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September 2017

  • Thursday, September 7th Gender, Migration and the Work of Care: Student presentations

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 7, 20171:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event showcases the work of student Interns and Research Assistants connected to the Partnership Project entitled Gender, Migration and the Work of Care, Principal Investigator Ito Peng. A presentation and discussion of policy options and recommendations for:
    – Home Care Models and Worker Registries
    – The Role of Immigration and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program
    – Better Immigrant Access to Care

    Video screening and discussion: Help Them Care, Make it Fair: New Organizing Strategies
    Presenters: Chelsey Legge, Lina Pulido, Alexandra Pileggi, Katerina Kalenteridis (SPPG Interns)
    Joshua Rodriguez, Sarah lima, Melissa Nicholls, Bastian Leones (RAs)

    From the SSHRC funded Partnership Project

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Deanna Pikkov
    Research Associate at the Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 8th THE LAND BENEATH OUR FEET (doc., 2016)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 8, 20175:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The Land Beneath Our Feet (2016) follows a young Liberian man, uprooted by war, who returns from the USA with never-before-seen footage of Liberia’s past. The uncovered footage is embraced as a national treasure. Depicting a 1926 corporate land grab, it is also an explosive reminder of eroding land rights. In post-conflict Liberia, individuals and communities are pitted against multinational corporations, the government, and each other in life-threatening disputes over land. What can this ghostly footage offer a nation, as it debates radical land reforms that could empower communities to shape a more diverse, stable and sustainable future?

    Gregg Mitman is the Director, Producer, and Writer of The Land Beneath Our Feet. He is an award-winning author, filmmaker, and teacher, who has spent the past decade uncovering the story behind the 1926 Harvard expedition to Liberia. He holds a distinguished research chair at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and is founder and director of Madison’s popular environmental film festival, Tales from Planet Earth. Mitman recently directed and produced In the Shadow of Ebola (2015, 23 min.), an intimate story of a family and nation torn apart by the Ebola outbreak in Liberia, which aired online on PBS/Independent Lens.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Gregg Mitman
    Speaker
    Director, Producer, and Writer of The Land Beneath Our Feet

    Michelle Murphy
    Moderator
    Professor of History and Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute, Innis College

    African Studies, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 12th A Journey for Love and Pride

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 12, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In a world before smart phones and social media, before there was human rights protection for lesbians and gays, before same sex marriage, Alan Li, a gay Asian teenager moved from Hong Kong to Canada in search for love and belonging. Amidst a world full of homophobia, racism and xenophobia, his pursuit took him onto pathways with many unexpected twists and turns, in his native and adopted countries; overcoming many challenges, and building many rewarding connections and relationships. The journey led to many inspiring experiences, including: practicing medicine in the oldest and poorest public housing neighborhood, leading Toronto gay pride parade through Chinatown, providing palliative care to his best friend who died of AIDS, becoming the first openly gay person to lead a national Chinese Canadian organization, mobilizing diverse racialized groups to fight against homophobic media, finding romance and sustaining long distance relationship before internet, fighting legislated racism with redress campaign for Chinese head tax and Exclusion Act, building the largest HIV/AIDS service organization serving Asian Canadians, founding the first public gay organization in Hong Kong and building a transformative network advocating for access and rights of immigrants and refugees living with HIV/AIDS.
    Through his sharing with images and narratives of historic events and pivotal moments both personal and societal, Alan will reflect on his life journey and the complex pathways and connections that supported his nearly four decades of experiences in building chosen families and communities in the quest for love and pride.

    Dr. Alan Li immigrated from Hong Kong at age 16. Since the 1980s, through his work as physician at Regent Park Community Health Centre and his many community connections, Alan has integrated his personal, professional and community work with many diverse marginalized communities and taken on roles as physician, community organizer, capacity builder, researcher and advocate to advance access and rights many issues related to immigrants and refugees, racial and sexual minorities, HIV/AIDS, and mental health. He has co-founded and played key leadership roles in many pioneering social justice and community service organizations, including as chair of Gay Asians Toronto, as National President of the Chinese Canadian National Council, the Hong Kong10% Club, Asian Community AIDS Services, and the Committee for Accessible AIDS Treatment.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Emily Hertzman
    Chair
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Dr. Alan Li
    Speaker


    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 14th On the Muslim Question: Assimilation and Sacrificial Citizenship

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 14, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture considers the preponderance of cultural and political concern with the assimilation of Muslim minorities primarily in the US, but also in Europe. Such an emphasis on producing “good Muslims” comes from both the right and the left, and in the discussions on assimilation there is little talk of the forms of being that have to be given up, renounced, or sacrificed for the sake of assimilation. The putative promise of assimilation is that the state would extend its protections to the assimilated subject, protecting assimilated Muslims from exposure to violence. And yet the sacrifice demanded of minority subjects happens in a political and economic climate of neoliberal rationality. How might sacrifice as a historical and social problematic help us to analyze the renewed emphasis on Muslim assimilation?

    Zahid Chaudhary, Associate Professor of English, Princeton University. Chaudhary specializes in postcolonial studies, visual culture and critical theory, and is the author of Afterimage of Empire: Photography in Nineteenth-Century India.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Zahid Chaudhary
    Associate Professor, Department of English, Princeton University Author of Afterimage of Empire: Photography in Nineteenth-Century India


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Deprtment of Historical Studies, UTM


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 15th Aurangzeb: Writing about the most hated man in Indian history and becoming hated myself

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 15, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In twenty first-century India, Aurangzeb Alamgir—the sixth ruler of the Mughal empire who reigned from 1658 until 1707—is relentlessly vilified in the media, politics, and popular culture. Common opinion, bolstered by a divisive Hindu nationalist agenda, pillories Aurangzeb as a callous Islamist oppressor who despised everything about India, especially Hindus. This unrelenting myth of Aurangzeb as a cruel Islamist tyrant is bad history, but it is a difficult—even dangerous—mythology to challenge, as I have learned first-hand from the aftermath of publishing a short biography of Aurangzeb Alamgir.
    In this talk, I present a core contention of my Aurangzeb book, namely that, far from being motivated by Islamic orthodoxy or hatred of Hindus, Aurangzeb’s actions are better explained by his vision of justice. I then explore the backlash to my Aurangzeb book and its key arguments, ending by commenting more broadly on how historians ought to respond and, in some cases, must respond to non-academic objections to their work.
    Audrey Truschke is Assistant Professor of South Asian History at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey. She is the author of Culture of Encounters: Sanskrit at the Mughal Court (Columbia University Press, 2016) and, most recently, Aurangzeb: The Life and Legacy of India’s Most Controversial King (Stanford University Press, 2017).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Karen Ruffle
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Audrey Tuschke
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of South Asian History, Rutgers University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 15th Munk Annual Lecture in European Affairs: Europe between Brexit, Trump and Putin

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 15, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria University
    93 Charles Street West
    Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2C7
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    Series

    Munk School Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Timothy Garton Ash is the author of nine books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last thirty years. He is Professor of European Studies in the University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. His essays appear regularly in the New York Review of Books and he writes a column on international affairs in the Guardian which is widely syndicated in Europe, Asia and the Americas.

    His books are: ‘Und willst Du nicht mein Bruder sein ...’ Die DDR heute (1981), a book published in West Germany about what was then still East Germany; The Polish Revolution: Solidarity (1983), which won the Somerset Maugham Award; The Uses of Adversity: Essays on the Fate of Central Europe (1989), for which he was awarded the Prix Européen de l’Essai; We the People: The Revolution of ’89 witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin and Prague (1990; US Edition: The Magic Lantern), which was translated into fifteen languages; In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent (1993), named Political Book of the Year in Germany; The File: A Personal History (1997), which has so far appeared in sixteen languages; History of the Present: Essays, Sketches and Despatches from Europe in the 1990s (2000); Free World (2004); and Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade without a Name (2009). He is currently writing a book about free speech in the age of the internet and mass migration, and leads a major Oxford university research project built around the 13-language website freespeechdebate.com.

    After reading Modern History at Oxford, his research into the German resistance to Hitler took him to Berlin, where he lived, in both the western and eastern halves of the divided city, for several years. From there, he started to travel widely behind the iron curtain. Throughout the nineteen eighties, he reported and analysed the emancipation of Central Europe from communism in contributions to the New York Review of Books, the Independent, the Times and the Spectator. He was Foreign Editor of the Spectator, editorial writer on Central European affairs for the London Times, and a columnist on foreign affairs in the Independent.

    In 1986–87 he was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. Since 1990, he has been a Fellow of St Antony’s College, Oxford, where he directed the European Studies Centre from 2001 to 2006 and is now Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow. Since 2010, he has directed the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom, based at St Antony’s. He became a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, in 2000. A frequent lecturer, he is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts and a Corresponding Fellow of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences. He has honorary doctorates from St Andrew’s University, Sheffield Hallam University and the Catholic University of Leuven.

    He continues to travel extensively, and remains a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and other journals. His weekly column in the Guardian is syndicated in leading newspapers across Europe, Asia and the Americas. He also contributes to the Financial Times, the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal.

    Honours he has received for his writing include the David Watt Memorial Prize, Commentator of the Year in the ‘What the Papers Say’ annual awards for 1989, the Premio Napoli, the Imre Nagy Memorial Plaque, the Hoffmann von Fallersleben Prize for political writing, the Order of Merit from Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic, and the British CMG. In 2005, he featured in a list of 100 top global public intellectuals chosen by the journals Prospect and Foreign Policy, and in Time magazine’s list of the world’s 100 most influential people. In 2006, he was awarded the George Orwell Prize for political writing.


    Speakers

    Prof. Timothy Garton Ash
    University of Oxford


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 18th Hungarian Forced Laborers in the Soviet Union, 1945-1955

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 18, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Description

    Description:
    By the end of World War II about 600,000 Hungarian citizens were captured by the Soviet army. One third of the prisoners were civilian internees who were deported from Hungary to the Soviet Union in 1945. The Soviets did not make a distinction between civilians and soldiers and the war was seen as useful for the purpose of supplying a labor force, as well as expanding the communist system in the occupied territories. The presentation will give a detailed picture on the process of the deportation of the civilians and on their fate in Soviet forced labor camps. The presentation also tries to uncover the motives and plans of the Soviet military leadership directing the deportation of hundreds of thousands of civilians from East-Central Europe during the last months of the war.

    Speaker:
    Tamás Stark received his PhD from the Eötvös Lóránd University of Budapest in 1993. From 1983 he was a researcher at the Institute of History, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and in 2000 he was appointed a senior research fellow. His specialization is forced population movement in East-Central Europe in the period 1938-56, with special regard to the history of the Holocaust, fate of prisoners of war and civilian internees, and the post war migrations. He was involved in numerous international research projects. In 1995/96 he was Pearl Resnick Post-Doctoral fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. In 2014 he was Fulbright professor at Nazareth College, Rochester, NY. USA. His main publications include Hungary’s Human Losses in World War II (Uppsala, 1995) Hungarian Jews during the Holocaust and after the Second World War, 1939-1949: A Statistical Review (Boulder, CO 2000) Magyarok szovjet fogságban /Hungarians in Soviet Captivity/ (Budapest, 2006) A magyar polgári lakosság elhurcolása a Szovjetunióba a korabeli dokumentumok tükrében. /Deportation of Hungarian civilians to the Soviet Union. Documentary Collection./ (Budapest, 2017).


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 18th Reading North Korean Wartime Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 18, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    North Korean wartime literature has never been valued highly by literary scholars. The lack of literary qualities in these wartime stories have deterred many from looking more seriously at this type of literature as its heroes, seemingly without any obstacles in their way, defeat the enemy and attain victory. Add this to the subservient role literature plays in North Korea and the worship of its leaders, and it is obvious why one would shy away from analysing these texts.

    However, even under such conditions of prescribed rules and top-down directives, the writer still needs to imbue the story with sufficient literary qualities to make it interesting to its readers. This is because the author is still constrained by the fact that the novel should not stray too far from reality or else the reader will not be persuaded. The author, therefore, also needs to address issues that are politically and socially sensitive in society. Condemnation of these issues in itself is not enough: to make an ideological claim the issue needs to be foregrounded, and the author must give a satisfactory interpretation of the issue.

    This led to the creation of quite interesting propaganda literature in wartime North Korea: The characters are imbued with heroic but down-to-earth characteristics that portray both the wartime experiences of North Korean soldiers and citizens, but also gives expression to North Korea’s wartime concerns.

    Jerôme de Wit is Professor in the Korean Studies department at the University of Tübingen, Germany. He is a specialist on North and South Korean Wartime Literature and modern Korean culture. His research interest in Korean culture is focused on public discourses concerning history and society and how cultural sources can provide us with different viewpoints on debates such as nationalism, identity, and history. His recent projects deal with such topics as post-colonialism in contemporary South Korean alternate history novels, and a study on the representation and changes in identity in the literature and movies of ethnic Koreans in China.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jerome de Wit
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Korean Studies, University of Tubingen

    Janet Poole
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 19th Asia's Reckoning: China, Japan, and the Fate of U.S. Power in the Pacific

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 19, 20171:30PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Richard McGregor’s Asia’s Reckoning is a compelling account of the widening geopolitical cracks in a region that has flourished under an American security umbrella for more than half a century. The toxic rivalry between China and Japan, two Asian giants consumed with endless history wars and ruled by entrenched political dynasties, is threatening to upend the peace underwritten by Pax Americana since World War II. Combined with Donald Trump’s disdain for America’s old alliances and China’s own regional ambitions, east Asia is entering a new era of instability and conflict. If the United States laid the postwar foundations for modern Asia, now the anchor of the global economy, Asia’s Reckoning reveals how that structure is falling apart.

    With unrivaled access to archives in the United States and Asia, as well as to many of the major players in all three countries, Richard McGregor has written a tale that blends the tectonic shifts in diplomacy with bitter domestic politics and the personalities driving them. It is a story not only of an overstretched America, but also of the rise and fall and rise of the great powers of Asia. The about-turn of Japan—from a colossus seemingly poised for world domination to a nation in inexorable decline in the space of two decades—has few parallels in modern history, as does the rapid rise of China—a country whose military is now larger than those of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and southeast Asia’s combined.

    The confrontational course on which China and Japan are set is no simple spat between neighbors: the United States would be involved on the side of Japan in any military conflict between the two countries. The fallout would be an economic tsunami, affecting manufacturing centers, trade routes, and political capitals on every continent. Richard McGregor’s book takes us behind the headlines of his years reporting to show how American power will stand or fall on its ability to hold its ground in Asia.

    Richard McGregor is an award-winning journalist and author with unrivalled experience in reporting on the top-level politics and economies of east Asia, primarily China and Japan, and also in Washington on national security issues.He was the Financial Times bureau chief in Beijing and Shanghai between 2000 and 2009, and headed the Washington office for four years from 2011. His book on the Chinese Communist Party published in 2010, ‘The Party’, was called a “masterpiece” by The Economist and won numerous awards in the US and overseas, including the Asia Society in New York award in 2011 for best book on Asia.A new book, on Sino-Japanese relations and the fate of US power in east Asia, tentatively titled “Asia’s Reckoning”, is due out in September, 2017, through Viking Press in the US, Penguin in the UK, and in Chinese and Japanese editions in Asia.He was a fellow at the Wilson Center in 2015 and a visiting scholar at the Sigur Center at George Washington University in 2016. McGregor has lectured widely, in the US and elsewhere, on Chinese politics and Asia.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Richard McGregor
    Speaker
    Journalist, Writer and Author

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Louis Pauly
    Discussant
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 20th Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 20, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My presentation reframes the history and logic of settler colonial capitalism through a focus on Asian racialization in Canada and the US. Drawing on an archive of Asian North American visual culture, I argue that the historical alignment of Asian bodies and labor with capital’s abstract and negative dimensions became one of settler colonialism’s defining features. My focus on the economic modalities of Asian racialized labor attempts to push beyond existing approaches to settler colonialism as a Native/settler binary to formulate it as a dynamic triangulation of Native, settler, and alien populations and positionalities.

    Iyko Day is an associate professor of English at Mount Holyoke College, chair of the Program in Critical Social Thought, and co-chair of the Five College Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program. She is the author of Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism (Duke, 2016).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Iyko Day
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English, Mount Holyoke College

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Grandparent Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20171:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This is a presentation of the results of the first cohort of students participating in The Grandparent Project: Inter-generational Conversations about Family, Mobility and Identity. Student members of the Asian Pathways Research Lab present their final projects, which combine oral histories of mobility from, between and within Asia and Canada, with their own personal reflections.

    The students working on this project have been investigating, in greater detail, the mobility histories and practices within their own families in order to reflect on how their own pathways are both similar and different from those of older generations.

    The stories present encourage new kinds of inter-generational conversations about the changing meanings of home, belonging, mobility, identity, diaspora and citizenship.

    The event will be structured as a literary short story reading, and copies of our inaugural publication Pathways will be distributed at the event.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2003, Environics pollster Michael Adams wrote a bestselling book entitled Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values. That book was based on surveys of the evolving social values of Canadians and Americans his firm had been conducting in Canada since 1983 and the United States since 1992. In 2016, Environics conducted 8,000 interviews in the United States and 4,000 in Canada to bring the comparative tracking data up to date which will be the basis of his new presentation: Fire and Ice Revisited: American and Canadian Social Values in the Age of Trump and Trudeau. He promises his research will surprise, disturb and reassure.

    Michael Adams is the president of the Environics group of research and communications consulting companies which he co-founded in 1970. In 2006, he founded and serves as president of the non-profit Environics Institute for Survey Research.
    Michael is also the author of six books, including: Fire and Ice: The United States, Canada and the Myth of Converging Values, (2003); and American Backlash: The Untold Story of Social Change in the United States (2005).
    Environics Institute projects include the first major survey of Muslims in Canada, the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study and, most recently, the Black Experience Project in the Greater Toronto Area.
    Michael holds an Honours B.A. in Political Science from Queen’s University (1969) and a M.A. in Sociology from the University of Toronto (1970).
    In 2009, he received an honorary Doctor of Letters from Ryerson University in Toronto.
    In December 2016, Michael was one of 100 leading individuals to be awarded the Order of Canada, the country’s highest domestic honour.
    Outside the field of research, he is a partner in the Robert Craig Winery in Napa Valley, California.


    Speakers

    Michael Adams
    President, Environics Institute



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Book Launch: The Economization of Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20175:00PM - 8:00PMGladstone Hotel
    Second Floor Reception Gallery
    Toronto, ON
    RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1722923654676992/
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    Series

    F. Ross Johnson/Connaught Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Please join us to celebrate the publication of Michelle Murphy’s book, The Economization of Life (Duke University Press 2017) on Thursday, September 21 from 5pm – 8pm. This is Michelle’s third single-authored book but only her first launch! To kick-off the TRU’s 2017-18 events, many of her peers and collaborators want to celebrate her latest achievement, and to honor her as a colleague, co-conspirator, mentor and friend. The event will take place in the Second Floor Reception Gallery of the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto. We’ll have a cash bar, light refreshments, and, of course, copies of the book for sale.

    Up-to-date information and RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1722923654676992/

    What is a life worth? In the wake of eugenics, new quantitative racist practices that valued life for the sake of economic futures flourished. In The Economization of Life, Michelle Murphy provocatively describes the twentieth-century rise of infrastructures of calculation and experiment aimed at governing population for the sake of national economy, pinpointing the spread of a potent biopolitical logic: some must not be born so that others might live more prosperously. Resituating the history of postcolonial neoliberal technique in expert circuits between the United States and Bangladesh, Murphy traces the methods and imaginaries through which family planning calculated lives not worth living, lives not worth saving, and lives not worth being born. The resulting archive of thick data transmuted into financialized “Invest in a Girl” campaigns that reframed survival as a question of human capital. The book challenges readers to reject the economy as our collective container and to refuse population as a term of reproductive justice.
    More here: https://www.dukeupress.edu/the-economization-of-life

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Faculty of Information, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 21st Book Launch "Jihad and Co.: Black Markets and Islamist Power" by Aisha Ahmad

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 21, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    For two decades, militant jihadism has been one of the world’s most pressing security crises. In civil wars and insurgencies across the Muslim world, certain Islamist groups have taken advantage of the anarchy to establish political control over a broad range of territories and communities. In effect, they have built radical new jihadist proto-states.

    Why have some ideologically-inspired Islamists been able to build state-like polities out of civil war stalemate, while many other armed groups have failed to gain similar traction? What makes jihadists win? In Jihad & Co., Aisha Ahmad argues that there are concrete economic reasons behind Islamist success. By tracking the economic activities of jihadist groups in Afghanistan, Somalia, Pakistan, Mali, and Iraq, she uncovers an unlikely actor in bringing Islamist groups to power: the local business community.

    To illuminate the nexus between business and Islamist interests in civil war, Ahmad journeys into war-torn bazaars to meet with both jihadists and the smugglers who financed their rise to power. From the arms markets in the Pakistani border region to the street markets of Mogadishu, their stories reveal a powerful economic logic behind the rise of Islamist power in civil wars. Behind the fiery rhetoric and impassioned, ideological claims is the cold, hard cash of the local war economy. Moving readers back and forth between mosques, marketplaces, and battlefields, Ahmad makes a powerful argument that economic savvy, as much as ideological fervor, explains the rise of militant jihadism across the modern Muslim world.

    Aisha Ahmad is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Co-Director of the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Her work explores the political economy of Islamist power in weak and failed states. She has conducted field research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, and Kenya. In 2012, she was a fellow at the Belfer Center on Science and International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School.

    Contact

    Samantha Smith


    Speakers

    Aisha Ahmad
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto and Co-Director, Islam and Global Affairs Initiative, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 22nd – Saturday, September 23rd Reframing Family Photography (conference)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20178:00AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
    Saturday, September 23, 20178:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 'Munk Centre For International Studies - 1 Devonshire Place
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 22nd Dismantling Japanese Developmentalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 22, 20172:00PM - 4:00PMMassey College
    University of Toronto
    4 Devonshire Place
    Upper Library
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Abstract

    Japan’s combination of economic success and conservative dominance from the 1950s into the early 1990s was the consequence of what Pempel calls “developmentalism.” The term involves more than the well-studied ‘developmental state.’ Most particularly, the Japanese success story relied on a specific and unusual socio-economic alignment; a positive sum relationship between state direction and corporate creativity; and Japan’s Cold War security and economic partnership with the United States. The combination unleashed a positive cycle of economic development and conservative political strength.

    Japan’s positive cycle was challenged by two external changes: first, the breakdown in diplomatic and security bipolarity that began with the Nixon visits to China and the Deng economic reforms; and second, the challenges from increased power of global finance and multinational production networks. These external global shifts undercut the Japan’s prevailing model and opened the challenge to find a suitable substitute. That search has continued for over twenty years resulting in some successes and many false starts. Professor Pempel’s talk will examine the relationship between this more complete understanding of developmentalism as the roots of Japan’s early successes and the subsequent difficulties of finding its adequate replacement.

    Biographical Sketch

    T.J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on Japan’s political economy, economic and security issues in East Asia, and Asian regionalism. His most recent book with Keiichi Tsunekawa is “Two Crises, Different Outcomes: East Asia and Global Finance” (Cornell University Press).

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    T. J. Pempel
    Speaker
    Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th Constitutionalism and Democracy in Latin America: Celebrating and Taking Stock of Ana Maria Bejarano’s Scholarly Legacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20171:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After her untimely passing in April 2017, Professor Ana Maria Bejarano’s colleagues and co-authors take stock of her contributions to scholarship on Latin American politics. This is a private event.

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 25th The Cultural Contexts of Indigeneity in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 25, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the past century, ‘indigenous’ as a political concept has become internationalized and, more recently, has risen in vogue as environmental protection movements worldwide are increasingly framed as Indigenous resistance to the enduring ills of settler colonialism. However, despite its trendiness, ‘indigeneity’ remains poorly defined, historically contingent, and the answers to its most basic questions (such as ‘who is Indigenous?’) remain in flux. In Southeast Asia, both Western and internal colonialism have been instrumental in the legal and political construction of Indigeneity and its application to specific populations. Meanwhile, Indigenous concepts of indigeneity typically diverge widely from State definitions, especially where territorial sovereignty is at stake. Drawing on my field research in the Philippines (and the work of others in Southeast Asia), I will discuss the cultural and political conundrums perpetuated by this nebulous term, and why grappling with ‘Indigeneity’ – as well as pondering its future – matters more than ever today.

    OONA PAREDES is Assistant Professor in the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at the National University of Singapore, and is the author of A Mountain of Difference: The Lumad in Early Colonial Mindanao (Cornell SEAP, 2013).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Oona Paredes
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Southeast Asian Studies, National University of Singapore Inaugural Strom Visiting Professor

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of History

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 26th Sex and Islam: From LGBTQ Rights to Muslim Feminists

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 26, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative

    Description

    From marriage equality to wearing the veil, some of the most controversial questions about Muslims in Canada focus on their bedrooms and their wardrobes. But what exactly is the conflict between Islamic and liberal ideas about sex, love, and gender?

    Muslim women are typically the topic of this conversation, but rarely have a voice in it. Instead, patriarchal Muslims and Islamophobic white supremacists alike characterize Muslim women as either victims or villains, both equally excluding Muslim women from debates about themselves.

    LGBTQ Muslims have also been excluded from these crucial conversations. The horrifying anti-gay hostilities in Indonesia, Chechnya, and Iraq clearly show that LGBTQ persons in these countries are at terrible risk. Closer to home, in a 2016 study, a majority of Canadian Muslim households surveyed said it was not possible to be an observant Muslim and in a same-sex relationship. Living at the intersection, LGBTQ Muslims are therefore confronted with both homophobia and Islamophobia.

    When it comes to sex and gender issues in Islam, there is much controversy and little consensus. But what do we actually know about the bedrooms and the values of Muslims? How have Islamic ideas about sex shaped social and political realities of Muslims around the world? Are these Muslim beliefs about gender, sexuality, and family incompatible with widely accepted liberal democratic ideals?

    Understanding sex in Islam is an essential part of the conversation about human rights and fundamental freedoms. Do LGBTQ Muslims have any hope for inclusion, both here in Canada and around the world? And how does the field of Islamic feminism challenge patriarchal visions of Islam, as well as white supremacist and Islamophobic beliefs about Islam and Muslims?

    To tackle these tough questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative is pleased to host this dynamic panel event, featuring four distinguished leaders.

    Speakers:
    Ayesha S. Chaudhry is the Canada Research Chair in Religion, Law and Social Justice and an Associate Professor of Islamic studies and Gender studies at the University of British Columbia, where she also serves on the Board of Governors. She is the author of Domestic Violence and the Islamic Tradition: Ethics, Law, and the Muslim Discourse on Gender (Oxford University Press, 2014).

    Shereen El-Feki is a Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School, an Associate Fellow of Chatham House, a Senior Fellow with Promundo, and Co-Chair of the Gender-Based Violence Hub at the Joint Learning Initiative for Faith and Local Communities. She is the author of Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World (Penguin Random House, 2013).

    El-Farouk Khaki is the Imam of the LGBTQ-affirming mosque El-Tawhid Juma Circle in Toronto, the founder of Salaam: Queer Muslim Community, the co-founder of the Muslim AIDS Project, and an award-winning speaker and activist on Islam and human rights.

    Mohammed Fadel is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto, with a specialization in Islamic Law. He has published extensively in leading legal journals on family law in the Islamic tradition, international human rights law, and the compatibility between Islamic and liberal democratic legal traditions.


    Speakers

    Ayesha S. Chaudhry
    Canada Research Chair in Religion, Law and Social Justice Associate Professor of Islamic Studies and Gender Studies University of British Columbia

    El-Farouk Khaki
    Imam, El Tawhid Juma Circle

    Shereen El-Feki
    Professor of Global Practice, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Mohammad Fadel
    Associate Professor & Canada Research Chair for the Law and Economics of Islamic Law, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th GOVERNANCE AND CORRUPTION IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL SECTOR: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 20179:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Corruption is considered to be one of the biggest barriers to human development and economic growth. Corruption is without borders; it can be
    found in any country, in different forms, levels, and types of organizations and institutions. In the health sector annually, an estimated $5.3 trillion is spent worldwide on providing health services, yet as much as 6 percent or $300 billion USD is lost to corruption and errors according to the World Health Organization. Corruption negatively impacts public health budgets, the price of health services and medicines, and the quality of care and medical products; as well, it threatens a country’s ability to provide universal health coverage by increasing the price of health care.
    This one day seminar will provide an opportunity for health care professionals and researchers to gain a deeper understanding of how
    corruption and lack of good governance can have an impact on pharmaceutical services and importantly provide strategies and tactics to
    educate participants on how to counter vulnerabilities within the sector.

    Course Objectives
    To introduce and discuss concepts of governance and corruption and explain how they relate to the pharmaceutical sector
    To educate participants on how to identify potential areas of weak governance that can lead to poor results in pharmaceutical services
    To highlight anti‐corruption initiatives, strategies and tactics relevant to the pharmaceutical sector

    Registration Fee: $175 + HST

    Sponsors

    Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Accountability and Transparency for the Pharmaceutical Sector

    Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th "Lazy Japanese" and "Degraded Koreans": Does Culture Matter in Explaining Economic Development?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 201712:00PM - 2:00PMUniversity College, room 179
    15 King's College Circle
    Toronto, M5S3H7
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    Description

    Culture has been frequently mentioned as an explanation for Asian successes in economic development. Typical is the comment by Samuel Huntington, the author of the controversial book, The Clash of Civilisations, offered as an explanation of the economic divergence between South Korea and Ghana, two countries that were at similar levels of economic development in the 1960s, argued: “Undoubtedly, many factors played a role, but ... culture had to be a large part of the explanation. South Koreans valued thrift, investment, hard work, education, organisation, and discipline. Ghanaians had different values. In short, cultures count”.
    In this talk, Ha-Joon Chang will argue that those arguments trying to explain international differences in economic development in terms of cultural differences are often ignorant, usually fail to take a dynamic view of culture, and are invariably based on simplistic theories.

    Professor Ha-Joon Chang is the economist at the University of Cambridge. In addition to numerous journal articles and book chapters, he has published 16 authored books (five co-authored) and 10 edited books. His main books include The Political Economy of Industrial Policy (Palgrave Macmillan UK, 1996), Kicking Away the Ladder (Anthem Pr, 2002), Bad Samaritans (Bloomsbury Press, 2009), 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism (Bloomsbury Press, 2012), and Economics: The User’s Guide (Bloomsbury Press, 2014). By 2018, his writings will have been translated and published in 41 languages and 44 countries. Worldwide, his books have sold 2 million copies. He is the winner of the 2003 Gunnar Myrdal Prize and the 2005 Wassily Leontief Prize. He was ranked no. 9 in the Prospect magazine’s World Thinkers 2014 poll.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ha-Joon Chang
    Speaker
    Economist & Author Reader, Department of Political Economy of Development, University of Cambridge

    Paul Kingston
    Chair
    Director, Political Science and IDS, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Critical Development Studies, UTSC

    Department of Political Science, UTSG


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 29th C4E Public Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 29, 20173:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Markus Dubber
    416.978.6421


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2017

  • Tuesday, October 3rd U. S. Economic Strategy in Asia in the Trump Era: From Pivot to About-Face?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 3, 20175:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2016, Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies began preparation of a brief for the next U.S. Administration on what the American strategy should be. President Obama talked about a “Pivot to Asia” and championed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). With incoming President Trump’s announcement that the USA would be withdrawing from TPP negotiations, that strategy needed an update. Join the co-author of the CSIS report “Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific: Recommendations for the Incoming Administration”, Scott Miller, as he brings us up to date on the U.S. economic agenda in Asia, and how Congress is looking at trade negotiations in the post-TPP era.

    Scott Miller has been a senior adviser and the William M. Scholl Chair in International Business at CSIS since 2012. The Scholl Chair focuses on key issues in the global economy, such as international trade, investment, competitiveness, and innovation. He has led many campaigns supporting U.S. free trade agreements and has been a contributor to U.S. trade and investment policy over many years. Mr. Miller advised the U.S. government as a liaison to the Advisory Committee on Trade Policy and Negotiations, and he is a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy. He was the founding chairman of the Department of Commerce’s Industry Trade Advisory Committee (ITAC) Investment Working Group. He is one of the authors of the CSIS report Reinvigorating U.S. Economic Strategy in the Asia Pacific https://www.csis.org/events/reinvigorating-us-economic-strategy-asia-pacific>


    Speakers

    Scott Miller
    Senior Advisor and Scholl Chair in International Business, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 5th Finding the Third Way

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 5, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Raised in a Buddhist household, “the Third Way” describes the path that Kristyn Wong-Tam has found to lead to move forward in new and challenging projects. As a queer, Asian woman, who left home as a teenager, she has forged a path to becoming a successful entrepreneur, realtor, community activist, and now politician. In each stage of her life, she has utilized the principles of finding a Third Way to develop creative solutions to complex problems. Leading with values of social justice and equity, she will share her experiences of bringing people together to find collaborative, community-responsive solutions to many challenges facing Toronto residents.

    Kristyn Wong-Tam is Toronto’s only openly gay, racialized City Councillor. She was elected in 2010 and has been a champion for social justice, equity. She has championed the development of Gender-Responsive Budgeting at the Municipal level, Toronto’s first LGBTQ youth shelters, and initialized comprehensive, sustainable planning policies in the downtown. She has led the way in ensuring Toronto’s downtown communities are liveable and sustainable for all residents.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    (416) 926-8996


    Speakers

    Emily Hertzman
    Moderator
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Councillor Kristyn Wong -Tam
    Speaker


    Main Sponsor

    Richard Chales Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement 20-years After Reformasi: Capitalist development and Anti-capitalist movement in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Following the capitalist crisis in 1997/98, Indonesia’s economic and political reforms led to increased incorporation into global capitalism. This paper examines three major issues related to such capitalist development after reformasi. First, the motor behind the development of capitalism is a remarkable exploitation of labor. Second, the accumulation of capital through land-based industries has seriously assaulted the mass of independent poor producers. Third, evidence indicates that the appropriation of nature has become the underlying feature of capitalist development. In response to such development there is a growing anti-capitalist movement in the country. Thus this paper also examines the anti-capitalist tendencies in the country. I will restrict my attention to two major tendencies among Indonesian activists today. The first is “reformist anti-capitalist” activists who advocate for a more regulated capitalism and demand a role for the state in regulating the market. The second is “revolutionary anti-capitalist” activists, whose concerns go beyond reforms to the capitalist system.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arianto Sangadji
    Speaker
    Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Programme in Geography, York University

    Tania Li
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies Professor, Department of Anthropology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 6th The Place of the Baltic in the French Atlantic Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 6, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This talk explores ways in which the Baltic region enabled the rise and consolidation of the French colonial empire in the Americas. The Baltic, a supplier of masts, tar, hemp, iron, planks, and other naval stores, has long been viewed as central to early modern European expansion overseas. Nevertheless, its particular association with French empire building remains little studied. Drawing on data from the Danish Sound Toll Registers and French consular records, the talk delineates how French colonization began as an attempt to secure commercial independence from the Baltic, only to produce the opposite effect of binding the French colonial enterprise and the Baltic ever closer together.

    Pernille Røge is Assistant Professor of French and French Colonial History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarly interests focus on interconnections between eighteenth-century political economic theory and colonial policy and practice. Her publications on the French, British, and Danish colonial empires have appeared in edited volumes and peer reviewed journals, including Dix-huitième Siècle, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, and History of European Ideas. She is co-editor of a collection of essays entitled The Political Economy of Empire in the Early Modern World (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013). Her book manuscript Reinventing the Empire: Political Economy, France, and the African and Caribbean Colonies, c. 1750-1800 is currently under review with Cambridge University Press.


    Speakers

    Pernille Roege
    University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 12th Professional Development: A Seminar for Graduate Students and Junior Faculty Members

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 12, 201712:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JSAC 2017 Conference

    Description

    Graduate students discuss their career opportunities with a great deal of gallows humour. Student lounges and faculty meeting rooms echo with stories about the saturated job market and sorrowful accounts of classmates and former students caught on the dreaded sessional treadmill. It is true that there is, in most academic fields and particularly in the social sciences and humanities, a mismatch between the number of tenure-track faculty positions and the number of PhD graduates. It is not true, however, that recently minted PhDs are destined for penury and a professional life of long-term underemployment.

    This half-day seminar examines key stages and strategies in the professional lives of individuals who are completing or have completed their PhDs. It reviews the nature of academic employment in North America and internationally, and covers such topics as:

    * Making the most of your time in graduate school;
    * Establishing an academic and professional persona;
    * Professional engagement and creating contacts outside the academy;
    * Converting your PhD research into scholarly interest in your career;
    * Is there a “publish and prosper” strategy?
    * Breaking out of the (academic) comfort zone: considering jobs in non-traditional places.
    * Knowing when to switch to a non-academic career.
    * Succeeding in the academy: from tenure-terror to professional success.

    The seminar aims to provide graduate students and junior faculty members with a practical guide to managing expectations and developing strategies for career success.

    The seminar will be led by Dr. Ken Coates, former President of the Japan Studies Association, with assistance from Dr. Carin Holroyd, University of Saskatchewan, and Dr. David Welch, University of Waterloo. Dr. Coates is currently the Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation, University of Saskatchewan. He has held senior administrative roles at the University of Waterloo, the University of Saskatchewan, the University of New Brunswick at Saint John, the University of Waikato and the University of Northern British Columbia. He has diverse and interdisciplinary interests in such fields as Japan studies, science, technology and society, Indigenous rights, northern development, and Northern Canadian history.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 25th John R. Evans Lectureship in Global Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 25, 201712:30PM - 2:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 26th Igniting the Internet: South Korea’s Internet-Born Protests and Popular Politics, 2002 to 2017

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 26, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In late 2016, South Korea saw a series of Internet-born street protests demanding that then-President Park Geun-hye step down, eventually leading to her impeachment in March of 2017. These candlelight protests were only the newest iteration of the youth-driven candlelight protest that originated online in 2002, which has now become a standard repertoire for activism. Drawing on Kang’s recent book Igniting the Internet (2016), this presentation attends to the cultural dynamics that allowed the Internet to so rapidly bring issues to public attention and exert influence on South Korea’s domestic and international politics. Kang will discuss the cultural dynamics of online politics and media-driven popular politics, situating them in the legacies of South Korea’s authoritarian and post-authoritarian eras. This presentation will consider the interplay among local historical context, structural variation across different societies, and the role of chance in the dynamics of mass movements and the “cultural ignition process”—speculating about the future of Internet-driven youth activism in South Korea and beyond.

    Jiyeon Kang is an associate professor of Communication Studies and Korean Studies at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include South Korean social movements, Internet activism, youth culture, globalization, and the mobility of Asian university students.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jiyeon Kang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Communication and Korean Studies, University of Iowa

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 28th Munk School Graduate Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 28, 201710:00AM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2017

  • Wednesday, November 8th "To keep alive the emigrants' affection for the home country": State-driven diaspora politics in early 20th century Southeastern Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 8, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:
    At the end of the 19th century, large parts of Southeastern Europe began to see massive emigration to North America and other overseas destinations. At a time of intense nation building, governments in the region could hardly ignore the fact that so many of their citizens were leaving. On the contrary, some of them discovered the usefulness of emigration for fostering nation-building. In my talk I will discuss the emerging politics of diaspora, focussing on three caste studies (Kingdom of Hungary, Greece, and interwar Yugoslavia). These efforts to project symbolic sovereignty across the Atlantic can elucidate new visions of the nation and its relation to territory, and heralded new forms of governmentality.

    Speaker:
    Dr. Ulf Brunnbauer is director of the Institute for East and Southeast European Studies and chair of Southeast and East European History at the University of Regensburg.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 13th Transnational Domesticity in the Making of Modern Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 13, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Modern domesticity in colonial-era Korea has generally been understood using the twin parameters of nationalism and colonialism. Much less attention has been paid to the impact of a transpacific network, mainly between the US and Korea through the Christian missionary societies, on the formation of modern domesticity before, during and after Japanese colonial rule. In this presentation, I examine the ways in which Korea’s modern domesticity was shaped by not only Japanese colonial policies but also the notion of modernity that was transmitted, reinterpreted and performed through the transpacific network that had formed among the Korean elite and American missionaries. Taking the idea of “modern home” as a key locus where national, colonial and missionary projects converged, I demonstrate how the intimate private sphere was rendered as one of the most dynamic sites for uncovering the confluence of interaction between the local, the national and the global.

    Hyaeweol Choi is Professor of Korean Studies at the Australian National University. Her research interests are in the areas of gender history, religion, and transnational studies. She is the author of Gender and Mission Encounters in Korea: New Women, Old Ways and New Women in Colonial Korea: A Sourcebook among others.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Hyaeweol Choi
    Speaker
    Professor Korean Studies, Australian National University

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 16th Making the Skyscraper Soviet: A Global History of Red Moscow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 16, 20174:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In the early 1930s, Soviet architects and engineers began work on a series of large-scale urban development projects in Moscow. Brought together in 1935 under the banner of the Moscow General Plan, these projects included the Moscow-Volga Canal, the Moscow Metro, and a building that, had it been completed, would have stood as the tallest state headquarters in the world: the Palace of Soviets. This talk explores the global networks and ideas that shaped the Palace of Soviets construction effort and were key more broadly to Moscow’s “socialist reconstruction” during the Stalin era.

    Dr. Katherine Zubovich is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, and an MA from the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Dr. Katherine Zubovich
    Ryerson University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 29th Escape Velocity? How to Overcome Secular Stagnation in Japan and Abroad

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 29, 20172:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan Inaugural Symposium

    Description

    For over two decades now, Japan has found itself at the forefront of economic policymaking. The bursting of the bubble economy ushered in an era of zero interest rates and unconventional monetary policy, long before such measures were widely adopted elsewhere during the Global Financial Crisis. Japan’s demographic trends presage continental Europe’s future. Many policy choices have been copied, even though their effectiveness continues to be debated in Japan as abroad. This events brings together leading members of the policy community from Japan and North America to discuss Japan’s experience. The purpose is not to take stock of Japan’s (alleged or real) malaise, but to identify common themes that provide useful lessons for other countries.

    Panelist Bios

    R. Anton BRAUN (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, GA). Dr Braun is a research economist and senior adviser on the macroeconomics and monetary policy team in the research department at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. His major fields of study are macroeconomic risks and the effects of monetary policy, as well as the economic effects of demographic change in Japan. Prior to joining the Federal Reserve, Dr. Braun was a full professor at the University of Tokyo, where he worked from 2001 to 2010.

    Nobuyuki KINOSHITA (Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo), Noboyuki Kinoshita, formerly with the Ministry of Finance and then the Bank of Japan, is an expert on corporate governance reforms in Japan and their macroeconomic implications. He served as Executive Director at the Bank of Japan from 2010 to 2014. He is currently senior advisor to Aflac (Columbus, GA), a leading supplemental insurance provider in the US and Japanese markets. He regularly presents to academic and professional audience on Japanese macroeconomic policies.

    Mark Manger (Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto). Professor Manger is an Associate Professor of Political Economy and Global Affairs at the Munk School and the Department of Political Science. He received his doctorate from UBC and joined the Munk School in 2012 following tenure-track appointments at McGill University and the London School of Economics. Professor Manger’s field of specialization is international political economy, with emphasis on trade and finance, and the political economy of East Asia and Japan. He has been a visiting researcher at the Institute of Social Science, University of Tokyo, in 2003 and in 2010, and is an alumnus of the Program on US-Japan Relations at Harvard University, where he was a fellow in 2007-2008.

    This inaugural symposium for the Centre for the Study of Global Japan is followed by a reception at 4:00-5:00.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    R. Anton Braun
    Speaker
    Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, GA

    Mark Manger
    Chair
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Nobuyuki Kinoshita
    Speaker
    Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Japan NOW Lecture Series


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2017

  • Friday, December 8th At the Geographic Limits of Discipline: The Japanese Empire and Indigeneity in Colonial Taiwan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In Michel Foucault’s terminology, the “disciplinary society” is produced by and in turn sustains the institutions that constitute individuals as subjects and objects of dispersed power. In colonial Taiwan (1895-1945), deficit spending on land-surveys, rentier-capitalist buy-outs, and “bandit eradication” established the foundations for disciplinary society in the densely populated areas of the island. However, in what became Taiwan’s indigenous territories, the costs of building an infrastructure (including schools, courts, prisons, hospitals, banks) that could produce self-policing surplus-surrendering modern “individuals” outstripped returns on investment. Therefore, indigenous peoples would be ruled on-the-cheap, as members of units through appointed intermediaries and beat-cops in the interwar years. During this period, a concatenation of ethnological, touristic, literary, and iconographic initiatives from the Japanese side, met with cultural entrepreneurialism from the indigenous side, to produce the durable and spatially containerized ethnic groups known as “Atayal,” “Bunun,” “Paiwan,” “Tsou,” “Saisyat,” “Amis,” “Rukai,” and “Tao” (Taiwan Indigenous Peoples) today.

    Paul D. Barclay teaches East Asian history at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the general editor of the digital repository East Asia Image Collection (http://digital.lafayette.edu/collections/eastasia) and author of numerous articles, reviews, and book chapters on Japanese colonialism. His book-length study on the history of Japanese-Taiwan Indigenous Peoples relations from 1873 to 1945 will be published by the University of California Press in fall, 2017. Barclay’s research has received support from the National Endowment from the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the Japanese Council for the Promotion of Science, and the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul D. Barclay
    Speaker
    Chair, Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of History

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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