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October 2016

  • Wednesday, October 5th Derechos Humanos en Chile (In Spanish)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 5, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMVictoria College 115
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    Description

    This talk will be in Spanish. Limited Headsets Available for Simultaneous Interpretation.

    Eduardo Contreras Mella is a Chilean journalist and Human Rights lawyer. After the coup d’etat that deposed Salvador Allende in 1973, he lived in exile for 15 years working in Mexico and Cuba. When he returned to Chile, alongside with Gladys Marín, he presented the first demand against Augusto Pinochet. Their initial efforts ultimately achieved Pinochet’s impeachment and trial for crimes against humanity.

    Contreras will discuss the trajectory of his work as human rights lawyer in the context of the 1973 Chilean military coup and dictatorship, and its aftermath. He will focus on the unique challenges of human rights litigation in transnational contexts, and on the roles of civil society and the private sector in human rights conflicts.

    One of the most important figures in the post-transitional justice process in Chile, Eduardo Contreras was responsible for many human rights trials to investigate abused under the Pinochet regime. He was the first to file, in conjunction with the Association of Relatives of Politically Executed Persons (AFEP), a lawsuit to establish the cause of the death of socialist president Salvador Allende during the military’s bombing of the La Moneda presidential palace in the Sep. 11, 1973 coup. Contreras also demanded clarification of the death of poet Pablo Neruda, which occurred on Sep. 23,1973 – just 12 days after his close friend Allende was overthrown. Since 2014, Contreras is the ambassador for Chile in Uruguay.


    Speakers

    Eduardo Contreras Mella
    Chilean journalist and Human Rights lawyer


    Sponsors

    Latin American Studies, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 6th Poetry, Fiction, and Authorial Identity in D. Dilip Kumar’s Short Stories

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 6, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. U. Vē. Cāminātaiyar Annual Tamil Lecture

    Description

    Poets appear as central characters in two of D. Dilip Kumar’s (1951-) Tamil short stories: first, as a feckless, drunken husband in the 1988 experimental piece “Nikala Marutta Arputam” (“The Miracle that Refused to Happen”), and second, as a romantic, suicidal misfit in the 1992 “Manam Enum Tōṇi Parri.” The title of the latter is the first line of a poem from the Śaiva Tirunāvukkarasar Tēvāram, and is used as part of the moody soundscape of the story, but has little bearing on the actual plot (the author and I have titled the story “Scent of a Woman” in English). I will explore three moments in which poetry appears in these stories. First, in “The Miracle that Refused to Happen,” Mr. James, the protagonist and for all practical purposes the only speaker in the entire story, utters a poem of his own composition towards the end of a disastrous monologue aimed at his wife. Second, James also begins to spout passages from the King James Version of the Psalms, and here I will examine how the Psalms in Tamil carry a very different feel from the same lines in the English of the King James text, and how the passages are used in this instance to manipulate and break down the resolve of his wife. My third example is drawn from “Scent of a Woman.” The story is semi-autobiographical, and the two poems that are featured in it are recited in intimate conversation with the story’s romantic heroine at moments of decisive and critical turns in its very structure. Exploring the several instances in which Dilip Kumar pays homage to the antiquity of the Tamil language and to its literary conventions, I will consider how verse is embedded in prose, what the shifts in register accomplish in terms of plot and character development, and how one mode of discourse is ultimately valued over another.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Martha Ann Selby
    Department of Asian Studies, The University of Texas at Austin


    Sponsors

    Department of Religion

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 7th Canada’s Back—Now What? International Policy for the Long Haul

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 201612:30PM - 1:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Building on the early foreign policy successes of the Trudeau government, how should Canada define and pursue its long-term goals in international affairs? In an era of dramatic global change and rising challenges, old assumptions about Canadian foreign policy may no longer apply. Canada needs to position itself to succeed not in the world that we have known, but in the world that is emerging.

    Roland Paris holds the University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa and teaches in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He was recently Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s senior advisor on global affairs and defence. Previously, he served as policy advisor in the Privy Council Office, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Federal-Provincial Relations Office, director of research at the Conference Board of Canada, assistant professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, and visiting researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC, and at Sciences-Po in Paris. A prolific scholar and commentator, he has won numerous awards for his research, teaching and public service.


    Speakers

    Roland Paris
    Speaker
    University Research Chair in International Security and Governance, University of Ottawa

    Stephen J. Toope
    Chair
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 7th The Dictator's Dilemma: The Chinese Communist Party's Strategy for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Many observers predicted the collapse of the Chinese Communist Party following the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, and again following the serial collapse of communist regimes behind the Iron Curtain. Their predictions, however, never proved true. Despite minor setbacks, China has experienced explosive economic growth and relative political stability ever since 1989. In The Dictator’s Dilemma, Bruce Dickson provides a comprehensive explanation for regime’s continued survival and prosperity. Dickson draws upon original public opinion surveys, interviews, and published materials to explain why there is so much popular support for the regime. This basic stability is a familiar story to China specialists, but not to those whose knowledge of contemporary China is limited to the popular media. This talk will appeal to anyone interested in understanding China’s increasing importance in world politics.

    Bruce Dickson is professor of political science and international affairs and chair of the political science department at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on political dynamics in China, especially the adaptability of the Chinese Communist Party and the regime it governs.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Bruce Dickson
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science and International Affairs and Chair, Department of Political Science, George Washington University

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 7th Multi-Ethnic Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMHart House
    University of Toronto
    7 Hart House Circle
    Music Room
    West Wing, 2nd Floor
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract:
    Mrs. Renho, a female politician with a Taiwanese father was elected to the leadership of the Democratic Party of Japan, which implies she could even be the Japan’s prime minister. Although her “dual-nationality” triggered some debate, what is more important and interesting is that her ethnic background does not seem to have handicapped her political career. In fact, both the size and roles of minority ethnic groups in Japan are far from negligible though they tend to be belittled as poor powerless groups. In addition, constant inflows of “newcomers” have been transforming their social status and public images. This lecture will give a snapshot of ethnic minorities in Japan today and discuss challenges Japan is facing as well as efforts being made to rectify them. It also tries to analyze the current status of Japan’s multi-ethnization by referring to its historical contexts and geopolitical environments.

    Speaker Bio:
    Masayuki Tadokoro is a Professor at Keio University, who previously taught at the National Defense Academy. He studied at Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. Currently he is spending sabbatical at University of Waterloo.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Masayuki Tadokoro
    Visiting Professor, University of Waterloo; Professor, Faculty of Law, Keio University


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 7th Banning Muslims? Explaining Xenophobia and Islam in Europe and the US

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 7, 20166:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative

    Description

    This event will also be available via live webcast, and can be viewed at the following link on October 7 starting at 6:00pm:
    https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/live/381.aspx

    In the home stretch of the 2016 US Presidential Election, American voters have become increasingly divided over one key demographic: Muslims. On one side, Donald Trump has called for an outright ban of all Muslims coming into the United States, declaring over one billion persons on the planet persona non grata. On the other side, Hilary Clinton has denounced Trump’s proposed ban as both racist and unconstitutional. With polls showing these two candidates neck-in-neck, the American people are clearly divided over the “Muslim question”.

    Across the Atlantic, a similar story unfolds. With war raging in Syria and Iraq, millions of refugees have made the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea in the hopes of landing safely in Europe. Some leaders, such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel, have welcomed these refugees and called for tolerance. Across Europe, however, this massive influx of predominantly Muslim men from the Middle East has also provoked anti-immigration political parties to demand a full-scale ban on these migrants, associating them with rape and terrorism. In the heat of this xenophobic backlash, some leaders have also called for a ban on other symbols associated with Islam, such as hijabs, burkas, and “burkinis”.

    What explains this dramatic divide across North America and Europe? Why are some countries experiencing a backlash against Muslims and refugees, while others have maintained a welcoming and tolerant attitude? What are the implications of this rising tide of xenophobia for democracy, peace, and international security? To answer these questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School, in collaboration with the Centre for the Study of the United States (CSUS) and the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES), is pleased to host a panel discussion with leading scholars at the University of Toronto working on these critical issues.

    Randall Hansen is Director of the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in Immigration & Governance in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He works on Immigration and Citizenship, Demography and Population Policy and the Effects of War on Civilians.

    Anna Korteweg is Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga. Her research focuses on the integration of Muslim immigrants in Western Europe and Canada.

    Chris Cochrane is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. He works on anti-immigration sentiment and left and right wing political parties in Canada and other democracies.

    Phil Triadafilopoulos is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. His research focuses on immigration and integration of Muslim migrants in Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands.


    Speakers

    Chris Cochrane
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Randall Hansen
    Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Anna Korteweg
    Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Phil Triadafilopoulos
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 13th Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil, and Israel

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 13, 20161:30PM - 3:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event will also be available via live webcast at the following link on October 13 starting at 1:30pm:
    https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/live/381.aspx

    Inaugural lecture as a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil, and Israel illuminates what kinds of stigmatizing or discriminatory incidents individuals encounter in each country, how they respond to these occurrences, and what they view as the best strategy—whether individually, collectively, through confrontation, or through self-improvement—for dealing with such events. This deeply collaborative and integrated comparative study draws on more than four hundred in-depth interviews with middle- and working-class men and women residing in and around multiethnic cities—New York City, Rio de Janeiro, and Tel Aviv—to compare the discriminatory experiences of African-Americans, black Brazilians, and Arab Palestinian citizens of Israel, as well as Israeli Ethiopian Jews and Mizrahi (Sephardic) Jews. Our detailed analysis reveals significant differences in narratives about behavior. We account for these patterns by the extent to which each group is actually a group, the socio-historical context of intergroup conflict, and the national ideologies, neo-liberal repertoires, and other narrativesthat group members rely on. We also consider similarities and differences between the middle class and the working class, as well as between men and women, and older and younger interviewees, to capture the extent to which racial identity overshadows the daily experiences of stigmatized groups across contexts. Our hope is that our book will be viewed as making a contribution to the study of everyday racism and stigma management, the quest for recognition and the comparative study of inequality and processes of cultural change.

    Michèle Lamont is Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies and the Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard University. She serves as the 108th President of the American Sociological Association in 2016-2017. A cultural and comparative sociologist, Lamont is the author of a dozen books and edited volumes and close to one hundred articles and chapters on a range of topics including culture and inequality, racism and stigma, academia and knowledge, social change and Successful Societies, and qualitative methods. She is currently working on a monograph titled Being Worthy. Her most recent publications include the coauthored book Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil, and Israel (Princeton University Press, 2016) and a special issue of Social Science and Medicine on “Mutuality, Health Promotion, and Collective Cultural Change.” Lamont is Director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; and Co-director of the Successful Societies Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research.

    Getting Respect: Responding to Stigma and Discrimination in the United States, Brazil, and Israel (Princeton University Press, 2016) will be available for sale at the event.


    Speakers

    Michèle Lamont
    Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies and the Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 13th Q&A with Patrice Leconte

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 13, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMLocation TBA
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    Description

    Details to follow

    Contact

    Véronique Church-Duplessis


    Speakers

    Patrice Leconte
    Filmmaker and comics author



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 13th Book Launch: Dealing with Dictators - The United States, Hungary and East Central Europe, 1942 - 1989

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 13, 20165:00PM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Author Professor Laszlo Borhi’s book discusses the American dilemmas of external transformation during the Cold War as well as the constraints faced by weak states in international politics. The book is a result of extensive multi archival research.


    Speakers

    Laszlo Borhi
    Speaker
    Author

    Robert Austin
    Moderator
    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Susan M. Papp
    Discussant
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 13th The Statebuilder's Dilemma: On the Limits of Foreign Intervention

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 13, 20165:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Frank W. Woods Lecture

    Description

    The central task of all statebuilding is to create a state that is regarded as legitimate by the people over whom it exercises authority. States sufficiently motivated to bear the costs of building a state in some distant land, however, are likely to have interests in the future policies of that country, and will therefore seek to promote loyal leaders who are sympathetic to their interests and willing to implement their preferred policies. Except in rare cases where the policy preferences of the statebuilder and the population of the country whose state is to be built coincide, as in the famous success cases of West Germany and Japan after 1945, promoting a leader who will remain loyal to the statebuilder undermines that leader’s legitimacy at home. Paradoxically, the greater the interests of the statebuilder in the target country, the more difficult it is to build a legitimate state that can survive on its own. The analysis is illustrated through the case of U.S. statebuilding efforts in Iraq after 2003.

    David A. Lake is the Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. He presently President of the American Political Science Association.


    Speakers

    David A. Lake
    Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th The 1956 Hungarian Revolution and Its Repercussions: A Sixty-Year Retrospective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 20169:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “The 1956 Hungarian Revolution and Its Repercussions: A Sixty-Year Retrospective”
    October 14, 2016
    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    October 14th

    9:00 Welcoming Remarks – Robert C Austin, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs

    9:10 – 10:00 Professor Géza Jeszenszky: “Did the Democracies Let Hungary Down in 1956?”

    10:15 – 12:00 Panel 1 – Global 1956
    Panel chair: Susan M. Papp
    Panelists: Laszlo Borhi, Stefano Bottoni, Mark Kramer, Veszna Wessenauer

    12:00 – 1:30 Lunch

    1:30 – 3:30 Panel 2 – 1956 in Different Perspectives
    Panel chair: Eva Tomory
    Panelists: Sandor Hites, Janos Kenyeres, Peter Kreko, Attila Pok

    3:30 – 4:30 Dr. Magyarics Tamás: “The Revolution as Represented in American Fiction – Robert Little’s The Company, James A. Michener’s The Bridge at Andau, and William F. Buckley, Jr.’s Who’s On First

    Participants

    Professor Robert C. Austin
    Conference Chair
    Robert Austin is an Associate Professor at the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. In the past, Prof. Austin was a Tirana-based correspondent for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty; a Slovak-based correspondent with The Economist Group of Publications; and a news writer with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. Austin has written articles for The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, Southeast European Times, Orbis, East European Politics and Societies and East European Quarterly along with numerous book chapters and two books published separately in Tirana and Prishtina. His most recent book, Founding a Balkan State, was published by the University of Toronto Press in October 2012.

    Professor Laszlo Borhi
    “Could the US and the West have Saved the Revolution of 1956?”
    Laszlo Borhi is the Peter A. Kadas Chair and associate professor, School of Global and International Studies Department of Central Eurasian Studies Indiana University and Scientific Counsellor, Center for Humanities Institute of History Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Professor Borhi has just published Dealing with Dictators, The United States, Hungary, and East Central Europe, 1942-1989, Indiana University Press. He is currently working on a book, Dark Decade: Hungary, Central Europe between Hitler and Stalin, 1944/1953.

    Dr. Stefano Bottoni
    “Repression as Nation Building: The Consenquences of 1956 in Romania”
    Stefano Bottoni is senior fellow at the Research Center for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He has been visiting fellow at the Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung in Potsdam and at Imre Kertész Kolleg in Jena. He is a team member of the EU/Horizon-funded international project “COURAGE” on the cultural opposition in Eastern Europe under state socialism. His main research fields are the communist nationality policy in Eastern Europe and the social impact of state security bodies in a comparative perspective. The English edition of two of his books will be published in 2017: Stalin’s Greenhouse. The Hungarian Autonomous Region in Romania, 1952-1960 (Lexington Books, Harvard Cold War Series) and Long Awaited West: A History of Eastern Europe since 1944 (Indiana University Press).

    Professor Sandor Hites
    “The Revolt of Literature? Hungarian Writers in 1956”
    Sándor Hites studied Hungarian literature and philosophy at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, where he earned his PhD in 2005. Since 2003, he has worked as research fellow at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and as lecturer at universities in Hungary and Romania, teaching courses on the nineteenth-century European novel, exile studies, and political and literary utopianism. He has held visiting fellowships at the University of London (2009) and the University of Edinburgh (2012). His earlier research focused on the nineteenth-century Hungarian historical novel, his recent scholarly work has engaged with twentieth century exilic literature and the nineteenth-century intersections of literature and economy. He has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto since 2015.

    Professor Géza Jeszenszky
    “Did the Democracies Let Hungary Down in 1956?”
    Géza Jeszenszky was a founding member of the Hungarian Democratic Forum (1988), which won the free elections in April 1990, nominating him Minister for Foreign Affairs in the government of J. Antall (199094). Between 1994 and 1998, he was a member of the Opposition in Parliament and active in the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe. He was appointed Ambassador to the United States of America in 1998 and in 2002 resumed teaching history and international relations at the Corvinus University of Budapest. From 2011 to 2014, he was Ambassador to the Kingdom of Norway and the Republic of Iceland.

    Dr. Jeszenszky is the author of a large number of scholarly publications and political writings, including An Outline History of International Relations (Budapest, 1987); The Changing Image of Hungary in Britain,1894-1918 (Budapest, 1986, 1994, in Hungarian); Post-Communist Europe and Its National/Ethnic Problems (Budapest, 2005, 2009), also articles in journals and collective volumes published in Hungary, the United States, the U.K. and Germany. His book on Hungary’s relations to its neighbours in the years of the regime change came out in April. He has been a visiting professor in the United States, Poland, and Romania.

    Professor Janos Kenyeres
    “The 1956 Hungarian Revolution in Film: A Comparative Analysis”
    János Kenyeres is Director and Associate Professor in the School of English and American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, where he teaches English and Canadian literature, Canadian cinema, and literary theory. He has several publications in these fields, including the book Revolving around the Bible: A Study of Northrop Frye (2003). From 2005 to 2008, he was Visiting Professor of Hungarian at the University of Toronto. He is currently vice-president of the Central European Association for Canadian Studies, head of the Canadian Studies Centre in the School of English and American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, and co-editor of The AnaChronisT.

    Professor Mark Kramer
    “The USSR, the Communist Bloc, and Upheavals in Poland and Hungary”
    Mark Kramer is a professor and director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a senior fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has been a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria.

    Professor Peter Kreko
    “The Legacy of 1956 and Its Message for Today”
    Péter Krekó is the director of Political Capital Institute, a Budapest-based Central European political research and consultancy firm. He is also an associate professor at Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences in Budapest and a member of the of the EU Radicalisation Awareness Network Centre of Excellence pool of experts. He regularly serves as commentator for leading international media. His publications include: A Russian spy in Brussels, The Conspiratorial Mindset in Europe, Russian Influence, European far-right and Putin, a Hungarian Putin? Krekó wrote his PhD thesis on the Social Psychology of Conspiracy Theories.

    Dr. Tamás Magyarics
    “The Revolution as Represented in American Fiction – Robert Little’s The Company, James A. Michener’s The Bridge at Andau, and William F. Buckley, Jr.’s Who’s On First
    Dr. Magyarics is currently the Head of the North American Department at the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. He also teaches as Associate Professor at the School of English and American Studies, ELTE, Budapest. He served as Ambassador to Ireland from 2011 to 2015; was a Senior Research Fellow and later the Director of the Hungarian Institute for International Affairs. He has been teaching at ELTE, Budapest since 1987, and was a Guest Professor at the UCSB, the IES in Vienna in addition to various other Hungarian universities. His fields of interest include the history of the Cold War, with special reference to the US-Central European relations, the history of US foreign affairs, and the theory of international relations. He has written and edited eleven books on these topics, and authored some 200 articles in peer reviewed and other journals. He attended some 100 conferences and read papers at most of them.

    Susan M. Papp
    Susan M. Papp is a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation topic is “The Politics of Exclusion: The Hungarian Film Arts Chamber, 1938-1944.” In 2015, she was awarded the Tziporah Wiesel Fellowship at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. Previously, Ms. Papp spent fifteen years at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a director and story producer. While at the CBC, she won the coveted Michener Award for public service broadcasting. Ms. Papp also ran her own production company for a decade, working in such farflung locations as Taiwan and Bosnia. She is the author of many articles and books including Outcasts: A Love Story, published in English, Hungarian, and Hebrew and produced as a documentary film by the same title.

    Professor Attila Pok
    “Captive Minds in a Turmoil – The 1956 Hungarian Revolution as a Problem of Intellectual History.”
    Attila Pok is deputy director of the Institute of History at the Research Centre for Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, vice-president of the Hungarian Historical Association, senior researcher at the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg. Between 1999 and 2013, he spent 10 semesters as Visiting Professor of History at Columbia University in New York. His publications and courses cover nineteenth- and twentieth-century European political and intellectual history as well as the history of modern European historiography with special regard to political uses of history and theory and methodology of history. His most important books include: Klios Schuld, Klios Sühne. Historie und Politik im Karpatenbecken (MTA BTK TTI, Budapest, 2014), co-editor of The Oxford History of Historical Writing, vol. 4 (Oxford University Press, 2011), A haladás hitele. (The Credibility of Progress) (Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2010), The Politics of Hatred in the Middle of Europe. Scapegoating in Twentieth Century Hungary: History and Historiography (Savaria Books on Politics, Culture and Society. Savaria University Press, Szombathely, 2009), co-editor with Randolph L. Braham, The Hungarian Holocaust after Fifty Years (Columbia University Press, New York, 1997), and A Selected Bibliography of Modern Historiography (Bibliographies & Indexes in World History, number 24, Greenwood Press, 1992).

    Dr. Eva Tomory
    Eva M. Tomory graduated from Nagy Lajos High School in Pécs, Hungary. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Toronto and her master’s degree from York University. Eva Tomory earned her PhD (summa cum laude) from the University of Pécs, Hungary, in 2015. From 1984 to 2001, with occasional short breaks, she taught Hungarian at the Hungarian Chair of the University of Toronto. Since 2009, Dr. Tomory has taught introductory, intermediate, and advanced Hungarian language courses in the CERES Program at the Munk School of Global Affairs. From 1991 to 2010, she was the associate secretary of the Hungarian Studies Association of Canada. Dr. Tomory has been published in the Hungarian Studies Review and has presented papers at the conferences of the Hungarian Studies Association of Canada and at academic conferences in Croatia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, the United States, and Hungary.

    Veszna Wessenauer
    “The Role and the relevance of Hungarian civil society in 1956 and today.”
    Veszna Wessenauer completed her studies at the University of Szeged, Faculty of Law (International Relations BA, European Studies MA) and Central European University, Department of Legal Studies (Human Rights MA). During her studies she did numerous internships at Hungarian NGOs and international CSOs. She was involved in different projects and have gained expertise in the field of online human rights advocacy, human rights education and became a local consultant of international NGOs. She was the local coordinator of EU-Russia Civil Society Forum’s General Assembly in December 2015. She conducted legal research at the Center for Media, Data and Society on journalistic source protection and on the role and responsibility of social media companies in online violent political extremism. Her research interests consist of the following fields: human rights and its critical aspects; online freedom of expression and privacy; online extremism; correlation of education and democracy; contemporary role and relevance of civil society in CEE region; and Russian influence.

    Sponsors

    Rakoczi Foundation

    Hungarian Research Institute of Canada

    Co-Sponsors

    Linamar Corporation

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Friends of the Hungarian Studies Program

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    1956 Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight 60th Anniversary Memorial Board

    Consulate General of Hungary in Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th Constructing the Pax Americana: The Origins and Future of World Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    108N, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Frank W. Woods Lunchtime Lecture

    Description

    Constructing the Pax Americana: The Origins and Future of World Order

    David A. Lake is the Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. He presently President of the American Political Science Association.

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    David A. Lake
    Jerri-Ann and Gary E. Jacobs Professor of Social Sciences and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego


    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Sponsors

    Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and TEA!)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th Collusions of Fact and Fiction: A Historiopoetic Approach to Slavery in the Works of Suzan-Lori Parks and Kara Walker

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Taking its cue from novelist Fred D’Aguiar’s assertion that each generation of African Americans “need their own version of the past, to see the past in their own images, words. To have slavery nuanced their way,” this talk aims to examine some of the ways in which one particular generation of African American artists, those born in the post-Civil Rights era and emerging on the artistic scene in the 1990s, has attempted “to nuance” the enduring legacy of New World slavery in word, performance, and image according to their own needs. Concretely, it focuses on the works of playwright Suzan-Lori Parks and visual artist Kara Walker for case studies. The talk is based on a larger book project on recent engagements with slavery in African American culture and seeks to sketch out the book’s overall conceptual frame and theoretical premises. It attempts to identify a poetic paradigm shift in the engagement with slavery from the neo-slave narratives of the 1970s and 80s to the postmodern works of the 1990s and 2000s. In comparison with their predecessors, the younger artists’ works evince a heightened imaginative investment in the past, marked by liberal collusion of fact and fiction, a high degree of ludic (and frequently iconoclastic) signifying on established tropes, iconographies, and narrative structures of black memory culture and a prevalent and pointed (at times, irritating) sense of humor. To stress the radically performative dimension of their approach to slavery and to distinguish it from more conventionally mimetic historiographic praxis, I introduce the concept of historiopoiesis – the making of history in literature through poetic means. The difference in poetic approach also bespeaks a different attitude toward the past. Unlike the authors of neo-slave narratives, Parks and Walker deploy their imagination not in order to reconstruct or recuperate the experience of African Americans under slavery but to lay bare the discursive dimension of slavery, to address the fraught history and legacy of its various verbal and visual signs, and, in this manner, to clear a discursive space for fresh approaches to thinking about the past and its meanings for contemporary black identities.

    Ilka Saal is a Feodor Lynen Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at the University of Toronto and a Professor of American Literature at the University of Erfurt, Germany. She holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. She has written on the literature of September 11 as well as on 20th century and contemporary American drama and theatre, including the award-winning book New Deal Theater: The Vernacular Tradition in American Political Theater. Her current research focuses on recent engagements with New World slavery in African American literature, theatre, and visual culture.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ilka Saal
    Feodor Lynen Research Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, University of Toronto; Professor of American Literature, University of Erfurt, Germany.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of English, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 14th Ridicule (1996; dir. Patrice Leconte)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 14, 20166:00PM - 8:00PMTheatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    Roundtable discussion with Paul Cohen (Director, CEFMF) followed by screening of Ridicule (1996)

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Paul Cohen
    Director, CEFMF, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 17th Policy and Industry Co-Evolution for the Bioenergy Topic

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 17, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen
    Professor and Chair, Department of Geography University at Buffalo



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 17th The Accidental Superpower and the Coming Global Disorder

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 17, 201610:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Near the end of the Second World War, The United States made a bold strategic gambit that rewired the international system. Empires were abolished and replaced by a global arrangement enforced by the U.S. Navy. With all the world’s oceans safe for the first time in history, markets and resources were made available for everyone. Enemies became partners.

    We think of this system as normal – it is not. We live in an artificial world on borrowed time.

    In The Accidental Superpower, international strategist Peter Zeihan examines how the hard rules of geography are eroding the American commitment to free trade; how much of the planet is aging into a mass retirement that will enervate markets and capital supplies; and how, against all odds, it is the ever-ravenous American economy that-alone among the developed nations-is rapidly approaching energy independence. Combined, these factors are doing nothing less than overturning the global system and ushering in a new (dis)order.

    Geopolitical Strategist Peter Zeihan is a global energy, demographic and security expert.

    Zeihan’s worldview marries the realities of geography and populations to a deep understanding of how global politics impact markets and economic trends, helping industry leaders navigate today’s complex mix of geopolitical risks and opportunities. With a keen eye toward what will drive tomorrow’s headlines, his irreverent approach transforms topics that are normally dense and heavy into accessible, relevant takeaways for audiences of all types.

    In his career, Zeihan has ranged from working for the US State Department in Australia, to the DC think tank community, to helping develop the analytical models for Stratfor, one of the world’s premier private intelligence companies. Mr. Zeihan founded his own firm — Zeihan on Geopolitics — in 2012 in order to provide a select group of clients with direct, custom analytical products. Today those clients represent a vast array of sectors including energy majors, financial institutions, business associations, agricultural interests, universities and the U.S. military.

    His freshman book, The Accidental Superpower, debuted in 2014. His sophomore project, Shale New World, will be released later this year.


    Speakers

    Peter Zeihan
    Author and Geopolitical Strategist


    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Omers Ventures


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 17th Elderly Care Policy in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 17, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Japan is a rapidly ageing society with the world’s second longest life expectancy. The increase of the care burden has become a serious political issue. Since the implementation of the Long Term Care Taking Insurance in 2000, Japan has accumulated 16 years of experience. Recently the Japanese government has shifted its policy towards ageing in place and dying at home, which is welcomed by the elderly. But how can it be realized? I will examine this policy change in light of the practice of medical practitioners and care providers.

    Light refreshment will be provided.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sheila Neysmith


    Sponsors

    Center for Global Social Policy

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 19th “Shifting Paradigms: De-Pathologizing Alzheimer’s Disease in Canada and Israel through Education, Arts and Creativity”

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 19, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dementia is a cultural phenomenon that affects society as much as it does the individuals who bear the paralyzing label. As a researcher and a carer to my mother, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer at the age of 58, my research highlights the ways in which symbolic language comes to define dire realities both for individuals who are labeled as patients of neurodegenerative diseases and for their families who are expected to accept the ‘sentence of social death.’ The aim of my cross-disciplinary research and advocacy efforts is to offer an alternative language to talk about dementia by educating the public about arts-based and improvisational skills in order to improve quality of life, prevent isolation and create a sense of community and self-worth for individuals living with the diagnosis and their families.

    My research reflects on the discourse employed both in English speaking countries, where a national dementia strategy is practiced or in the process of becoming; and in Israel, where a national strategy has not yet been normalized and/or institutionalized. The goal of my research is to critically examine the popular discourse that is used to talk about AD and the impact of this language on Alzheimer’s and dementia-related policies that in turn, affect negatively the everyday lives of persons diagnosed with AD and their families and care-partners. Through my research I wish to change the language that we use to talk about AD and dementia, as illnesses or disease, and start evaluating the condition as a cultural phenomenon that reveals the constructedness of seemingly naturalized concepts such as memory, identity, pathology and tragedy.

    Liza Futerman is a Vanier doctoral scholar at the Centre for Comparative Literature and the the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto, where she researches the popular discourse around Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the ways it affects policymakers, individuals who are diagnosed as ‘AD patients’ and families. Futerman holds an MA in History of Art and Visual Culture from the University of Oxford, UK, and a BA and MA in Foreign Literatures and Linguistics from Ben-Gurion University in Israel. Futerman is a writer and an avid advocate for arts-based dementia care. She is the CEO & Founder of www.ArtsForDementia.com


    Speakers

    Liza Futerman
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 20th Cooperation between Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians in Lviv during WWII

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 20, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During WWII Lviv experienced a variety of traumatic occupations that disrupted the balance of relations between its major ethnic inhabitants, Poles, Jews, and Ukrainians. Prof Hnatiuk explores the myths, the animosities, and the interactions between these groups during the war years, dispelling many of the presumed truths about irremediable hostility and conflicts. Her focus is on the relations between individuals as documented in personal archives rather than on collective perceptions and activities.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Aleksandra (Ola) Hnatiuk
    Speaker
    Professor in Culture Studies, University of Warsaw

    Maxim Tarnawsky
    Chair
    Professor at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 21st Seminar with Theda Skocpol

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 21, 201611:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University. At Harvard, she has served as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and as Director of the Center for American Political Studies. In 2002-03, she served as President of the American Political Science Association. She has been elected to membership in all three major U.S. interdisciplinary honor societies: the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. Skocpol’s research focuses on health reform, social policy, and civic engagement amidst the shifting inequalities in American democracy. Current projects include tracking the implementation of health reform in the U.S. states; analyzing the dynamics of local Tea Party groups; and probing how the Democratic Party has handled – and mishandled – political battles over taxes and public revenues. Her most recent books are Health Care Reform and American Politics (2012, with Lawrence R. Jacobs), The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism (2012, with Vanessa Williamson), and Obama and America’s Political Future (2012). In addition to her teaching, research, and service in academia, Skocpol currently directs the Scholars Strategy Network, a national organization she co-founded in 2009 that encourages public engagement by university-based scholars. Skocpol speaks regularly to community groups and writes for blogs and public-interest magazines. She has met with groups of Congressional Democrats and attended White House sessions that included the president during the Clinton years.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Theda Skocpol
    Victor S. Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University, and Director of the Scholars Strategy Network.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    History Department, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 21st Dust, between Life and Death: Reflections on the Materiality of Media

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 21, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This paper begins with Zhao Liang’s Behemoth (悲兮魔兽), a controversial experimental film on extractive industries and the lost bodies and ghosts that roam the ruined and toxic landscapes of Inner Mongolia. My interest in this film is part of a larger project asking how we might study the dust that causes industrial explosions, that gathers in gold and coalmines, in the lungs, becomes a part of the everyday for those who care for the near dead, or mourn the already gone. We live now in a moment marked by air pollution masks as fashion statements. We know masking is performed on social media platforms. And we know all about mostly western media attempts to portray China as an eco-apocalyptic death zone. Lost in this media frenzy are those hidden away in factories or those workers who labour underground, those often denied masks and respirators. This takes me into stories of scholars and activists who care for the sick and the dying, who work to make dust legible. Dust kills and it creates demands for justice and forms of compensation, even though these activists and families know that lives sacrificed for national wealth and global media connectivity can never be reclaimed. I conclude with some thoughts on how our own tools of research and storytelling – mobile phones, digital cameras and images, social media platforms, batteries, cables and clouds – are implicated in the dust that enters the everyday lives of miners and industrial workers, in China and elsewhere. How dust is part of the global everyday.

    Ralph Litzinger is Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. He is the author of Other Chinas: the Yao and the Politics of National Belonging (Duke University Press, 2000). His most recent book, with Carlos Rojas, is Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China (Duke University Press, 2016). He has published on dam protests and environmental politics in southwest China, on rural-urban migration, and suicide as a form of protest in contemporary China. He is the editor of the “Labor Question in China: Apple and Beyond,” in South Atlantic Quarterly in 2013, and co-editor of “Self Immolation as Protest in Tibet,” a 2012 online issue of Cultural Anthropology. He is currently completing a book manuscript called Migrant Futures: China from the Urban Fringe. His new research concerns eco-media, media materialism, and the visualization of the Anthropocene.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ralph A Litzinger
    Professor, Duke University, Cultural Anthropology


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 21st Dawn of the Vinelords: Wine and Capitalism in Colonial Algeria

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 21, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith 2098
    100 St George St.
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In the late nineteenth century wine production took off in French-ruled Algeria, to such an extent that for most of the following century this Muslim-majority territory was the fourth biggest wine producer in the world. Many of Algeria’s vineyards were on a scale that far exceeded those found in metropolitan France, earning some colonists spectacular fortunes and, in time, significant influence over the colony’s affairs. Through a study of the backgrounds and business dealings of these “vinelords,” this talk will demonstrate the central importance of wine to the economic life of colonial Algeria, while arguing that agricultural capitalism also posed substantial risks to the French project of colonization.

    Owen White is an associate professor of history at the University of Delaware. His publications include Children of the French Empire: Miscegenation and Colonial Society in French West Africa, 1895-1960 and the edited volume (with J.P. Daughton) In God’s Empire: French Missionaries and the Modern World, as well as articles on a variety of topics in French colonial history. He is currently completing a book manuscript about the Algerian wine industry.


    Speakers

    Owen White
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Delaware


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 24th Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 24, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In his acclaimed new book, Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, Adam Hochschild argues that we pay too little attention to this tragic piece of history and that, in a sense, World War II began in 1936–in Spain. Where else, after all, were Canadians, Britons, and Americans in uniform being bombed by Nazi pilots long before Hitler attacked France and Poland? Please join us for a seminar in which Prof. Hochschild discusses his work, and invites your response.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Adam Hochschild
    Professor, UC-Berkeley


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    St. Michael's College, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 24th Distinguished Lecture: Voltaire and the Radical Enlightenment

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 24, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMOld Victoria College, Alumni Hall
    73 Queen’s Park Crescent
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    Description

    Further details to follow


    Speakers

    Nicholas Cronk
    Director, Voltaire Foundation, Oxford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 25th The Composer as a Curator: Following John Cage's Composition for Museum

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 25, 20164:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 1989, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles (MoCA) invited the American composer and artist John Cage to create a new artwork. The result was a chance-derived four movement composition for museum entitled Rolywholyover A Circus. While many other artists have experimented with the form of an art exhibition, Cage’s project constituted something new: he constructed his exhibition in a manner akin to his musical composition, forming a new field of research – the composer as a curator – where the exhibition space adopts sound composition principles, and thereby, alters the concept of exhibition-making.

    Liora Belford is a PhD Candidate from the Department of Art, University of Toronto. As a sound artist, scholar, and curator who has had the opportunity to organize exhibitions in both public and private institutions, Belford’s practice spans the experimental sonic realm. In her ongoing research, she investigate the relationship between sound and space and her doctoral thesis surrounds the American composer John Cage and his groundbreaking composition for museum – Rolywholyover A Circus.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Liora Belford
    PhD Student, Art History Department, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 26th A New History of Vietnam? Questions of Colonialism, Collaboration, and Periodization

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 26, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    It has never been easy to write the history of Vietnam. This small country’s role in one of the most violent wars of decolonization of the 20th century and in one of the Cold War’s longest conflicts has meant that its past has been endlessly abused for all sorts of purposes, both inside and outside the country. It is perhaps only now, in the early 21st century, that the events which created the modern state can be seen from a more dispassionate, historical perspective. To illustrate this point, Christopher Goscha examines two themes that have been left out of standard accounts of Vietnam – the question of Vietnamese colonialism and collaboration. He will also suggest why it might be useful to revisit the question of periodizing Vietnam’s ‘modern history’ in terms of this country’s colonial encounter with the French in 1858 in order to push it further back in time or leave it open.

    Christopher Goscha is associate professor of international relations at the department of history at the Université du Québec à Montréal. His works focuses on colonial Indochina, the wars over Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, and the Cold War in Asia. He recently published Vietnam, A New History (Basic Books, 2016) and is currently working on a social history of colonial Saigon and Hanoi in a time of war (1945-54).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 26th What Ukrainians and Jews Know and What They Do not Know about One Another

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 26, 20165:00PM - 7:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100A
    170 St. George Street
    Toronto, Ontario, M5R 2M8
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    Description

    There is much that ordinary Ukrainians do not know about Jews and that ordinary Jews do not know about Ukrainians. As a result, those Jews and Ukrainians who may care about their respective ancestral heritages usually view each other through distorted stereotypes, misperceptions, and biases. This talk sheds new light on highly controversial moments of Ukrainian-Jewish relations and argues that the historical experience in Ukraine not only divided ethnic Ukrainians and Jews but also brought them together.

    Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern is the Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor of History in the History Department at Northwestern University, Chicago. He has authored a number of prize-winning books, including The Golden Age Shtetl (Princeton University Press, 2015). His research and publications have been supported by a number of foundations, including the Rothschild, Jewish Memorial, DAAD, Kosziuszko, Lady Davis, and National Endowment for the Humanities. He has taught at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv. For his pedagogical and scholarly contribution, he has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” in Kyiv.

    Registration is not required for this event.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Yohanan Petrovsky Shtern
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    Ukrainian Jewish Encounter


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 27th The Look of Silence Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 27, 20163:00PM - 7:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
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    Description

    The Center for Southeast Asian Studies invites you to the first screening of a brand-new movie series. We will screen the second documentary by critically-acclaimed filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer (The Act of Killing) about the 1965 Indonesian genocide. In this sequel, Oppenheimer “focuses on a family of survivors who discovers how their son was murdered, as well as the identities of the killers. The youngest son, an optometrist named Adi, decides to break the suffocating spell of submission and terror by doing something unimaginable in a society where the murderers remain in power: he confronts the men who killed his brother and, while testing their eyesight, asks them to accept responsibility for their actions. This unprecedented film initiates and bears witness to the collapse of fifty years of silence http://thelookofsilence.com/).” Tania Li, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Southeast Studies, will comment on the movie and contextualize it in relation to politics and development in Indonesia.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Professor, Anthropology; Director, Center for Southeast Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 27th Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 27, 20164:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A panel discussion on the civic and scholarly significance of the book, Jews and Ukrainians: A Millennium of Co-Existence, co-authored by Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (University of Toronto) and Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (Northwestern University), and published by University of Toronto Press.

    Chair:

    Professor Doris Bergen
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

    Commentators:

    Adrian Karatnycky
    Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council

    Professor Ori Yehudai
    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Professor Anna Shternshis
    Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Respondents:

    Professor Paul Robert Magocsi
    Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Professor Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University


    Speakers

    Doris Bergen
    Chair
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

    Adrian Karatnycky
    Chair
    Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council

    Ori Yehudai
    Commentator
    Professor at the Department of History, University of Toronto

    Anna Shternshis
    Commentator
    Director, Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Paul Robert Magocsi
    Commentator
    Professor and Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern
    Speaker
    The Crown Family Professor of Jewish Studies, Northwestern University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair of Holocaust Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    Ukrainian Jewish Encounter


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th Conference: Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in Comparative Historical Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20161:00PM - 5:30PMKnox College, 23 King's College Circle/St. George St., University of Toronto
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    Description

    The conference will bring together presenters on the Irish (Peter Gray, Queen’s University, Belfast), Bengal (Janam Mukherjee, Ryerson University), and Ukrainian (Liudmyla Hrynevych, Academy of Sciences, Ukraine) famines and examine differences and commonalities (Mark von Hagen, Arizona State University and Andrea Graziosi, Italian National Agency for the Evaluation of University and Research).

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th Editing Hitler's Mein Kampf: A Critical Experience

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20162:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In this lecture, Prof. Andreas Wirsching will discuss the critical edition of Hitler’s Mein Kampf, which the Institute for Contemporary History published earlier this year following the expiry of the copyright in 2015 (i.e., 70 years after the death of the author) and which has since attracted worldwide attention. Prof. Wirsching will expound upon the many scholarly, legal, political, and moral aspects that were taken into account in producing this new edition.

    Andreas Wirsching has been Director of the Institut für Zeitgeschichte (Institute for Contemporary History) München – Berlin and Full Professor for Modern and Contemporary History at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich since April 2011. Prior to this appointment, he was Associate Professor for Modern West European History at the University of Tübingen and then Full Professor for Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Augsburg. He studied History, (Protestant) Theology and Philosophy at the Universities in Berlin and Erlangen and received his doctoral degree from the University of Erlangen in 1988. In 1995, he received his habilitation at the University of Regensburg. His research focuses, among others, on the History of Germany and France in the Interwar Period, on the History of National Socialism as well as on German and European History since the 1970s.

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Institute for Contemporary History - Munich

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 28th “Religious Suicide” and the Limits of Indian Secularism: Screening and Discussion with the director Shekhar Hattangadi

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 28, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMMedia Commons Theatre
    130 St George St, 3rd Floor
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    What happens when a traditional religious practice conflicts with modern secular law? The talk — in conjunction with the film — addresses this central question as it looks at the tensions that arise when a religious tradition endorses the self-extinguishment of human life in a legal system that treats suicide as a criminal offence. It explores the doctrinal-scriptural, ethical, medico-legal and sociological aspects of Santhara — a Jain practice in which a person fasts unto death — and examines how religion, law and constitutional secularism intersect in the ongoing debate outside the courtroom and in the litigation over the legality of the practice. Irrespective of how the Indian courts may rule in the matter, Santhara remains a classic example of the law-religion conflict, and provides an ideal template for debating the question of reconciling individual freedom as well as a minority community’s religious rights with the justification for state intervention in matters of religion.

    A Mumbai,India-based media columnist, law professor and film-maker, Shekhar Hattangadi believes he is an academic at heart. He topped University of Mumbai’s law exams bagging three gold medals, and he fondly recalls his years as a student and researcher on the American campus: first as a graduate student at Ohio University in Athens,OH and then as a Kennedy Fellow in Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F.Kennedy School of Government. SANTHARA: A Challenge to Indian Secularism? is the first of his series of documentaries examining controversial religious practices in India.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Shekhar Hattangadi
    University of Mumbai, India


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 29th The Holodomor and the Language of Hate in Stalinist Propaganda (In Ukrainian).

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 29, 20164:00PM - 6:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute, 620 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    Dr. Hrynevych will discuss propaganda in the context of the Holodomor.

    Please note that the lecture will be in Ukrainian.

    If you have any questions regarding the event, including registration, please contact Ms. Marta Baziuk at 416 923-4732

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Liudmyla Hrynevych
    Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Ukrainian Canadian Research & Documentation Centre

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2016

  • Wednesday, November 2nd International Agreements and National Policy Change: The Political Origins of (Mal)nutrition

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 2, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Human rights are firmly entrenched in international law, however, the protection of these rights remains a serious challenge. While the right to health can be upheld through the state provision of public goods and services, states vary in their willingness to prioritize health on the national agenda. What role can international actors play in eliciting national policy change? The influence of international agreements has long been the subject of a lively discussion amongst scholars and policymakers alike. Conventional scholarship has focused on investigating international treaties and formal, legally binding agreements. The United Nations (UN), however, has increasingly turned to the use of more informal approaches. For this reason, my dissertation examines a non-binding agreement, the UN-led Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) initiative. SUN requires country signatories to improve maternal and child nutrition policies, but the agreement has no legal charter, provides no direct financial incentive, and uses no formal mechanism for punishing non-compliance. Does SUN contribute to national policy change? If so, under what conditions? Since SUN emerged in 2009, country signatories have travelled down dramatically different paths. Certain countries pushed through rapid national policy change, while others remained stagnant. What explains these diverging trajectories? And what do these outcomes reveal about the UN’s ability to influence policy change? Drawing upon original fieldwork carried out in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, the Philippines, and Thailand, I show how the same agreement can drive policy change in certain countries, while constraining improvements in others. My dissertation introduces a theoretical framework to elaborate on the causal mechanisms explaining these outcomes.

    Carmen Jacqueline Ho is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Science. At the Munk School of Global Affairs, she is the Health and Human Rights Senior Doctoral Fellow with the Comparative Program on Health and Society and a Doctoral Fellow with the Asian Institute. At the Hospital for Sick Children, she is affiliated with the Centre for Global Child Health. Her research interests include global governance, the political economy of development, comparative social policy, and health politics. Her research has been supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, International Development Research Centre, Ontario Graduate Scholarship, and the Vivienne Poy Chancellor’s Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

    Dr. Onil Bhattacharyya is a family physician and the Frigon-Blau Chair in Family Medicine Research at Women’s College Hospital. He is also an associate professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and an assistant professor at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto. He received his medical degree at McGill University. He has a PhD in health services research from the University of Toronto and was a Takemi Fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health.


    Speakers

    Dr. Onil Bhattacharyya
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine

    Carmen Ho
    Speaker
    Lupina Health and Human Rights Fellow, doctoral candidate at the Department of Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 2nd R2P Has A Long Way To Go

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 2, 20163:30PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Dr. Kurt Mills is Senior Lecturer in International Human Rights at the University of Glasgow, where he is the Director of the Glasgow Human Rights Network. He previously taught at the American University in Cairo, Mount Holyoke College, James Madison University, and Gettysburg College, and served as the Assistant Director of the Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies at Hampshire College. He is the author of numerous publications on human rights, humanitarianism, humanitarian intervention, international criminal justice, and international organizations, including, most recently, International Responses to Mass Atrocities in Africa: Responsibility to Protect, Prosecute, and Palliate (University of Pennsylvania Press). He is the founder of the International Studies Association (ISA) Human Rights section, past Vice-President of ISA, and current Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of the Academic Council on the United Nations System.


    Speakers

    Dr. Kurt Mills
    Senior Lecturer in International Human Rights at the University of Glasgow


    Main Sponsor

    Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Peace, Conflict and Justice Society, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 4th The Politics of Shari'a Law: Islamist Activists and the State in Democratizing Indonesia

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Islamization of politics in Indonesia after 1998 presents an underexplored puzzle: why has there been a rise in the number of shari’a laws despite the electoral decline of Islamist parties? In his talk, Michael Buehler presents an analysis of the conditions under which Islamist activists situated outside formal party politics may capture and exert influence in Muslim-majority countries facing democratization. His analysis shows that introducing competitive elections creates new pressures for entrenched elites to mobilize and structure the electorate, thereby opening up new opportunities for Islamist activists to influence politics.

    Michael Buehler is a Senior Lecturer in Comparative Politics in the Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London. Specializing in Southeast Asian politics, his teaching and research interests evolve around state-society relations under conditions of democratization and decentralization.Previously he taught at Columbia University and Northern Illinois University. He has also held research fellowships at the Center for Equality Development and Globalization Studies at Northwestern University in Chicago, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute in New York City, and the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. Michael Buehler has been an Associate Research Fellow at the Asia Society in New York City since 2011.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Michael Buehler
    Senior Lecture, Comparative Politics, Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London


    Sponsors

    Insitute of Islamic Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 4th Chornobyl 30 Years After: Energy, Environment, Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 4, 20162:30PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The explosion at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant on April 26, 1986 continues to have serious economic, social, and biological consequences for the inhabitants of the affected territories and beyond. The problems caused by the disaster in Ukraine and policies developed to address them have been further complicated by geopolitical conflict and the economic and humanitarian crisis this conflict has precipitated. To commemorate the 30th anniversary of the disaster, this panel brings together scholars to discuss issues such as the future nuclear energy in Ukraine, the impact of radiation on wildlife in Chornobyl’s exclusion zone, and the management of displaced people. In situating their research, panelists will draw comparisons between the Chornobyl and Fukushima accidents, and between the Chornobyl accident and Ukraine’s Anti-Terrorist Operation.

    Presentations:

    Chernobyl and the Future of Nuclear Power in Ukraine
    David Marples, Professor, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta

    Do Nuclear Accidents Generate a “Garden of Eden” for Wildlife? Lessons from the Chernobyl and Fukushima Disasters
    Tim Mousseau, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina.

    A Humanitarian Crisis after the Chernobyl Disaster and the Anti-terrorist Operation (ATO) in Ukraine: What do They Have in Common?
    Alexander Belyakov, Ph.D., Certified Sustainability Professional. The Roots Collaborative, Founding Member

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    David Marples
    Distinguished University Professor and Chair, Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta; Director of the Stasiuk Program for the Study of Contemporary Ukraine

    Tim Mousseau
    Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of South Carolina. Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The American Council of Learned Societies, and the National Explorers Club

    Alexander Belyakov
    Ph.D., Certified Sustainability Professional. The Roots Collaborative, Founding Member. http://alexbelyakov.com/


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 7th Interdependence: Beyond the Binaries

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 7, 20166:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Wiegand Memorial Foundation Lecture

    Description

    A focus on the autonomous individual as the primary unit of concern has characterized both philosophy and social and life science. Feminists, on the other hand, have rejected the traditional focus on the autonomous individual as an expression of the neglect of gender in understanding all forms of social life. This lecture explores ways of moving beyond the binaries of independence/dependence and autonomous/ heteronomous to an analytic stance that recognizes both individuals and the social and physical relations in which they find themselves.

    Professor Helen Longino is the Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The author of several books, including Studying Human Behavior, she is particularly interested in the relations between scientific inquiry and its social, cultural, and economic contexts and is known for her arguments in defense of a social account of objectivity, a position she called critical contextual empiricism.

    The purpose of the Wiegand Memorial Foundation Lecture is to facilitate the encounter and advance the dialogue between science and the non-rational in the modern world as understood by, but not limited to, intuition, the spiritual dimension in life, poetry, art, literature, music, symbols, belief and faith.


    Speakers

    Professor Helen Longino
    Clarence Irving Lewis Professor of Philosophy, Stanford University


    Sponsors

    Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 8th Empires and the Idea of Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 8, 20164:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Visitor Lecture

    Description

    The word “culture” in English today gestures toward two distinct ideas: one of a universal hierarchy of values, embodied in canons of art and literature; and the other of a plurality of systems of value associated with different societies. In what was called the “culture life,” cosmopolitan intellectuals in Japan between the two world wars conceived a third sort of culture in an attempt to bridge Eurocentric hierarchy and local particularism. The idea also gained currency in colonial Korea. Although the “culture life” in Japan collapsed in the 1930s under the weight of its own idealism, it had a long life in Korea and saw a revival in Japan after the war. The unresolved dialectic between universal Culture and particular cultures was later absorbed into heritage protection policy under UNESCO, where Japan played an important role as one of the most powerful non-European participants. This lecture will show how a hybrid conception of culture was enabled by Japan’s position among the imperial powers, and how the fall of the Japanese empire and the dismantling of European colonial empires redefined what could be imagined under the rubric of culture.

    Jordan Sand is Professor of Japanese History and Culture at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He holds a masters degree in architecture history from the University of Tokyo and a doctorate in history from Columbia University. His research focuses on material culture and the history of everyday life. He is the author of House and Home in Modern Japan (Harvard University Press, 2004), Tokyo Vernacular: Common Spaces, Local Histories, Found Objects (University of California Press, 2013) and 帝国日本の生活空間 (Living Spaces of Imperial Japan; Iwanami shoten, 2015). He has also published on historical memory, museums and cultural heritage policy, and the history of food. He has served as visiting professor at Sophia University, the University of Tokyo, University of Michigan, and the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences in Paris. He is presently a visiting researcher at Waseda University working on a study of the history of slums in Tokyo and other Asian cities.


    Speakers

    Jordan Sand
    Professor, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 9th Community Safety, Insecurity, and Radicalization: Holocaust Memory and Education in the 21st Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 9, 20163:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This panel discussion focuses on issues of antisemitism and community safety in Europe. Concern over Jewish community safety continues to be prominent, including apprehension over Holocaust denial and trivialization. This session focuses on responses that seek to increase community security and address radicalization: in France, a prefect was appointed to protect religious and cultural sites; the Director of the Mémorial de la Shoah has identified Holocaust and genocide education as a means to combat antisemitism; and a European Commission Colloquium has included Holocaust education and criminalizing Holocaust denial as hate speech among its proposals to address hate crime and promote inclusivity. Building on these responses, this discussion will include invited panelists, chaired by HEW Scholar-in- Residence Prof. Ron Levi, who will explore the meaning of community safety in the current context, the role of Holocaust memory and education in addressing radicalization, and how the European Jewish experience opens thinking into the role of memory in promoting community safety.

    Co-presented by the Consulate General of France.
    Generously co-sponsored by Naomi Rifkind Mansell & David Mansell in honour of Joyce Rifkind.
    The HEW Scholar-in-Residence is sponsored by the Cohen Family Charitable Trust.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Consulate General of France

    Naomi Rifkind Mansell & David Mansell in honour of Joyce Rifkind

    Sarah & Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 11th Revolutions in Indology

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 11, 20164:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture

    Description

    Amidst the challenges of diminishing funding and folding departments, the study of India’s classical languages and cultures has been enjoying an unexpected period of excitement and development. Indology is alive, dynamic, and full of new ideas that make major differences to how we think about India’s past. Examples of ideas where old certainties are being challenged include the dating and relationships of early yoga literature, the Greater Magadha hypothesis, the date of the Arthaśāstra, the Buddhist origins of ayurveda and yoga, the Tibetan Buddhist tantric origins of Hatha Yoga, and the origins of Dharmaśāstra. Ideas from Olivelle, Bronkhorst, Zysk, Maas, Pollock, Mallinson, Singleton and others are transforming Indian studies in major ways. Not all these new hypotheses will survive longer scrutiny. But many will, and tomorrow’s Indology may be a renewed and markedly different field of scholarship.

    Dominik Wujastyk is the Saroj and Prem Singhmar Chair of Classical Indian Society and Polity at the University of Alberta, a post he has held since 2015. He was educated at Oxford University, and later worked as a curator of Sanskrit manuscripts at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London. From 2002 to 2009 he held a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship at University College London, and from 2009 to 2014 he worked on the project “Philosophy and Medicine in Early Classical India” at the University of Vienna. His monograph publications include Metarule of Paninian Grammar (1992) and The Roots of Ayurveda (3rd ed. 2003), and he is currently working with Prof. Philipp Maas (Leipzig) on a book about the earliest history of Indian yoga postures.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dominik Wujastyk
    University of Alberta, Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 11th Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture: "The Fields of Sorrow: Mapping the Great Ukrainian Famine"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 11, 20167:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past lecturers have included James Mace, Norman Naimark, Alexander Motyl, Anne Applebaum, and Tymothy Snyder.


    Speakers

    Serhii Plokhy
    Mykhailo S. Hrushevs'kyi Professor of Ukrainian History; Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    The Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    The Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES)

    the Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto branch


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 15th In Conversation with Jameel Jaffer: Drones, targeted killings and state secrets

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 15, 201612:00PM - 2:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join Jameel Jaffer, Munk School Distinguished Fellow and Director of the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University, in conversation on the United States drone program, targeted assassinations, and government secrecy.

    The discussion will touch on Jaffer’s new book on the “drone memos” – US government documents setting out the scope of the drone program and its justifications obtained from the Freedom of Information Act – and draw on his experience as one of America’s foremost litigators and advocates on national security and civil liberties.

    November 15, 2016
    12:00-12:30 p.m. light lunch
    12:30-2:00 p.m. lecture & discussion


    Speakers

    Jameel Jaffer
    Speaker
    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs Director, Knight First Amendment Institute, Columbia University

    Ron Deibert
    Chair
    Director, Citizen Lab

    Carmen Cheung
    Moderator
    Executive Director, Global Justice Lab



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 16th Social and Biological Mechanisms Underlying the Relationship between Dietary Patterns and Incident 2 Diabetes: A Comparative Study

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 16, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Type 2 diabetes is a major health issue in Canada, with a prevalence that continues to grow despite billions invested towards treatment and prevention. About 90% of new cases are due to a small number of lifestyle factors including poor diet and inadequate physical activity. While clinical interventions have shown a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes, little emphasis has been placed on lifestyle change including diet at the population level.

    Given the growing burden of type 2 diabetes, there is an urgent need to explain the poorly understood mechanisms through which specific dietary patterns promote disease progression at the population level. Thus, my plan of study is to identify the extent to which various mediating pathways explain the association between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes risk.

    Importantly, gender and SES differences in this relationship are understudied, and corresponding prevention strategies may be ineffective by not accounting for these differential effects. Accordingly, a central focus of my project involves a systematic comparison between gender and SES groups as modifiers of the association between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes risk.

    This project will examine previously neglected comparisons between men and women as well as investigate the role of public policy as it relates to fundamental SES constructs including food security and affordable access to healthy foods which are key components of this emerging research area.

    Christopher Tait is a third year PhD candidate in Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. He received a BSc in Human Biology, Health and Society from Cornell University and an MPH in Epidemiology from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. He is broadly interested in chronic disease epidemiology and more specifically on factors that underpin sociodemographic and racial disparities in chronic disease risk factors and related outcomes. He has also spent time abroad in Sub-Saharan Africa studying regional differences in chronic diseases in vulnerable populations in low- and middle-income countries. His dissertation will explore social and biological mechanisms by which diet influences type 2 diabetes risk in the Canadian population.


    Speakers

    Christopher Tait
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 18th Le Tombeau du martyr juif inconnu and Jewish Memory of Deportation after the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    A memorial to the six million murdered Jews of Europe was inaugurated in Paris in 1956. It is now known as the Mémorial de la Shoah, but then it was called the Tombeau du Martyr juif inconnu. This memorial was one of the first of its kind, and its construction was completed in the mid-1950s, when, according to received wisdom, a general silence about the fate of European Jewry in the Second World War was said to prevail. How and why was the memorial constructed; how is it to be interpreted; and why was the memorial built in France?

    Philip Nord is the Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Princeton University, where he has taught since 1981. He is the author of several books on the history of modern France, including: The Republican Moment: Struggles for Democracy in Nineteenth-Century France (1995), Impressionists and Politics: Art and Democracy in the Nineteenth Century (2000); France’s New Deal: From the Thirties to the Postwar Era (2010); and France 1940: Defending the Republic (2015).


    Speakers

    Philip Nord
    Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Princeton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 22nd Three Seismic Shifts in the Global Economy and Japan as a Spearhead of the Change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 22, 20162:00PM - 4:00PMMulti-Faith Centre
    Main Activity Hall
    569 Spadina Avenue, 2nd Floor
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Three “seismic” shifts in the global economy are identified.

    (1) There is a persistent dampening fallout from the property bubbles, busts, and the ensuing financial crises.
    (2) Information communication technology becomes ubiquitous and unfortunately employment-unfriendly.
    (3) Many economies have shifted or are close to shift from the demographic bonus phase of young and growing population to the demographic onus phase of aging population.

    Japan has been a spearhead of these changes and many economies seem to follow suit. These seismic shifts carry both short- and long-run effects, with strong policy implications. In the short run, they have generally weakened aggregate demand, and rendered it less responsive to traditional macroeconomic stimulus. In the long run, many economies are losing flexibility, such that their capacity to adjust is declining. Finally, and most importantly, the novelty of these conditions has heightened uncertainty. This heightened uncertainty poses a serious challenge to policy makers.

    Speaker Bio:

    Kiyohiko G. Nishimura is Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo and National Graduate Institute for Public Policy. He was Deputy Governor of the Bank of Japan for five years until March 19, 2013, one of the most turbulent periods in the history of the world economy and central banking. He was awarded Emperor’s Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon in 2015, for his outstanding contribution to theoretical economics. Professor Nishimura received his PhD from Yale University in 1982.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Kiyohiko G. Nishimura
    Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo and National Graduate Institute for Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 29th Which is Complementary? Negotiating (Bio)medical Knowledge

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 29, 20164:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    As biology is becoming increasingly understood as a technology, as something that can be made and re-made, and technology is becoming more ‘biologized,’ what new meanings of ‘natural’ emerge? What does it mean to create a life ‘naturally’ in the context of an intensely materialist, capitalist, and (bio)technological society? How might alternative fertility treatments such as acupuncture, be (re)conceptualized in the context of a dominant framework of Western biomedicine that relies on the normalization of technological advancements like assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)? Drawing on fieldwork conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area from July-August 2016, this talk will explore the ways in which biomedical knowledge surrounding reproduction is translated, mediated, and contested in the context of alternative fertility clinics. Nahal will pay close attention to the logics of healing and care that are mobilized by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) healthcare practitioners and patients, as they attempt to negotiate between two systems of knowledge – Western biomedicine and TCM – to diagnose and treat infertility.

    Navreet Nahal is a Ph.D. student in Medical/Socio-cultural Anthropology, working under the supervision of Dr. Sandra Bamford. Her doctoral research examines the ways in which men and women diagnosed with infertility incorporate various forms of Traditional Chinese Medicine into their treatments (e.g. acupuncture, herbs), rather than solely relying on Western biomedical practices such as assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). While it is clear that many individuals experiencing infertility rely on treatments outside of the normative framework of Western biomedicine, in both academic and public discourse, little is known regarding people’s perceptions, attitudes, and motivations for opting for alternative treatments. Her research site is the San Francisco Bay Area, an area well known for its high concentration of alternative fertility clinics, as well as an enthusiasm to engage with alternative medicine.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Navreet Nahal
    Ph.D. student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 30th Mine Waste (Mis)management, Colonial Imaginaries and the Future of Non-Renewable Resource Extraction in British Columbia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 30, 201610:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Despite four major mine waste spills across Canada in just over a decade, there is little indication from public or private sectors that meaningful steps are being taken to mitigate the risk of future spills. Employing a critical lens that seeks a clearer understanding of ongoing systems of colonialism, my doctoral research examines recent spills in the Central Interior of British Columbia to better understand how for-profit mineral resource extraction is interwoven with concerns for health, human rights, environmental justice, and cultural preservation.

    Neil Nunn is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning. His work engages political ecology, anti-colonial, posthuman, and affective thought to gain insight into the relationships between industrial waste and ongoing systems of colonialism. Neil has worked in non-profit and public sectors, and has spent over a decade and a half in the reforestation sector, which informs his current research. Outside his professional and academic life, Neil is a dad and enjoys surfing whenever time and proximity to the ocean permits.


    Speakers

    Neil Nunn
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2016

  • Thursday, December 1st The Politics of Flooding in Bangkok

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 1, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This presentation challenges the dominant approach to examining flooding through a case study of the 2011 Bangkok, Thailand floods, the fourth‐costliest disaster ever globally and which led to over 800 deaths. The alternative approach developed here views floods not only as outcomes of biophysical processes but also as products of political decisions, economic interests, and power relations. This approach illustrates how vulnerability to floods in Bangkok, which is a combination of exposure to floods and capacity to cope with them, and the extent to which floods are a disaster, are uneven at multiple scales across geographical and social landscapes. While the Chao Phraya River Basin received heavy rainfall in 2011, a number of human activities interacted with that rainfall to create the floods. This talk discusses how state actors together with unequal socioeconomic processes caused vulnerability to be unevenly distributed before, during, and after the event.

    The event is presented as part of the Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA) at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Danny Marks
    UCRSEA Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Asia Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Urban Climate Resilience Partnership in Southeast Asia (UCRSEA)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 1st The Revolutionary Origins of Soviet Durability

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 1, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The twentieth century saw the emergence of a number of authoritarian regimes ­ China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, the USSR ­ that have both challenged the global order and persisted in the face of massive external pressure and catastrophic economic downturns. Drawing on statistical analysis and in-depth case studies, Lucan Way argues that the threat and resilience of such regimes can be traced to their origins in violent revolutionary conflict. A history of violent revolutionary struggle encourages external aggression but also inoculates regimes against major causes of authoritarian breakdown such as military coups and mass protest. Professor Way¹s talk will focus on the impact the Soviet Union¹s revolutionary origins on its durability in the face of repeated crises (rebellion, famine, foreign invasion) in the first half of the twentieth century.

    Lucan Way received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley and is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Way¹s research focuses on democratization and authoritarianism in the former Soviet Union and the developing world. His most recent book, Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (Johns Hopkins, 2015), examines the sources political competition in the former Soviet Union. His book, Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (with Steven Levitsky), was published in 2010 by Cambridge University Press. Way¹s book and articles on competitive authoritarianism have been cited thousands of times and helped stimulate new and wide-ranging research into the dynamics of hybrid democratic-authoritarian rule.

    Way has also published articles in Comparative Politics, Journal of Democracy, Perspectives on Politics, Politics & Society, Slavic Review, Studies in Comparative and International Development, World Politics, as well as in a number of area studies journals and edited volumes. His article in World Politics was awarded the Best Article Award in the Œcomparative Democratization¹ section of the American Political Science Association in 2006. Together with Steven Levitsky, Professor Way is currently writing a book, under contract with Princeton University Press, on the durability of authoritarian regimes founded in violent revolutionary struggle. He is Co-Directorof the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine and is Co-Chair of the Editorial Board of The Journal of Democracy.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Prof. Lucan Way
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto

    Prof. Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto

    Prof. Peter Solomon
    Discussant
    Department of Political Science and CERES, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 6th Metamorphoses: Archival Fictioning and the Historian’s Craft

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 6, 20162:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In attempting to understand early modern science and medicine from Chinese natural history to Manchu translations of bodily gesture and sensation, my work has placed the history and translation of metamorphic stories at its center. For our gathering – intended more as a conversation about craft than a formal talk – I will introduce recent work in which I have been expanding my practice to integrate short fiction and prose poetry as modes of reading and analyzing historical documents. The focus of my attention will be a new project called Metamorphoses that is loosely inspired by the work of Ovid and is devoted to creating stories of material transformation through creative readings and misreadings of primary source documents that derive from (or are oriented toward) early modern China.

    Carla Nappi is Associate Professor of History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies at the University of British Columbia. Her first book, The Monkey and the Inkpot: Natural History and its Transformations in Early Modern China (Harvard, 2009) was a study of belief-making in early modern Chinese natural history through the lens of the Bencao gangmu (1596), a compendium of materia medica. Her current research explores practices and contexts of translation in the Ming and Qing periods.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Carla Nappi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History and Canada Research Chair of Early Modern Studies, University of British Columbia.

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2017

  • Tuesday, January 17th Innovation by the People, for the People

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 17, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Dr. Amos Zehavi
    Senior lecturer, Department of Political Science Department of Public Policy, Tel Aviv University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 25th Unpacking the ‘Core Content’ of Essential Medicines under the Right to Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 25, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Access to essential medicines is part of the right to health and a cornerstone of an equitable health system. Enshrined in the ICESCR, the right to health offers a set of standards, principles and duties to guide its realisation. Global health and development initiatives increasingly embrace a right to health approach, particularly for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health.

    Authoritative entities such as the WHO and the former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Health maintain that national governments should give legal recognition in domestic law to essential medicines as part of the right to health. Legal recognition offers a framework for national policy makers and health workers to implement these rights while providing a foothold for their enforcement. In particular, universal health coverage (UHC) enshrined in domestic law can advance health rights by making essential medicines affordable and available to all.

    Currently, it is unclear to what degree domestic legal rules providing for essential medicines mirror right to health principles and how such legal approaches are framed. This research maps the domestic legal terrain governing access to essential medicines in middle income countries. Through comparative legal analysis, this multidisciplinary study determines how domestic legal texts articulate the public health dimensions of access to medicines (i.e. Who are the beneficiaries? Which medicines are provided? What are the direct costs to patients?) through a human rights lens that considers provisions for non-discrimination and vulnerable groups. This research reflects on how national policy makers have made explicit use of the norms and standards in the right to health when forming pharmaceutical benefits in national UHC schemes. It will outline potential ‘best practice’ legal approaches to express rights- sensitive provisions for universal access, offering tools for prospective domestic policy learning to advance the SDG for health.

    Katrina Perehudoff M.Sc. LL.M. is a PhD candidate at the University of Groningen where she studies model domestic law for universal access to medicines through a human rights lens under the supervision of prof. Hans V. Hogerzeil (Faculty of Medical Sciences) and prof. Brigit Toebes (Faculty of Law). As a Research Fellow at the Global Health Law Groningen Research Centre, Katrina coordinates the Essential Laws for Medicines Access project and the Centre’s 2016 Summer School. Katrina has 5 years of experience advocating for access to medicines and their rational use at the NGOs Health Action International and The European Consumer Organization. She will join the CPHS as a Temporary Health & Human Rights Fellow in 2017.


    Speakers

    Katrina Perehudoff
    Visiting Health and Human Rights Fellow (University of Groningen)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2017

  • Wednesday, February 8th Re-Conceptualizing Mental Health Services for Women Who Have Experienced IPV: Responding to Intersecting Experiences of Trauma

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Despite the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and its devastating effects on Canadian women, there is a gap in empirically-supported mental health interventions for IPV. Specifically, despite wide acknowledgment of the links between IPV and trauma, there is a research gap in understanding how IPV interventions address trauma. Also problematic is that Canadian IPV interventions have mainly been informed by the 1980s experiences of white, cis-gendered, middle-class, heterosexual women from Duluth, Minnesota, rather than representing women’s diverse experiences of race, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, socioeconomic status, religion, and immigration experiences. Interventions for IPV need to shift from a view of gender-based oppression as the root cause of IPV, to a view that encompasses the multiple ways in which identity-based oppressions and traumatic experiences can impact IPV. Informed by critical feminist intersectional and trauma-informed approaches, this qualitative study aims to build theory to address these gaps, using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Theoretical sampling and semi-structured interviews with women in Ontario who have accessed mental health services for IPV will be employed to: 1) understand how trauma is conceptualized and addressed within IPV services; and 2) compare differences in women’s service experiences based on intersecting identities and oppression. Through comparative analysis, this study aims to identify service inequities based on women’s complex identities, and to understand how trauma on multiple levels (childhood adversities, racism, classism, homophobia, etc.) impacts IPV-related trauma. Findings will provide knowledge necessary to reduce inequities in the future design of mental health care for IPV survivors.

    Stephanie Baird is a PhD candidate at Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at University of Toronto. Her research interest in trauma and intimate partner violence builds on her community and clinical social work practice with people who have been impacted by experiences of trauma and violence. Her dissertation, which is supported by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowship, will explore the intersectional experiences of trauma of women who have been abused by a partner.


    Speakers

    Stephanie Baird
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 16th Lumumba (2000; dir. Raoul Peck)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 16, 20177:30PM - 9:30PM Theatre Spadina
    Alliance Française de Toronto
    24 Spadina Road
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    Series

    Cinema and Contexts: Alliance Française de Toronto / CEFMF Film Series

    Description

    In collaboratoin with the Alliance Française de Toronto, CEFMF organizes each year a film series, in which important francophone films are screened in conjunction with a short talk on the film’s historical context and importance, given by a member of the University of Toronto faculty.


    Speakers

    Julie MacArthur
    Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 22nd We’re Here: Understanding Subjugation and Resistance among Older Gay Men Seeking and Receiving Care in Medical Settings

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 22, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In recent years, a growing body of literature on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging has highlighted the systemic exposure of older sexual and gender minorities to complex expressions of stigma and discrimination across a variety of social contexts, the confluence of which tends to adversely affect the social conditions and health outcomes of these groups. Older gay men have specifically been recognized as a population of concern, given this group’s exposure to the unique social history of HIV, and therefore the unique features of stigma and discrimination that are likely to typify the realities of these older adults as they access health care and social services (Addis et al., 2009). Informed by this literature, my research seeks to examine how older gay men experience the production of subjugation at the intersection of older age, gay sexuality, and HIV stigma, specifically when they access health care systems, and how they resist these systemic issues in their interactions with health services. In this qualitative study, I aim to interview 30 gay men who are 50 years of age or older with recent experience accessing health care services, 15 of whom will be HIV-positive. In these interviews, I will ask participants to discuss their overall experiences of accessing health care services as older gay men, and how they believe they navigate potential barriers to access in these contexts. Drawing on these accounts, I will infer how intersectional subjugation is produced and resisted as older gay men, including those living with HIV, enter and interact with systems of care. The results of this study will be used not only to further insight in the growing field of LGBT aging, but also to develop health care policy and practice implications that seek to address access to care in a key subpopulation of aging and sexual minorities.

    Hannah Kia is a third year PhD Candidate in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences Division of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She is also a member of the Re:searching for LGBTQ Health Team, led by Dr. Lori Ross. Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Hannah was a clinical social worker in British Columbia, where she gained practice experience in palliative care and other health care specialty areas. During her time as a social worker, she conducted research on the experiences of care-giving partners of gay men, and assisted with a Metropolis BC-funded study that examined the experiences and service needs of sexual minority newcomers. Hannah holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in social work from the University of British Columbia. At this time, Hannah’s research interests centre on examining health care access among older LGBTQ adults. In pursuing her doctoral studies, she hopes to gain a better understanding of how older LGBTQ adults, particularly those living with HIV and other chronic illnesses, experience stigma and discrimination as barriers to accessing care. In April 2015, Hannah was awarded a Doctoral Research Award by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to support her work in this area.


    Speakers

    Hannah Kia
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2017

  • Wednesday, March 8th In the Image of a Woman: Spirited and Embodied Interpellations Along the Betsiboka River

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 8, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My ethnographic dissertation project examines the subject formation of same-sex desiring and/or gender non-conforming male-bodied persons in rural and urban northwestern Madagascar (sarimbavy in Malagasy) through their participation in both spirit mediumship and MSM (Men who have Sex with Men) HIV/AIDS activism. The two are intertwined; the MSM activist organization in Madagascar, funded by international HIV/AIDS prevention NGOs, is formed through networks of spirit mediums. As such, HIV/AIDS projects committed to curbing the spread of the virus, particularly amongst the “vulnerable” MSM population, tend to unknowingly employ peer educators who are spirit mediums and/or who are familiar with that milieu. Relatedly, I’m concerned with the philosophical implications that emerge when individuals come to understand their gender/sexual alterity first and foremost through the foreign, human rights-based language of “MSM,” “LGBT,” and discourses of disease prevention in peer-educator led workshops (as opposed to indigenous models of sex/gender/sexuality). My work differs from most on MSM communities and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa in that I inquire into how international intervention into HIV/AIDS unwittingly works through the socio-spiritual networks in which sarimbavy are placed. My thesis also draws from feminist/queer historiographical methodologies to analyze how sarimbavy were studied by French colonial doctors at the fin-de-siècle alongside the development of the medical field of sexology. The narratives that emerged from these interactions were then published in European and North American medical journals. I ask how these histories resonate with contemporary intervention into sarimbavy bodies and their health given the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

    Seth Palmer is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology and the collaborative programs in Women and Gender Studies and Sexual Diversity Studies. Seth’s doctoral research examines the interface between same-sex desiring and gender non-conforming male-bodied subjectivities (sarimbavy in Malagasy) and tromba spirit mediumship in northwestern Madagascar. Seth’s dissertation is based on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork that moved between a rural, riverine town and surrounding villages, a small regional port city, and the nation’s capital, Antananarivo, in order to conceptualize how sexed/gendered discourses on categories of personhood, sexological taxonomies, tromba spirits and sarimbavy spirit mediums, and MSM and HIV/AIDS-prevention activism flowed between seemingly disparate spaces. Seth has taught a course on the anthropological category of “spirit possession” in the Department of Anthropology (St. George) and will teach a course on reading and writing in gender studies in the Department of Women and Gender Studies (Mississauga) in the Winter 2017 semester.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Seth Palmer
    Health and Human Rights Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 22nd Socioeconomic inequalities across birth outcome distributions: A comparative study of Canada and its peer nations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 22, 201710:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Chantel Ramraj
    Lupina Research Associate Fellow



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2017

  • Wednesday, April 12th Viral Hepatitis B and C among Immigrants: A Population Based Comparison Using Linked Laboratory and Health Administrative Data

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 12, 201710:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Ontario, hepatitis is the most burdensome infectious disease, and disproportionately affects migrant groups. Novel treatments are constantly being developed, making treatment and prevention more economical; which subsequently impacts screening and testing practices. As such, continuous evaluation is needed to ensure efficient and effective use of public health resources. Abdool’s current research investigates the burden of viral hepatitis B and C among immigrants to Canada, using linked health admin data. There is currently a lack of population-level information on the distribution of viral hepatitis within Ontario, and his research will shed new light on its epidemiology, with applications towards the development of novel public health policies.

    Abdool Yasseen is currently a doctoral candidate in epidemiology at the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk school of global affairs. He has a BSc in biochemistry and statistics and an MSc in theoretical evolutionary ecology from Carleton University. He worked as an epidemiologist / biostatistician for the Public Health Agency of Canada, and as a methodologist for the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, while continuing his studies in a graduate diploma in Population Health Risk Assessment and Management at the University of Ottawa. Abdool has developed expertise in obstetric / pediatric epidemiology, and became interested in hepatitis research through collaborative work focused on universal hepatitis screening during pregnancy.


    Speakers

    Abdool Yasseen
    Lupina Senior Doctoral Fellow, Doctoral Candidate at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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