and Regional Development (with A. Scott; Routledge, 1992), Worlds of Production: The Action Frameworks of the Economy (with Robert Salais, Harvard Univ. Press, 1997), The Regional World: Territorial Development in a Global Economy (Guildford Press, 1997), and Latecomers in the Global Economy (editor with L. Tsipouri and S. Thmodakis; Routledge, 1998), Keys to the City: How Economics, Institutions, Social Interaction, and Politics Shape Development (Princeton University Press, 2013.
    Storper received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands in 2008. He was elected to the British Academy in 2012, and also received the Regional Studies Association’s award for overall achievement, the Sir Peter Hall Award, in the House of Commons in 2012.
    In 2014 he was named one of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” by Thomson Reuters


    Speakers

    Michael Storper
    Professor of Regional and International Development Director, Global Public Affairs Luskin School of Public Affairs UCLA

    Meric Gertler
    President, University of Toronto Professor of Geography and Planning


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Martin Prosperity Institute

    Global Cities Institute

    School of Public Policy and Governance

    Geography and Program in Planning

    Urban Strategies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th “Comfort Women” in Global Histories of Colonialism: A Report from Current Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk is drawn from the newly published book, Thinking about/from “Comfort Women” Histories: Structure of Ordinary Lives beyond Military Violence (Tokyo: Iwanami, 2014). The volume is a series of attempts by historians in Japan and Korea to break through current debates. The experiences of women who were forced to serve in the military brothels of Japan during WWII require scholars to look beyond war time. The authors of the book study broader fields: Korean rural socio-economy in the pre-war period, military brothels in the post-war Korean Army, the daily lives and decisions of Imperial Japanese licensed sex workers, and the history of sexual discipline in the American military. Instead of a revisionist history of bare sexual desire at a time of emergency, this lecture proposes an understanding of the event set in the longer and broader context of colonialism. The audience is invited to review these recent studies in politically charged East Asian settings.

    Dr. Hiroyuki Matsubara is Associate Professor, Faculty of Urban Innovation, Yokohama National University, Japan, where he teaches US History. He is an editor of and contributor to the above mentioned book by the Historical Science Society of Japan. His book Undermined Ground of “Efficiency” : 1910s Social Hygienic Movement and American Political Culture (2013) won the Women’s History Association Award in 2014.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hiroyuki Matsubara
    Professor, Yokohama National University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Yokohama National U Student Mixer

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This event is for students only. Tcards will be checked at the door.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th How Many Maidans Does Ukraine Need to Succeed?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Location of the event: Alumni Hall 400 (121 St. Joseph Street, 4th floor), University of Toronto

    NO REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.

    Andrey Kurkov has published 18 novels, 7 children’s books, and more than 30 film scripts. His most recent work is Ukraine Diaries: Dispatches from Kiev, which documents his experience living through the Euromaidan Revolution (also known as the Revolution of Dignity) from November 2013 through April 2014. The book has been translated into German, French, Italian, Estonian, English, Polish, Russian and Japanese. A member of PEN International, Kurkov commands the largest international audience of any author writing in the Russian language. He is also Ukraine’s best-selling author abroad.

    Kurkov’s novels satirize life in post-Soviet Ukraine. His biting humour nonetheless reveals a tenderness for the characters he creates. Kurkov often uses surrealism to deal with political and social issues. A famous example is his novel Death of the Penguin (1996, English 2001). An independent thinker and fine essayist, Kurkov is an active participant in the civic life of Ukraine, using his excellent command of English, German, French, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian to represent Ukraine’s artists, reformers and human rights activists at international for a.
    Among his recent media engagements in the West, see a BBC feature: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04n30gl

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Andrei Kurkov


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    CERES

    Canadian Institute for Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th 'Do they not attack here with the same desire...?': Early Republican Gallipoli as Contested Commemorative Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    This paper compares early republican Turkish and foreign memorialization and pilgrimage efforts on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
    Using archival documents and pilgrim accounts, it details the development of foreign commemorative superiority on the peninsula, and the efforts of travelers of various origins to make the space ‘fit’ with preconceived notions of the 1915 Battle of Gallipoli. It will be argued that foreign preeminence in the perceived Turkish national space of the peninsula had a potent effect on Turkish travelers, eliciting intense shame and territoriality, reshaping Gallipoli’s narrative space, and transforming the 1915 battle from an illustrious Turkish (in truth, Ottoman) victory into an ongoing struggle for Turkish national sovereignty

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Pheroze Unwalla
    York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Book Launch: "Forgiveness: A Gift from My Grandparents" by Mark Sakamoto

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20155:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “You are going to remember this book” – Michael Ignatieff

    Please join as bestselling author Mark Sakamoto recounts his moving, personal saga of a family scarred by history’s pain and their own self-destructiveness, yet redeemed by stoic endurance and the capacity for forgiveness.

    Q&A and book signing to follow.

    MARK SAKAMOTO, a lawyer by training, has enjoyed a rich and varied career. He began his professional career in live music, working with international acts such as Shania Twain and Tim McGraw. Since law school, Mark has worked at a national law firm and a national broadcaster-the CBC-and has also cut his teeth in politics as a senior advisor. He is currently an executive at an international software company and sits on the Premier of Ontario’s media development advisory board. Sakamoto lives in Toronto with his wife and two children.

    Introductions by:
    Michael W. Donnelly
    Professor Emeritus of Political Science
    Dr. David Chu Professor Emeritus of Asia Pacific Studies

    Emeritus Professor Michael Donnelly completed his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University where he was a Fellow of the Faculty. He has published on a wide variety of topics, many concerning the political economy of contemporary Japan. Professor Donnelly first visited Japan in 1958. He has been a visiting professor and researcher at six Japanese universities and research institutes. He is the recipient of an Outstanding Teaching Award from the Faculty of Arts and Science. He has served as Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, founding Director of the Asian Institute, and first-holder of the David Chu Professorship of Asia Pacific Studies. In the fall of 2014 Professor Donnelly was a recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun Gold Rays conferred by the Japanese Government.


    Speakers

    Mark Sakamoto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Early Mass Culture’s Image Ecology

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In the history of picture production, as opposed to the narrower history of fine arts, the United States in the 19th century was a site of internationally significant developments. It became a principal locus for advances in the instrumentalization of images for marketing, political persuasion, and the circulation of information. At first slow by European standards to develop a pictorial press, a lithography trade, and a corps of skilled draughtsmen, printmakers, and designers, the U. S. was, by the end of the century, a world leader in the mass production of pictures and in the expansion of commercial, political, and aesthetic uses for them. Although the growth of mass visual culture was an international phenomenon, the unconstrained capitalism and rapid territorial and demographic expansion of the U. S. made it ground zero. This crucial chapter in the commodification of images is largely unwritten, yet it is foundational for the international image-culture of the 21st c. This paper will argue for an account of 19th-century U. S. visual culture as a complex image ecology warranting comprehensive, critical, and non-triumphalist historical examination. It will focus on a small cross section of this visual culture drawn from the transformative period between 1835 and 1860.

    Michael Leja (Ph.D., Harvard) studies the visual arts in various media (painting, sculpture, film, photography, prints, illustrations) in the 19th and 20th centuries, primarily in the United States. His book, Looking Askance: Skepticism and American Art from Eakins to Duchamp (2004), traces the interactions between the visual arts and the skeptical forms of seeing engendered in modern life in northeastern American cities between 1869 and 1917. It won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize in 2005. An earlier book, Reframing Abstract Expressionism: Subjectivity and Painting in the 1940s (1993), situates the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and others in a culture-wide initiative to re-imagine the self in the midst of a traumatic history. It won the Charles Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He is currently at work on a book exploring changes in pictorial forms and in social relations associated with the industrialization of picture production and the development of a mass market for images in the mid-nineteenth century.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Michael Leja
    Professor, Department of Art, University of Pennsylvania


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Art, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Jesook Song’s new book Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea. Interweaving personal interviews, archival sources and media analyses, this illuminating ethnography profiles the stories of young, single women in South Korea who confront difficulties in their pursuits to live independently and achieve residential autonomy. Living on Your Own skillfully exposes the clash between women’s burgeoning desire for independence and traditional conservative norms in Korean housing practices and financial institutions.

    Professor Jesook Song is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Jesook Song received her B.A. in Education Science at the Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology with a minor degree in Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

    Laura C. Nelson (UCBerkeley associate professor, Gender & Women’s Studies, and Chair, Center for Korean Studies) is an anthropologist interested in the mutual engagements of public policies and society/culture. Her three current Korea-based projects examine breast cancer, older women without children, and the generation of new Koreans born to immigrant brides.

    Lisa Yoneyama received her B.A. in German Language Studies and M.A. in International Relations at Sophia University, Tokyo, and Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at Stanford University, California. Prior to joining the University of Toronto, she taught Cultural Studies and U.S.-Japan Studies at University of California, San Diego, where she also served as Director of two academic programs, the Program for Japanese Studies and Critical Gender Studies Program.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please visit the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Jennifer Jihye Chun
    Chair
    Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Associate Professor, Sociology (UTSC)

    Lisa Yoneyama
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of East Asian Studies & Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Laura C. Nelson
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Gender and Women’s Studies, UC Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Ethnology and Resistance in Vichy France: A Genealogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Germaine Tillion, a French ethnographer, conducted 36 months of fieldwork in the Aurès mountains of Algeria in the 1930s. Returning to France in 1940, she immediately joined the Resistance only to be betrayed and deported to Ravensbrück with her mother. Tillion survived and became one of the most outspoken early “witnesses” to the Holocaust; she later criticized the use of torture in Algeria. Tillion’s extraordinary commitment to combating injustice in the “dark” twentieth century is being recognized with her “Pantheonization” in Paris this coming May. How do we account for such a life? This talk is not only about Tillion but about a larger group of résistants: scholars. She was in fact part of a remarkable cohort of students in interwar France who, under the mentorship of Marcel Mauss, acquired the conceptual tools to render the so-called primitive Other “familiar.” Mauss understood before most the need not just to denounce the old racial science that underpinned Nazi ideology, but to show that another way of seeing the Other was possible. In their ethnographies, Mauss’ closest students consistently demonstrated how differences among human societies were the product of history rather than that of biology. Several of these students became resisters and precocious critics of colonialism. I will nevertheless conclude with a dramatic counter-example: Jacques Soustelle, a resister-ethnographer from this generation who later joined the OAS.

    Alice L. Conklin is a professor of history at the Ohio State University. She is the author, most recently of In the Museum of Man: Race, Anthropology and Empire in France, 1850-1950. She is currently working on the first global anti-racism campaign conducted by UNESCO’s Social Sciences Department.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Alice L. Conklin
    Departement d'Histoire Ohio State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Intimacy and Reconciliation Otherwise: Tsushima Yuko’s Exceedingly Barbaric

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In recent years, there has been a booming cultural market for products that articulate Japanese colonial period and its legacy in Taiwan in an amicable if not nostalgic way. From films to literature, from memoirs to pop culture, they produce what I call the sentiment of “intimacy” between Taiwan and Japan across time and space, an affective turn that is markedly different from the anti-Japanese representations in mainland China and the two Koreas. While this reconstituted intimate relationship has the benefit of assuaging political tensions, it runs the risk of misrepresenting historical colonialism and its messy legacies that collapse personal accounts to colonial relations. While nation-states remain important sites for official rapprochements, and demands for apologies and compensations, interstate relations alone do not attend to the complexity, ambivalence and contradiction of people’s lives under extraordinary historical circumstances. Through the reading of the Japanese novelist, Tsushima Yuko’s “Exceedingly Barbaric” (2008), I argue for an inter-generational and gendered understanding of colonial and postcolonial sites of violence, survival and reconciliation. Revisiting the brutal insurgency and suppression of the 1930 Musha (Wushe) Incident, Tsushima’s novel crosses time (1930s and 2005) and traces the lives of two Japanese women (aunt and niece) across the colonial divide to expose the “barbarity” of both colonial suppression and patriarchal oppression.

    Leo Ching is the author of Becoming Japanese: The Politics of Identity Formation in Colonial Taiwan. He teaches Japanese and East Asian cultural studies at Duke University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Leo Ching
    Associate Professor, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Leaders in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Film Screening: "Palikari - Louis Tikas and the Ludlow Massacre"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20157:00PM - 9:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Director Nikos Ventouras and Producer Lamprini Thoma will be in attendance.

    Iota Films announces the second US screening tour of “Palikari – Louis Tikas and the Ludlow Massacre”, a 90-minute documentary that deals with labor relations in early 20th-century America, as told through the story of Greek immigrant and trade union activist Louis Tikas.

    Director Nikos Ventouras and producer Lamprini Thoma will be in North America touring with the film in March 2015 and offering insight into its filming, their motivation to make the documentary and additional insight into the history of the Ludlow Massacre and Tikas’ role and legacy.
    Screening events are being planned at universities throughout the nation where immigrant studies, labor studies and US history is taught.
    Acclaimed historian Howard Zinn called the “culminating act of perhaps the most violent struggle between corporate power and laboring men in American history”.

    It took more than a decade for Ventouras and Thoma to chart the story of the great 1913-1914 coalminers’ strike and Louis Tikas’s murder, as it survives in oral and family traditions, as well as in official history. They interviewed historians and artists, some of them direct descendants of the striking miners. Labor movement emblem Mother Jones and industrialist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. also make cameo appearances in this palimpsest of memory, struggle and deliverance.

    Tikas’ murder and the Ludlow Massacre led to a United States Congressional Order for Inquiry in 1915, which eventually led to the adoption of labor protection laws, changing the history of the United States forever and how immigrant and other laborers were handled by their employers. Tikas’ story can but reverberate in our time, in view of what is happening with the rights of workers and immigrants around the world.

    The documentary had its world premiere on March 16, 2014 as an Official Selection at the Thessaloniki International Documentary Film Festival to critical acclaim, since then it has screened globally— including in Cork, Ireland, at the Spirit of Mother Jones Film Festival and throughout the United States.

    View a trailer of the film at: http://www.palikari.org

    Donations are welcomed in support of the Hellenic Heritage Foundation Apollo Project.

    Sponsors

    Lourakis Family in support of the Hellenic Heritage Foundation Apollo Project

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, March 8th Contentious Politics on the Korean Peninsula: A Workshop for Koreanists

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, March 8, 201511:30AM - 1:30PMKoffler House, MultiFaith Center
    569 Spadina Ave.
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    Series

    Part of the Comparative Politics Student Group Conference

    Description

    This workshop consists of two groups and four panelists exploring contentious politics in both Koreas. Dr. Adam Cathcart (University of Leeds) and Christopher Green (Leiden University) will present work on contentious politics in North Korea during the Kim Jong-un era, focusing on the government’s use of information strategies, namely “re-defector” press conferences and the Moranbong Band, to maintain a “domain consensus” (i.e, its legitimacy). Professors Jennifer Chun and Judy Han will present their latest work on contentious politics in South Korea, focusing on politically active conservative religious groups and the social and political activities of South Korea’s more precarious workers.

    Click the link below to register.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    The Comparative Politics Student Group (CPSG) Conference

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 9th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 9, 201511:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This information session will be insightful for students interested in applying for Dr. David Chu Travel grants. For more information on the Dr. David Chu Scholarships visit the website link listed below.

    This event is for students only; Tcards will be checked at the door.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 11th Examining the Independent Effect of Social Support on Perceived Mental Health Care Needs among Canadians

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Although the Canada Health Act seeks to facilitate reasonable access to health care services without financial or other barriers, studies have shown that some Canadians are still not receiving the required mental health services. Access to health care is a complex process that can be influenced by individual and contextual factors. A generally used indicator of access to health care is the proportion of individuals having unmet health care needs in a population. Past studies have classified factors influencing perceived mental health care needs into three main domains (predisposing, needs, and enabling factors) based on the behavioural model of access to health services developed by Aday and Andersen (1974). However, despite the growing social epidemiological evidence in the extant literature, the role of social support has not been adequately recognized as a social determinant of access to mental health care services in Canada. Using data from Statistics Canada’s 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) – Mental Health, this paper aims to address this gap in the literature by examining the extent to which social support influence perceived mental health care needs among Canadians. I hypothesized that there will be an independent effect of social support in explaining perceived mental health care needs after adjusting for predisposing, needs, and enabling factors. The paper discusses the findings and their implications for mental health care policy.

    Philip Baiden is a second year PhD student at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto. He holds a Master of Arts degree in Sociology from Western University and a Bachelor of Arts (Honors) degree in Sociology and Philosophy from the University of Ghana. Prior to coming to University of Toronto, Philip was a Research Coordinator/Data Analyst at Child and Parent Resource Institute which is a residential facility for children and youth with mental health and developmental disabilities. His areas of research interests include: social determinants of health, the effects of neighbourhood on mental health needs, mental health service utilization, suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury, quantitative research methodology, and statistical analysis.

    Frederick Ato Armah was educated at the University of Cape Coast in Ghana and Lund University in Sweden. He has held the prestigious Swedish Institute Scholarship (2006-2008) and has been lecturing at the Department of Environmental Science, University of Cape Coast in Ghana since June 2009. Frederick is currently a PhD candidate in Geography (Environment and Human Health) at Western University in Canada, where he is an Ontario Trillium Scholar. His academic and professional interests include Health Geography, Human-Environment Interactions, Environmental Hazards and Risk Assessment, Agro-Ecological Systems and Participatory Natural Resources Management. He has over 65 publications in international peer-reviewed journals.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Philip Baiden
    Speaker
    Junior Doctoral Fellow

    Frederick A. Armah
    Discussant
    PhD Candidate at the University of Western Ontario and an Ontario Trillium Scholar



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 12th Is Average Over for Canada too?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 12, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall, Innis College
    University of Toronto
    Sussex Ave. and St. George St.
    Doors open at 6:30 pm
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Tyler Cowen is the Holbert L. Harris Professor of Economics at George Mason University and also Director of the Mercatus Center. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1987. His book, The Great Stagnation: How America Ate the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will (Eventually) Feel Better, was a New York Times bestseller. He was recently named in an Economist poll as one of the most influential economists of the last decade, and last year Bloomberg Business Week dubbed him “America’s Hottest Economist.” Foreign Policy magazine named him as one of its “Top 100 Global Thinkers” of 2011. His book, An Economist gets Lunch, deals with the economics of food. His latest work, Average is Over: Powering America out of the Great Stagnation, focuses on the implications of growing inequality. He also co-writes a blog at www.marginalrevolution.com and he has recently initiated an on-line economics education project, MRUniversity.com.

    Registration is required for this event. Please register at Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/tyler-cowen-is-average-over-for-canada-too-tickets-15553646375

    This lecture is part of the Conference, “Inequality in the Anglo-American Democracies,” held at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs. For additional information on the conference, please go to our website at: www.munkschool.utoronto.ca/inequalityconference/

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tyler Cowen
    Holbert C. Harris Chair of Economics and Professor, George Mason University; Director, Mercatus Center.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 16th The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty: Oil, Ice, and Inuit Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 16, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Munk School-Gordon Foundation Arctic Security Speakers Series

    Description

    Jessica Shadian discusses her recent book The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty: Oil, Ice, and Inuit Governance, the first in-depth account of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC). Beginning with European exploration of the region and concluding with recent debates over ownership of the Arctic, the book unfolds the history of a polity that has overcome colonization and attempted assimilation to emerge as a political actor which has influenced both Arctic and global governance.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Jessica Shadian
    Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies, Aarhus University


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 18th Autonomy, equality, and supported decision-making for persons with disabilities: Assessing the role for personal support networks

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Sophie Nunnelley
    Lupina/OGS Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th Three Minutes to Midnight: is the World Sleepwalking Into a Nuclear Disaster?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 201512:00PM - 2:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Five years ago hopes were high that the world was at last seriously headed towards nuclear disarmament. By the end of 2012, however, as reported in the inaugural State of Play report, much of this sense of optimism had evaporated. By the end of 2014, the fading optimism had given way to pessimism. New START was signed and ratified, but the treaty left stockpiles intact and disagreements about missile defence and conventional-arms imbalances unresolved. Nuclear weapons numbers have decreased overall but increased in Asia; nuclear-weapons programs in India, Pakistan and China have accelerated; North Korea has conducted three nuclear tests and the CTBT is yet to enter into force; and fissile material production is not yet banned. A comprehensive agreement on Iran eluded negotiators by the extended deadline of 24 November 2014 and the push for talks on a nuclear-weapon-free zone in the Middle East has stalled. Cyber-threats to nuclear weapons systems have intensified, outer space remains at risk of nuclearization, and the upsurge of geopolitical tensions over the crisis in Ukraine produced flawed conclusions about the folly of giving up nuclear weapons on the one hand, and open reminders about Russia’s substantial nuclear arsenal, on the other. Against this sombre backdrop, Nuclear Weapons: The State of Play 2015 by Gareth Evans, Tanya Ogilvie-White and Ramesh Thakur, provides an authoritative advocacy tool for governments, organizations and individuals committed to achieving a safer and saner nuclear-weapon-free world in the lead-up to the Ninth NPT Review Conference in New York in April–May 2015

    RAMESH THAKUR, a former United Nations Assistant Secretary-General and ICISS Commissioner and co-author of The Responsibility to Protect doctrine (2001), is Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, Australian National University. In this talk he presents the main findings of the above study and also draws on his new book Nuclear Weapons and International Security: Collected Essays (Routledge, 2015).

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative academic enterprise between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Ramesh Thakur
    Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament, Australian National University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th On the historicity of space and urban imagination in South Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture 2014/2015

    Description

    Following David Harvey’s notion of dispossession many urban scholars assume that global capital flows, commodification and capitalization of land universally affect urban areas all over the globe. However, not all spaces are equally amenable to commodification or gentrification and in many cases the specific historical character of a city, a neighborhood or an urban space tends to stick to it for many generations. What happened in a space, who lived there before, which community or class is associated with it, leave marks that do not easily evaporate or change. This is particularly true in post-colonial cities marked by deep historical segmentation. Drawing on material from India (and South Africa) I will show how religious markers and boundaries of caste and community mark space in an enduring way that gets etched onto the urban imagination, profoundly and durably structuring the use and habitation of urban space.

    Thomas Blom Hansen is Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and director of the Center for South Asia at Stanford. He is the author of multiple books and articles on Hindu nationalism, Hindu-Muslim violence, urban life, religious identity politics, sovereignty and the modern state in South Asia and South Africa.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thomas Blom Hansen
    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor; Director, Center for South Asia, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Ukraine in Perpetual Transition: War, Law and Corruption

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20159:30AM - 4:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The event will take place in room OI 2286 (the Oise – Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Building, 252 Bloor Street West)

    This interdisciplinary workshop gathers political scientists, historians and linguists to discuss Ukrainian realities and Russian-Ukrainian political and cultural encounters including wars, propaganda wars, memory and lustration politics, and judicial reforms.
    There will be two thematically organized panels. The first panel will explore cultural disruption in Ukraine during the Soviet era as a result of Soviet nationalities policies and state terror, and will consider its implications for contemporary Ukrainians. In addition, panelists will discuss the meanings of nationalism in the Ukraine-Russia conflict from a historical perspective, and will provide an analysis of Putin’s memory politics in the context of Soviet history and probe his attempts to rewrite the national historical narrative.

    The second panel will examine Ukrainian law in Ukraine, and Russian legal and extralegal activities in Crimea after its annexation by the Russian Federation. More specifically, panelists will discuss the politics of lustration of judges, judicial reform initiatives of the past decade (police, procuracy and anti-corruption reforms), and the broader lustration program in Ukraine. The situation in Crimea will be assessed in the context of changes in the culturo-ethnic balance, in particular the evolving situation of the Crimean Tatars and their institutions, the methods of enforcement of Russian citizenship, and international legal and regional security issues.

    Conceptually, the workshop traces the continuity of Soviet traditions and practices, and illuminates their influences on contemporary politics in Ukraine and Russia, and on Russian-Ukrainian relations. In all, the program accentuates Ukraine’s geopolitical significance, and identifies the challenges of legal reforms in Ukraine and the consequences of the Russo-Ukrainian war, factors that present serious obstacles on the road to Ukraine’s sovereignty and democratization.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Olga Bertelsen
    University of Toronto

    Todd Foglesong
    University of Toronto

    Marta Dyczok
    University of Western Ontario

    George Liber
    University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto

    Myroslav Shkandrij
    University of Manitoba

    Peter Solomon
    University of Toronto

    Bohdan Vitvitsky
    former federal prosecutor, the US


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Xi Jinping in Zhejiang (2002-2007)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Chinese political succession literature on Xi Jinping’s accession to becoming general secretary tends to emphasize patronage and factional politics (power struggle, factional balance, etc.) whereas other equally significant factors, such as the deliberate grooming by the Chinese Communist Party CCP) and Xi’s own performance and policy-making records, are often neglected. By focusing on Xi’s career in Zhejiang from 2002-2007, this paper attempts to describe and explain Xi’s performance and policy-making record and the extent to which this had contributed to a “perfect resume” for the CCP’s top position. Specifically, the paper discusses how Xi dealt with the challenging issues of development, economic growth, political participation, rural/urban gap, and environmental degradation. It will also evaluate Xi’s contribution to the modification of the “Zhejiang Model.”

    Alfred L. Chan, PhD (Toronto), is professor and chair of political science at Huron University College, Western University. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one book on Hu Jintao and China in the 21th Century, and another one on Chinese political recruitment and succession.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred L. Chan
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, Huron University College, Western University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th King Dhammacetī and the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions: Ideas, Borders, Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building
    Room 318
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the 15th century, the Buddhist king Dhammacetī sponsored a sīmā (ordination hall) reform that was to become the most famous of its kind in mainland Southeast Asia. Having wrangled with the hairs of monastic law concerning sīmās, Dhammacetī sent monks from his kingdom centered in what is now lower Myanmar to Sri Lanka in order to return with a pure ordination line. In a most significant historical decision, Dhammacetī had an account of these reforms inscribed on ten large stone slabs, which became known as the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions. While addressing matters of law, history, and political order, the inscriptions are also at their heart a sīmā text, that is, a text about the regulation of ritual boundaries and religious land. Drawing especially on these inscriptions, this paper explores elements of the ideational and border-making and border-crossing world Dhammacetī and others participated in and helped cultivate, even as they established innovations that would dramatically shape future memory, religio-political culture, and transregional identity.

    Jason A. Carbine is the C. Milo Connick Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Whittier College. His research and teaching about religion and society combines historical and ethnographic approaches, and draws from an interdisciplinary body of research pertaining to the history and sociology of religions, textual studies, anthropology, and comparative religious ethics. His publications include Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition (2011) and the co-edited volume How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (2012). Carbine is currently preparing a new text and translation of the famous Kalyāṇī Inscriptions.

    For information please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason A. Carbine
    Associate Professor, Religious Studies, Whittier College


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Why Mass Incarceration Matters in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In the last forty years, the United States has engaged in a massive War on Crime and War on Drugs that resulted in it incarcerating more of its citizens than any other country on the globe. In this talk, Dr. Thompson examines the origins of this punitive policy turn, as well as it far-reaching but under-appreciated consequences for American cities, the American economy, and the very foundation of American democracy.

    Heather Ann Thompson is Professor of History at in the departments of African American Studies and History at Temple University (University of Michigan, Fall 2015). Thompson writes about the history as well as current crises of mass incarceration for numerous popular and scholarly publications. Her work can be found in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Salon, Huffington Post, and Dissent, and she has appeared as well on NPR, Sirius Radio, and various television news programs here and abroad. Several of Thompson’s scholarly pieces, including “Why Mass Incarceration Matters,” have won best article awards, and her popular piece in The Atlantic, “How Prisons Change the Balance of Power in America,” was named a finalist for the Best Media Award given by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency. Thompson is a Soros Justice Fellow, sits on the board of the Prison Policy Initiative, and recently served as well on a National Academy of Sciences blue-ribbon panel to study causes and consequences of incarceration in the U.S. Her books include Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Rebellion of 1971 and its Legacy (Pantheon Books, forthcoming), Whose Detroit: Politics, Labor and Race in a Modern American City, and the edited collection Speaking Out: Protest and Activism in the 1960s and 1970s. Thompson was also named a Distinguished Lecturer by the Organization of American Historians.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Heather Ann Thompson
    Speaker
    Professor of History at in the departments of African American Studies and History at Temple University

    Jason Hackworth
    Moderator
    Professor, Dept. of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Geography and Planning


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 23rd Marcel Cadieux, Pierre Trudeau, and the Department of External Affairs, 1968-1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 23, 20152:00PM - 3:30PMLA200, Larkin Building
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    Series

    Contemporary International History Graduate Research Forum

    Description

    Between Marcel Cadieux and Pierre Trudeau there was a history. In 1949, fresh from backpacking around the world and sporting a raffish beard, the future prime minister came to Ottawa hoping for a job. When he expressed an interest in the Department of External Affairs (DEA), however, its Personnel Officer (Cadieux) vowed to bar his way. Yet almost two decades later, when Trudeau succeeded Lester Pearson as prime minister of Canada, Cadieux, who was now under-secretary of state for external affairs, was thrilled. The challenge from nationalist Quebec and Gaullist France was serious and demanded a commensurate response, one that Trudeau was determined to provide. Unfortunately, he and Cadieux agreed on liSle else. This paper explores the DEA’s difficult adaptation to the new Trudeau government through the eyes of Cadieux and argues that the essen3al difference between him and the prime minister was between the consummately professional civil servant who believed in tradition and the brilliant politician who sought to redefine the government in new and startling ways.

    Interested in presenting your work as part of the Graduate Research Forum? Contact susie.colbourn@mail.utoronto.ca for more information.


    Speakers

    Brendan Kelly
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 24th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Open House IR Subject Post

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 20151:00PM - 4:00PM302N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Marilyn Laville
    416-946-8950


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Canada and China in the 21st Century: A Book Launch and Discussion with David Mulroney

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    China’s rise is having a direct impact on our prosperity, our health and well-being, and our security here in Canada. The road to achieving many of our middle-power aspirations now runs through the Middle Kingdom. We need to start paying closer attention, says former ambassador David Mulroney. China has become our second largest economic partner, not as important as the US is, but far bigger than all the rest. Canada exerts a magnetic pull on Chinese tourists and students. It’s also a popular destination for Chinese home buyers in search of a new life or simply looking for a safe place to park money. An assertive China is challenging the balance of power in the Pacific, and it is more than willing to reach across borders, including Canada’s, to steal technologies and to confront challenges to its ideology.

    We must do better. David Mulroney is uniquely positioned to discuss this issue as the former ambassador to China, and as a leader in forming a successful strategy in Afghanistan. He discusses what our challenges in Afghanistan were and how we eventually got it right, and how these lessons can be applied to the future challenges of China, and beyond.

    David Mulroney served as Ambassador of Canada to the People’s Republic of China from 2009 to 2012. Prior to this, he served as the Deputy Minister responsible for the Afghanistan Task Force, overseeing interdepartmental coordination of all aspects of Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan. He is currently a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.


    Speakers

    David Mulroney
    Speaker
    Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Lynette Ong
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Political Science & Asian Institute and Collaborative Master's Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute

    Stephen Toope
    Speaker
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Joshua Baker
    Chair
    Director, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Multidirectional Identities-Harney Lecture series

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Open House IR subject post

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20151:00PM - 4:00PM302N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Marilyn Laville
    416-946-8950


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Russia's Great War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    For most of the twentieth century Russia’s Great War was a historical afterthought. Overshadowed by the Bolsheviks’ revolution, Civil War, and consolidation of power, the War took a back seat within professional scholarship as both Soviet and Western experts focused their energy on explaining the origins and rise of Russian Communism. In recent years a new generation of researchers has begun to re-examine and re-evaluate the significance and meaning of the War. Buttressed by new archival findings and freed from the ideological baggage of earlier historical debates they have begun to analyze Russia’s Great War not as a prelude to “Red October,” but as the fulcrum which set into motion a chain of events that transformed Eurasia and much of the world.

    Russia’s Great War and Revolution is a decade-long multinational scholarly effort that aims to fundamentally transform understanding of Russia’s “continuum of crisis” during the years 1914-1922. The project incorporates new research methods, archival sources, and multiple media formats to re-conceptualize critical concepts and events and to increase public awareness of Russia’s contributions to the history of the twentieth century.

    Prof. John W. Steinberg is authoer of All the Tsar’s Men: The Russian General Staff and the Fate of Empire, 1898-1914 (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2010) and co-editor of The Making of Russian History: Society, Culture, and the Politics of Modern Russia (Bloomington, IN: Slavica Academic Publishers, 2009) and The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective: World War Zero.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. John W. Steinberg
    Austin Peay State University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th What Is Greece?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20157:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    2 Sussex Avenue
    (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street)
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    **This event will take place at Innis Town Hall at Innis College, 2 Sussex Avenue (corner Sussex Avenue and St. George Street).**

    Stathis N. Kalyvas is Arnold Wolfers Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he also directs the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence. He obtained his BA from the University of Athens (1986) and his PhD from the University of Chicago (1993), both in political science. He taught at Ohio State University (1993-94), New York University (1994-2000), and the University of Chicago (2000-03), before joining Yale in 2003. He has held visiting professorships and senior fellowships at the University of São Paulo, Lingnan University in Hong Kong, Northwestern University, Columbia University, the University of Witten/Herdecke, the Juan March Institute, the Max Planck Institute, and the European University Institute.

    Prof. Kalyvas is the author of The Logic of Violence in Civil War (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and The Rise of Christian Democracy in Europe (Cornell University Press, 1996), the co-editor of Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2008), and the author of over fifty scholarly articles in five languages. His current research focuses on global trends in political violence. Prof. Kalyvas has received several awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Award for best book on government, politics, or international affairs, the Luebbert Award for best book in comparative politics, the European Academy of Sociology Book Award, the Luebbert Award for the best article in comparative politics (three times), and the Greenstone Award for best book in politics and history. His research has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the United States Peace Institute, the Folke Bernadotte Academy, the Department for International Development, and the Alexander S. Onassis Foundation. He was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in 2007. In 2008 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Follow the Money: International Donors, External Homelands and their Effect on Romani Media and Advocacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Roma are not only Europe’s largest minority, but also Europe’s largest transnational population but there is no one “homeland” state that claims to guard their interest. The lack of “an external national homeland” (Brubaker, 1996) to watchdog and safeguard their rights has a particular effect on how Roma are engaging as political actors and subjects. I argue that international donors/foundations have assumed the role of “external homeland” and this has unintended and problematic consequences. By reviewing nearly 20 years of Romani media, this paper explores the effect that changing donors’ funding priorities have on Romani advocacy.

    Shayna Plaut, PhD, received her Doctorate from the University of British Columbia in November, 2014. Her dissertation was entitled “Writing/Righting Truths across Borders: Learning from Transnational Peoples Journalism and Politics.” Her work primarily focuses on the intersection of media, advocacy and human rights education as activism and she has designed and taught numerous courses in Canada, the United States and Europe with university students and practitioners since 2000. Shayna is particularly interested in working with Peoples who do not fit neatly within the traditional notions of the nation-state including Roma, Saami and other transnational peoples. She has worked with Romani media and journalist since 2003 throughout Central/Eastern Europe especially Hungary and Macedonia. Currently Shayna is continuing her practitioner based research; she is a lecturer at the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University and working on Strangers at Home a journalistic project reaching out to artists, thinkers and doers storytellers throughout Europe to explore the rise of xenophobia, antisemitism and anti Roma sentiment. Shayna received her MA from the University of Chicago and her BA from Antioch College.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Shayna Plaut
    University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Hungarian Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Self-organization of precarious informal workers: Using international comparisons to understand forms and outcomes

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSK Annual Speaker Series

    Description

    The growth of informal and precarious work has led many to conclude that labor organizing and collective worker power face severe obstacles. However, reflecting another instance of Polanyi’s much-cited double movement, even workers who are both informal and precarious have successfully organized and won victories, and are doing so in increasing numbers. The greatest successes in this regard are not found in Canada or the United States, but in the global South. The global distribution of these movements and their varied and uneven outcomes across nations point to the usefulness of comparative research. This talk summarizes two recent comparisons in this vein, one comparing US day laborers with Mexican street vendors, and one comparing subcontracted textile and apparel workers in Brazil, China, India, and South Africa. Results point to how precarious informal worker organizing can win, and how social and institutional context can shape informal worker organizing possibilities, strategies, and outcomes. This talk conclude by discussing evolving plans for a global study examining informal and precarious worker organizing in 8 countries: Canada, China, India, Mexico, South Korea, South Africa, and the U.S.

    Chris Tilly is a professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at UCLA. He has a Joint Ph.D. in Economics and Urban Studies and Planning from MIT. His research specializes in labor markets, with interests in inequality, urban and regional development, public policy, and organizing strategies directed towards better jobs. His current research projects focus on retail jobs and informal worker organizing in a global comparative context. Tilly has published numerous books on labor markets, including Half a Job: Bad and Good Part-Time Jobs in a Changing Labor Market (1996) and Stories Employers Tell: Race, Skill, and Hiring in America (2001). His most recent work includes editing How Global Migration Changes the Workforce Diversity Equation (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Chris Tilly
    Speaker
    Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (ILRE), University of California, Los Angeles

    Jennifer Jihye Chun
    Chair
    Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Associate Professor, Sociology (UTSC)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Labour Research Centre

    York University

    Closing the Employment Standards Enforcement Gap

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Departement d'Histoire University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 28th Striking Balances: Russia, Energy Security, and National Budgets

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 28, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The 2015 Toronto Conference on Germany
    Striking Balances: Russia, Energy Security, and National Budgets
    *Additional details to be added soon*

    Saturday, March 28, 2015

    Chair: Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    Keynote Address
    Edelgard Bulmahn, Member of the German Bundestag

    In the Black: Balanced Budgets at All Costs?
    Panel and Q&A
    • Peter Bofinger, University of Würzburg
    • Kevin Page, University of Ottawa
    Moderator: Doug Saunders, The Globe and Mail

    Energy Security: Common Interests – Different Priorities?
    Panel and Q&A
    • R. Andreas Kraemer, Ecologic Institute
    • Linda Duncan, MP
    • Katrina Marsh, Canadian Chamber of Commerce
    Moderator: Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    The Russia-Ukraine Conflict: Negotiate or Isolate?
    Panel and Q&A
    • Edelgard Bulmahn, Member of the German Bundestag
    • Taras Kuzio, University of Alberta
    • Robert Johnson, University of Toronto
    • Chrystia Freeland, MP
    Moderator: Constanze Stelzenmüller, Brookings

    Closing Remarks – Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    **This event will also be streamed live via webcast.**


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st Austerity as Epidemic: The New Political Economy of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Faraz Shahidi
    Lupina Research Associate



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 1st The Impact of International Sporting Events and the Case of PanAm/Parapan Games 2015

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This summer, Toronto will host one of the most important multi-sport events, the 2015 Pan Am and Parapan American Games. In this talk, Dr. Chatzigianni examines the potential impact of this international sport event on the host city, region and country in relation to the various social, political, economic and cultural aspects of the Games.

    Efthalia (Elia) Chatzigianni is Tenured Assistant Professor of International Organizations and other forms of cooperation in the field of Sport at the Sport Management Department, University of Peloponnese, Greece. She holds a BA in Sociology and PhD in International and European Studies (Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens, Greece), and an MA in International Politics, (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium). Her research interests include the areas of International Organization and Governance in Sport, European Governance and Lobbying, Greek Politics and Interest Groups. She is author of the book Lobbying: Interest Promotion Mechanisms (2007). She has participated in many conferences and published numerous articles and book chapters in English, Greek, and German. Among others, she is an active member of various NGOs, she was Stagiaire in the European Parliament (1998), and worked for three Organizing Committees for the Olympic Games (Atlanta, 1996, Salt Lake City, 2002, Athens, 2004). Chatzigianni was Visiting Professor at the CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs, and the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto (2013 and 2014 respectively).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Elia Chatzigianni
    Tenured Assistant Professor, Sport Management Department, University of Peloponnese, Greece


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Consul General of the United States - Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 1st Les occupations et les liens entre les deux guerres mondiales **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    **This event will be held in French.**

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Annette Becker
    Departement d'Histoire Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 2nd What Went Wrong in Japan? The Crisis of Social Reproduction

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 2, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The story of Japanese capitalism, held up as a model for economic prosperity and growth, hid nonstandard employment and women’s unpaid reproductive labor in the narrative of success. Once celebrated as a high trust system generating strong economic performance, Japan seemed to have lost its way spectacularly in what some have called the “Lost Decade” of the 1990s. The forms taken by the decades-long crises and the current efforts at resolution must be understood in terms of the specific features of this variety of coordinated capitalism that has dictated events. This juxtaposition of rapid economic success against subsequent failure has eluded theorists’ attempts to explain the enigma of Japanese capitalism. This presentation will identify the institutional sources of labor insecurities behind Japan’s postwar employment system. Gendering institutional analysis has been key to deciphering the enigma of Japanese capitalism.

    Heidi Gottfried, Associate Professor of Sociology at Wayne State University, has published several books and articles on gender and work transformation. Her recent book is entitled Gender, Work and Economy: Unpacking the Global Economy. She has edited or co-edited books on Gendering The Knowledge Economy: Comparative Perspectives; Remapping The Humanities: Identity, Community, Memory, (Post)Modernity; Equity in the Workplace: Gendering Workplace Policy Analysis; and Feminism and Social Change: Bridging Theory and Practice. Her publications include “Temp(t)ing Bodies: Shaping Gender at Work in Japan” and “Japan: The Reproductive Bargain and the Making of Precarious Employment.” The Reproductive Bargain: Deciphering the Enigma of Japanese Capitalism will be published by Brill in the spring.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Heidi Gottfried
    Professor of Sociology, Wayne State University


    Sponsors

    Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 9th Towards a Grounded, Immanent Critique: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in Delhi

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This talk explores possibilities for developing a grounded critique of capitalism in contemporary India, drawing on the politics and cosmologies of migrant workers in Delhi. I begin by discussing the workings of categories (e.g. freedom, dignity, and consciousness), the ambivalence towards religion, and the relative absence of workers’ categories and self-understandings in works of Indian labor studies. Next, I describe the intertwining of politics and cosmology in the discourses and activities of migrant workers working in a metal polishing factory of Delhi. According to the implicit visions of workers, oppressive, work-intensifying processes in factories arise due to a dynamic interplay between souls and the present, ‘decivilizing’ epoch (the Kalyug in Hindu cosmology, the impending Qayamat in Islam), in which thoughts, actions, and dealings become distorted by egoistic and demonic proclivities. Workers attempt to non-cooperate with this distorting interplay through body-conserving resistances, humor and joking, multiple forms of collectivity, public protests, and religious festivity. Through these ‘anti-decivilizing’ activities, workers create possibilities for survival, respect, integrative relations, and glimpses of justice. I conclude by suggesting how categories from multiple sources (workers, proximate discourses, and remote thinkers) might be integrated to construct a grounded, immanent critique of capitalism, which analyses oppressive practices of capital and the state, recognizes distortions in workers’ activities, and intimates possibilities for autonomous transformations in workers’ worlds.

    Shankar Ramaswami is a Lecturer on South Asian Studies at the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University, where he teaches courses on anthropology, religion, literature, and cinema. He completed a B.A. in Economics at Harvard College and a Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago. He is currently working on a book entitled, Souls in the Kalyug: The Politics and Cosmologies of Migrant Workers in

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shankar Ramaswami
    Lecturer, Department of South Asian Studies, Harvard University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Social Determinants of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 201512:00PM - 3:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    The CPHS policy workshop will take place at the George Ignatieff Theatre at the Trinity College (15 Devonshire Place)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn
    Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    Arjumand Siddiqi
    Dalla Lana School of Public Health

    Gary Bloch
    Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto

    Faraz Vahid Shahidi
    CPHS Research Associate Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society

    Co-Sponsors

    Dalla Lana School of Public Health


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Invisible Fences and the Aesthetics of Austerity in Thoreau’s "Walden" (1854)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In this paper, D’Amico examines Henry David Thoreau’s distaste for accumulation in “Walden” (1854), focusing on Thoreau’s peculiar desire for property and ownership unimpeded by materiality. She suggests that Walden’s inchoate philosophy of property offers insight into the contradictory position of property in the circuit of capitalist exchange; more specifically, that Thoreau’s dread of over-accumulation and desire for Spartan simplicity reflects capital’s abstract desire for unfettered exchange and circulation. Indeed, throughout “Walden” Thoreau describes physical property as waste, excess, and spiritual pollutants, cultivating an aesthetic of austerity that privileges “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.” Lauding the poet’s ability to enclose the landscape within verse, “the most admirable kind of invisible fence,” Thoreau articulates a theory of ownership that eschews material forms of possession in favour of a higher law (Gilmore 1985; Newman 2010). By placing “Walden” in conversation with Lockean social contract theory and its discontents (Rousseau and Marx), she read Thoreau’s text as part of the history of political philosophy. “Walden” figures property as both excess and insufficiency, and it is the goal of this paper to draw out the implications of this contradiction for contract theory. Importantly, she does not characterize “Walden” as an easy example of bourgeois ideology. Instead, following Rob Nixon’s (2011) claim that representational strategies have serious political weight, she argues that Thoreau’s text is useful because it performs, in aesthetic terms, the contradictory elements of the social contract under capitalism.

    Cristina D’Amico is a fourth year PhD candidate in the department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation reads nineteenth-century American literature’s attempts to address – in formal, aesthetic, and philosophical terms – the limitations of “possessive individualism,” C.B. Macpherson’s useful term for describing what he calls “the proprietary logic of western political ontology.” She is especially interested in representations of unorthodox houses in American fiction as alternative expressions of political subjectivity. She has contributed academic writing to Esquire: Journal of the American Renaissance and The Howellsian: Journal of William Dean Howells Studies. She currently holds a SSHRC CGS- Doctoral Fellowship (2011-2014).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Cristina D'Amico
    PhD candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 21st Competing Methods for Modelling Urban Healthcare Reform in China: Agent Based and System Dynamics Modeling and Computer Simulation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 21, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    ABSTRACT: Solutions to many global health and global development problems require identifying and implementing social innovations that span multiple human service sectors (e.g., housing, water, healthcare, education). However, identifying, implementing, and sustainably scaling social innovations to address such problems is inherently challenging and in many ways different from technology innovations.
    This talk outlines some of the challenges of identifying, implementing, and sustainably scaling social innovations to address global health and global development challenges, and considers agent based models (ABM) along with system dynamics (SD) models as two potential solutions.
    The methods are considered within the context of identifying and evaluating social innovations for urban healthcare reform in China for migrant workers. Specific attention is given to the underlying heterogeneity and scale of human services needed across multiple sectors of care in
    human services in China for migrant workers and fundamental population dynamics of migration and socio-economic development.
    BIO: Peter Hovmand, PhD, is the founding director of the Brown School’s Social System Design Lab. He has a bachelor of science in electrical engineering and bachelor of arts in mathematics from Bucknell University. He received his masters in social work and interdisciplinary social science doctorate in social work and community psychology from Michigan State University. Dr. Hovmand’s research and practice focuses on using participatory group model building. Application areas include early child and maternal health, childhood obesity, energetics and cancer, mental health, domestic violence, child welfare, household economic security, structural racism, educational equity, and the implementation and scale-up of health innovations. Dr. Hovmand has conducted many group model building workshops domestically and internationally, including rural and urban India, Mongolia, United Kingdom, Canada, China, Panama, and the United States.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Peter S. Hovmand, PhD
    Brown School Social System Design Lab Washington University in St. Louis


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th Social Justice and Public Health: Policy-Maker Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    ‘Social justice’ is often identified as a central value for public health practice and, indeed, for the public’s health. Yet, at the same time it is rarely acknowledged that social justice is a complex, multifaceted concept that does different work in different contexts. As such, ‘social justice’ often precludes a single (or simple) interpretation or application. Despite the ubiquity and apparent foundational role of social justice in public health, in practice a commitment to social justice might therefore tend to refer to diverse, if not divergent, views about the goals and obligations of public health. While some philosophical accounts have recently been proffered to specify the contents of social justice in this context, these works lack a morally significant empirical component that should be considered integral to any account of social justice in public health; that is, how social justice is understood, negotiated, and pursued in practice. This presentation will report findings from a study that involved key informant interviews with public health policy-makers in two distinct domains of public health, chronic disease prevention and public health emergency preparedness and response, which were conducted with the aim of achieving contextual understanding of how social justice is conceptualized and negotiated in practice and to capture whether different norms of social justice obtain in different public health contexts.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Maxwell Smith
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Friday, May 1st Russia and the Ukraine Crisis: Thinking beyond Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 1, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Annual Munk Lecture on European Affairs

    Description

    Prof. Allison joined the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies (SIAS) in 2011 from a Readership in International Relations at the London School of Economics. He was previously a doctoral student and an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford; a Lecturer and Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham (1987-99) and Head of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) (1993-2005). Between 2001 and 2005, Prof. Allison was also a Senior Research Fellow attached to the Centre for International Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, Oxford University. His broad research interests include the international relations, foreign and security policies of Russia and Eurasia and has travelled extensively there for research projects under his direction.


    Speakers

    Prof. Roy Allison
    University of Oxford



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 13th – Friday, May 15th Canadian Foreign Policy: Traditions and Transitions

    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This conference will focus upon the traditions of Canadian policy and assess their impact today and their relevance for the future. Scholars, practitioners, and former political leaders will lead the discussions in an event sponsored by the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History and the Canadian International Council.

    Two new book series associated with the Graham Centre will be launched at the conference: the C.D. Howe Series in Canadian Political History with the University of British Columbia Press and the Contemporary Canadian Issues Series with Dundurn Press.

    To register and for more information, please visit http://billgrahamcentre.utoronto.ca/canadian-foreign-policy-traditions-transitions/

    Contact

    Nina Boric

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Canadian International Council


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, May 16th – Sunday, May 17th The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA)

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 16, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Sunday, May 17, 20159:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts (FSALA),

    This is an international festival with a difference, truly reflecting the diversity of Toronto. Over 30 writers from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Tanzania, and of course all across Canada will be present. Saturday night dance performance by Hari Krishan and InDance. African guitar by Tichaona Maradze. There will be panels on a variety of subjects, including New Theatre in Canada, East Asian Writing, South Asian Writing, Writing in Languages Other than English.

    Admission is free except for the Saturday night event. It is advisable but not essential to pre-register.

    The event runs May 15-17, 2015, for more information and the full program click the link below.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Festival of Literature and the Arts

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, May 23rd – Sunday, May 24th Doors Open Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 23, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S 0A7
    Sunday, May 24, 201510:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S 0A7
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs will once again be participating in Doors Open Toronto. Visitors will have the opportunity to freely roam throughout the public spaces at the Munk School of Global Affairs’ historic 315 Bloor Street West Observatory Site. The halls, library, and unique meeting spaces all feature exceptional art by artists from Canada and around the world. Guided tours will be offered at three times during the day for members of the public, and staff will be available on site to answer questions about the Munk School and Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects’ (KPMB) beautiful renovation.

    About Doors Open Toronto
    Since its inception in 2000, Doors Open Toronto has attracted more than two million visits in nearly 600 unique locations across the city. It is Canada’s largest Doors Open event and one of the three largest Doors Open events in the world.

    The 16th annual Doors Open Toronto is scheduled for May 23-24, 2015 and will offer residents and visitors an opportunity to take a peek behind the doors of 150 architecturally, historically, culturally and socially significant buildings across the city.

    For more information, and to see other buildings participating in Doors Open Toronto, please click on the link below.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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