Upcoming Events

Past Events Login

May 2016

  • Thursday, May 5th Big Cities, Big Ideas Lecture - Funding Democracy: Participatory Budgeting in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 5, 20164:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    One of the most pressing challenges facing today’s cities is how to involve the public in the machinery of government and its fiscal decisions in a meaningful way. Participatory budgeting, a model derived from the Brazilian experience, gives the public the right to propose, deliberate, and vote on a part of the city budget. Does participatory budgeting actually improve democracy, transparency, and accountability, or is it simply another consultation tool in disguise? On May 5, join us for a panel discussion on the opportunities and challenges of implementing participatory budgeting in Canadian cities.

    Josh Lerner is the Executive Director of the Participatory Budgeting Project, the leading non-profit supporting participatory budgeting in the US and Canada. His work has been recognized by the White House as a model for open government, and by the Brown Democracy Medal as the best practical innovation advancing democracy around the world. He is the author of two books, Making Democracy Fun: How Game Design Can Empower Citizens and Transform Politics (MIT Press, 2014) and Everyone Counts: Could Participatory Budgeting Change Democracy? (Cornell University Press, 2014).

    Seating is limited for this event, and registration is required.

    This event is part of the “Big City, Big Ideas (BCBI)” lecture series, organized by the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance at the University of Toronto, in collaboration with its BCBI Partners: The School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG), the Department of Geography & Planning, the Innovation Policy Lab (IPL), the Global Cities Institute (GCI), the Martin Prosperity Institute (MPI), and Urban Strategies Inc.


    Speakers

    Josh Lerner
    Keynote
    Executive Director, Participatory Budgeting Project

    Shelley Carroll
    Panelist
    Toronto City Councillor for Ward 33 Don Valley East

    Alex Mazer
    Panelist
    Co-Founder, Better Budget TO

    Peter MacLeod
    Moderator
    Co-Founder and principal of MASS LBP



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, May 6th Unsettling the Senses: Dialogues on Multiculturalism, Diversity and Inequality

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 6, 201610:00AM - 5:00PMDepartment of Anthropology
    19 Russell Street, Room 246
    University of Toronto
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Osaka University RESPECT Summer School 2016

    Description

    The Osaka University RESPECT (Revitalizing And Enriching Society Through Pluralism, Equity And Cultural Transformation) Summer School 2016 in Multicultural Studies at the University of Toronto is designed to give Japanese graduate students a critical first-hand experience with multiculturalism in Canada: both its possibilities and challenges.

    Students from Osaka University will present their research findings from this intensive program alongside graduate students at the University of Toronto, who will elaborate on many dimensions of this central theme. This joint graduate student workshop is an exciting opportunity for cross-cultural communication and the development of comparative and critically nuanced understandings of this broad and rich concept.

    EVENT SCHEDULE

    10:00 AM – 10:10 AM     
    Introduction by Prof. Shiho Satsuka (Department of Anthropology) and the RA Team Lisa Davidson, Emily Hertzman, and Alexandre Paquet

    CLUSTER I: HISTORY AND DEBATES ON CANADIAN MULTICULTURALISM
    Moderator, Lisa Davidson
     
    10:10 AM- 10:40 AM  
        
    Osaka Student Presentation and Discussion
     
    10:40 AM- 10:55 PM
    Jessica Cook (Department of Anthropology) –  “Indigenous women and the urban community in Tkaronto”

    10:55 PM- 11:10 PM
    Amy N. Fox (Department of Anthropology) – “Information Sharing in the American Eastern Woodlands: A Stone-Tool Case Study from the Late Archaic (4000-3000BP)”

    11:10 PM- 11:25 PM       
    Questions Period
     
    11:25 PM- 11:40 PM       
    “Still Waiting for Justice” Documentary Screening
     
    11:40 PM- 12:40 PM       
    Lunch Break (to be provided by the Asian Institute)
     
    CLUSTER II ETHNOGRAPHY OF KENSINGTON MARKET
    Moderator, Emily Hertzman

    12:40 PM- 1:10 PM
    Osaka Student Presentation and Discussion

    1:10 PM- 1:25 PM
    Rachel Levine (Department of Anthropology) – “That Poor Dog!”: Studying Poverty and Pet  Ownership in Toronto
     
    1:25 PM – 1:40 PM
    Alexandra Maris (Women and Gender Studies   Institute) – “Women and Muscle Mass: With a Focus on Women doing Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)”
     
    1:40 PM- 1:55 PM            
    Questions Period
     
    1:55 PM- 2:05 PM            
    “Hanging On” Documentary Screening
     
    2:05 PM- 2: 15 PM           
    Coffee Break
     
    CLUSTER III: TRANSNATIONALISM, MIGRATION AND RELIGION: HOME-MAKING AMONGST THE DIASPORA
    Moderator, Alexandre Paquet
     
    2:15 PM- 2:45 PM
    Osaka Student Presentation and Discussion
     
    2:45 PM- 3:00 PM
    Sandra Brewster (Department of Visual Studies) – “In Residency at Alice Yard”
     
    3:00 PM- 3:20 PM
    Justin Lee – “Sugar Brown: The Shades of Blues”
    Movie Screening with Introduction by the Director
     
    3:20 PM- 3:35 PM
    Questions Period
     
    3:35 PM- 3:45 PM
    Coffee Break    

    KEYNOTE PRESENTATION
    Moderator, Alexandre Paquet
     
    3:45 PM- 4:30 PM
    Adrian De Leon (Department of History) – “Smells, Tastes, and the Ethics of Everyday Multiculturalism”
     
    4:30 PM- 4:45 PM
    Questions Period
     
    4:45 PM- 5:00 PM            
    Closing Remarks

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Osaka University

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, May 9th – Tuesday, May 10th Big Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 9, 20167:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, May 10, 20167:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and CBC IDEAS

    Description

    We leave a digital trail behind us everywhere we go: the calls we make, the emails we send, the links on which we click, the websites and documents that we retrieve. This also includes our social relationships, habits, preferences, even our movements in space and time. IDEAS, CBC RADIO ONE in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto weighs the opportunities, the risks — and the trade-offs — as the world of BIG DATA relentlessly changes our lives.

    Monday, May 9, 2016, Part 1: The Promise and the Perils of Big Data for Business, for Consumers, and for Society

    For business, the promise of BIG DATA is at least as great as that of the Internet itself. Companies can now anticipate what consumers want even before we know it ourselves. As consumers, we get more of what we want, when we want it. But we must also live under constant surveillance as companies chase down the opportunities that we create for them online.

    Anita M. McGahan, Professor of Strategic Management at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto; Ashkan Soltani, independent researcher and technologist specializing on issues relating to privacy, security, and behavioral economics, and former Chief of Technology for the Federal Trade Commission in Washington, DC; John Weigelt, National Technology Officer, Microsoft Canada; and moderator Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs consider the consequences of Big Data as it changes business – and our lives – for better... and for worse.

    Tuesday, May 10, 2016, Part 2: BIG DATA – or – BIG BROTHER? Citizenship and security in the Age of Big Data.

    BIG DATA does not evaporate. It accumulates, creating a new, exponentially expanding system of planetary information. The Snowden/NSA revelations have shown that the U.S. and its allies’ secretive “signals intelligence agencies” routinely collect, mine and analyze this system, partly with help from the private companies that operate it. But what are the risks and trade-offs for liberty and privacy? And, who guards against abuses of power when the state watches everything and everyone, all the time?

    Ann Cavoukian, Executive Director of the Privacy and Big Data Institute at Ryerson University and former Information and Privacy Commissioner (three terms) for the province of Ontario; Ronald J. Deibert, Oont, Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs; Neil Desai, executive with Magnet Forensics, a software company that provides digital forensic tools to law enforcement and national security agencies around the world; and moderator Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs, grapple with BIG DATA , national security and our rights –as citizens–in relation to the State.


    Speakers

    Paul Kennedy
    Chair
    Host, CBC IDEAS

    Stephen J. Toope
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Ann Cavoukian
    Panelist
    Executive Director of the Privacy and Big Data Institute, Ryerson University

    Ronald J. Deibert
    Panelist
    Director, Citizen Lab

    Neil Desai
    Panelist
    Director, Corporate Affairs, Magnet Forensics

    Anita M. McGahan
    Panelist
    Professor of Strategic Management, Rotman School of Management

    Ashkan Soltani
    Panelist
    Independent researcher and technologist specializing in privacy, security, and behavioral economics

    John Weigelt
    Panelist
    National Technology Officer, Microsoft Canada


    Co-Sponsors

    CBC IDEAS

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, May 12th Farewell to a "Wonderful Slavonic People": Ethnic Othering and Stereotyping During the Russo-Ukrainian War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 12, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The ongoing Russo-Ukrainian war, euphemistically called “the Ukraine crisis”, has revealed a dramatic gap between the imaginary Ukraine (“a wonderful Slavonic people”, in Aleksandr Dugin’s terms) created by three centuries of the Russian imperial mythmaking and the real Ukraine that evolved as an alternative and ultimately a bold denial of those efforts. The talk examines Russian stereotypes of Ukrainians as an important element of that mythmaking and deconstructs them as the instruments of imperial manipulation, discursive dominance and, nowadays, unscrupulous propagandistic war. It contends that the popular view of Ukrainians and Russians as “almost the same people” becomes increasingly obsolete since it refers primarily to common soil and blood, culture and history, contrary to Ukrainians’ attempts to develop civic identity and establish a value-based rather than ethnic proximity to democratic nations of Europe.

    Mykola Riabchuk is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Political and Nationalities’ Studies in Kyiv and a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the George Washington University, USA. He published a number of books and many articles on postcommunist transformations, state-nation building, nationalism and national identity in Ukraine. His last books include “Gleichschaltung. Authoritarian Consolidation in Ukraine, 2010-2012” (2012, in both Ukrainian and English) and “Postcolonial Syndrom” (2011), translated also into Polish (2015) and Hungarian (2016).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Mykola Riabchuk
    Speaker
    Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Political and Nationalities’ Studies in Kyiv

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, May 12th "Two Cheers for Europe's Populist Backlash!" - Munk Annual Lecture in European Affairs

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 12, 20165:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Liberalism in Britain and Europe has over-reached itself in recent decades—on European integration, immigration and much besides—and populism has been striking back. That is not all bad. Politics needs a new settlement between liberalism and populism.

    David Goodhart is a British journalist and think-tanker. He worked for the Financial Times for 12 years and was the founding editor of the monthly current affairs magazine Prospect for 15 years. He then became director of the centre-left think tank Demos. He is now director of the Integration Hub website and head of the Demography, Immigration and Integration unit at the Policy Exchange think tank. His book, The British Dream: Successes and Failures of Post-War Immigration, was published in 2013.


    Speakers

    David Goodhart
    Integration Hub and Policy Exchange



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, May 18th Richard Thaler on "Misbehaving: The Story of Behavioral Economics"

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 18, 20164:00PM - 5:00PMFleck Atrium
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto,
    105 St. George Street, Toronto
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    All current Munk School students, faculty and staff are invited to register free of charge for this next session of our ongoing Behavioural Science Experts Speaker Series @ Rotman.

    DATE: Wednesday, May 18, 2016

    TIMING: 4:00 sharp to 5:00pm on-stage discussion and audience Q&A

    PLACE: Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, 105 St. George Street, Toronto (Fleck Atrium, ground floor, south building)

    SPEAKER: Richard H. Thaler, Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business, U of Chicago; President, American Economic Association; Author

    IN CONVERSATION WITH: Amanda Lang, Host – “Bloomberg North”, Bloomberg TV Canada; Author

    TOPIC: Misbehaving: The Story Of Behavioral Economics (Norton, 2015)

    BOOK SYNOPSIS: Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans—predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth—and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world. Traditional economics assumes rational actors. Early in his research, Thaler realized these Spock-like automatons were nothing like real people. Whether buying a clock radio, selling basketball tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists. In other words, we misbehave. More importantly, our misbehavior has serious consequences. Dismissed at first by economists as an amusing sideshow, the study of human miscalculations and their effects on markets now drives efforts to make better decisions in our lives, our businesses, and our governments. Coupling recent discoveries in human psychology with a practical understanding of incentives and market behavior, Thaler enlightens readers about how to make smarter decisions in an increasingly mystifying world. He reveals how behavioral economic analysis opens up new ways to look at everything from household finance to assigning faculty offices in a new building, to TV game shows, the NFL draft, and businesses like Uber. Laced with antic stories of Thaler’s spirited battles with the bastions of traditional economic thinking, Misbehaving is a singular look into profound human foibles. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers, and policy makers are both profound and entertaining.

    SERIES SPONSOR: Behavioural Economics in Action @ Rotman Research Hub

    SERIES CO-HOST: Munk School of Global Affairs

    TO REGISTER please visit www-2.rotman.utoronto.ca/may18 (Munk School students, faculty and staff, ID required at event) or http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ProfessionalDevelopment/Events/UpcomingEvents/20160518RichardThaler.aspx (all others) by noon on May 17.

    ‘Dress code’ is business casual. We hope that you’ll attend.

    Speakers

    Richard H. Thaler
    Speaker
    Professor of Behavioral Science and Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business, U of Chicago; President, American Economic Association; Author

    Amanda Lang
    Moderator
    Host - "Bloomberg North”, Bloomberg TV Canada; Author


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Rotman School of Management


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, May 27th Enchanting India: A Photo Exhibit and Conversation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 27, 20166:30PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    (at St. George, south of Bloor)
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This keynote photographic presentation features images made in the northern parts of India, capturing the beauty of the region’s geography and glimpses of its culture through the eyes of global travellers Neville and Vivienne Poy. Neville, now a retired Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, has had a life-long passion for visual and performing arts. He found at an early age that the camera was the best instrument through which he could express his artistic abilities, and it became his constant recreational companion. As a historian and author, Vivienne delights in acquiring knowledge of cultural diversity and experiencing and learning about the people and places of our world, both in the present and the historic past. The pair found their visual perception of India to be enchanting; therefore they will present images that are as much artistry as they are a record of the people and places visited. Neville and Vivienne’s combined artistic and intellectual interests promise to make for an enjoyable and rewarding presentation.

    Dr Neville Poy graduated from McGill University in 1960 with the degrees of BSc, MD, CM, MSc (surgery), FRCS©, and FACS. He is a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, and was Director of the first burn unit in Canada at the Scarborough General Hospital beginning in 1967. He became its Inaugural Recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. Dr Poy was appointed as an Officer of the Order of Canada in 1998 and an Officer of the Order of St. John in 2003. He is a recipient of both the Queen’s Gold and Diamond Jubilee Medals. He was appointed Honorary Lt Colonel of the Queen’s York Rangers (oldest Reserve Army Regiment in Canada) in 2003, Honorary Colonel in 2007, and Honorary Colonel Emeritus in 2010 including the present. He has served on numerous boards, medical and non-medical. He retired from medical practice in 1995.

    The Honourable Dr Vivienne Poy is Chancellor Emerita of the University of Toronto, an author of non-fiction, and a historian. In 1998, she was the first Canadian of Asian heritage to be appointed to the Senate of Canada, where she focused on gender issues, multiculturalism, immigration, and human rights. She retired from the Senate in September 2012 and continues to be actively involved with communities across Canada. She travels extensively and has a special interest in the study of Chinese diaspora.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr Neville Poy

    The Honourable Dr Vivienne Poy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Saturday, May 28th – Sunday, May 29th Doors Open Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, May 28, 201610:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    Sunday, May 29, 201610:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, ON
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs will once again be participating in Doors Open Toronto. Visitors will have the opportunity to freely roam throughout the public spaces at the Munk School of Global Affairs’ historic 315 Bloor Street West Observatory Site. The halls, library, and unique meeting spaces all feature exceptional art by artists from Canada and around the world. Guided tours will be offered at three times during the day for members of the public, and staff will be available on site to answer questions about the Munk School and Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects’ (KPMB) beautiful renovation.

    No registration required.

    About Doors Open Toronto
    The 17th annual Doors Open Toronto presented by Great Gulf returns on Saturday, May 28 and Sunday, May 29, 2016, offering free and rare access to more than 130 architecturally, historically, culturally and socially significant buildings across the city.

    The Doors Open Toronto 2016 theme of Re-used, Re-visited and Revised will explore the adaptive re-use of buildings throughout Toronto’s architectural history.

    Doors Open is presented by Great Gulf and produced by the City of Toronto in partnership with the broader community.

    To plan your Doors Open Toronto weekend,click on the link below for information on free special programming, exhibits, walking tours, and talks that can be experienced during the event.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

June 2016

  • Friday, June 3rd Convergence and Divergence in Global Health: Reductions in Premature Mortality Worldwide

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 3, 20164:00PM - 6:30PMMaRS Auditorium
    101 College Street
    Toronto, ON
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The John R. Evans Lectureship in Global Health by Dr. Prabhat Jha

    Description

    Dr. Prabhat Jha, Dalla Lana Chair in Epidemiology and Global Health, to give the John R. Evans Lectureship in Global Health on June 3, 2016. His talk, “Convergence and divergence in global health: reductions in premature mortality worldwide,” will be followed by a panel discussion led by Professor Stephen J. Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and include Dr. Paul Cadario, Distinguished Senior Fellow in Global Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs as a panelist. Reception to follow.

    Speakers

    Dr. Prabhat Jha
    Keynote
    Dalla Lana Chair in Epidemiology and Global Health

    Prof. Stephen J. Toope
    Chair
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Paul Cadario
    Panelist
    Distinguished Senior Fellow in Global Innovation, Faculty of Engineering and Munk School of Global Affairs

    Borys Chabursky
    Panelist
    Founder and Chairman, Shift Health

    Dr. Jillian Kohler
    Panelist
    Director, WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency in the Pharmaceutical Sector

    Dr. Tim Evans
    Panelist
    Senior Director, Health, Nutrition and Population Health, World Bank


    Sponsors

    Dalla Lana School of Public Health


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, June 6th What Happened? The Curious Case of Social Change in 20th Century America

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 6, 20163:00PM - 5:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria College
    University of Toronto
    91 Charles St. West
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The Environics Institute for Survey Research, the Centre for the Study of the United States, and the Munk School of Global Affairs invite you to a special event in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the Environics Institute:

    A special presentation by Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam:
    What Happened? The Curious Case of Social Change in 20th Century America.

    Followed by a panel discussion on the Canadian perspective with:

    Rahul Bhardwaj, Toronto Foundation (moderator)
    Dr. Keith Banting, Queen’s University
    Dr. Kwame McKenzie, Wellesley Institute

    Material well-being (per capita income, life expectancy) in America rose steadily throughout the 20th century. By contrast many major aspects of American society, politics, and economics from 1900 to today followed a clear but puzzling pattern – rising strongly and steadily from 1900 to about 1970, and then falling by equal measure from 1970 to today. This pattern applies to income and wealth equality, associational membership and personal philanthropy, cross-party political collaboration, social integration, union membership, progressive tax rates, and the native-born proportion of the population. What happened to cause such a seismic shift in the direction of society? Understanding the origins of such a massive pendular swing from individualism to communitarianism and back again could inform our thinking about how to restore balance to America. And it may have important lessons for Canada and other western democracies.

    Robert D. Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the British Academy, and past president of the American Political Science Association. He has written 14 books, translated into more than 20 languages, including Bowling Alone and Making Democracy Work, both among the most cited publications in the social sciences in the last half century. His 2010 book (co-authored with David E. Campbell), American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us, won the American Political Science Association’s 2011 Woodrow Wilson award as the best book in political science. He has consulted for American presidents, British prime ministers, French presidents, and hundreds of grassroots leaders and activists in many countries. His latest book, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, on the growing class gap among American young people, was published in March 2015.

    This event is free and open to the public. Registration is required. To attend, please register here: http://robertputnam.eventbrite.ca

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Robert Putnam
    Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Environics Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, June 10th Taiwan Studies in Trans* Perspectives: Transdisciplinary, Transnational, and Transcultural

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 10, 20169:00AM - 5:00PMUniversity of Toronto, Canada
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    North American Taiwan Studies Annual Conference

    Description

    We are pleased to announce that the 22nd North American Taiwan Studies Association (NATSA) Annual Conference will be held from June 10-11, 2016. This year’s conference, titled “Taiwan Studies in Trans* Perspectives: Transdisciplinary, Transnational, and Transcultural,” welcomes scholars interested in studying Taiwan from all disciplines and explores how Taiwan—as a case, a theory, or even a method—can further transform current knowledge constructs toward an inclusive global vision.

    Trans*, used in transgender studies as an umbrella term to include individuals seeking gender identities within and beyond the traditional male-female dichotomy, sheds light on an insightful and radical approach to Taiwan Studies. The asterisk in trans*, originating from computer science, serves as a wildcard character that stands for any words starting with trans, and symbolizes the openness and inclusiveness of the transdisciplinary community of Taiwan Studies. In line with this inclusive spirit, Trans* opens up new approaches to encourage scholars of Taiwan Studies to boldly transgress disciplinary boundaries and cull perspectives from various intellectual communities.

    Of all the relevant trans* themes in this conference, participants are encouraged, but not limited, to set transdisciplinarity, transnationality, and transculturalism as a point of reference. Transdiciplinarity is not only a series of cross-disciplinary activities but also a transformation among contexts and the transcendence of multiple disciplines to create innovative context-based theories. Taiwan Studies from a transdisciplinary perspective offers a lens for researchers to examine, discuss, and understand issues in multiple contexts. Transnationality both emphasizes and questions the existence of universal values or a one-size-fits-all nation-state theory. It not only digs out the diversity derived from the uniqueness of local contexts, but also tries to clarify the imbalanced power structure among the units. Transculturalism, a theoretical concept that seeks to break the boundaries between different communal, cultural, societal, and national sectors. Additionally, a new framework is established in which participants are understood not as members exclusively belonging to particular groups but as constantly crossing categorical boundaries in a search for self-identity.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    North American Taiwan Studies Association

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia-Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

September 2016

  • Monday, September 19th Interviewing a Washington Insider on Elections and the Media: How the Digital Revolution Has Changed U.S. Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 19, 20165:30PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, South House
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    From the 140 characters of Twitter to the 10 seconds of Snapchat, digital and social media are transforming the role of media in U.S. politics. As the Presidential candidates, TV and cable news, and print media race to keep pace with instantaneous reporting, citizen journalists and social media, how is political coverage evolving, and how is this changing politics? What will be the impact when 100 million Snapchat users become politically active?

    Join former Globe and Mail editor John Stackhouse in discussion with Marcus Brauchli, former editor of the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal in what will no doubt be a compelling and insightful discussion just six weeks away from the U.S. elections.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    (416) 946-8972


    Speakers

    John Stackhouse

    Marcus Brauchli



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, September 22nd – Thursday, September 29th IPL Speaker Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 22, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, September 22, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, September 29, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, September 29, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Neena Peterson
    416-946-8929


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.