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September 2015

  • Tuesday, September 8th Unraveling Visions: ‘Girly’ Photography in Recessionary Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 8, 20153:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    This presentation asks what happens to feminist art in contexts of economic deregulation and concomitant care deficit that tend to reconnect women to regimes of social reproduction. Drawing on the observation that women’s photography centered on portraying relationships, photography critics—dominantly men—interpreted the genre as a project that aimed to reconnect communities that have unraveled in the wake of the long recession. Women photographers, however, rejected this interpretation. Building on this tension, I claim that critics projected onto women’s photography their own nostalgia for the high-growth era and its characteristic gender division of labor. My interviews with photographers reveal that it was precisely the desire to disengage from the normative gender roles of the high-growth period that drove women to photography. Women, I argue, practiced photography to expand the zones of subjectivity from which they were able to draw new forms of labor and pleasure.

    Gabriella Lukacs is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research explores themes of mass media, digital media, capitalism, labor, and gender in contemporary Japan. Her first book, Scripted Affects, Branded Selves: Television, Subjectivity, and Capitalism in 1990s Japan, was published by Duke University Press. Her current book project, Diva Entrepreneurs: Labor, Gender, and the Digital Economy in Japan, explores why women turn to the digital economy and how this economy mobilizes them to regimes of unpaid labor that it harnesses as a motor of its own development.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Gabriella Lukacs
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th The Logic and Context of Conformity: Japan’s Entry into International Society

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20151:15PM - 2:45PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Japan’s 19th century entry into international society was dramatic and fraught with danger. In the four decades after being challenged to drastically alter its position in international society in 1853, Japan reinvented itself as a modern sovereign state, shedding its long-standing isolation and political practices. Faced with the crucial task of responding to existing Western norms of international society, Japan’s leaders chose to conform.

    In contrast with the majority of historically-focused inquiries, Professor Okagaki introduces a political science perspective into the central questions of Japan’s internationalization. Why did Japan join the Western state system without voicing as much resistance as other Asian countries? How, in turn, did Japan’s entry affect international society? How did Japan balance international and domestic constraints and resources? What implications does the Japanese experience hold for other countries today in their encounters with prevailing international norms?

    Tomoko Okagaki is Professor of Political Science at Dokkyo University in Saitama, Japan. She holds a doctorate in Political Science from the University of Michigan. She was a visiting student at the University of Toronto and University of British Columbia, and a visiting scholar at both Harvard University and Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Professor Okagaki’s research interests include state socialization, Asian regionalism, and international political relations. She is the author of numerous publications including The Logic of Conformity: Japan’s Entry into International Society (2013), and co-translator of Kenneth Waltz’s Theory of International Politics (2011).

    Presented by The Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto; Japan Studies Association of Canada; Japan Futures Initiative, The Japan Foundation

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tomoko Okagaki
    Professor, Political Science, Dokkyo University in Saitama, Japan


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th The Structure of Protest Cycles: Contagion and Cohesion in South Korea’s Democracy Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In his seminal study of contentious politics, Sidney Tarrow conceptualized social movements as constituting a series of protest cycles. While the concept of protest cycles has received much attention in the social movements literature, its empirical operationalization remains relatively crude compared to the rich theoretical discussion. Most studies operationalize protest cycles as the total number of protest events in a given period. Drawing on recent work on event structures, this paper attempts to further develop the application of the protest cycle concept by conceptualizing social movements as a population of interlinked events and identifying events that play critical roles in historical outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of considering protest cycles as protest event networks with a novel dataset on South Korea’s democracy movement. In our conceptualization the nodes of the network are protest events and links are coded as present if protestors cited a specific prior event as a source of inspiration for mobilizing. Appropriating strategies developed for network analysis we ascertain which events in Korea’s democracy movement were more likely to solicit direct responses and which linked disparate event clusters. By identifying the characteristics of events that contribute to the probability of protest contagion and movement cohesion, we hope to show the usefulness of identifying direct links between events when analyzing protest events data, while providing a better understanding of the structure of protest cycles in South Korea’s democracy movement.

    Paul Y. Chang is Assistant Professor of Sociology and serves on the Executive Committee of the Korea Institute at Harvard University. His primary research interest is in South Korean social and political change. He is the author of Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement (Stanford University Press 2015), and co-editor of South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society (Routledge 2011).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul Chang
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Sociology, Harvard University

    Jennifer Chun
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 16th German Reunification - 25 Years Later

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 16, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    After more than four decades of division, Germany’s East and West were officially reunited on 3 October 1990. This panel discussion will focus on the historical importance of this momentous event and will examine the progress achieved by the Federal Republic since then as well as the challenges that it continues to face.

    In an informal setting, our panel of distinguished experts will reflect on a series of questions. How does Germany look 25 years after the heady days of 1989/1990? Which fears were realized, which not? How well integrated is East Germany? How did Reunification imapct Germany’s position in regional and global political contexts?

    Doris Bergen is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies. Her research focuses on issues of religion, gender, and ethnicity in the Holocaust and World War II and comparatively in other cases of extreme violence. Her books include Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich (1996); War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (2003 and 2009); The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Centuries (edited, 2004); Lessons and Legacies VIII (edited, 2008), and Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941-1945 (co-edited with Andrea Löw and Anna Hájková, 2013). She has held grants and fellowships from the SSHRC, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the German Marshall Fund of the United States, the DAAD, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and she has taught at the Universities of Warsaw, Pristina, Tuzla, Notre Dame, and Vermont.

    Randall Hansen is Director of the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Full Professor and Canada Research Chair in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He works on migration and citizenship, eugenics and population policy, and the effect of war on civilian populations. His published works include Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after July 20, 1944 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013), Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Doubleday, 2008), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (OUP, 2000). He has also co-edited Immigration and Public Opinion in Liberal Democracies (with David Leal and Gary P. Freeman) (New York: Routledge, 2012), Migration States and International Cooperation (with Jeannette Money and Jobst Koehler, Routledge, 2011), Towards a European Nationality (with P. Weil, Palgrave, 2001), Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. And Europe (w. P. Weil, Berghahn, 2002), and Immigration and Asylum from 1900 to the Present (w. M. Gibney, ABC-CLIO, 2005).

    Konrad H. Jarausch has written or edited about forty books in modern German and European history. Starting with Hitler’s seizure of power and the First World War, his research interests have moved to the social history of German students and professions, German unification in 1989/90, with historiography under the Communist GDR, the nature of the East German dictatorship, as well as the debate about historians and the Third Reich. More recently, he has been concerned with the problem of interpreting twentieth-century German history in general, the learning processes after 1945, the issue of cultural democratization, and the relationship between Honecker and Breshnew. His latest book is Out of Ashes: A New History of Europe in the Twentieth Century (Princeton 2015).

    Stephen F. Szabo is the executive director of the Transatlantic Academy (TA). The TA, which is a partnership between German Marshall Fund and the Ebelin and Gerd Bucerius Zeit Stiftung of Hamburg, Germany, the Robert Bosch Stiftung of Stuttgart, Germany, and the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is a forum for research and dialogue between scholars, policy experts, and authors from both sides of the Atlantic. Dr. Szabo has held fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the American Academy in Berlin. Szabo received his Ph.D. From Georgetown University in political science and has a bachelor’s and master’s from the School of International Service, the American University. He is the author of a number of books on German foreign policy, most recently Germany, Russia and the Rise of Geo-economics (2015) and teaches German politics at the Johns Hopkins University SAIS.

    Rebecca Wittmann (PhD University of Toronto) is Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto and Chair of the Department of Historical Studies at UTM. Her research focuses on the Holocaust and postwar Germany, trials of Nazi perpetrators and terrorists, and German legal history. She has received fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service). She has published articles in Central European History, German History, and Lessons and Legacies. Her book, Beyond Justice: The Auschwitz Trial (Harvard University Press, 2005) won the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History. She is currently working on her second book project entitled Guilt and Shame through the Generations: Confronting the Past in Postwar Germany.


    Speakers

    Konrad H. Jarausch
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

    Doris Bergen
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of Toronto

    Stephen Szabo
    Panelist
    Transatlantic Academy

    Rebecca Wittmann
    Panelist
    Department of History, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Germany in Toronto

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 16th China's Stock Market Crash: Implications and Challenges

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 16, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Chinese stock market crash began with the popping of the stock market bubble on June 12, 2015 when a third of the value of the Chinese A-shares on the Shanghai Stock exchange was lost within the course of one month. The event has alarmed investors globally and has initiated a series of vibrant conversations centred on the inner workings of the Chinese economy and its authoritarian government policy implications. Several schools of macroeconomic thought plugged into rigorous debate with each other after the announcement from the Chinese central government in that it intends to use aggressive approaches to intervene in the Chinese stock market to prop up the stock prices and conduct heavy investigations into the possibility of illegal short selling. Proponents of the market forces argue that this is a perfect scenario of a long time government interventionism that has failed, while others argue that the crisis has emerged due to insufficient government interventionism and monitoring of the Chinese stock market in recent years. The concern now centres on the possible spread of the stock market downfall on other Chinese domestic sectors and its potential global implications. The question of the regime stability of the Chinese government also comes into question.

    This 2 hour expert panel will focus on examining the reasons behind the Chinese stock market crisis and the political and economic implications that it has had or will have on domestic China and the global market. The panel will also strive to produce possible policy suggestions and approaches to deal effectively with the crisis.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    CASSU - Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 17th Iranian Journalists and Their Psychological Wellbeing: A Study by Dr. Anthony Feinstein

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 17, 20156:30PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Fellowship in Global Journalism at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto is pleased to host the launch of a landmark new study by Dr Anthony Feinstein on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Iranian journalists.

    Dr Feinstein is a professor at the Depart of Psychiatry of U of T. The report was commis-sioned by Journalism is not a Crime, an awareness raising campaign founded by the Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari.

    Mr Bahari was jailed for 118 days in Iran’s Evin Prison in 2009 after covering the protests that followed Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection. His detention was the subject of his best-selling book Then They Came for Me and the film Rosewater by Jon Stewart. Mr Bahari started the Journalism Is Not A Crime campaign to raise awareness about the harassment of Iranian journalists by their government, including 55 still in prisons across Iran, and to provide legal and psychological assistance for hundreds of other persecuted reporters.

    Dr Feinstein, a neurologist and professor of psychiatry, is the world’s leading authority on PTSD among journalists. His 2003 books Dangerous Lives: War and the Men and Women Who Report It and Journalists Under Fire: The Psychological Hazards of Covering War, were the first major works to look at the mental health of war reporters.

    The report – titled Iranian Journalists: A Study of Their Psychological Wellbeing – is the first to investigate the emotional health of Iranian journalists. Dr Feinstein found that re-porters in Iran suffer extreme levels of trauma and PTSD because of their work – nearly 60% (58.8%) have been arrested, almost 20% (19.3%) tortured, and 10.5% assaulted. More than half had some form of depression with almost 30% of those surveyed suppering from severe depressive symptoms.

    The findings were similar to those among journalists in Mexico – a sample comparison country where journalists are also under severe threat. Western journalists who have worked in war zones also showed similar symptoms to the Iranian reporters. Dr Feinstein’s study also found significantly increased PTSD symptoms in those Iranian journalists who had been arrested and jailed by the authorities.

    Anna Maria Tremonti, host of CBC Radio One’s show The Current, will chair a panel dis-cussion between Mr Bahari, Dr Feinstein, and an Iranian journalist recently released from prison. The panel will consider both the report and the wider situation for Iranian journalists who regularly experience harassment, violence and detention.

    Anna Maria Tremonti

    Anna Maria Tremonti has been the host of CBC Radio One’s The Current since it first burst onto the airwaves in November of 2002.

    She brings a mix of hard-edged journalism and hard-won empathy to a 90-minute program that tackles everything from the politics of the day, to the changes that affect our society, to the stories of individuals whose personal journeys and traumas affect us all.

    The Current marked her return to radio after 19 years with CBC Television, including two years as a host of the flagship investigative program the fifth estate. For nine years she was a foreign correspondent for The National, based in Berlin, London, Jerusalem and Washington. Her assignments abroad included ongoing coverage of the war in Bosnia, the fall of communism, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, as well as the politics of the Arab world, Europe and the United States.Prior to that, Anna Maria reported from Parliament Hill, and worked as a reporter in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Alberta.She began her career in private radio, at CKEC in New Glasgow Nova Scotia.

    Anna Maria has won two Gemini awards, and a life Achievement Award from Women in Film and Television Toronto. During her time at The Current, she and the program have won numerous awards at the New York Festivals, including: Gold for Best News Documentary of Special (2013), Gold for Best Talk Special: Interview (2009), Silver for Best Newsmagazine (2013), Bronze for Best Talk Show Host (2008, 2014 and 2015), Bronze for Best Coverage, Breaking News (2015), and Bronze for Best News Documentary or Special (2014). Her work at The Current also has been recognized with an Amnesty International Canada Media Award (2012), three Gracie Awards (2011, 2014 and 2015), and several Gabriel Awards and RTDNA Awards, including the Adrienne Clarkson Diversity Award (2013), the Peter Gzowski Information Program Award (2009, 2011 & 2014) and the Gord Sinclair Live Special Events Award (2014). With Anna Maria at the helm, The Current in 2012 also won the Canadian Journalism Foundation’s Excellence in Journalism Award (Large Media Category), and was a finalist for that top honour in 2013.

    Anna Maria is a graduate of the Communications Studies program at the University of Windsor. She has honorary doctorates from the University of Windsor and Carleton University in Ottawa.

    Maziar Bahari

    Maziar Bahari is an Iranian Canadian journalist and filmmaker. He has produced a number of documentaries and news reports for broadcasters around the world including BBC, Channel4, HBO, Discovery, Canal+ and NHK and was a reporter for Newsweek from 1998 to 2011.

    Bahari graduated with a degree in communications from Concordia University in Montreal in 1993. Soon after, he made his first film The Voyage of the Saint Louis (1994). His films include Paint! No Matter What (1999), Football, Iranian Style (2001), And Along Came a Spider (2002), Mohammad and the Matchmaker (1994), Targets: Reporters in Iraq (2005), Greetings from Sadr City (2007), Online Ayatollah (2008), The Fall of a Shah (2009), An Iranian Odyssey (2010), From Cyrus to Ahmadinejad (2011) and Forced Confessions (2012). A retrospective of Bahari’s films was organized by the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam in November 2007. Bahari has been a jury member of number of international film festivals. In September 2009, Bahari was nominated for the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord.

    During the 2009 Iranian Election Protests Bahari was arrested without charge, and detained in Evin prison for 118 days. Then They Came for Me, his family memoir, was published by Random House in June 2011. Rosewater, a film by Jon Stewart based on the book and starring Gael Garcia Bernal, is currently being released globally. In 2013, Bahari launched Iranwire.com, which focuses on current affairs, culture and politics, and is available in both Persian and English.

    Dr Anthony Feinstein

    Anthony Feinstein received his medical degree in South Africa. Thereafter he completed his training in psychiatry at the Royal Free Hospital in London before training as a neuropsychiatrist at the Institute of Neurology in London. His Master of Philosophy and Ph.D were obtained through the University of London. He is currently a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto.

    His neuropsychiatry research focuses on the search for cerebral correlates of behavioral disorders associated with multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and hysteria (conversion disorders). In patients with MS, detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shed light on the pathogenesis of depressive disorders and current work is exploring changes in the brain associated with pathological laughing and crying. His work in the field of conversion disorder has involved developing functional MRI paradigms that complement psychoanalytic interpretations of why patients develop disabling, quasi-neurological symptoms. Finally, Dr. Feinstein is involved in a series of studies unrelated to neuropsychiatry but nevertheless of relevance to current issues within our society. The questions being addressed are: how are journalists affected emotionally by their work in war zones and what motivates them to pursue such dangerous occupations?

    In 2000-2001 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study mental health issues in post-apartheid Namibia. This led to the development of Namibia’s medical system to be able to respond to mental illness. He is currently engaged with a similar project in Botswana.

    Dr. Feinstein is the author of ‘Dangerous Lives: War And The Men And Women Who Report It’ (Thomas Allen, Toronto, 2003), ‘The Clinical Neuropsychiatry Of Multiple Sclerosis’ (Cambridge University Press 1999, with a second edition in 2007), ‘In Conflict’ (New Namibia Books, 1998), an autobiographical account of his time as a medical officer in the Angolan and Namibian wars, and ‘Michael Rabin’, America’s virtuoso violinist (Amadeus Press, 2005). His new book, ‘Journalists Under Fire: The Psychological Hazards Of Covering War’ (John Hopkins University Press) was published this year. He has also published widely in peer-reviewed journals and contributed to many co-authored books.

    Sponsors

    Fellowship in Global Journalism, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Journalism Is Not A Crime


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Regional Governments in International Affairs: Lessons from the Arctic

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20158:30AM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Munk School of Global Affairs
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    Description

    Note: Keynote lecture on September 17th at the George Ignatieff Theatre, Trinity College has been cancelled.

    To register please visit https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/regional-governments-in-international-affairs-lessons-from-the-arctic-tickets-17898250148

    The Arctic is gaining the attention of national governments around the world. Indeed, countries as diverse as Switzerland, Mongolia, and Turkey have sought observer status at the Arctic Council as one expression of their Arctic interests. Much of the dialogue about circumpolar governance over the last few years has been focusing on how these non-Arctic voices will shape, change, or contribute to the Arctic agenda. Perhaps, this focus has led us to miss something – what is the role of the regional governments from within the Arctic in shaping the international Arctic agenda?
    With the advent of globalization that has brought urban and international issues closer together than ever before, an opportunity arises for local governments across border to work with each other to tackle some of the these problems. So what role do regional governments play in international affairs? What lessons can be learned from regional governance and co-operation from different parts of the world and the Arctic that address similar issues such as the environment and economics? How can these lessons be applied to the circumpolar Arctic region?
    At the front lines of the decisions made for the Arctic regions are municipalities, territorial and state governments, and Indigenous organizations and governments. How do these subnational actors and governments from within the Arctic participate in international diplomacy which could result in outcomes that affect them? With no formal role on the Arctic Council, which is often regarded as the main platform for international Arctic diplomacy, how do these regional governments engage in international affairs in the Arctic? What does the future of the Arctic look like, and how will these subnational and regional governments be involved? The goal of this conference is to learn more about the ways in which regional governments are engaging in Arctic issues across the circumpolar world.

    Agenda and Confirmed Speakers

    8:45-9:15am: Registration

    9:15-9:30am: Welcoming Remarks: Professor Stephen Toope, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto

    9:30 – 9:40am: Introducing Tony Penikett: John English, Director of the Bill Graham Centre

    9:40 – 10:30am: Welcoming Address: A conversation with Bill Graham, former Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Tony Penikett, former Premier of the Yukon Territory, moderated by Mayo Moran, Provost of Trinity College

    10:30 – 10:45am: Coffee break

    10:45am – 12:15pm: Panel I: The Role of Regional Governments in International Affairs
    Chair: Professor Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon; Speakers: Steve Cowper, Former Governor, Alaska

    12:15-1:00pm: Lunch

    1:00 – 2:30 pm: Panel II: The Role of Regional Government in the Circumpolar Arctic Governance
    Chair: Professor Jessica Shadian; Speakers: Inuuteq Holm Olsen, Head of Representation, Greenland Representation, Washington, D.C.; Christin Kristoffersen, Mayor of Longyearbyen, Norway; Elaine Taylor, Deputy Premier of Yukon; Lesil McGuire, Senator in the Alaska State Legislature

    2:30 – 2:45 pm: Coffee

    2:45 – 4:00pm: Panel III: The Arctic Council at 20 – The Role of Circumpolar Cities and Regions
    Chair: Professor Patricia McCarney; Speakers: Madeleine Redfern, Former Mayor of Iqaluit;
    Svein Ludvigsen, Governor, County of Troms; Sigríður Kristjánsdóttir, Assistant Professor, Agricultural University of Iceland

    4:00 – 5:30: Panel IV: Arctic Council in Transition: From Canada to US, and the Next 20 Years
    Chair: Professor Franklyn Griffiths Speakers: Terry Fenge, Principal, Terry Fenge Consulting;
    Rafe Pomerance, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Environment and Development, United States of America; Nauja Bianco, Senior Advisor – Arctic and cooperation with neighbours to the west, Nordic Council of Ministers; Igor Makarov, Associate Professor, University Higher School of Economics Moscow

    5:30pm: Closing Remarks: Dr. Thomas S. Axworthy, President and CEO of the Gordon Foundation

    5:40 – 7pm: Closing reception

    For Canadian post-secondary students not located in Toronto, we are offering five bursaries of a maximum of $1,000 each to assist your travel to and from the conference event. We hope that this will give you a special opportunity to participate, ask questions, and meet the speakers directly. If you are interested, we encourage you to apply through completing the bursary application available here: http://gordonfoundation.ca/sites/default/files/images/Bursary%20Application.pdf. Please note that you must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to apply.

    For our Northern and international audiences, we will be webcasting this event live. Please stay tuned for more details and a link to the webcast.

    This event is made possible by the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, the Munk-Gordon Arctic Security Program, and the generous support of The Gordon Foundation. Please note that further details on the event, schedule and speakers will shortly be made available. If you have questions about the event, please contact Emily Tsui (emily@gordonfn.org)

    Contact

    Emily Tsui

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation

    Global Cities Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th How to Make It Well Again? Greek-German Relations in the Shadow of Occupation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Dr. Katrina Kralova
    Assistant Professor of Contemporary History Balkan, Eurasian, and Central European Studies Institute of International Studies, Charles University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 21st The Evolution of San Diego's Innovation Economy

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 21, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    Drawing from her recent book, “The Evolution of San Diego’s Innovation Economy,” Walshok will describe the social dynamics and industrial legacies which established the military as a primary economic development resource driving the growth of San Diego through an era of defense contracting and R&D which was transformed from the 1970s onward into a major center of science and technology, in both research and commercial enterprises.

    Mary Walshok, Ph.D. is an author, educator, researcher, and associate vice chancellor for public programs and dean of Extension at the University of California San Diego.

    She is the author of more than 100 articles and reports on aligning workforce development with regional economic growth. She has authored and co-authored Blue Collar Women (1981), Knowledge Without Boundaries (1995), Closing America’s Job Gap (2011), Creating Competitiveness: Entrepreneurship and Innovation Policies for Growth (2013) and Invention and Reinvention: The Evolution of San Diego’s Innovation Economy (2013), Public Universities and Regional Growth: Insights from the University of California (2014) and the Oxford Handbook of Local Competitiveness (forthcoming 2015).

    An industrial sociologist studying the dynamics of regional economic transformation, with a particular focus on how globalization and rapid changes in technology are affecting the social dynamics and economic challenges of regions across America, Walshok has researched various communities with support from the U.S. Department of Labor, NSF, and the Lilly Endowments. She is currently engaged in research on binational innovation dynamics.

    She oversees a $45 million, 250-employee division that annually serves more than 65,000 enrollees through innovative local and online programs, as well as provides access to a vast array of intellectual resources through the award-winning UCSD-TV and nationwide through UCTV, which reaches over 22 million households and millions more around the globe on the Web. The Division also serves more than 3,000 foreign students annually.

    A co-founder of the San Diego Dialogue in the 1990s, a program focused on opportunities in the San Diego-Tijuana region, she currently serves on the boards of San Diego CONNECT (which she helped found in 1985), the United States-Mexico Foundation for Science, the International Community Foundation, La Jolla Playhouse, Olivewood Gardens and the Girard Foundation.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Mary Walshok
    Associate Vice Chancellor for Public Programs and Dean of Extension, University of California San Diego



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 22nd Courting the "Ethnic Vote": Immigration and Multiculturalism in the 2015 Federal Election

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 22, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What impact will Canada’s immigrant and ethnic minority populations have on the upcoming federal election? Will they affect the campaign? How will they vote? What are the implications for Canadian democracy? Immigrant and minority voters played a key role in 2011; will the same be true in 2015? The panel will discuss recent research, and the perspectives of media and community actors.

    Panelists:

    Chris Cochrane, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto. Chris’s research examines opinion formation, public opinion and political behaviour in Canada. His latest book is Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas

    Jane Hilderman, Samara Canada. Jane is the Executive Director of Samara Canada, a trusted, non-partisan champion of increased civic engagement through innovative research and educational programming.

    Ratna Omidvar, Global Diversity Exchange, Ryerson University. Ratna is the Executive Director of the Global Diversity Exchange, which provides analysis and leadership to strengthen the links between migration, diversity and prosperity.

    Priya Ramanujam, New Canadian Media. Priya is a journalist and editor with New Canadian Media, which covers issues relevant to Canadian immigrant and ethnic minority communities.

    Erin Tolley, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto. Erin’s research focuses on representation and diversity in Canadian politics. She is the author of Framed: Media and the Coverage of Race in Canadian Politics

    Moderated by Jeffrey Reitz, Director, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies.


    Speakers

    Jane Hilderman
    Panelist
    Samara Canada

    Chris Cochrane
    Panelist
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Ratna Omidvar
    Panelist
    Global Diversity Exchange, Ryerson University

    Priya Ramanujam
    Panelist
    New Canadian Media

    Erin Tolley
    Panelist
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jeffrey Reitz
    Moderator
    Director, Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies


    Sponsors

    Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 24th Developmental State and Politics of Industrial Complex Development in South Korea: A Multi-scalar Analysis of the Development of Masan Free Export Zone in the 1960s

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 24, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In explaining the economic success of the East Asian countries, the developmental state thesis highlights the positive role of the state intervention in markets. In particular, it sees as an essential condition for the East Asian economic mira¬cle the capacity of the autonomous national bureaucrats, which are assumed to be independent of particular economic and social interests, to lead the policy-making process on behalf of the nation as a whole. More specifically, the state’s industrial policies have been seen as a crucial means through which the national bureaucrats have been able to guide and discipline firms to play a role in national industrialization. This kind of explanations, however, lacks serious under¬standings of the spatial aspects of industrial development due to its limited focus on aspatial elements of industrial governance. Industrial activities actually take place at certain locations, and necessarily require the infrastructures fa¬cilitating the spatial flows and movements of materials, information, money, and so on. Indeed, constructing industrial complexes was an essential spatial technology that the Korean state deployed to promote national industrialization in the 1960s and the 1970s. Without paying sufficient attention to the spatiality of industrialization, the developmental state thesis may pro¬vide a biased view on the Korean industrial development. In particular, its emphasis on the leadership role of the state in national industrialization may not be easily justified, once the complicated socio-spatial processes through which the industrial complexes had been constructed are carefully examined.

    With this problem orientation, this paper aims to explore the ways in which the Masan Free Export Zone was developed in the late 1960s. In contrast to the developmental state thesis, which relies on the neo-Weberian assumption of the state-society separation and the methodological nationalism, this research borrows the strategic-relational view to the state, which sees the state actions as an outcome of complex interactions among social forces acting in and through the state, as well as the multi-scalar approach to the political economic processes, in order to better grasp the spatiality of Korean industrialization. In particular, this paper will examine the ways in which the construction of Masan Free Export Zone was planned, implemented and materialized through complex and contested interactions among social forces at various geographical scales act¬ing in and through the state.

    Bae-Gyoon Park is a Professor of Geography in the College of Education at Seoul National University in Korea, and also serves as the Head of International Relations at Seoul National University Asia Center. He received his PhD in Geography at Ohio State University in the USA after doing his BA and MA in Geography at Seoul National University. He had also taught in National University of Singapore as an assistant professor of Geography. He is now a Co-editor of Territory, Politics, Governance, and a member of the editorial boards of Political Geography, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, and Geography Compass. His recent research is focused on multi-scalar understandings of East Asian developmental states and developmental urbanism in East Asia. He has recently edited an English-written book, entitled “Locating Neoliberalism in East Asia”, and several Korean-written books, including “Gukkawa Jiyeok(State and Localities)”, “Saneok Gyeongkwanui Tansaeng(The Birth of Industrial Landscapes)”, and so on. He has also published papers in International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Political Geography, Economic Geography and Critical Asian Studies.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Bae-Gyoon Park
    Professor, Department of Geography Education, Seoul National University

    Jennifer Chun
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th FIRST! - The Economics of Rebellion in Eastern Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
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    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Yuri Zhukov is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and a Faculty Associate with the Center for Political Studies at the Institute for Social Research. His research on international and civil conflict has been published in the American Political Science Review, Foreign Affairs, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Peace Research and other peer-reviewed and generalaudience publications.

    Using new micro-level data on violence in Eastern Ukraine, this article evaluates the relative merits of `identity-based’ and `economic’ explanations of civil conflict. The first view expects rebellion to be most likely in areas home to the geographic concentration of ethnolinguistic minorities. The second expects more rebel activity where the opportunity costs of insurrection are low. Evidence from the armed conflict in Ukraine supports the second view more than the first. A municipality’s prewar employment mix is a more robust predictor of rebel activity than local ethnolinguistic composition. Municipalities more exposed to trade shocks with Russia experienced a higher intensity of rebel violence throughout the conflict. Such localities also fell under rebel control earlier — and took longer for the government to liberate — than municipalities where the labor force was less dependent on exports to Russia.


    Speakers

    Professor Yuri Zhukov
    University of Michigan


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th Forced migration in the Mediterranean: EU and South European states' perspectives and strategies

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    What are the security repercussions of forced migration for both the EU and of particular South European states? For dealing with this important issue, firstly a detailed picture of how illegal migration unfolds in the broader Mediterranean region over the last decade (trends, migration routes, impact of the Arab uprisings, the Syrian crisis etc.) is given. Secondly, particular emphasis is put on understanding how forced migration is being perceived and interpreted (a “securitization move”? in terms of “strategic culture”?) by the European Union as well as by certain South European states, particularly Italy and Greece. Concurrently, the European Union as well as the national (mainly Greek and Italian) responses and/or strategies to forced migration in the Mediterranean region are further discussed and analysed.

    This lecture is part of the Seminar Series in Hellenic and Balkan Studies.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Panagiotis Tsakonas
    Professor of International Relations, Security Studies, and Foreign Policy Analysis Department of Mediterranean Studies University of the Aegean Rhodes, Greece


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Hellenc Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th American Dilemmas

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Professors Carlson and Schneiderhan will be reading from their new publications. A book launch and reception will follow the readings.

    Citizen-Protectors: The Everyday Politics of Guns in an Age of Decline (Oxford University Press, 2015)
    By Jennifer Dawn Carlson
    Less than two years after the Sandy Hook massacre, Pew Research found in fall 2014 that for the first time, broad cross-sections of Americans – white and African American, men and women – believed in the majority that gun ownership makes people safer, rather than less safe. This presentation, based on my book Citizen-Protectors: The Everyday Politics of Guns in an Age of Decline, interrogates this dramatic reversal in public opinion by examining the spread of gun carry within the US from the perspective of men who turn to guns for protection. Focusing on Michigan, particularly Metro Detroit, the book draws on 60 interviews with male gun carriers as well as ethnographic observations in firearms training, shooting ranges, activist events, and Internet gun forums. Responding to the structural erosion of breadwinning masculinity, guns provide an opportunity for men to assert themselves as “citizen-protectors” willing to use lethal force against (criminal) others in order to protect (innocent) life. While gun carriers turn to firearms amid localized concerns regarding socioeconomic insecurity, crime and police inefficacy, they are encouraged to embrace this kind of citizenship through firearms training, developed by the National Rifle Association (NRA), and required to obtain a concealed pistol license. Emphasizing the embodied politics of gun carry and the socio-economic conditions in which men turn to guns, this presentation explores how NRA training attaches a particular set of civic rights, duties and responsibilities (that is, a model of citizenship) to the lawful carrying of guns – reshaping gun culture from the ground up and with profound consequences for crime, policing and governance.

    Jennifer Carlson is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research examines gun politics, policing and law enforcement, the politics of race and gender, and violence. She is the author of Citizen-Protectors: The Everyday Politics of Guns in an Age of Decline, as well as peer-reviewed articles that have appeared in Gender & Society, Contexts, Theoretical Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, and other outlets. She has also written for popular audiences, including the Washington Post, the LA Times, the Toronto Star, and the Detroit News. Her current research focuses on American police attitudes on guns and gun policy enforcement in Michigan and California.

    The Size of Others’ Burdens: Barack Obama, Jane Addams, and the Politics of Helping Others (Stanford University Press, 2015)
    By Erik Schneiderhan

    Americans have a fierce spirit of individualism. We pride ourselves on self-reliance, on bootstrapping our way to success. Yet, we also believe in helping those in need, and we turn to our neighbors in times of crisis. The tension between these competing values is evident, and how we balance between these competing values holds real consequences for community health and well-being. The Size of Others’ Burdens asks how people can act in the face of competing pressures, and explores the stories of two famous Americans to develop present-day lessons for improving our communities. Although Jane Addams and Barack Obama are separated by roughly one hundred years, the parallels between their lives are remarkable: Chicago activists-turned-politicians, University of Chicago lecturers, gifted orators, crusaders against discrimination, winners of the Nobel Peace Prize. Addams was the founder of Hull-House, the celebrated American “settlement house” that became the foundation of modern social work. Obama’s remarkable rise to the presidency is well known. Through the stories of Addams’ and Obama’s early community work, the book challenges readers to think about how many of our own struggles are not simply personal challenges, but also social challenges. How do we help others when so much of our day-to-day life is geared toward looking out for ourselves, whether at work or at home? Not everyone can run for president or win a Nobel Prize, but we can help others without sacrificing their dignity or our principles. Great thinkers of the past and present can give us the motivation; Addams and Obama show us how. The author highlights the value of combining today’s state resources with the innovation and flexibility of Addams’s time to encourage community building. Offering a call to action, this book inspires readers to address their own American dilemma and connect to community, starting within our own neighbourhoods.

    Erik Schneiderhan is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Before becoming an academic, he was a political activist, campaign worker, and policy analyst in New Hampshire. His research focuses on community engagement, deliberation, and democracy.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Erik Schneiderhan
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jennifer Carlson
    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2015

  • Thursday, October 1st Nationalism, Internationalism and Cosmopolitanism: Some Observations from Modern Indian History

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    2015-16 Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    This lecture will look at nationalism, internationalism and cosmopolitanism as an interconnected triad of movements and ideas from the beginning of the 20th century. Armed nationalist revolutionaries in India established connections abroad to seek arms and training. Indian communists joined the Communist International launched by the Soviet Union in order to move the anti-colonial movement in India in the direction of a people’s democratic revolution. Following World War II, with an emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, a space was created at Bandung in 1955 for a new internationalism of the new independent nations, demanding the end of colonial rule and racial discrimination and the formal establishment of equal sovereignty of all nation-states. This lecture will argue that despite the recent call for a cosmopolitan global order superseding the nation-state, these historical achievements of nationalism and internationalism cannot be erased.

    Partha Chatterjee is Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies at Columbia University, New York, and Honorary Professor, Center for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta. Among his many books are Natinalist Thought and the Colonial World (1986), The Nation and Its Fragments (1993), The Politics of the Governed (2004) and The Black Hole of Empire (2012).


    Speakers

    Partha Chatterjee
    Professor, Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 2nd Greece's foreign policy: Assessing the past, anticipating the future

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Professor Panagiotis Tsakonas
    Professor of International Relations, Security Studies and Foreign Policy Analysis at the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Greece.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 9th FIRST! - Lecture by Susan Hyde, Yale University

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 9, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM 3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
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    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Susan Hyde
    Yale University


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Paprika, Pálinka, and Politics: Variations on Themes in Hungarian Studies

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 20158:00AM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This one-day event aims to explore the diversity and inclusiveness of Hungarian Studies, while providing a platform for students at all levels and from a variety of backgrounds to share their ideas. Papers will explore the diversity of current research and encompass a wide range of multidisciplinary perspectives. The conference will feature the research of past and present students in the Hungarian Studies program. It is organized for students by students.

    Are you an undergraduate or graduate student at University of Toronto interested presenting your academic work? Visit our Call for Papers (https://hungarianstudiesconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/) page to learn more about how you can be part of the conference. Registration is required for this event.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Dr. Laszlo Borhi
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for the Humanities, Institute of History (Budapest, Hungary)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Taxes, Burden, and Anxiety: How Russia and the World Reformed Their Fiscal Systems and Became Modern in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture considers the evolution of Russian, European, and North American tax systems in the context of the formation of a modern polity. It argues that all states moved toward a system of revenue that was at once respectful of certain immunities and rights, and more intrusive and inquisitive about the individual citizen and enterprise. Tax systems embody the duality of modern citizenship: the person has the right to be left alone, and the person is more transparent and vulnerable than ever before.”

    Yanni Kotsonis is professor of history at New York University. He is founding director of the Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia. His recent book, States of Obligation: Taxes and Citizenship in the Russian Empire and Early Soviet Republic (2014) was awarded the Wallace K. Ferguson Prize of the Canadian Historical Association. He is the proud father of three tax exemptions.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Yanni Kotsonis
    New York University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 21st Neo-Nazi Hate Crimes in Russia: Varieties, Causes, and Interconnections

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 21, 201512:30PM - 2:00PMCentre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies
    Canadiana Gallery
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    2nd Floor
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    Description

    Race-based ‘hate crimes’ in Russia reached unprecedentedly high levels in the first decade of the millennium, a point illustrated through comparison to other countries and historical epochs. While racist violence in the Russian Federation is ‘overdetermined,’ the paper explores a number of putative causes, principally the ongoing simmering ethnic conflict in the Russian south. The paper finishes by drawing conclusions on how international comparisons can help us build better theory and conceptual clarity when discussing ‘hate crimes’ versus ‘ethnic conflict.’

    Richard Arnold is Associate Professor of Political Science at Muskingum University. His research concerns extremist and vigilante groups in the Russian Federation and his book on neo-Nazi and Cossack hate crimes/ethnic violence is under review currently with Routledge. He has previously published articles in Theoretical Criminology, Post-Soviet Affairs, Problems of Post-Communism, Nationalities Papers, PS: Political Science and Politics and Journal for the Study of Radicalism. He has authored chapters on Alexei Navalny for Routledge’s Europa series and has a chapter in a forthcoming Palgrave-Macmillan book about Megaevents in Eurasia. He is currently studying the Cossack revival across the enitre Russian Federation, especially in non-traditional Cossack lands.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Richard Arnold
    Muskingum University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd A Roundtable Discussion on Canadian Foreign Policy & Mainstreaming R2P in Today's World

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 201511:00AM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd The Second Surge: Cultural Transfer and Political Literacy in Central Europe, 1815-1850

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    History Department
    Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098
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    Description

    The transfer of knowledge during the Enlightenment is a well-established research field that has taught us much about the circulation and reception of ideas. Thousands of books crossed borders, and the business of translation transformed the cultural landscape of eighteenth-century Central Europe. But what about the nineteenth century? In absolute numbers, German publishers imported and translated far more books than in the eighteenth century, yet the scholarship on this “second surge” remains in its infancy. Examining the penetration of western texts into German markets, this paper focuses on the publishers who brokered this cultural exchange. Their strategies to market themes of materialism and constitutionalism as mass print for popular audiences call attention to the suffusion of Atlantic World political discourse into Central Europe after 1820.

    James M. Brophy is the Francis H. Squire Professor of History at the University of Delaware. He has written Capitalism, Politics, and Railroads in Prussia, 1830-1870 (1998) and Popular Culture and the Public Sphere in the Rhineland, 1800-1850 (2007) as well as co-edited Perspectives from the Past: Sources in Western Civilization (6th ed., 2015). In addition, he has published numerous essays on nineteenth-century Europe, which have appeared in such journals as Past & Present, Journal of Modern History, and Historische Zeitschrift. He is currently working on Markets of Knowledge: Publishers and Politics in Central Europe, 1770-1870, a book that examines German publishers as cultural brokers, political actors, and entrepreneurs of print.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. James M. Brophy
    Francis H. Squire Professor of History, University of Delaware


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd FIRST! - Lecture by Sonal Pandya, University of Virginia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
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    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Sonal Pandya
    University of Virginia


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2015

  • Monday, November 2nd Canada Among Nations Book Launch "Elusive Pursuits"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 2, 20155:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Canada Among Nations is the premier source for contemporary insight into pressing Canadian foreign policy issues. Started at the Norman Paterson School of international Affairs at Carleton University, the series has brought together leading scholars, practitioners, journalists, and members of the NGO community for an assessment of the Canada’s foreign policy since 1984. The Centre for International Governance Innovation is proud to partner with NPSIA, on previous and future editions of Canada Among Nations.

    Join us for a panel discussion and book launch for the 2015 edition entitled Elusive Pursuits: Lessons From Canada’s Interventions Abroad. In this edition, the 29th in the influential Canada Among Nations series, contributors examine Canada’s role in foreign military and security missions, and its tendency to intervene under the auspices of international institutions. Canada is not just among nations in these efforts, but in nations on a regular basis.

    Elusive Pursuits is currently avaialble for pre-order from www.CIGIOnline.org

    To register, please visit: https://www.cigionline.org/events/canada-among-nations-book-launch-toronto-1


    Speakers

    Stephen Toope
    Host
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Fen Hampson
    Moderator
    Distinguished Fellow, CIGI

    Steven Saideman
    Panelist
    The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University

    Aisha Ahmad
    Panelist
    University of Toronto

    Jane Boulden
    Panelist
    Royal Military College, Kingston


    Sponsors

    CIGI


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 4th Urban Boosterism in Closed Contexts: The ‘Magical State’ and Spectacular Urbanization in Three Caspian Capitals

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Natalie Koch
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, Syracuse University, Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 5th 2015 Frank W. Woods Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 5, 20155:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    (416) 946-0326


    Speakers

    Deborah Avant
    University of Denver



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 6th Frank W. Woods Lunch-Time Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    (416) 946-0326


    Speakers

    Deborah Avant
    University of Denver


    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 6th Law, the Commodity Image and the Consuming Public

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Although the discourse of globalization following the fall of the Soviet Union was sudden and celebratory, many distinct historical developments were brought together in most of the invocations, converging around the argument, either latent or patent, that a verdict had been delivered with the end of the Cold War, on the side of freedom and against overarching state authority.
    My paper will address two specific sets of developments that instance the globalization of media and markets, namely advertising and trademark regulation. There are interesting differences between these developments, and to some extent they reflect consequential differences in nomenclature and usage, between the brand and the trademark. Although in a sense these are the same entity as intellectual property, and can be figured together in the idea of the commodity image, the former is in a lightly regulated zone at best, while the latter is subject to strenuous adjudication seeking to protect manufacturers’ and merchants’ rights while regulating market behavior. Studying examples from Indian case law and the history of Indian marketing and advertising, I will seek to understand how, when key aspects of the development of Indian markets have not replicated western conditions, the relevant differences appear to remain as aberrations to the given norms of understanding market-led globalization.

    Arvind Rajagopal’s work explores questions of political aesthetics vis-à-vis postcolonial state formation. His book Politics After Television: Hindu Nationalism and the Reshaping of the Public in India (Cambridge, 2001) won the Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy Prize from the Association of Asian Studies in 2003, and his edited volume The Indian Public Sphere appeared in 2009. Recent articles include “The Emergency and the New Indian Middle Class” in Modern Asian Studies, 2011, and “Special Political Zone” on the anti-Muslim violence in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, in South Asian History and Culture, 2011. He has held fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton. In addition, he has been a visiting professor at the University of Goettingen, Germany, the Delhi School of Economics at the University of Delhi, and the Central University of Hyderabad. His current research draws on archives in five countries, including India and the United States, and seeks, among other things, to link the disciplinary history of media studies with the history of communication technology.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Arvind Rajagopal
    Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, NYU



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th Empire, Russia, and the First World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Dominic Lieven graduated first in his year, 1973, at the University of Cambridge. He was a Kennedy Scholar at Harvard and, on completing his PhD, became a lecturer in the Department of Government at the London School of Economics, where he is now Professor of Russian Government. He has also been a visiting professor at Tokyo and Harvard Universities, as well as a Humboldt Fellow in Göttingen and Munich. He has published widely, writing on aristocracy, late imperial Russia, and empire. Dominic’s most recent book, Russia against Napoleon, was a major new history of the Napoleonic Wars from the Russian perspective which draws on previously unexploited Russian archival sources. The End of Tsarist Russia, to be published by Allen Lane in May 2015, will provide an account of the First World War told from the Russian perspective.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Dominic Lieven
    London School of Economics


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 17th Sacred Mountains of China with Ryan Pyle

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 17, 20156:30PM - 8:30PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Join adventurer and renowned photographer, Ryan Pyle, as he spends months exploring and photographing Western China’s remote Sacred Mountains in an effort to better understand these Tibetan regions. His human-powered adventure is “one of the ages” as he explores the remote provinces of Qinghai, Tibet, Sichuan and Yunnan.

    Born in Toronto, Canada, Ryan Pyle spent his early years close to home. After obtaining a degree in International Politics from the University of Toronto in 2001, Ryan realized a lifelong dream and travelled to China on an exploratory mission. In 2002 Ryan moved to China permanently and in 2004 he became a regular contributor to the New York Times. In 2009 Ryan was listed by PDN Magazine as one of the 30 emerging photographers in the world. In 2010 Ryan began working full time on television and documentary film production and has produced and presented several large multi-episode television series for major broadcasters in the USA, Canada, UK, Asia, China and continental Europe.

    Note: We ask that you arrive 15 minutes prior to the start of the screening with a copy of your ticket to guarantee your seat

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Ryan Pyle
    Speaker
    Producer

    Josepj Wong
    Chair
    Director, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    CINSSU

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th FIRST! - Lecture by Stephen Clarkson, University of Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Stephen Clarkson
    University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2015

  • Tuesday, December 8th Landscapes of power: mass housing at the urban core in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 8, 20153:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Largely unknown to city-dwellers before the 1960s, large apartment complexes (ap’at’ŭ tanji) powerfully shape the landscapes of contemporary South Korean cities. Some are now being memorialized by artists, planners and citizen themselves. How did apparently western-style housing blocks migrate to Korea on such a large scale? To what extent do they reflect the power relations between the global and the local in South Korean cities? What is currently at stake regarding the future of apartments in the contemporary post-industrial Korean society? Combining the perspectives of cultural geography and Korean studies, and using ethnographic materials gathered on sites studied since the mid-1990s (in downtown Seoul) or new ones in the making (Songdo), the symposium will address those issues regarding the significance of South Korea as a “Republic of Apartments” (ap’at’ŭ konghwaguk), where apartment complexes have been the main mediation of the Korean society to urban modernity.

    Valérie Gelézeau addresses in her research the various dimensions of space as a social construct in contemporary Korea, via different perspectives including urban geography, cultural geography, regional geography and geopolitics. She is the author of Ap’at’ŭ konghwaguk (“The Republic of Apartments” 2007), Atlas de Séoul (2011, a geographical monograph of Seoul as a megacity) and, with Koen De Ceuster and Alain Delissen, the co-editor of De-bordering Korea. Tangible and intangible legacies of the Sunshine Policy (Routledge 2013).


    Speakers

    Valérie Gelézeau
    Associate professor at l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS, Paris), Affiliated fellow at the International Institute for Asian Studies (Leiden, The Netherlands)

    Jennifer Chun
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea & Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2016

  • Friday, January 15th FIRST! - Grad Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 15, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
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    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 29th FIRST! - Lecture by Jon Lindsay, Munk School of Global Affairs

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 29, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Jon Lindsay
    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2016

  • Friday, February 19th FIRST! - Lecture by Patrick Thadeus, American University

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 19, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Patrick Thadeus
    American University


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2016

  • Friday, March 4th FIRST! - Lecture by Norrin Ripsman, Concordia University

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 4, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Norrin Ripsman
    Concordia University


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 11th Cooperation and the ‘Population Problem’ in Late Colonial Korea: the 1940 Health Investigation of the Urban Poor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 11, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In 1940, students of the Medical Department at Keijō Imperial University set out to investigate the health and living conditions of urban residents in what were perceived as the ghettos of Seoul (Keijō). Called the t’omangmin, these new urban residents whose burgeoning numbers and needs the infrastructure of Seoul was unable to handle were considered part of the “population problem,” as categorized by colonial authorities. Juxtaposing this with other research projects, the presentation explores the rhetoric of love and cooperation in a purportedly scientific investigation to interrogate medical activities and health administration in the context of Seoul’s urban development and expansion of Japanese military expeditions during the Pacific War.

    Sonja M. Kim is Assistant Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY) where she teaches courses on Korean history and East Asia. Her research interests are on issues of gender, medicine, and public health in 20th century Korea.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Sonja Kim
    Assistant professor, Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University (SUNY)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 18th Fights against Trafficking in Persons in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 18, 20163:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    South Korea is currently listed as a tier 1 country under the US State Department Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report. In 2001, when it was ranked a Tier 3 country as a source and transit country, South Korean government tried diligently to improve its image in many ways. It adopted the Act on the Punishment of Acts of Arranging Sexual Traffic in 2004 that punishes the solicitation of sex, transformed pre-existing law, and, in 2013, amended provisions in the Criminal Act which broadened the definition of trafficking to include labour trafficking as well. The protection of the victims and witnesses, however, is still quite weak, and a constitutional challenge on the legality of the punishments has been raised. The ratification bill for the Palermo Protocol submitted by the Government on July 10, 2014, is still pending. Professor Baik reviews the light and shadow of the fights against human trafficking in Korea, and discusses the role of law and social morality.

    Dr. Tae-Ung Baik is an Associate Professor of Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai’i at Manoa. He teaches international human rights law, comparative law, and Korean law. Dr. Baik was appointed a mandate-holder of Special Procedure of the UN Human Rights Council in 2015 as a member of the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances (WGEID). He earned his Master’s (LL.M.) and Doctoral (JSD) degrees from Notre Dame Law School, and is an attorney at-law in the State of New York. His book, “Emerging Regional Human Rights Systems in Asia,” was published by Cambridge University Press in 2012.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tae-Ung Baik
    Associate Professor of Law,William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 25th FIRST! - Lecture by Emmanuel Adler, University of Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 25, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Emmanuel Adler
    University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2016

  • Friday, April 1st FIRST! - Lecture by Shiping Tang, Fudan University

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 1, 201612:00PM - 2:00PM3130 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St George St,
    Toronto, ON M5S 2E5
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    FIRST! (Friday IR Seminar and Tea)

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sari Sherman
    (416) 978-4725


    Speakers

    Shiping Tang
    Fudan University


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science


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