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March 2017

  • Tuesday, March 28th Turmoil in Turkey: The Aftermath of the Failed Coup

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    On July 15, 2016, a group of Turkish soldiers, apparently initiating a coup attempt, flew attack helicopters; F16s fighter jets, bombed the parliament building, and drove tanks down the streets of Istanbul and the capital city of Ankara. The subsequent violence caused almost 300 people to lose their lives, and at least two thousand more to suffer physical harm. The upheaval, quickly crushed by governmental forces, granted Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoǧan an opportunity to squelch his critics, effectively bolstering his authority. He promptly accused Islamic cleric Fethullah Gülen (b. 1941) and his followers of masterminding the plot, and launched a series of oppressive measures against those affiliated with the Gülen Movement, also known as Hizmet (Turkish for “service”). Individuals from a wide range of political allegiances perceived to be in opposition of the government were arrested. Most of those arrested or fired, however, were involved, or affiliated in some way, with Hizmet. In the aftermath, participants found themselves under siege, vulnerable to human rights abuses, in light of Erdoǧan’s three-month suspension of the European Convention of Human Rights. Termed “the purge,” or temizlik(Turkish for cleansing), his AKP government detained 94,889 people, arrested over 47,120, and closed or took over 149 media outlets, and over 2,000 educational institutions were shut down.[1] Erdoǧan also labeled Gülen a traitor, and the movement a terrorist organization, creating the conditions for ordinary participants to experience acute ostracism from those around them, creating rifts between friends and family members. Refugees of the purge spoke of loss of family, friends, occupations, and property, and also of their very identity as Turks or citizens of Turkey. These series of events reflect seismic fault lines in Turkey between sectarian, ethnic, and ideological groups, and ultimately a brutal struggle over the soul of Turkey. The resulting geopolitical outcomes will transform Turkey and the larger region, already destabilized by the war in Syria, PKK militancy, and Russian aggression.
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    [1] Turkey Purge, as of March 16, 2017,http://turkeypurge.com/.

    Dr. Sophia Pandya specializes in women, religion, and globalization. She received her BA from UC Berkeley in Near Eastern Studies/Arabic, and her MA and PhD from UCSB in Religious Studies, with a focus on women and Islam. An Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California at Long Beach, she co-edited the book entitled The Gulen Hizmet Movement and its Transnational Activities: Case Studies of Altruistic Activism in Contemporary Islam.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Sophia Pandya
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of California at Long Beach



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 28th Stakeholder Capitalism in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Special Symposium

    Description

    It is now widely recognized that globalized shareholder capitalism, while generating substantial wealth over recent decades, has failed to distribute the benefits of such wealth equitably. The financial crisis of 2008 has brought to fore growing social and economic inequality, negative social and human costs of unregulated business practices, and short and long-term impacts of wasteful resource extraction and consumption on social and natural environment. The search is now on to identify more sustainable ways of organizing capitalism. In 2014 world business, government and civil society leaders and academics at World Economic Forum in Davos began discussing the idea of ethical capitalism. What is ethical capitalism? A group of scholars from Europe, North America and Asia has returned to history to answer this question. In the second half of the 19th century, Shibusawa Eiichi, a major business leader and entrepreneur, and widely considered the father of modern Japanese economy, expressed the view that business enterprise could and should simultaneously achieve profits and social goals through enhanced public welfare. His solutions are still relevant today. In this symposium we: 1) elaborate on the Asian and Western origins of ethical capitalism; 2) map out arguments for corporate responsibilities and the changing corporate practices; and 3) debate the relations between ethics and economy for a sustainable global economies and societies.

    Featuring:

    Ken Shibusawa, Chairman, Commons Asset Management, Inc.
    Geoffrey Jones, Professor of Business History, Harvard Business School
    The Hon. Kevin G. Lynch, Vice-Chair, BMO Financial Group

    with an introduction to the “Ethical Capitalism” project by:

    Patrick Fridenson, Professor Emeritus in International Business History, Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris
    Takeo Kikkawa, Professor of Business History, Graduate School of Innovation Studies, Tokyo University of Science
    Janet Hunter, Saji Professor of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Program:

    MC: Ito Peng, Professor, Department of Sociology, and School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto.
    • 14:00 – 14:02 Welcome by Professor David Cameron, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto
    • 14:02 – 14:05 Opening remarks by Peter Loewen, Director, School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto.
    • 14:05 – 14:10 Remarks by Mr. Yasunori Nakayama, Consul General of Japan in Toronto.
    • 14:10 – 14:30 Introduction to the “Ethical Capitalism” project, Patrick Fridenson (Professor Emeritus in International Business History, Écoles des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris) & Takeo Kikkawa (Professor of Business History, Graduate School of Innovation Studies, Tokyo University of Science).

    Moderator: Janet Hunter, Saji Professor of Economic History, London School of Economics and Political Science.
    • 14:30 – 15:00 Keynote speaker: The Hon. Kevin G. Lynch, Vice-Chair, BMO Financial Group.
    • 15:00 – 15:20 Keynote speaker: Ken Shibusawa, Chairman, Commons Asset Management, Inc.
    • 15:20 – 15:35 Discussant: Geoffrey Jones, Professor of Business History, Harvard Business School.
    • 15:35 – 15:55 Panel Discussion and Q & A
    • 15:55 – 16:00 Closing Remarks by Masahide Shibusawa, President, Shibusawa Eiichi Memorial Foundation.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918

    Sponsors

    Shibusawa Eiichi Memorial Foundation

    University of Toronto Press

    School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Japan Foundation

    Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Japanese Association of Commerce & Industry

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 28th The Pale King and the “Cowboys of Information”

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 28, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In 1997-98, David Foster Wallace took three accounting classes at Illinois State University as part of the research for what became The Pale King, his posthumously published, unfinished novel about IRS accountants. His notes for these classes include, in block capitals, the statement “ACCOUNTANTS ARE COWBOYS OF INFORMATION.” This talk draws on archival research at the Harry Ransom Center (at the University of Texas at Austin), arguing that The Pale King is not only a book about “cowboys of information” at the Peoria IRS Regional Center; it is also a book that required its author and its editor—as well as its readers—to act as cowboys of information, corralling a large and increasingly unwieldy body of data into something meaningful.

    Philip Sayers is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto, and a Junior Fellow at Massey College. He holds a BA in English from Cambridge and an MA in Comparative Literature from University College London, and specializes in twentieth century and contemporary Anglophone prose, psychoanalysis, and continental philosophy.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Philip Sayers
    PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto; Junior Fellow at Massey College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 29th Promoting the Relationship between the G20 and the United Nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 29, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Shuyong Guo is dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Shanghai International Studies University, where he is also director of the Centre for G20 Studies. He is the deputy general secretary of the Society of Studies on International Politics in Universities in China, Vice President of Association of the Study of Basic Theories of Behavioural Law in China, Vice President of Shanghai Association of International Strategic Studies, foreign affairs consultant for the Shanghai municipal government, and an editorial board member of International Organization Research Journal.

    Jiyong Jin is an associate professor of political science and the deputy dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Shanghai International Studies University. His research focuses on Sino-American relations, global health governance, health diplomacy and America’s global health strategy. He was awarded a Fox International Fellowship by Yale University and studied at Yale from 2008 to 2009. He completed his postdoctoral program at University of Oxford and Princeton University respectively as Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow from 2011 to 2013.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Shuyong Guo
    School for International Relations and Public Affairs, Shanghai International Studies University

    Jiyong Jin
    School for International Relations and Public Affairs, Shanghai International Studies University


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 29th 2017 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 29, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was founded in 1989 by Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber. The prize is a literary award for the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs that seeks to deepen public debate on significant international issues. Presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Foreign Policy magazine, the winning author receives $15,000.

    A Rage for Order: The Middle East in Turmoil, From Tahrir Square to ISIS

    A Rage for Order tracks the tormented legacy of what was once called the Arab Spring. Combining dramatic storytelling with an original analysis of the Arab world today, Worth captures the psychic and actual civil wars raging throughout the Middle East and explains how the dream of an Arab renaissance gave way to a new age of discord.

    Robert F. Worth spent 14 years as a foreign correspondent for The New York Times and was the paper’s Beirut bureau chief from 2007 until 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine and The New York Review of Books. He has twice been a finalist for a National Magazine Award. Born and raised in Manhattan, he now lives in Washington, D.C.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 30th I and I Survive: Film Blackness and Contemporary Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will consider some of the major arguments and themes of Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Film with attention to issues of visual historiography, death, resistance, and film form. By mapping out ways of addressing the idea of black film through the lens of black visual and expressive culture, the talk will focus on Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits (2015), Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight (2016), the work of Kevin Jerome Everson, and other recent and consequential enactments of film blackness.

    Michaeal Boyce Gillespie’s work focuses on black visual and expressive culture, film theory, genre, visual historiography, global cinema, adaptation theory, popular music studies, and contemporary art. His recently released book, Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film (Duke University Press, 2016) frames black film alongside literature, music, art, photography, and new media, treating it as an interdisciplinary form that enacts black visual and expressive culture. The book shifts the ways scholars think about black film, treating it not as a category, genre, or strictly a representation of the black experience, but as a visual negotiation between film as art and the discursivity of race. Gillespie has published numerous essays and book chapters including “Grace and Grind: Notes on the Work of Kevin Jerome Everson” in How to Remain Human (Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, 2015), and “Reckless Eyeballing: Coonskin, Film Blackness, and the Racial Grotesque,” in Contemporary Black American Cinema: Race, Gender and Sexuality at the Movies, edited by Mia Mask (Routledge, 2012). His most recent research project is entitled Music of My Mind: Blackness and Sonic Visuality. Gillespie is currently associate professor of film at The City College of New York, holding a joint appointment in the Department of Media and Communication Arts and the Black Studies Program. He holds a masters and doctoral degrees from New York University’s Department of Cinema Studies.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Michael Boyce Gillespie
    Associate Professor of Film, Department of Media and Communication Arts, and the Black Studies Program, The City College of New York


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 30th The Looming Illiberal World Order, Israel and World Jewry

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Professor Yossi Shain is the Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University where he also serves as Head of TAU’s School of Political Science, Government and International Affairs, head of the Abba Eban Graduate Studies Program in Diplomacy and Director of the Frances Brody Institute for Applied Diplomacy. He is also a Full Professor of Comparative Government and Diaspora Politics at Georgetown University, and the Founding Director of the Program for Jewish Civilization (PJC) at Georgetown. In 2007, he served (pro-bono) as President of Western Galilee College. Shain earned his B.A. (Philosophy-1981 cum laude) and M.A. (Political Science-1983) degrees from Tel Aviv University and received his Ph.D. in Political Science (with distinction) from Yale University in 1988. Shain is the author and editor of 8 books which won wide acclaim, and published numerous articles in academic journals. He also writes newspaper columns including a regular Op-Eds to Yediot Achronot, Israel’s leading daily, and serves as commentator on Israeli and international media. In 2016 Shain was appointed as a member of Israel’s Council for Higher Educational, and he is now heading Israel’s National committee on rejuvenating the liberal arts and the humanities.

    Chemi Shalev is a senior columnist and U.S. analyst for the widely respected Haaretz news organization. He has recently returned to Israel after five years in New York, where he served as U.S. editor and correspondent, writing about U.S. politics, U.S.-Israeli relations and the American Jewish community. He will continue to cover these issues and to report and comment on Israeli politics and the Israeli-Palestinian peace process from his home near Tel Aviv. Mr. Shalev writes and lectures in both Hebrew and English. He is published in Haaretz’s print editions as well as on its website in Hebrew, Haaretz.co.il, and English, Haaretz.com. He has been covering Arab-Israeli conflict, US-Israeli relations, Israel’s internal politics and American Jewry for over thirty years. Previously he served as diplomatic correspondent and commentator for several major Israeli dailies, including Maariv, Davar, Yisrael Hayom and Jerusalem Post. Mr Shalev’s columns on American and Israeli affairs are frequently cited in major newspapers throughout the world. He has been a guest-commentator on CNN, BBC, Sky, CBS and other television networks during times of Middle East crisis and has served as CNN’s resident analyst during several Israeli election campaigns. For many years, Shalev was the Jerusalem correspondent for the New York-based Jewish weekly The Forward and has also served as associate editor of the Australian Jewish News. He is married, has three daughters and lives in Givatayim, Israel.


    Speakers

    YOSSI SHAIN
    Romulo Betancourt Professor of Political Science at Tel Aviv University

    CHEMI SHALEV
    Haaretz news organization


    Sponsors

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Political Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 30th Godin (2013; dir. Simon Beaulieu)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 30, 20177:30PM - 10:30PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Description

    In collaboration with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty

    All film screenings / talks take place at
    Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road


    Speakers

    Sean Mills
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st Decoding the Digital Debate

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20179:00AM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor St. West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For further event information, please visit http://www.digitaldebate.ca/

    The digital realm is wired into our everyday lives. While the internet has offered information liberation, economic opportunity and increased global connection, our reliance on it exposes us to threats from state and non-state adversaries. Opinions on these threats are widely debated: some believe a Cyber Pearl Harbour is imminent, others argue there is current cyber threat inflation. On the civilian side, there exists a tug-of-war between the right to privacy and domestic surveillance.
    The Digital Debate is a highly contested arena, untangling the conflicting theoretical and practical debates requires thoughtful input from all sectors across each discipline.
    As states work to navigate various legal and normative frameworks in cyberspace, comprehension on the various challenges is necessary. This one-day event will bring together actors from academia, think tanks, government, private sector and civil society to engage on topics from cyber war and state censorship of information to international law.

    TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
    9:00am – 9:25am Breakfast
    9:30am – 11:00am PANEL 1
    11:05am – 11:15am Break
    11:20am – 12:50am PANEL 2
    12:55am – 1:40pm Lunch
    1:45pm – 3:15pm PANEL 3
    3:20pm – 3:30pm Break
    3:35pm – 5:05pm PANEL 4
    5:10pm – 5:20pm Concluding Remarks
    5:30pm – End of Event

    PANEL 1: UNTANGLING THE NARRATIVE
    The digital debate is a crowded space with contributors from each sector and discipline shaping emerging narratives. In evaluating the potential for cyber war, opinions vary greatly between imminent threat and unlikely skepticism. Media coverage can, at times, be sensationalist. The high technicality of cyberspace and computer networks leaves little room for general public expertise. Yet, productive policymaking regarding all areas – from education and business to security – requires cooperation. This panel will comb through the myriad of voices contributing to the field and attempt to identify points of intersection, which may be capitalized for greater collaboration.

    PANEL 2: UNDERSTANDING TECHNICAL CAPABILITIES IN CYBERSPACE
    Computer networks and infrastructure are vulnerable to attacks and intrusions by people and organizations across entirely different jurisdictions. Some claim that attributing these cyber attacks are difficult due to the technical nature of cyberspace, others argue that a lack of political will is the true obstacle. The military and intelligence communities are constantly concerned that adversaries can penetrate nuclear command, control, and communication systems, and policy-makers worry that hackers can shut down entire city grids. Many argue that cyber offense dominates cyber defense due to the numerous vulnerabilities in computer networks and critical infrastructure. This panel will attempt to address these technical complexities and seek to find ways in which computer networks and infrastructure can be more resilient to attacks and intrusions.

    PANEL 3: SURVEILLANCE, CENSORSHIP & HUMAN RIGHTS ONLINE
    There are significant challenges facing the balance between government surveillance and use of data analytics and a citizen’s privacy and civil liberties. Digital whistleblowers have provided a platform for increased public knowledge on government intelligence operations. At the same time, not all governments use the Internet or information technology for good. Non-state actors, like ISIL, continue to use online networks for recuritment and information campaigns. This panel will hear from a variety of voices on the balance between national security and civil liberties.

    PANEL 4: A FRAMEWORK FOR INTERSTATE RELATIONS
    Concerns over how states interact with and exploit each other’s software and cyber infrastructure have been around since at least the 1960s. From deterrence to cooperation, disagreements in international relations theory and practice about cyber security grow stronger, as progress in understanding the best path forward becomes weaker. On the legal side, understanding how domestic laws apply to cyber security is a difficult task for any state internally, understanding how a state’s cyber actions are governed by international law is even more challenging. This panel will explore the current theoretical and practical gaps in the cyber debate within international relations and evaluate the international legal frameworks applicable to cyberspace.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st A Remittance Forest in Java; Turning Migrant Labour into Agrarian Capital

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMAP 246, 19 Russell St.
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    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    lunch will be served in the Faculty Lounge at 12:00pm; talk begins at 12:30pm

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nancy Peluso
    UC Berkeley



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st The Place of the Baltic in the French Atlantic Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This talk explores ways in which the Baltic region enabled the rise and consolidation of the French colonial empire in the Americas. The Baltic, a supplier of masts, tar, hemp, iron, planks, and other naval stores, has long been viewed as central to early modern European expansion overseas. Nevertheless, its particular association with French empire building remains little studied. Drawing on data from the Danish Sound Toll Registers and French consular records, the talk delineates how French colonization began as an attempt to secure commercial independence from the Baltic, only to produce the opposite effect of binding the French colonial enterprise and the Baltic ever closer together.

    Pernille Røge is Assistant Professor of French and French Colonial History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarly interests focus on interconnections between eighteenth-century political economic theory and colonial policy and practice. Her publications on the French, British, and Danish colonial empires have appeared in edited volumes and peer reviewed journals, including Dix-huitième Siècle, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, and History of European Ideas. She is co-editor of a collection of essays entitled The Political Economy of Empire in the Early Modern World (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Her book manuscript Reinventing the Empire: Political Economy, France, and the African and Caribbean Colonies, c. 1750-1800 is currently under review with Cambridge University Press.


    Speakers

    Pernille Røge
    University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 31st Isaac Julien: Artist's Talk

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 31, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    Innis College
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Ave.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    This lecture was rescheduled from Jan. 23rd to March 31, 4-6 pm. Registration is not required for this event. Seating is on a first-come, first-seated basis.

    Isaac Julien is a Turner prize nominated artist and filmmaker. Earlier works include Young Soul Rebels (1991), which was awarded the Semaine de la Critique Prize at the Cannes Film Festival, the acclaimed poetic documentary Looking for Langston (1989), and Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask (1996). Julien has pioneered a form of multi-screen installations with works such as Western Union: Small Boats (2007), Ten Thousand Waves (2010), andPlaytime: Kapital (2014).

    Julien was a participant in the 56th Biennale di Venezia, curated by Okwui Enwezor (2015). He has exhibited his work in major museums and institutions across the world including the nine screen of Ten Thousand Waves at Museum of Modern Art, New York, at Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and more recently Playtime and Kapital at El Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo in Mexico City. Julien’s work is included in the collections of institutions around the globe. In 2013, a monographic survey of his career to date, Riot, was published by MoMA, NY.

    Julien is currently producing a new work that is a poetic meditation on aspects of the life and architecture of Lina Bo Bardi, entitled 7 Songs for Lina Bo Bardi. The first chapter of this work, Stones Against Diamonds was shown during 2015’s La Biennale di Venezia, Art Basel, and Art Basel Miami Beach. Julien was Chair of Global Art at University of Arts London (2014-2016), and is the recent recipient of the 83rd James Robert Brudner Memorial Prize and Lecture at Yale University (2016).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Isaac Julien
    artist and filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    Women and Gender Studies Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Department of Art

    Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Master of Visual Studies, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Saturday, April 1st Fifty Years ‘Beyond Vietnam’: Dr. King’s Revolutionary Dream Against Our Neoliberal/Neofascist Nightmare

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 1, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMBloor St. United Church
    300 Bloor St. West
    Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca. Registration is not required for this event, but seating is limited.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelly
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Lee Maracle
    Author, Instructor, and Traditional teacher

    Faith Nolan
    Social Justice Activist and Musician


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Women and Gender Studies

    African Studies

    Department of Geography and Planning

    Caribbean Studies

    Hart House

    Academic Initiatives Fund, New College

    Diaspora and Transnational Studies

    Equity Studies

    Department of History

    MVS Proseminar

    Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto

    A Different Booklist


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 3rd Robin D.G. Kelley & Fred Moten: In Conversation

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 3, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMGreat Hall
    Hart House
    University of Toronto
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In Conversation is a TICKETED EVENT. Tickets are free but required and available at:
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/robin-dg-kelley-fred-moten-in-conversation-tickets-32116721980

    For more information contact: wg.si@utoronto.ca.

    All talks are wheelchair accessible with ASL provided.

    SPONSORS: A Different Booklist; Caribbean Studies; Academic Initiatives Fund, New College; Women and Gender Studies; African Studies; Geography and Planning; Centre for the Study of the United States, at the Munk School of Global Affairs; Diaspora and Transnational Studies; Equity Studies; Hart House; History; MVS Proseminar; and the Faculty of Arts & Science at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Robin D.G. Kelley
    Speaker
    Professor Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History, UCLA

    Fred Moten
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of English, UC Riverside; Northrop Frye Visiting Scholar, University of Toronto

    Rinaldo Walcott
    Moderator
    Director, Women & Gender Studies Institute

    Afua Cooper
    Moderator
    James Robinson Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies, Dalhousie University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 4th The Making of a President and the Unmaking of Political Parties: France 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 4, 20174:30PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Arthur Goldhammer
    Senior Fellow, Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 6th Performing Revolution: Violence and Dissent in China's Red Guard Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 6, 20171:00PM - 3:00PMFirst Floor Conference Room, Jackman Humanities Building, 262 Bloor St W
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    From 1966 to 1968, students and workers in urban China were embroiled in deadly factional battles in what many of them believed to be a revolution of a lifetime – the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. In the middle of factional violence, they also expressed radical ideas of political dissent. Based on the recently published book The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), this talk argues that both violence and dissent were the results of the dramatic enactment of a revolutionary culture. The mechanism of this enactment was revolutionary competition. This conclusion has direct implications for understanding the role of political culture in collective violence in today’s world.

    Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor of Communication and Sociology at the Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include The Red Guard Generation and Political Activism in China (2016), The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (2009), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 vols. 2003). He is the editor of Media Activism in the Digital Age (with Victor Pickard, forthcoming), China’s Contested Internet (2015), The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China (with Jacques deLisle and Avery Goldstein, 2016), and Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Guobin Yang
    Speaker
    Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th The representation of 'Zainichi-Chosenjin'(Korean residents in Japan) in South Korea in the 1970s: Mass-media and representation of home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMMain Activity Hall, 2nd Floor
    Multi-faith Centre
    569 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    In this speech I would like to tell you how the ‘home-visiting project’ in 1975 has represented in the mass media in South Korea, and that this particular method of representation has been targeted. I want to talk about the representation of the Zainichi- Chosenjin(在日朝鮮人) in the 1970s reflect today’s South Korea rather than the realistic reconstruction of the surrounding home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan. The Zainichi-Chosenjin refer to ancestry of chosen(Korea) peninsula and their descendants who defected to Japan from colonial rule, regardless of nationality, belong to the Japanese colonial rule. In the 1970s, however, Zainichi-Chosenjin was understood as the image of ‘Pro-North Korea’ and ‘Converted chongnyeon (在日朝鮮人總聯合會)’ in South Korea. In 1975, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan began in the South Korean government’s intention to gain dominance over the North Korean regime. At the same time, it was an active national anti-communistic tourism project, which is distinguished from the “North Korea Repatriation Project”(歸國事業) in 1959.

    On the surface, the home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan appeared to be based on humanitarianism. By December 29, 1975, the number of visitors to South Korea was about 1,600. If the North Korea Repatriation Project was exodus for the settlement of paradise of socialism, home-visiting project of Korean residents in Japan was the anti-communistic tourism for the purpose of denying the dark past as pro-North Korea by showing the rapid development of South Korea. In the 1970s, the mass media in South Korea represented Zainichi-Chosenjin as the converted to South Korea(“Total System converted collectively, 總轉向體制). However, the anti-communistic project planned by Yushin government, the National Intelligence Service, were not intended for Zainichi-Chosenjin. In Conclusion, the issue of dispersed family between North and South Korea, legal status concerning Zainichi-Chosenjin was not discussed. Instead converting of Zainichi-Chosenjin to South Korea was represented as victory of South Korea in competition of Cold War.

    Kim Won is an associate professor of political science at the Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies. Now he reserches at Hiroshima University in Japan for investigating memories of Zainichichosejin in era of cold war. Recently he presented “Stow away, border and nationality : Atomic notebook tial by Sohn Jin-doo victim of Korean atomic bomb”(2016). His interests include reemberinig of East Asia, labor history, and oral history. He is the author of several books including Factory Girl: Antihistory of Her (2006), Ghost of Park-Jung Hee Era(2011), Uprising June in 1987 (2009), The Disappearing Place of Politics (2008), Memories about the 1980s: Subculture and Mass Politics of Korean Students in the 1980s (1999).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Won
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Graduate School of Korean Studies, Academy of Korean Studies

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Bookish Transactions in the Countryside: Missionary Print in nineteenth-century rural India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMEast Common Room, Hart House, 7 Hart House Circle
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    Description

    Coinciding with the rise of Protestant missionary activity, the spread of print technology in nineteenth-century South Asia introduced the cheap, mass-produced book in Indian languages and led to a boom in religious print. Despite the considerable body of work on Christian missionaries’ pioneering role in vernacular printing and their use of print for proselytizing, little attention has been paid to the impact of Christian tracts in the low-literacy environment of rural India. This talk examines how missionaries used the printed tract as both an object of transaction and a tool of conversion in their encounters with prospective converts in the Indian countryside. It also explores the understudied role of Indian colporteurs and catechists in disseminating Christian tracts. In tracing the shifting status of the tract as gift and saleable object, I outline the challenges of the missionary print enterprise, while drawing attention to the material dimensions of the book.

    Ulrike Stark is Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on Hindi literature, South Asian book history and print culture, and North Indian intellectual history. She is the author of An Empire of Books: The Naval Kishore Press and the Diffusion of the Printed Word in Colonial India (2007) and is currently completing a biography of Raja Sivaprasad ‘Sitara-e Hind.’

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ulrike Stark
    Speaker
    Professor, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Co-Sponsors

    the Centre for Comparative Literature

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 7th Transcendence in a Secular World: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 7, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMInnis Town Hall
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    Description

    The crisis of global modernity has been produced by human overreach that was founded upon a paradigm of national modernization. Today, three global changes: the rise of non-western powers, the crisis of environmental sustainability and the loss of authoritative sources of transcendence – the ideals, principles and ethics once found in religions — define our condition. The physical salvation of the world is becoming the transcendent goal of our times, transcending national sovereignty. The foundations of sovereignty can no longer be sought in tunnelled histories of nations; we are recognizing that histories have always been circulatory and the planet is a collective responsibility.

    I re-consider the values and resources in Asian traditions—particularly of China and India– that Max Weber found wanting in their capacity to achieve modernity. Several traditions in Asia, particularly in local communities offer different ways of understanding the relationship between the personal, ecological and universal. The idea of transcendence in these communities is more dialogical than radical or dualistic: separating God or the human subject from nature. Transnational civil society, NGOS, quasi-governmental and inter-governmental agencies committed to to the inviolability or sacrality of the ‘commons’ will need to find common cause with these communities struggling to survive.

    Prasenjit Duara is the Oscar Tang Chair of East Asian Studies at Duke University. Born and educated in India, he received his PhD in Chinese history from Harvard University. He was Professor of History and East Asian Studies at University of Chicago (1991-2008) and Raffles Professor and Director of Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (2008-2015).

    His books include Culture, Power and the State: Rural North China, 1900-1942 (Stanford Univ Press) winner of Fairbank Prize of the AHA and Levenson Prize of the AAS, USA, Rescuing History from the Nation (U Chicago 1995), Sovereignty and Authenticity: Manchukuo and the East Asian Modern (Rowman 2003) and The Crisis of Global Modernity: Asian Traditions and a Sustainable Future (Cambridge 2014; discussion of the book can be found in http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/world/asia/china-religion-prasenjit-duara.html?ref=world

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, April 8th The 2017 Toronto Conference on Germany: Populism, Immigration, and Elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 8, 20179:00AM - 4:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    An annual event, this conference examines the state of the union in Germany—Europe’s most consequential country—as well as the relationship between Germany and Canada.

    The conference features expert panels that this year will examine the 2017 German federal elections, immigration in Germany and Canada, and populism in Europe and North America.

    Chair: Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    09:00 – 09:15
    Welcome – Stephen J. Toope, Munk School of Global Affairs; Eugen Wollfarth, Minister of the Embassy of Germany, Ottawa; Michael Meier, Friedrich Ebert Foundation

    09:15 – 10:00 Keynote Speech and Q&A
    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag

    10:00 – 11:30 Panel and Q&A: The 2017 German Federal Elections

    Dagmar Freitag, Member of the German Bundestag
    Prof. Eric Langenbacher, Georgetown University
    Dr. Michael Petrou, Montreal Institute for Genocide & Human Rights Studies
    Moderator: Veit Medick, Der Spiegel, Washington office

    11:30 – 11:45 Coffee break

    11:45 – 13:15 Panel and Q&A: Immigration in Canada and Germany

    Nele Allenberg, Head of the Welcome Center for Immigrants Berlin
    Prof. Jeffrey Reitz, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Moderator: Marina Jimenez, Toronto Star

    13:15 – 14:00 Lunch

    14:00 – 15:30 Panel and Q&A: Populism in Europe and North America

    Bob Rae, former Premier of Ontario and Interim Leader, Liberal Party
    Prof. Dr. Frank Decker, University of Bonn
    Moderator: Joanna Slater, The Globe and Mail

    15:30 – 15:45 Closing remarks – Randall Hansen, University of Toronto

    This event is co-sponsored by the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung; the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; the Munk School for Global Affairs; the Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada; and the German Academic Exchange Service

    Use #germanTO on Twitter to follow this event

    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung @FES_DC

    Munk School @CERESMunk @munkschool

    German Embassy @GermanyInCanada

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Washington Office

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 12th Seeing as Touch: Gao Jianfu's Revolutionary Design in Modern Canton

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the early years of the Republic the revolutionary Cantonese brush-and-ink painter Gao Jianfu (1879-1951) presented Sun Yatsen, father of the Republic, with an essay in which he argued that porcelain manufacture would save the new nation. Important among Gao’s own porcelain designs was a dish painted with mantises devouring pupa, encircled by a rim ornamented with patterns of stylized fishes, flowers, and birds on a ground much like Japanese shibori tie-dyed textiles. The striking contrast of the decorative rim with the specimen-like insect depiction at the dish’s centre raises questions. How did the rim’s artificial lines mediate the naturalism of the insects to embody Gao’s radical conception of modern design – a design that was more than formal, but social and political as well? And what did it mean for the nation to see and touch insects on their patriotic porcelains? How, in short, was the dish designed and designing?

    Lisa Claypool publishes widely on late imperial and Republican-era visual culture and design in China, and has curated and published a series of essays and interviews about contemporary art. She is currently at work on two projects: a book about the mediation of science through the ink brush in early 20th century China, and; an article about curatorial practices of contemporary artists in China.

    本人在阿尔伯塔大学主要教授中国艺术方面的课程,并负责大学美术馆的中国古代绘画和艺术藏品的管理和展览. 主要研究方向包括十八世纪之后的中国艺术和现当代视觉文化。目前已有多篇关于博物馆、近现代艺术、展览学以及审美学的文章在重要学术刊物和会议出版物中发表。

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Lisa Claypool
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Depertment of the History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Alberta; Ailsa Mellon Bruce Senior Fellow, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery 2016-17

    Jennifer Purtle
    Chair
    Interim Dr. David Chu Director in Asia-Pacific Studies; Associate Professor, Graduate Department of Art


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 13th Provisional Authority: Police, Order, and Security in India Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 13, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.

    Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.

    Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.
    Beatrice Jauregui is assistant professor at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Global Policing and Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency, the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

    Frank Cody
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; and Department Of Anthropology, UTM

    Andrea Muehlebach
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, UTM

    Kevin O’Neill
    Discussant
    Professor, Department for the Study of Religion

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 19th The Holodomor - Genocide Against the Ukrianian Nation in the Context of World Genocides

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 19, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Myroslava Antonovych is the Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”, Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2010-2014 she was a Judge ad Hoc at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She graduated from the Faculty of Law, Lviv National University (1995) and from the English Department, Dnipropetrovsk National University in Ukraine (1981) with honors. She has LL.M. degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada (1999). Her Doctor of Law degree is from the Ukrainian Free University in Munich, Germany (2008) and Candidate of Philology degree is from Kyiv Linguistic University in Ukraine (1988). As a Fulbright scholar she conducted research on International Human Rights at the Urban and Morgan Institute for Human Rights, University of Cincinnati, Ohio, USA (1996). She is the author of about 100 books and articles in Ukraine and abroad. Her research focuses on International Human Rights and Genocide Studies. In April-May 2017, Dr. Antonovych will be the visiting professor at the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Myroslava Antonovych
    The Director of the Centre for International Human Rights and Associate Professor of the Faculty of Law, University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy"


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 28th Ukraine Today Between War and Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 28, 20173:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Bios of the panelists:

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    As the 3rd president of Georgia, Mikheil Saakashvili was applauded in the West for his reforms, which transformed the country from an almost failed state to a model in the fight against corruption. But he was defeated in parliamentary elections in 2012. Now he’s back – not in his native Georgia but as Ukrainian politician. In 2015 he was appointed by President Petro Poroshenko as his top foreign policy adviser and head of Ukraine’s Advisory International Council on Reforms. Then a Governor of Odessa Region. But when all of his attempts to transform the system in at least one region failed, Mikheil created an opposition party “Movement of New Forces” which has now officially been registered in Ukraine.

    Yuriy Butusov
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website, Yuriy Butusov has worked for the newspapers Kijevskije Vedomosti and Zerkalo nedeli (Weekly Mirror). In 2004 Butusov started the website Censor.net and is its editor. This online project is one of the most popular news portals in Ukraine. He wrote the screenplay for the film Orange Sky and produced the film Illusion of Fear. Yuriy Butusov is a journalist who reports on incisive social topics and conducts journalistic research. He has exposed many corruption cases and other crimes committed by the power elite. Censor.net, which was created by Butusov is among the most popular Ukrainian news portal. The main topic covered by Butusov currently is the situation in Ukraine – Russia’s aggression and the military activities in Donbas.

    Lyuba Shipovich
    In January 2016 Lyuba Shipovich, President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine, was named one of top 50 developers of New York City.
    She has developed a software called “OKO”: a media monitoring project, which automatically gathers all mentions on Ukraine in foreign media, grades by social rating (likes, shares, comments), and manually (by team of editors) prepares daily and weekly reports for the UN representatives, diplomats, politicians, media etc. In her effort to help reform Ukraine, she led the implementation of electronic record keeping and e-service systems in Odesa region of Ukraine. Brought the region to the 1st place in the investment efficiency rating, implementation of the Google program “Digital transformation of Odesa”.


    Speakers

    Mikheil Saakashvili
    Speaker
    Former President of Georgia, current leader of the opposition party "Movement of New Forces" in Ukraine

    Yuriy Butusov
    Speaker
    Ukrainian journalist, military expert and editor-in-chief of the Censor.net website

    Lyuba Shipovich
    Speaker
    President and Co-Founder of Razom for Ukraine

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; Petro Jacyk Program's co-director

    Victor Ostapchuk
    Co-Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Near and Middle Easthern Civilizations, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canada-Ukraine International Assistance Fund


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2017

  • Thursday, May 4th Social Determinants of Health and Human Rights

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 4, 20178:00AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Comparative Program on Health and Society as we commemorate seventeen years of the Program and celebrate its achievements in advancing research on the social determinants of health. Presentations by distinguished alumni will include discussions of their current research, with topics ranging from the health impacts of fracking in British Columbia to the Trade in Human Liver Lobes.

    Schedule:

    8:00 – 9:00: Breakfast

    9:00 – 10:30: Introductory Panel – The History of CPHS
    Dr. Peter Warrian, Dr. Margaret Hovanec, Prof. Lisa Forman

    10:30 – 11:00: Tea Break

    11:00 – 12:30: Panel 1 – Socio-economic Status and Health Outcomes
    Prof. Weizhen Dong, Prof. Regine King, Dr. Laurie Corna, Prof. Andrea Daley

    12:30 – 13:30: Lunch

    13:30 – 15:00: Panel 2 – Socio-Economic Status and Access to Healthcare Services
    Prof. Christopher Buse, Mr. Rusty Souleymanov, Prof. Sara Allin, Dr. Arif Jetha

    15:00 – 15:30: Tea Break

    15:30 – 17:00: Panel 3 – Human Rights, Globalization, and Ethics
    Prof. Diego Silva, Prof. Suzanne Hindmarch, Prof. Monir Moniruzzaman, Dr. Maxwell Smith

    17.00-17.10 Closing remarks – Professor Forman

    ***Reception to follow***

    Contact

    Pragya Kaul
    (416) 946-0104


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 12th A Celebration of Emanuel Adler’s Scholarship and Career

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 12, 20179:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    On the occasion of Professor Emanuel Adler’s 70th birthday and 35th anniversary of graduating Berkeley, his colleagues and former PhD students gather to recognize their intellectual and personal debts and to celebrate Adler’s many scholarly achievements in the time-honored academic fashion of a Fest conference hosted at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    The different papers presented at the conference will engage intellectually and critically Adler’s extensive contributions in the theory of international relations, especially but not limited to issues such as progress, communities, practices, constructivism, the Middle East, complexity theory, and the European order. Special attention will be given to Adler’s ongoing book project: A Social Theory of Cognitive Evolution: Change, Stability, and International Social Orders, which brings to fruition the different strands that interested him throughout his incredibly fruitful career.

    Emanuel Adler is the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the European Academy of Sciences, an Honorary Professor at the University of Copenhagen, and former editor of International Organization. Previously, he was Professor of International Relations at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently based out of the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs.

    His publications include books such as The Power of Ideology; Security Communities (with Michael Barnett); Communitarian International Relations; Convergence of Civilizations (with Federica Bicchi Beverly Crawford, and Raffaella Del Sarto); International Practices (with Vincent Pouliot); and Israel in the World. He has also published articles such as “Seizing the Middle Ground: Constructivism in World Politics” and “The Emergence of Cooperation: National Epistemic Communities and the International Evolution of the Idea of Nuclear Arms Control.”

    Professor Adler’s interests include international practices and communities of practice, the evolution of international order, a constructivist reconsideration of strategic logic, including deterrence, European security institutions, international relations theory — in particular, constructivism, epistemic communities, security communities, and communities of practice — and Israel’s relations with the world.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Department of Political Science, Mr. Charles Bronfman and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies University of Toronto

    9:00 Welcome
    Lou Pauly, Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science
    Stephen J. Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Karen Weisman, Professor and Acting Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    9:30 Becoming Emanuel Adler: Ideas, communities and practices
    Piki Ish-Shalom, the A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Markus Kornprobst, Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies
    Vincent Pouliot, Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    10:15 Coffee break

    10:30 Pragmatism and meaning making: Evolutionary imperatives
    Michael Barnett, University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University
    Janice Stein, Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    11:15 Corridors and conduits of power: Cognitive evolution, world views and polymorphic globalism
    Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    12:00 Lunch break

    13:00 Seizing the middle ground in new terrain
    Christian Reus-Smit, Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    13:45 In consideration of evolving matters
    Alena Drieschova, Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    14:30 Coffee break

    15:00 Adler and complexity theory for IR
    Peter M. Haas, Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    15:45 Cognitive evolution, time and multiple modernities
    Stefano Guzzini, Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    16:30 Closing remarks
    Emanuel Adler, Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    *** Reception to Follow ***


    Speakers

    Peter J. Katzenstein
    Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

    Christian Reus-Smit
    Professor of International Relations, University of Queensland

    Alena Drieschova
    Lecturer in International Relations, Cardiff University

    Peter M. Haas
    Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Stefano Guzzini
    Senior Research, Danish Institute for International Studies

    Emanuel Adler
    Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    Stephen J. Toope
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Piki Ish-Shalom
    A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Family Chair in International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Markus Kornprobst
    Professor of International Relations, Vienna School of International Studies

    Vincent Pouliot
    Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar, McGill University

    Michael Barnett
    University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, George Washington University

    Janice Stein
    Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs and Department of Political Science

    Lou Pauly
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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