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August 2015

  • Thursday, August 20th Higher Learning: The Missing Picture introduced by Rithy Panh

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, August 20, 20158:30PM - 10:30PMTIFF Bell Lightbox Cinemas
    350 King Street West
    (corner of King and John Streets)
    St. Andrew Subway Station
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    Description

    As part of Visible Evidence, an international conference on documentary film and media, director Rithy Panh joins us for a screening of his Cannes-winning film The Missing Picture, which provocatively employs clay figurines and dioramas to chronicle the suffering of the director’s hometown under the Khmer Rouge. Hosted by Deirdre Boyle, Associate Professor in the School of Media Studies, The New School for Public Engagement.

    This event is Free. Tickets are distributed at the venue two hours before the start of the event (1 ticket per person).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996

    Sponsors

    Visible Evidence Conference

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu program for Asia-Pacific Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2015

  • Friday, September 11th The Structure of Protest Cycles: Contagion and Cohesion in South Korea’s Democracy Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20153:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In his seminal study of contentious politics, Sidney Tarrow conceptualized social movements as constituting a series of protest cycles. While the concept of protest cycles has received much attention in the social movements literature, its empirical operationalization remains relatively crude compared to the rich theoretical discussion. Most studies operationalize protest cycles as the total number of protest events in a given period. Drawing on recent work on event structures, this paper attempts to further develop the application of the protest cycle concept by conceptualizing social movements as a population of interlinked events and identifying events that play critical roles in historical outcomes. We demonstrate the usefulness of considering protest cycles as protest event networks with a novel dataset on South Korea’s democracy movement. In our conceptualization the nodes of the network are protest events and links are coded as present if protestors cited a specific prior event as a source of inspiration for mobilizing. Appropriating strategies developed for network analysis we ascertain which events in Korea’s democracy movement were more likely to solicit direct responses and which linked disparate event clusters. By identifying the characteristics of events that contribute to the probability of protest contagion and movement cohesion, we hope to show the usefulness of identifying direct links between events when analyzing protest events data, while providing a better understanding of the structure of protest cycles in South Korea’s democracy movement.

    Paul Y. Chang is Assistant Professor of Sociology and serves on the Executive Committee of the Korea Institute at Harvard University. His primary research interest is in South Korean social and political change. He is the author of Protest Dialectics: State Repression and South Korea’s Democracy Movement (Stanford University Press 2015), and co-editor of South Korean Social Movements: From Democracy to Civil Society (Routledge 2011).

    Contact

    Rachel Ostep
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul Chang
    Assistant Professor, Sociology, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 17th – Friday, September 18th Regional Governments in International Affairs: Lessons from the Arctic

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 17, 20157:00PM - 9:00PM
    Friday, September 18, 20158:30AM - 7:00PM
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    Description

    To Register please visit https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/regional-governments-in-international-affairs-lessons-from-the-arctic-tickets-17898250148

    Conference Venues:
    September 17, 7:00-9:00 PM – George Ignatieff Theatre, Massey College, 15 Devonshire Place
    September 18, 8:30-7:00 PM – The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place

    The Arctic is gaining the attention of national governments around the world. Indeed, countries as diverse as Switzerland, Mongolia, and Turkey have sought observer status at the Arctic Council as one expression of their Arctic interests. Much of the dialogue about circumpolar governance over the last few years has been focusing on how these non-Arctic voices will shape, change, or contribute to the Arctic agenda. Perhaps, this focus has led us to miss something – what is the role of the regional governments from within the Arctic in shaping the international Arctic agenda?

    With the advent of globalization that has brought urban and international issues closer together than ever before, an opportunity arises for local governments across border to work with each other to tackle some of the these problems. So what role do regional governments play in international affairs? What lessons can be learned from regional governance and co-operation from different parts of the world and the Arctic that address similar issues such as the environment and economics? How can these lessons be applied to the circumpolar Arctic region?

    At the front lines of the decisions made for the Arctic regions are municipalities, territorial and state governments, and Indigenous organizations and governments. How do these subnational actors and governments from within the Arctic participate in international diplomacy which could result in outcomes that affect them? With no formal role on the Arctic Council, which is often regarded as the main platform for international Arctic diplomacy, how do these regional governments engage in international affairs in the Arctic? What does the future of the Arctic look like, and how will these subnational and regional governments be involved? The goal of this conference is to learn more about the ways in which regional governments are engaging in Arctic issues across the circumpolar world.

    Contact

    Emily Tsui

    Sponsors

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Walter & Duncan Gordon Foundation

    Global Cities Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 29th Forced migration in the Mediterranean: EU and South European states' perspectives and strategies

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 29, 20154:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    What are the security repercussions of forced migration for both the EU and of particular South European states? For dealing with this important issue, firstly a detailed picture of how illegal migration unfolds in the broader Mediterranean region over the last decade (trends, migration routes, impact of the Arab uprisings, the Syrian crisis etc.) is given. Secondly, particular emphasis is put on understanding how forced migration is being perceived and interpreted (a “securitization move”? in terms of “strategic culture”?) by the European Union as well as by certain South European states, particularly Italy and Greece. Concurrently, the European Union as well as the national (mainly Greek and Italian) responses and/or strategies to forced migration in the Mediterranean region are further discussed and analysed.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Hellenc Studies Program


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2015

  • Friday, October 2nd Greece's foreign policy: Assessing the past, anticipating the future

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 201512:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Hellenic and Balkan Seminar Series

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Edith Klein
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Professor Panagiotis Tsakonas
    Professor of International Relations, Security Studies and Foreign Policy Analysis at the Department of Mediterranean Studies, University of the Aegean, Rhodes, Greece.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Paprika, Pálinka, and Politics: Variations on Themes in Hungarian Studies

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 20158:00AM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This one-day event aims to explore the diversity and inclusiveness of Hungarian Studies, while providing a platform for students at all levels and from a variety of backgrounds to share their ideas. Papers will explore the diversity of current research and encompass a wide range of multidisciplinary perspectives. The conference will feature the research of past and present students in the Hungarian Studies program. It is organized for students by students.

    Are you an undergraduate or graduate student at University of Toronto interested presenting your academic work? Visit our Call for Papers (https://hungarianstudiesconference.wordpress.com/call-for-papers/) page to learn more about how you can be part of the conference. Registration is required for this event.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8497


    Speakers

    Dr. Laszlo Borhi
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for the Humanities, Institute of History (Budapest, Hungary)



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2015


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