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January 2015

  • Friday, January 9th Canada’s Future as an Arctic Actor

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 9, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Please join us for the Lunch and Learn Discussion with Dr. Franklyn Griffiths, one of Canada’s leading experts on Arctic affairs.

    Dr. Griffiths will speak on the topics of climate change and arctic geo-engineering, new security and sovereignty challenges as the region is globalized, and the need now for greater regional collaboration to cope with foreseeable difficulty. His presentation will be followed by a question and answer session for participants.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a joint academic enterprise between the Munk School of Global Affairs and Trinity College at University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Dr. Franklyn Griffiths
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    University of Toronto Association of Political Science Students

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    The Gordon Foundation


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 9th Opening of the Exhibition "Poland: From War to Victory, 1939-1989"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 9, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The opening of the exhibition will take place on January 9th, 2015 at 2pm at the Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, and will be followed by a lecture by Dr. Lukasz Kaminski, the President of the Institute of National Remembrance.

    The exhibition will be on display from 9 to 26 January, 2015 at the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place.

    Admission Free.

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto

    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History

    The Institute of National Remembrance, Poland


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 9th When the Future disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 9, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Janet Poole’s When the Future Disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea (Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University). Prof. Poole’s new book takes a panoramic view of Korea’s dynamic literary production in the final decade of Japanese rule, locates the imprint of a new temporal sense in Korean modernism. Such alertness of interruption of time, with no promise of a future, propels Korean literati under the Japanese colonial rule to produce some of the most sophisticated writings of the 20th century modernism.

    Professor Poole teaches Korean literature and cultural history at the University of Toronto and is a a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. She has translated the works of many writers from colonial Korea, including Yi T’aejun’s Eastern Sentiments.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please click on the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Janet Poole
    Associate Professor & Graduate Coordinator, Department of East Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 13th Doing Business in the New Climate Economy: Spotlight on Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 13, 201510:00AM - 1:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The next 15 years will be critical as the global economy undergoes deep structural transformation. The global economy may grow by more than a half, a billion more people will come to live in cities, and rapid technological advance will continue to change business and lives. Around US$90 trillion is likely to be invested in infrastructure in the world’s urban, land use and energy systems. How these changes are managed will shape future patterns of growth, productivity and living standards. This represents a significant business opportunity.

    In this panel discussion, speakers will share findings from the New Climate Economy’s US Study Report, discuss the report’s impact in the US, and then highlight its relevance for Canadian business leaders and decision makers. Speakers will also share best practice in their respective fields of what businesses are already doing to seize opportunities in the emerging low-carbon economy.

    Panel presentations will be followed by a Q&A and networking over a light lunch.

    Contact

    Nina Boric


    Speakers

    Matthew Hoffmann
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Gord Lambert
    Speaker
    Executive Advisor, Sustainability and Innovation, Suncor Energy

    Helen Mountford
    Speaker
    Director of Economics, World Resources Institute,

    Program Director, New Climate Economy

    Stefan Sjöstrand
    Speaker
    CEO, IKEA Canada

    Stewart Elgie
    Moderator
    Director, Institute of the Environment, University of Ottawa

    Jim Burpee
    Speaker
    President and CEO, Canadian Electricity Association



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 13th University Spin-Offs: Input/Output Metrics and Benefits

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 13, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    Denys Cooper has been studying university spin-off firms (USO) for 25 years. The study has cumulated multi-year data for over 1,400 USOs covering over 90 centres in all provinces. Many special features of the results will be presented on firm status, jobs, sales, investments and gazelles (high growth firms). Canada ranks 6th of 34 countries reporting numbers of USOs, but first in the depth of national data on socio economic benefits. Data has also been assembled on the entrepreneurial professors with 2+ USOs, female-led firms and student-led spin-off firms.

    Speaker bio: Denys Cooper received his B.Sc. At the University of Exeter and his Ph.D. at the University of Liverpool. He has written extensively on technological innovation in Canada and has worked for the National Research Council of Canada’s Industrial Research Assistance Program between 1973 and 2008. He authored special studies on biotech financing, IPO values for biotech firms in Canada, university spin-off firms, high-growth firms, lag time from research to innovation, and R&D tax credits for industry. He has served on NSERC’s committee on National Biotech Strategy and various DFATD’s committees focusing on U.S., Russian, and Ukrainian technologies.

    Contact

    Essyn Emurla
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Denys G. T. Cooper
    National Research Council



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 14th Realizing the Aspirations of the Right to Health Care in Canada: A Comparative Assessment of Methods of Implementing the Right

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 14, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Legal scholars and philosophers increasingly recognize the right to health care. It clearly exists as a matter of international human rights law as a subset of the right to health enshrined in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and other international human rights law documents. Nations arguably have the right to use different methods for implementing the right to health care as a matter of both law and ethics. They accordingly take a variety of methods of achieving the salutary effects of such a right, including constitutional recognition of rights to health and/or health care in constitutional documents, judicial recognition of constitutional rights to health and/or health care as part of broader rights (to e.g., security of the person and dignity) and non-constitutional statutory guarantees of health care entitlements. Yet it is worth examining which modes best realize the salutary effects the right to health care is designed to provide. If another method of implementation better realizes those effects and fits within a nation’s existing legal framework, this arguably provides reason for a nation to change its method of implementation.

    It can, however, be difficult to assess different nations’ methods of implementing a right to health care in the absence of a shared standard of comparison. This presentation will accordingly argue that international human rights law can be used to identify the core components of a right to health care and that scrutiny of these components can provide metrics for identifying the extent to which different nations’ methods of implementation achieve the salutary effects the right to health care is designed to provide. First, it will describe how international human rights law presents the core components and how one can use these methods to identify metrics for success. Then, it will present preliminary findings on how Canadian constitutional law fares as a method of implementation. Finally, it will point to other methods of implementation that will be studied in later chapters of my doctoral dissertation.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Michael Da Silva
    Senior Doctoral Fellow, CPHS


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 14th Operation CARIBBE

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 14, 20151:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    On October 30, 2014, Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Athabaskan returned to its home port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, after a successful deployment on Operation CARIBBE, Canada’s contribution to the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking by transnational organized crime in the Caribbean basin and the eastern Pacific Ocean.
    HMCS Athabaskan seamlessly conducted joint operations, supported multiple aircraft patrol sorties, and participated in six intercept operations, one of which resulted in the successful disruption of 820 kg of cocaine.
    The Royal Canadian Navy has deployed seven warships as part of Operation CARIBBE 2014. The contributions of these warships have resulted in the seizure or disruption of more than six metric tonnes of cocaine to date.
    The Canadian Armed Forces has been conducting Operation CARIBBE since November 2006 and remains committed to working with Western Hemisphere and European partners to disrupt illicit trafficking operations, while improving regional security and deterring criminal activity in the coastal regions of Central America and the Caribbean region


    Speakers

    Commander Matt Plaschka
    Speaker
    Commanding Officer of HMCS Athabaskan, Canadian Forces

    Professor Ramón A. Victoriano-Martínez
    Chair
    Acting Director, Caribbean Studies Program, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 16th Courtyard Housing and Cultural Sustainability in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 16, 201511:30AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    The Chinese have lived in single-extended-family courtyard houses in many parts of China for thousands of years. The earliest courtyard house found in China was during the Middle Neolithic period (5,000-3,000 BCE). However, the 20th century was a significant turning point in the evolution of Chinese courtyard houses. This presentation provides an overview of this transition and evaluates some of its causes. Based on Dr. Zhang’s empirical research and analysis of six multi-household renewed and new courtyard housing experimental projects built in Beijing and Suzhou since the 1990s, she observes that, although the new communal courtyards can facilitate some social interactions, neighborly relations are only partially influenced by the form and space of the courtyard housing, and are perhaps influenced even more so by China’s changing and polarizing society as manifested in these specific residents’ socio-economic levels, housing tenure, modern lifestyles, community involvement, common language, cultural awareness, and demographic backgrounds.

    Dr. Donia Zhang is a graduate of Oxford Brookes University (Barch, MA, PhD) in the UK and Brock University (Med) in Canada. Her area of expertise is in courtyard housing development in China and North America, China’s heritage preservation policies and practices, cultural sustainability, and architectural multiculturalism.

    Donia’s email is doniazhang@gmail.com

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Donia Zhang
    The City Institute, York University


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 16th PCJ Speaker Series - Economics, Development and Conflict: from theory to practice

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 16, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This seminar will explore the links between violent conflict and development. It will focus on the micro-level processes leading to conflict, and how conflict and violence affect people’s lives not only at the household level but also within groups and communities. It will also examine how these micro-level processes are linked to wider political and economic issues including governance and public good provision. In order to do that, we will describe specific country studies and introduce to both quantitative and qualitative assessments of how exposure to violent conflict affects development responses.

    Contact

    Reina Shishikura
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Prof. Paola Salardi
    Acting Director



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 19th By Land or By Sea? Double Agents, Military Deception, and the Allied Capture of Rome, May-June 1944

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20152:00PM - 3:30PMLA200, Larkin Building
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    Description

    Part of the Contemporary International History Graduate Research Forum.

    After several unsuccessful attempts, Allied forces under General Harold Alexander finally broke German defences south of Rome in May 1944, leading to a German retreat northward and the Allied entry into the Eternal City. While brute military force was essential to the victory, the Allies also subtly manipulated the intelligence of the German commander, Field Marshal Albert Kesselring, leading him to believe that the Allies would launch an amphibious assault north of Rome. This paper argues that Allied double agents, which consistently fed false information to the German intelligence service, were vital in convincing Kesselring that the attack would come from the sea, rather than the land assault which was actually planned. The paper utilizes a combination of German military records and recently declassified British papers to make this argument on the value of double agent operations and military deception in World War II.

    Interested in presenting your work as part of the Graduate Research Forum? Contact susie.colbourn@mail.utoronto.ca for more information.

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a joint academic enterprise between the Munk School of Global Affairs and Trinity College at University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Brett Lintott
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 19th Book Launch: "The Fountain of Knowledge: The Role of Universities in Economic Development" by Shiri M. Breznitz

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
    M5S0A7
    416-946-8929
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    Description

    Today, universities around the world find themselves going beyond the traditional roles of research and teaching to drive the development of local economies through collaborations with industry. At a time when regions with universities are seeking best practices among their peers, Shiri M. Breznitz argues against the notion that one university’s successful technology transfer model can be easily transported to another. Rather, the impact that a university can have on its local economy must be understood in terms of its idiosyncratic internal mechanisms, as well as the state and regional markets within which it operates.

    To illustrate her argument, Breznitz undertakes a comparative analysis of two universities, Yale and Cambridge, and the different outcomes of their attempts at technology commercialization in biotech. By contrasting these two universities—their unique policies, organizational structure, institutional culture, and location within distinct national polities—she makes a powerful case for the idea that technology transfer is dependent on highly variable historical and environmental factors. Breznitz highlights key features to weigh and engage in developing future university and economic development policies that are tailor-made for their contexts.

    Shiri M. Breznitz teaches for the Munk One and Master of Global Affairs programs as Assistant Professor. An economic geographer, she specializes in innovation, technology, and regional economic development. Her research is at the critical intersection of theory and policy to fit the new realities of globalization. Professor Breznitz’s work has informed policymaking at the local, national, and international levels. She has advised on the role of universities in the larger story of innovation, on the economic impact of biotechnology, and on the role of clusters in driving innovation. Read more.


    Speakers

    Shiri M. Breznitz
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 19th In the Shadow of the Shtetl: Small-Town Jewish Life in Soviet Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 19, 20154:00PM - 6:00PMJackman Humanities Building
    Room 100
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    Based on videotaped oral histories conducted with Jews living in small-towns throughout Ukraine, this multimedia presentation discusses Jewish life and death under Communism and Nazism.

    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 170 St. George Street

    Co-sponsors: the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and the Centre for Jewish Studies

    This event is free and open to the public. No registration required. Please arrive early as seating is limited.

    Contact

    Emily Springgay
    (416) 978-1624


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Veidlinger
    University of Michigan



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 21st NGO Organizational Logistics and Shifting Aid Mandates: The Field As Site of Authority and Power

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 21, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Emily Scott
    Lupina/OGS Doctoral Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Diasporic Intimacies: Queer Filipinos and Canadian Imaginaries

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 20159:00AM - 9:00PMOCAD University, Room 190
    100 McCaul Street
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    Description

    This inaugural event, the first of its kind in North America, brings together academics, artists, activists, and frontline community members as they examine and discuss the experiences of queer Filipinos/as in Canada. Through a series of connected and provocative events, this gathering aims to initiate rich dialogue between multiple stakeholders around the contributions and needs of queer Filipinos/as as a diasporic community with links within and beyond Canada.

    ABOUT THE CONFERENCE
    This conference places emerging and established scholars in Filipino, Asian North American and Queer Studies in conversation with artists, front-line community workers, and community members. Participants will address specific concerns and topics that are relevant to LGBTQ Filipinos/as in Canada, and will attempt to intervene in dialogues around policy, integration, and settlement.

    Click the link below for more information about the event.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Roland Sintos Coloma
    Professor, Department of Teacher Education, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, USA

    Dr. Martin F. Manalansan IV
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and Asian American Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA


    Co-Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Recasting Modern Chinese Intellectual History: Ideological Moments, Intellectual Worlds and Enduring Ideas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    The challenge for understanding modern Chinese intellectual history is to get beyond our assumptions and the big stories. For many, Chinese intellectuals are dissidents and democrats, people trying to be like us. The big stories are tied to what China is today. Recasting modern Chinese intellectual history requires us to find ways to break out of these set story lines. Looking at China’s thinkers and writers in terms of ideological moments and intellectual worlds can help us understand what intellectuals in different decades thought they were doing, what the problems were that they were addressing, and thus how to assess their contributions to enduring ideas in Chinese thought from the nature of “the people” to “Chinese” to “democracy.”

    His research, teaching and translating focus on the recent history of China, especially the role of Chinese intellectuals in the twentieth century and the history of the Chinese Communist Party. His books include Critical Introduction to Mao (2010) Living with Reform: China Since 1989 (2006), Mao Zedong and China’s Revolutions (2002) and Propaganda and Culture in Mao’s China (1997), as well as New Perspectives on State Socialism in China (1997), with Tony Saich, and The Secret Speeches of Chairman Mao (1989) with Roderick MacFarquhar and Eugene Wu, and China’s Establishment Intellectuals (1986), with Carol Lee Hamrin. His new book, The Intellectual in Modern Chinese History will be available on Cambridge University Press in 2015.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Timothy Cheek
    Professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research, Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Gender, Nation and Revolution: the Role of Women in the Euro Maidan Protests of 2013-2014 in Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Petro Jacyk Program seminar

    Description

    Women’s participation in EuroMaidan and its social and media evaluations largely reflect the social position of women in the Ukrainian society. In the current economic and social situation, entrenched stereotypes of men as family breadwinners and leaders in the public sphere (particularly, in politics) and stereotypes of women as mostly wives and mothers inhibit progress in gender equality in Ukrainian society. In my research I will try to discuss three major ideas: (1) (International) media discourse about EuroMaidan was “narrow”; event (practices) is much more diverse; (2) Women were not “helpers”, but “participants” of EuroMaidan; (3) women had possibility to fulfill not only “traditional” (“female”) roles; new niches for egalitarian (emancipatory) participation were possible. The empirical base for research is the examples of speeches on Maidan, journal articles, pictures and video materials, blogs and social networks; participants observation and interviews with activists. The theoretical background of my research is feminist theories, especially intersection of feminism and nationalism (Yuval-Davis 1997; Bohachevsky-Chomiak 1994; Kis 2005; Rubchak 1996; Zhurzhenko 2012 and others).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Tamara Martseniuk
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 23rd Nation and Family: Personal Law, Cultural Pluralism, and Gendered Citizenship in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 23, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSAS Lives and Worlds of Law Series

    Description

    The distinct personal laws that govern the major religious groups are a major aspect of Indian multiculturalism and secularism. States that inherited personal laws reflecting specific cultural norms adopted different approaches to recognition and family regulation. India changed its personal laws less than Turkey and Tunisia, but far more than Algeria, Syria, and Lebanon, and increased women’s rights and individual liberties in certain ways, contrary to the trend in Pakistan, Iran, Sudan, and Nigeria since the 1970s. Moreover, Hindu law was changed earlier and more extensively than the minority laws.

    Ruling elites’ discourses about the nation, its cultural groups, and its traditions interact with the state-society relations that regimes inherit and the projects of regimes to change society. These interactions influence the pattern of multiculturalism, the place of religion in public policy and public life, and forms of family regulation. They led India to introduce moderate yet sustained personal law reforms. Further, the greater engagement of political elites with Hindu initiatives and the predominant place of Hindu motifs in nationalist discourses shaped Indian multiculturalism. They were crucial reasons why policy-makers changed Hindu law far more although support for personal law reform was not clearly higher among Hindus.

    Narendra Subramanian is Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. He studies the politics of nationalism, ethnicity, religion, gender, and race in a comparative perspective, focusing primarily on India. Subramanian’s first book (Ethnicity and Populist Mobilization: Political Parties, Citizens and Democracy in South India, Oxford University Press, 1999) examined why the mobilization of intermediate and lower status groups through discourses of language and caste reinforced democracy and tolerance in Tamil Nadu, southern India. His second book (Nation and Family: Personal Law, Cultural Pluralism, and Gendered Citizenship in India, Stanford University Press, 2014) traced the course of the personal laws that govern family life among India’s major religious groups. He is currently engaged in a project comparing the effects of political rights on the socio-economic status of two historically bonded groups, titled From Bondage to Citizenship: The Enfranchisement and Advancement of Dalits and African-Americans.

    Contact

    Stephanie Taylor
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Narendra Subramanian
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 27th Playing as Living: Gold-diggers and Con Artists As Vital Theatrical Subjects in Modern American Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 27, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Given the early twentieth century’s continued association with aesthetic modernism, critical engagements with the theatre and theatricality in this period are usually positioned in terms of anti-theatricality. Theatre scholar Martin Puchner has argued (Stage Fright) that in fact the key to modernism’s overall aesthetic lies specifically in its opposition to the theatre. Rothstein’s paper reads against the grain by drawing attention to representations of theatricality as vitality, as something positive rather than suspect. Using Henri Bergson’s contemporaneous conception of vitalism as a creative force encompassing intuition, will, and feeling, together with his theories of comedy, in which the “living” being is one who (unlike a machine) is able to change, she fashions a picture of the ways that characters in Anita Loos’s novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925) and Ernst Lubitsch’s film Trouble in Paradise (1932) offer models of living with creativity, passion, and vigour. Both Loos and Lubitsch make a link between theatricality and an understanding of what lies behind appearances, the consciousness and mastery of which are essential to their characters’ success. This success is frequently tied to social mobility, with the con artist presented as a working class hero trying to improve his or her position in the class hierarchy. No apologies are made for Lorelei Lee and Gaston Monescu, their role playing and playing with language are held up for pleasure and admiration, their energy and creativity enlivening both themselves and others. Because the vital theatrical subject is often most visible in comedy, these works provide a place to begin to frame a more nuanced discussion of theatricality beyond its frequent dismissal as “inauthentic” and excessive.

    Jackie Rothstein is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, “Acting Up: Theatricality as Vitality in Modern American Literature” looks at novels, plays, and films in the period 1920–1950 for the way in which they present theatricality as a way of living life with energy, creativity, and passion. Sitting at the intersection of cultural and affect studies, Jackie’s project exhibits her interest in issues of gender, class, and ethnicity, and in blurring the boundaries between “high,” “middlebrow,” and “low” culture. Jackie earned her MA from Columbia University. Prior to returning to university to complete her PhD, she worked as an in-house book editor, as a writer for design and communications firms, and as a project manager and editor on art catalogues and exhibitions.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jackie Rothstein
    PhD Candidate in the Department of English, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 28th The Japanese Art of Fascist Modernism: Yasuda Yukihiko’s The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 28, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    This presentation investigates The Arrival of Yoshitsune/Camp at Kisegawa (1940-41) produced by the Japanese-style painter Yasuda Yukihiko. It demonstrates that the painting, which emulates Kamakura-period paintings, depicts medieval warriors, and was displayed at an exhibition that celebrated Japan’s imperial family, significantly contributed to the politicized cultural discourse that espoused the theme of “return to Japan” (Nihon kaiki), which was central to Japan’s wartime ideology. The painting, Asato Ikeda will reveal, clearly drew on pre-modern Japanese pictorial art but it was simultaneously inspired by the modern aesthetics of post-expressionist machine paintings, and thus mirrors the fundamental contradiction of the wartime Japanese state that repudiated some aspects of modernity upon which it was nevertheless predicated. Following recent fascism studies that understand fascism in relation to a paradoxical attitude toward modernity, Asato Ikeda will suggest that Yasuda’s work not only exemplified the Japanese state’s appropriation of modernism, but can also be considered as a Japanese example of fascist modernism.

    Asato Ikeda is Assistant Professor of Art History and Music at Fordham University, New York and an Asia-Pacific Journal contributing editor. Between 2014 and 2016, she is the Bishop White Postdoctoral Fellow at Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where she plans to organize an exhibition about wakashu (male youth). Co-editor, with Ming Tiampo and Aya Louisa McDonald, of Art and War in Japan and its Empire: 1931-1960 (Leiden: Brill, 2012), she is currently working on a monograph that will explore the relationship between Japanese art and war in the 1930s and early 1940s.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Asato Ikeda 
    Assistant Professor, Fordham University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th – Friday, January 30th 8th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Thursday, January 29, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 20159:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, January 30, 201511:00AM - 1:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 29th 'Sola Scriptura'? Book History and Religious Authority in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, January 29, 20156:00PM - 7:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Protestantism has been the dominant influence shaping both American religious history and the history of American book culture, as the drive for widespread literary, mass book dissemination, and the public school movement were each significantly driven by the religious imperative to access the Word. The Protestant doctrine of sola scriptura energized the first large-scale publishing project in North America, John Eliot’s Algonquin Bible of 1663. From these beginnings, through the nineteenth-century Bible and tract societies, to the Christian Booksellers Association of the present, the story of Protestantism in the United States has been inseparable from the drive to control and disseminate print. Yet all along, print has also served as a site of religious conflict and a tool of religious innovation and dissent, as examples ranging from Tom Paine and the Book of Mormon to Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Oprah Winfrey make clear.

    This lecture will attend to this dynamic of authority, to the role of print in the interplay of establishment and dissent in American religious life. Three themes structure the analysis: the relationship between scriptural and non-scriptural forms of print; the gendered dimensions of reading, literacy, and authorship; and the nature of print as commodity, and therefore as a site where market dynamics shape religion with particular potency. Through an examination of key examples across four centuries, this talk aims to consider a basic historiographical question: how do the frameworks of book history sharpen our understanding of authority in American religious history.

    Matthew Hedstrom is a historian of the United States specializing in religion and culture in the late19th and 20th centuries. His overarching research interests are the social history of religious sensibilities and the cultural mechanisms of their production and propagation. His particular areas of teaching and research thus far have been religious liberalism, spirituality, the cultures and politics of pluralism, religion and race, and print culture. His first book, The Rise of Liberal Religion: Book Culture and American Spirituality in the Twentieth Century, employs novel sources in book history to tell the surprising story of religious liberalism’s cultural ascendancy in the 20th century. The religious middlebrow culture of mid-century, Hedstrom argues, brought psychological, mystical, and cosmopolitan forms of spirituality to broad swaths of the American middle class. He has also authored various articles, reviews, and reference works in American studies and American religious history. He is beginning work on a new book project on race and the search for religious authenticity from the Civil War through the 1960s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hedstrom
    Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies and Program in American Studies, University of Virginia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Centre for the Book

    Book History and Print Culture Collaborative Program, Massey College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 201510:00AM - 12:00PMAnthropology Building AP 246
    19 Russell Street
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    Series

    Constructing Asian Infrastructures: Politics, Poetics, Plans

    Description

    Drawing on two decades of ethnographic research in Sulawesi, Indonesia, Land’s End offers an intimate account of the emergence of capitalist relations among indigenous highlanders who privatized their common land to plant a global market crop, cacao. Some prospered; others lost their land. It is a story with potent messages for social movement activists, who expect indigenous people to be guardians of community and tradition, committed to sustaining food production. It also interrupts transition narratives that expect people who lose their land to march off to the city to find a job. For these newly landless highlanders, as for many other post-peasants across Asia, jobs are scarce. When land’s end is a dead end, a different politics must emerge.

    Tania Murray Li is Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy and Culture of Asia in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto, and author of Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier (Duke University Press 2014), Powers of Exclusion: Land Dilemmas in Southeast Asia (with Derek Hall and Philip Hirsch, NUS Press, 2011), and The Will to Improve: Governmentality, Development, and the Practice of Politics (Duke, 2007).

    Join us for a presentation and discussion session with Tania Li, Derek Hall, Christopher Krupa, and Katharine Rankin.

    Click the link below to register.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Professor, St. George Campus and Canada Research Chair in the Political-Economy and Culture of Asia, University of Toronto

    Derek Hall
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Christopher Krupa
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Katharine Rankin
    Professor, Department of Geography and Program in Planning, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    The Department of Anthropology

    Co-Sponsors

    The Development Seminar

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 30th Professionalizing Perfume in Eighteenth-Century Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 30, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Kirsten James
    Doctorante en Histoire Universite de Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, January 31st Health & High Politics: The modern state’s interest in health equity & security

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 31, 201510:00AM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs- 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    10:00-10:45 Registration

    10:45 -11:30 Introductions + Keynote, Peter A Singer, CEO of Grand Challenges Canada

    11:30- 12:45: Panel 1 – Paradigm Shift: The New Health Landscape

    The 21st century has seen traditional “state-centric” threats – war, espionage, etc. – replaced with non-state threats from terrorism to tsunamis. International institutions like the G8, the WHO, and the OECD have identified disease and health inequality as chief among these “neo-vulnerabilities.” How did we get to where we are today? What, ultimately, compels a state to address global health equity and security

    12:45 – 2:15 Lunch

    2:15 – 3:30: Panel 2 – Global Co-Operation in Action

    Addressing new sources of vulnerability requires practical collaboration between governments, non-state actors, and the academy. What is required to reach solutions that meet the goals of all these actors? How can innovators best engage their state, others, and the international community to affect positive health outcomes?

    3:30 – 4:00 Coffee Break

    4:00 – 5:15 Panel 3 – The Next Decade: Stress-Tests in Health Collaboration

    Looking to the future, what will be required of our international health infrastructure? Is our system prepared to meet existing and fast-evolving challenges from communicable and non-communicable disease? How does the status-quo need to change and what are our metrics for success?

    Speakers Include:

    Keynote – Peter A Singer
    Professor Joy Fitzgibbon
    Dr. Ophira Ginsburg
    Professor John Kirton
    Dr. James Orbinski
    Professor Joseph Wong

    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Student Union

    Arts and Science Student Union

    International Relations Society

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2015

  • Thursday, February 5th The Treacherous Double Vision of "A Moveable Feast"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Although many critics discuss the importance of World WarI to Hemingway (Cowley, Wilson, Crews), few consider the war in A Moveable Feast (1964). Much of the memoir is narrated through a voice that entwines Hemingway’s perspective with that of his former mentor, Gertrude Stein. Through this complex act of ventriloquism, Hemingway attacks former allies like Stein in a voice that bespeaks his indebtedness to them. He thus exploits F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “double vision” to simultaneously valorize and undermine his autobiographical “I,” recognizing that after WWI, he could no longer conceive of a self disconnected from others – even in the egocentric genre of autobiography.

    Tony Fong is a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs, for 2014-15. Fong recently received his PhD in English at the University of Toronto, and works on issues of contemporary literature and film, focusing especially on life writing, ethics, and gender/sexuality studies.

    His dissertation, “Authoring Death: Mourning Masculinity in American Autobiography,” for which he received the A.S.P. Woodhouse Prize for the best dissertation defended in the Department of English, probes representations of the “unhealthy” male bodies that permeate American personal narratives. By exposing the different ways the auto-biographical text manifests the writer’s failing corporeality—even when he struggles to conceal it—“Authoring Death” challenges the myth of the self-made and invulnerable man of American autobiography. Fong’s next book-length project, Starving Art: Sacrifice, Ethics, and American Hunger Narratives, examines the centrality of hunger within American culture by studying how literary and visual narratives diminish the body and its appetites. By approaching hunger as a sacrificial act, this project posits an ethics of self-deprivation. Fong’s writing can also be found in Philip Roth Studies, University of Toronto Quarterly, and The Huffington Post.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Tony Fong
    Visiting Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 9th The Young and the Clueless: the Strategic Promotion of Junior Officials to the Top Echelon in Chinese Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 9, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Both Mao and Deng used the excuse of rejuvenating the party to “helicopter” very junior officials into the upper echelon of the party. This paper provides an analytical explanation of why Mao and Deng pursued this strategy. Furthermore, using both historical and statistical evidence will be used to illustrate how the promotion of junior officials afford the incumbent leader greater policy flexibility and less threat to their power. This talk will conclude with a discussion of how this strategy has affected contemporary politics in China.

    Victor C. Shih is a political economist at the University of California at San Diego specializing in China. An immigrant to the United States from Hong Kong, Dr. Shih received his doctorate in Government from Harvard University, where he researched banking sector reform in China with the support of the Jacob K. Javits Fellowship and the Fulbright Fellowship. He is the author of a book published by the Cambridge University Press entitled Factions and Finance in China: Elite Conflict and Inflation. It is the first book to inquire the linkages between elite politics and banking policies in China. He is further the author of numerous articles appearing in academic and business journals, including The American Political Science Review, The China Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Politics, The Wall Street Journal and The China Business Review, and frequent adviser to the financial community. Dr. Shih holds a B.A. from the George Washington University, where he studied on a University Presidential Fellowship and graduated summa cum laude in East Asian studies with a minor in economics

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Victor Shih
    Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 10th PCJ Speaker Series: Paradigm Shift Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 10, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 11th Birthing Culture: Indigeneity and Biomedicalization of Childbirth in Yucatan, Mexico

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 11, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Sarah Williams
    Lupina/OGS Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 12th Becoming the Nation's Third Faith: Judaism and the Shaping of Post-WWII American Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 12, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    During the 1940s and 1950s, Jews became – improbably, considering their tiny numbers – “America’s third faith.” For most of the nation’s history, American religion had meant, for all intents and purposes, Christianity. But as postwar America defined itself in contrast to its Cold War enemies, as Jews moved to the suburban frontiers and became known and befriended by middle-class neighbours who attended churches and Sunday schools, and as the Cold War demanded that every American have a religion, social and political rules were rewritten, resulting in a reordering of the American moral order. What was associated with Nazism was deemed undemocratic, if not evil. Jews’ racial categorization was replaced by a new American agreement: Judaism now counted as one of the nation’s primary religions. “Judeo-Christianity” proclaimed a bold revision of the nation’s religious history to include Jews and Judaism in America’s moral tradition. How Jews and American culture responded to those changes is at the heart of this story.

    Rachel Gordan received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and her BA from Yale College. She teaches a course in American religious history, and is currently working on a book manuscript about post-World War II American Judaism.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rachel Gordan
    Lecturer and Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 18th CPHS Seminar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 24th Job shortages, Care shortages: The U.S. nursing workforce and the crisis of American health care

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The United States has suffered from nursing shortages since at least the 1970s. As a result, rural and inner-city hospitals struggled to properly and consistently staff, offering signing bonuses, and recruiting nurses from abroad. Nursing schools also increased enrollment, and a new generation of nurses—lured by the good job market and salary—entered the profession. As the early stages of the recession began in the mid-2000s, however, the job market changed drastically. Fewer positions exist, and health care facilities are only hiring nurses with experience. On average, new nurses search for work for over a year before finding a position. Yet, nurse-to-patient ratios have remained similar to the days of the labour shortage. This paper investigates this situation, arguing that a new normal in nursing and health care in the U.S. has arrived. By interrogating the recent switch from a shortage to surplus of nurses over the past decade, this paper investigates the impacts of states and federal policies aimed at alleviating the shortage of the late 1990s/early 2000s through growing the domestic labour supply, as well as changing expectations around nurse-to-patient ratios. As this new era of labour surplus and job shortage will show, shortages and surpluses in social reproductive labour involve the manipulation of expectations around care and the value ascribed to it. The new normal in health care and nursing arises through various types of crisis—oversupply of nurses, shortage of nurses, general economic crisis—but in the end is a crisis of neoliberal health care.

    Caitlin Henry is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography, at the University of Toronto. Her research works towards a political definition of health by placing the work of health care at the centre. Her dissertation investigates the impacts of labour surplus and shortage on the nursing workforce, the work of nursing, and the geography of health care by drawing on the everyday practice of nursing, state-driven hospital closures, and federal health and immigration policy since the early 1980s.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caitlin Henry
    PhD candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 27th Balancing Opportunity and Risk: How Multinationals are Viewing China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Christian Murck is a member of the International Advisory Council of APCO Worldwide. He is based in New York, NY having returned in August 2013 after twenty-two years in Asia. He is also a trustee of the Yale-China Association, an independent foundation engaged in educational, medical and cultural exchange programs between the U.S. and China, and a trustee of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Murck
    Trustee, United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia; Member, International Advisory Council at APCO Worldwide; and Vice Chair, Board of Trustees at Yale-China Association



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 27th CSAS Reception

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 27, 20156:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2015

  • Monday, March 2nd Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Reimagining the Asia Pacific

    Description

    This talk introduces Born Out of Place: Migrant Mothers and the Politics of International Labor (University of California Press and Hong Kong University Press). The book, based on over fifteen months of ethnographic research among Filipino and Indonesian migrant workers who become pregnant while working in Hong Kong, makes three main arguments: (1) that temporary workers must be considered people, not just workers; (2) that policies often create the situations they aim to avoid; and (3) that the stigma of single motherhood often causes migrant mothers to re-enter what is called the “migratory cycle of atonement.” Professor Constable will also discuss the current socio-political climate of Hong Kong today, in relation to the book’s recent reception, including attitudes towards outsiders, economic and class anxieties, and relations with mainland China. Questions will also be raised about the role of “public anthropology” and how this book relates to migratory contexts beyond Hong Kong.

    Nicole Constable is Director of the Asian Studies Center in the University Center for International Studies, and professor of anthropology in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author or editor of seven books, including: Christian Souls and Chinese Spirits: A Hakka Community in Hong Kong; Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers; and Romance on a Global Stage: Pen Pals, Virtual Ethnography, and “Mail-Order’ Marriages.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nicole Constable
    Director, University Center for International Studies; Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women's Health and Human Rights

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Dr. Sesia will present on the topic “Possibilities and limitations of the judicialization of human rights’ violations in maternal health care. A preliminary analysis of current experiences of strategic litigation in Mexico.”

    In today’s Mexico, we experience a new development: some victims and supporting activist organizations are taking cases of human rights’ (HR) violations that occurred in the provision of maternal health care within public hospitals to Court. Almost all victims are poor, underserved, and indigenous women. Judicialization may be a promising avenue for obtaining justice for the victims. Strategic litigation may also play a positive role in putting pressure on the Mexican health system to become more responsive, improve its quality, and become less discriminatory in the provision of maternal health care.
    Still, judicialization faces major hurdles in a country where the judicial system is not well-suited to HR litigation pursuing social justice and where the health system reproduces social inequalities and treats the mistreatment of poor women as something to be expected.
    The presentation will critically assess what judicialization may or may not accomplish in its attempt to improve maternal health care from a rights-based approach in contemporary Mexico.

    The title and the abstract of Dr. Jeannie Samuel’s talk are forthcoming.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Paola Sesia
    Professor and researcher at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology (CIESAS, its Spanish acronyms) in Mexico

    Jeannie Samuel


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Early Mass Culture’s Image Ecology

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In the history of picture production, as opposed to the narrower history of fine arts, the United States in the 19th century was a site of internationally significant developments. It became a principal locus for advances in the instrumentalization of images for marketing, political persuasion, and the circulation of information. At first slow by European standards to develop a pictorial press, a lithography trade, and a corps of skilled draughtsmen, printmakers, and designers, the U. S. was, by the end of the century, a world leader in the mass production of pictures and in the expansion of commercial, political, and aesthetic uses for them. Although the growth of mass visual culture was an international phenomenon, the unconstrained capitalism and rapid territorial and demographic expansion of the U. S. made it ground zero. This crucial chapter in the commodification of images is largely unwritten, yet it is foundational for the international image-culture of the 21st c. This paper will argue for an account of 19th-century U. S. visual culture as a complex image ecology warranting comprehensive, critical, and non-triumphalist historical examination. It will focus on a small cross section of this visual culture drawn from the transformative period between 1835 and 1860.

    Michael Leja (Ph.D., Harvard) studies the visual arts in various media (painting, sculpture, film, photography, prints, illustrations) in the 19th and 20th centuries, primarily in the United States. His book, Looking Askance: Skepticism and American Art from Eakins to Duchamp (2004), traces the interactions between the visual arts and the skeptical forms of seeing engendered in modern life in northeastern American cities between 1869 and 1917. It won the Modernist Studies Association Book Prize in 2005. An earlier book, Reframing Abstract Expressionism: Subjectivity and Painting in the 1940s (1993), situates the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Barnett Newman, and others in a culture-wide initiative to re-imagine the self in the midst of a traumatic history. It won the Charles Eldredge Prize for Distinguished Scholarship in American Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He is currently at work on a book exploring changes in pictorial forms and in social relations associated with the industrialization of picture production and the development of a mass market for images in the mid-nineteenth century.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Michael Leja
    Department of Art, University of Pennsylvania


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Art, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Living on Your own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Critical Korean Studies Workshop

    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Korea is pleased to present the launch of Professor Jesook Song’s new book Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea. Interweaving personal interviews, archival sources and media analyses, this illuminating ethnography profiles the stories of young, single women in South Korea who confront difficulties in their pursuits to live independently and achieve residential autonomy. Living on Your Own skillfully exposes the clash between women’s burgeoning desire for independence and traditional conservative norms in Korean housing practices and financial institutions.

    Professor Jesook Song is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto and a faculty affiliate of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Jesook Song received her B.A. in Education Science at the Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. She received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology with a minor degree in Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

    For more information on the book and to purchase the book, please visit the link below.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Ethnology and Resistance in Vichy France: A Genealogy

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Alice L. Conklin
    Departement d'Histoire Ohio State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Intimacy and Reconciliation Otherwise: Tsushima Yuko’s Exceedingly Barbaric

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    In recent years, there has been a booming cultural market for products that articulate Japanese colonial period and its legacy in Taiwan in an amicable if not nostalgic way. From films to literature, from memoirs to pop culture, they produce what I call the sentiment of “intimacy” between Taiwan and Japan across time and space, an affective turn that is markedly different from the anti-Japanese representations in mainland China and the two Koreas. While this reconstituted intimate relationship has the benefit of assuaging political tensions, it runs the risk of misrepresenting historical colonialism and its messy legacies that collapse personal accounts to colonial relations. While nation-states remain important sites for official rapprochements, and demands for apologies and compensations, interstate relations alone do not attend to the complexity, ambivalence and contradiction of people’s lives under extraordinary historical circumstances. Through the reading of the Japanese novelist, Tsushima Yuko’s “Exceedingly Barbaric” (2008), I argue for an inter-generational and gendered understanding of colonial and postcolonial sites of violence, survival and reconciliation. Revisiting the brutal insurgency and suppression of the 1930 Musha (Wushe) Incident, Tsushima’s novel crosses time (1930s and 2005) and traces the lives of two Japanese women (aunt and niece) across the colonial divide to expose the “barbarity” of both colonial suppression and patriarchal oppression.

    Leo Ching is the author of Becoming Japanese: The Politics of Identity Formation in Colonial Taiwan. He teaches Japanese and East Asian cultural studies at Duke University.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Leo Chin
    Associate Professor, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 18th Autonomy, equality, and supported decision-making for persons with disabilities: Assessing the role for personal support networks

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 18, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Sophie Nunnelley
    Lupina/OGS Doctoral Fellow


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program on Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th On the historicity of space and urban imagination in South Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20154:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture 2014/2015

    Description

    Following David Harvey’s notion of dispossession many urban scholars assume that global capital flows, commodification and capitalization of land universally affect urban areas all over the globe. However, not all spaces are equally amenable to commodification or gentrification and in many cases the specific historical character of a city, a neighborhood or an urban space tends to stick to it for many generations. What happened in a space, who lived there before, which community or class is associated with it, leave marks that do not easily evaporate or change. This is particularly true in post-colonial cities marked by deep historical segmentation. Drawing on material from India (and South Africa) I will show how religious markers and boundaries of caste and community mark space in an enduring way that gets etched onto the urban imagination, profoundly and durably structuring the use and habitation of urban space.

    Thomas Blom Hansen is Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University and director of the Center for South Asia at Stanford. He is the author of multiple books and articles on Hindu nationalism, Hindu-Muslim violence, urban life, religious identity politics, sovereignty and the modern state in South Asia and South Africa.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Thomas Blom Hansen
    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor, Director, Center for South Asia, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th Xi Jinping in Zhejiang (2002-2007)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Chinese political succession literature on Xi Jinping’s accession to becoming general secretary tends to emphasize patronage and factional politics (power struggle, factional balance, etc.) whereas other equally significant factors, such as the deliberate grooming by the Chinese Communist Party CCP) and Xi’s own performance and policy-making records, are often neglected. By focusing on Xi’s career in Zhejiang from 2002-2007, this paper attempts to describe and explain Xi’s performance and policy-making record and the extent to which this had contributed to a “perfect resume” for the CCP’s top position. Specifically, the paper discusses how Xi dealt with the challenging issues of development, economic growth, political participation, rural/urban gap, and environmental degradation. It will also evaluate Xi’s contribution to the modification of the “Zhejiang Model.”

    Alfred L. Chan, PhD (Toronto), is professor and chair of political science at Huron University College, Western University. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one book on Hu Jintao and China in the 21th Century, and another one on Chinese political recruitment and succession.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred L. Chan
    Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, Huron University College, Western University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th King Dhammacetī and the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions: Ideas, Borders, Culture

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20152:00PM - 4:00PMDepartment for the Study of Religion
    Jackman Humanities Building
    Room 318
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the 15th century, the Buddhist king Dhammacetī sponsored a sīmā (ordination hall) reform that was to become the most famous of its kind in mainland Southeast Asia. Having wrangled with the hairs of monastic law concerning sīmās, Dhammacetī sent monks from his kingdom centered in what is now lower Myanmar to Sri Lanka in order to return with a pure ordination line. In a most significant historical decision, Dhammacetī had an account of these reforms inscribed on ten large stone slabs, which became known as the Kalyāṇī Inscriptions. While addressing matters of law, history, and political order, the inscriptions are also at their heart a sīmā text, that is, a text about the regulation of ritual boundaries and religious land. Drawing especially on these inscriptions, this paper explores elements of the ideational and border-making and border-crossing world Dhammacetī and others participated in and helped cultivate, even as they established innovations that would dramatically shape future memory, religio-political culture, and transregional identity.

    Jason A. Carbine is the C. Milo Connick Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Whittier College. His research and teaching about religion and society combines historical and ethnographic approaches, and draws from an interdisciplinary body of research pertaining to the history and sociology of religions, textual studies, anthropology, and comparative religious ethics. His publications include Sons of the Buddha: Continuities and Ruptures in a Burmese Monastic Tradition (2011) and the co-edited volume How Theravāda is Theravāda? Exploring Buddhist Identities (2012). Carbine is currently preparing a new text and translation of the famous Kalyāṇī Inscriptions.

    For information please contact Christoph Emmrich at christoph.emmrich@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jason A. Carbine
    Whittier College


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 24th Envisioning Détente: The Johnson Administration and the October 1964 Khrushchev Ouster

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    After considerable turbulence, the Cold War reached a period of relative stability in the early 1960s. The ouster of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964 could have imperiled this inchoate accord between the United States and Soviet Union, but instead represented an acknowledgement in both Washington and Moscow of the importance of maintaining stability and consistency in superpower relations. Making extensive use of U.S. and Soviet primary materials (especially from the Johnson Library), this paper outlines the successes and failures of American analysis during and after the leadership transition. The Johnson administration quickly came to understand that the Kremlin shared its goal of stability, and identified several important themes presaging a period of détente. This paper offers insight into policy making and preferences in the Johnson White House, the evolution of perceptions of the Soviet Union in the West, and the roots of détente.

    Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft at the University of Texas at Austin. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Miles is a Visiting Research Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. His doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, is an examination of U.S.-Soviet relations during the early 1980s. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto (Hon. BA, History), and the London School of Economics (MA, International History).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Simon Miles
    Visiting Research Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th Governance Feminism in the Post-Colony: India’s Rape Law Reforms of 2013

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Against the backdrop of the phenomenal international successes of governance feminism, my paper considers governance feminism in the post- colony. In particular, the paper uses the wide-ranging law reforms on rape and trafficking in India in the wake of the rape and murder of a Delhi student in December 2012 to make two arguments. First, that Anglo-American governance feminism has a rather limited and contingent influence on postcolonial feminism. Second, that a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades suggests that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. Viewing the 2013 reforms as the culmination of decades of feminist lobbying of the state for rape law reform, the paper argues that Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, that Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. On the pathway to increased influence, Indian governance feminism has faced challenges from advocates of the LGBT community, children’s rights groups and sex workers’ groups. The paper considers in detail mobilizational efforts of one such group, namely, sex workers to illuminate both aspects of governance feminism, namely, the politics of feminism in relation to sex work but also the challenges for governance feminism as sex workers have mobilized outside the folds of the Indian women’s movement and in the space of what Partha Chatterjee calls political society. Brought together in the struggle for the Criminal Law (Amendment) Act, 2013, I compare and contrast the ways in which Indian feminists and sex workers approached law reform. This illuminates ways in which governance feminism relates not just to juridical power but also to highly mobile forms of governmentalised power. This paper thus tells a highly contextual story of fragmentation, partial reception, partial rejection, and the local production of feminist ideas and stances towards governance.

    Prabha Kotiswaran is Senior Lecturer in Law, King’s College London where she teaches criminal law, transnational criminal law, jurisprudence, law and social theory and sociology of law. She is the author of Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Published by Princeton University Press (2011) and co-published by Oxford University Press, India (2011), Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor won the SLSA-Hart Book Prize for Early Career Academics in 2012. She is also the editor of Sex Work, an anthology published by Women Unlimited (2011) for a series on issues in contemporary Indian feminism. Current projects include an edited volume on Shaping the Definition of Trafficking in the Palermo Protocol, a co-authored book on Governance Feminism and a co-edited Handbook on Governance Feminism (both with with Janet Halley, Rachel Rebouche and Hila Shamir). She is also the Co-Convener (with Peer Zumbansen) of the King’s Summer Institute in Transnational Law and Governance.

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Prabha Kotiswaran
    Lecturer, Department of Law, King's College


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Russia's Great War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    416-946-8900
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    For most of the twentieth century Russia’s Great War was a historical afterthought. Overshadowed by the Bolsheviks’ revolution, Civil War, and consolidation of power, the War took a back seat within professional scholarship as both Soviet and Western experts focused their energy on explaining the origins and rise of Russian Communism. In recent years a new generation of researchers has begun to re-examine and re-evaluate the significance and meaning of the War. Buttressed by new archival findings and freed from the ideological baggage of earlier historical debates they have begun to analyze Russia’s Great War not as a prelude to “Red October,” but as the fulcrum which set into motion a chain of events that transformed Eurasia and much of the world.

    Russia’s Great War and Revolution is a decade-long multinational scholarly effort that aims to fundamentally transform understanding of Russia’s “continuum of crisis” during the years 1914-1922. The project incorporates new research methods, archival sources, and multiple media formats to re-conceptualize critical concepts and events and to increase public awareness of Russia’s contributions to the history of the twentieth century.

    Prof. John W. Steinberg is authoer of All the Tsar’s Men: The Russian General Staff and the Fate of Empire, 1898-1914 (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2010) and co-editor of The Making of Russian History: Society, Culture, and the Politics of Modern Russia (Bloomington, IN: Slavica Academic Publishers, 2009) and The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective: World War Zero.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Prof. John W. Steinberg
    Austin Peay State University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th The Lip Affair in the Long 1968

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Donald M. Reid
    Departement d'Histoire University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2015

  • Wednesday, April 1st Austerity as Epidemic: The New Political Economy of Health

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Faraz Shahidi
    Lupina Research Associate



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 1st Les occupations et les liens entre les deux guerres mondiales **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 1, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    **This event will be held in French.**

    Contact

    Joseph Hawker
    416-946-8698


    Speakers

    Annette Becker
    Departement d'Histoire Universite Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Etudes de la France et du Monde Francophone

    York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 14th Invisible Fences and the Aesthetics of Austerity in Thoreau’s "Walden" (1854)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 14, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    In this paper, D’Amico examines Henry David Thoreau’s distaste for accumulation in “Walden” (1854), focusing on Thoreau’s peculiar desire for property and ownership unimpeded by materiality. She suggests that Walden’s inchoate philosophy of property offers insight into the contradictory position of property in the circuit of capitalist exchange; more specifically, that Thoreau’s dread of over-accumulation and desire for Spartan simplicity reflects capital’s abstract desire for unfettered exchange and circulation. Indeed, throughout “Walden” Thoreau describes physical property as waste, excess, and spiritual pollutants, cultivating an aesthetic of austerity that privileges “simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.” Lauding the poet’s ability to enclose the landscape within verse, “the most admirable kind of invisible fence,” Thoreau articulates a theory of ownership that eschews material forms of possession in favour of a higher law (Gilmore 1985; Newman 2010). By placing “Walden” in conversation with Lockean social contract theory and its discontents (Rousseau and Marx), she read Thoreau’s text as part of the history of political philosophy. “Walden” figures property as both excess and insufficiency, and it is the goal of this paper to draw out the implications of this contradiction for contract theory. Importantly, she does not characterize “Walden” as an easy example of bourgeois ideology. Instead, following Rob Nixon’s (2011) claim that representational strategies have serious political weight, she argues that Thoreau’s text is useful because it performs, in aesthetic terms, the contradictory elements of the social contract under capitalism.

    Cristina D’Amico is a fourth year PhD candidate in the department of English at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation reads nineteenth-century American literature’s attempts to address – in formal, aesthetic, and philosophical terms – the limitations of “possessive individualism,” C.B. Macpherson’s useful term for describing what he calls “the proprietary logic of western political ontology.” She is especially interested in representations of unorthodox houses in American fiction as alternative expressions of political subjectivity. She has contributed academic writing to Esquire: Journal of the American Renaissance and The Howellsian: Journal of William Dean Howells Studies. She currently holds a SSHRC CGS- Doctoral Fellowship (2011-2014).

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Cristina D'Amico
    PhD candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 22nd Social Justice and Public Health: Policy-Maker Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 22, 201510:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CPHS Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Maxwell Smith
    Lupina Research Associate


    Main Sponsor

    Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Sponsors

    Comparative Program of Health and Society


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 29th CPHS Policy workshop

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 29, 201510:00AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2015

  • Tuesday, May 5th Delicious Destruction: A Short History of Industrial Fermentation and Food

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 5, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    The history of fermentation as a practice of food preparation and preservation (e.g. bread, wine/beer, yogourt, vinegar, soy sauce) dates back to antiquity and is relatively well-known. Less well-known is the modern history of “controlled,” aseptic (under sterile conditions) fermentation on an industrial scale, by which means microbial species have been used to help produce everything from plastics to household cleaners, birth control to insulin, cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, vitamins to pesticides, and vaccines to germ warfare. Industrial fermentation technologies profitably repurpose the often invisible intermediary products of the petrochemical, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries that form the fabric of contemporary American life. Sarah Tracy focuses here on the role of a few early biochemical companies and of the American marketplace in crystallizing industrial fermentation as an integral part of twentieth-century food production. She highlights the link between fermentation and delicious taste, or the creative cellular destruction that makes many iconic foods taste so good, e.g. hotdogs, canned soup, flavoured potato chips, and prepared baked goods. She unpacks the politics of “making big” at work in industrial fermentation and, likewise, the politics of “making small” in the twenty-first century, through which artisanal beer, miso, bread, etc. producers fetishize ancient technologies that have long since been extrapolated onto a globalized, industrial platform.

    Sarah Tracy is a Doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A business administration and honours history graduate of the University of New Brunswick, her work brings feminist science & technology studies (STS), food studies, post-colonial theory, and sensory history to bear on the global politics of food & health in the twentieth century United States. She has previously held fellowships with the Jackman Humanities Institute (2012-2013), and the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs (2010-2011). Her dissertation is entitled, “Delicious: A History of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) and the Fifth Taste Sensation.”

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Sarah Tracy
    Doctoral candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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