The MGA courses

Academic Year 2016-2017

First Year

First year courses are required core courses. They cannot be substituted for any other courses.

These courses are open only to MGA students. Students from other departments will not be admitted.

Fall Term

GLA1002H - Global Civil Society

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 1-4pm (fall) & Friday 10am-1pm (winter/spring)
Room: TBA

Description:

Explores the emergence, growth, and influence of global civil society organizations and networks, as well as global foundations. Examines their various roles, from knowledge generation and knowledge sharing, to policy development and policy change, advocacy, norm development, global agenda setting, transnational governance and regulation, to program delivery and policy implementation. Examines these processes through the analysis of the interactions among global civil society with states, intergovernmental organizations and processes, and the private sector. Course format will include lecture, discussion and may include guest speakers who have had leadership roles in civil society organizations.

GLA1004H - Global Policy Analysis

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 9am-Noon & 1-4pm
Instructor(s): Wilson Prichard
Room: TBA

Description:

Explores the processes of global policy development and change. Applies tools of policy analysis to explain and understand the forces that act on policy development and the impact and limits of global policies in producing political, legal, economic, social, and environmental change. The course will draw from the emerging literature on global public policy, which applies some of the same tools and methodologies as its domestic counterpart, but adapts them to policy development within the increasingly visible arena of global policy. It also pays explicit attention to the multiple nodes through which global policy is made and implemented, including national, transgovernmental, intergovernmental, non-state, and marketplace actors, networks, and institutions. In so doing, it encourages students to see policy development from multiple perspectives of different kinds of actors and networks, their influences and limits in producing policy change, and the processes through which policy is developed and put into action across or transcendent of national jurisdictions.

GLA1005H - Decision Making and Strategic Thinking in the Global System

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 9-11:30am (LEC0101) & Tuesdays 11:30am-2pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Janice Stein , Peter Loewen
Room: TBA

Description:

This seminar introduces students to scholarship on the psychology of decision making and the analytics of strategic thinking. Drawing from the literature on public policy making, behavioral economics, and strategic analysis, the seminar will develop the analytical tools and the practical leadership skills students need to navigate the intersection among the global economy, global institutions, and global civil society. Students are required to analyze and craft strategies to address global public policy problems in the context of the three sectors.

GLA1010H - Microeconomics for Global Afffairs

For students who have not taken microeconomics within the last two years and received at least a B. Students are graded on a credit/no-credit basis.

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon & Friday 10am-Noon (tutorial)
Instructor(s): Peter Morrow
Room: TBA

Description:

This course covers the principles of microeconomics, with an emphasis on global affairs. In addition to the principles and techniques of microeconomics and models of economic behaviour, this course provides case studies of topics such as international trade, capital markets, international development, and tradeoffs in economic policy, in the context of global affairs. This is a required course, but is not require for students who have taken microeconomics and received at least a B + within the last two years.

GLA1012H - Data and Analytics

Tutorials for this course are as follows:

TUT101: Wednesdays Noon-1pm
TUT102: Thursdays Noon-1pm

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Mondays 12pm-2pm (LEC0102), Wednesday 10am-Noon (LEC0101)
Instructor(s): Mark Manger
Room: TBA

Description:

This course introduces qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct research for policy purposes. The course discusses research design, case studies, observational and experimental studies, and introduces  statistical concepts with a focus on applications. Students will come away with a good grasp of the ideas behind case studies, sampling, bias, causation, correlation and randomization, and the use of data to evaluate policy choices and outcomes.

Winter/Spring Term

GLA1001H - Macroeconomics & International Economics

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 2-4pm & Wednesday 2-4pm (tutorial)
Instructor(s): Walid Hejazi
Room: TBA

Description:

Introduction to the key concepts of international trade and international finance, with attention to contemporary issues and policy. Empirically assesses alternative trade theories, and examines international commercial policy, international finance and macroeconomics, as well as their relationship to broader global issues. The course is designed to utilize understanding of international trade and international finance to help students think through real world events and design policy responses. The supplementary readings thus deal with key world issues in order to illustrate the more abstract material and to engage with global economic policy challenges.

Each week will consist of two blocks of two hours. The first block will be used for lectures, the second for tutorials and tests.

GLA1002H - Global Civil Society

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 1-4pm (fall) & Friday 10am-1pm (winter/spring)
Room: TBA

Description:

Explores the emergence, growth, and influence of global civil society organizations and networks, as well as global foundations. Examines their various roles, from knowledge generation and knowledge sharing, to policy development and policy change, advocacy, norm development, global agenda setting, transnational governance and regulation, to program delivery and policy implementation. Examines these processes through the analysis of the interactions among global civil society with states, intergovernmental organizations and processes, and the private sector. Course format will include lecture, discussion and may include guest speakers who have had leadership roles in civil society organizations.

GLA1003H - Global Security

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 11am-2pm & 4-7pm
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay
Room: TBA

Description:

Analyses the global security architecture, grand strategy, and contemporary and emerging security challenges. Topics may include the evolution of contemporary national security doctrines, the implications of shifting loci of power for global security, the role and limits of multilateral security arrangements, the role of intelligence and intelligence failure, and threat assessments of emerging or ongoing security problems such as nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and insurgency.

GLA1006H - Public International Law

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 9:30-11:00am & Thursday 9:30-11:00am
Instructor(s): Jutta Brunnee , Stephen J. Toope
Room: TBA

Description:

Introduces students to public international law and the global legal environment, with an emphasis on legalization and the interaction of law, institutions, civil society, and the global marketplace. Students will be introduced to: the sources of international law (treaties, custom, and the debates about the role of other sources); the concept of international legal personality (the concept of the sovereign state; the evolving role of other international actors, such as international organizations, non-governmental organizations, firms, and individuals); questions of jurisdiction over territory and persons; the relationship between international and domestic law; the peaceful settlement of international disputes in multiple issue areas. Students will also be introduced to topical areas in international law, such as the evolving roles of UN organs such as the Security Council and the International Court of Justice; the law relating to the use of force; the law of state responsibility; the protection of human rights and the environment; international criminal law; international humanitarian law; international economic and trade law; and the law of the sea.

GLA1011H - Global Innovation

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Dan Breznitz , Darius Ornston
Room: TBA

Description:

This course provides an introduction to cross-national study of the role of the state in industrial development, innovation, and business-government relations. The emphasis is on providing a broad base of the competing theoretical perspectives with particular attention to the different ways in which state and markets interact in rapid-innovation-based industries. Special consideration is given to the role of Science and Technology Industrial Policies, Innovation, and Economic Development. Centering our attention on politics the seminar examines the nature and extent of government in business and business in government.

Second Year

Choice of 5 (2.5 FCE) elective courses.

MGA students have priority in these courses. Limited space available to non-MGA students in select courses only.

Equipped with core competencies—both theoretical and practical—in the global architecture, students specialize in one of the program’s three streams.

MGA students are required to take at least 1.5 elective FCEs in their chosen stream.  Each course lists the stream(s) it falls under.  These designations are to allow you to specialize broadly in your main area of interest (global civil society, global markets, or global institutions) rather than to constrain your choices.  You will see that many courses fall under more than one stream.  Courses from other departments or units may be counted toward an appropriate stream at the Director’s discretion.

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses (updated July 2015)

A select number of MGA elective courses have a certain number of spaces open to non-departmental students if the course is not full. The enrollment period for these spaces will run from September 19-23 2016. No enrollment will be considered before the 19th or after the 23rd. Enrollment is not guaranteed and is at the discretion of the MGA program and the course instructor. Priority for enrollment will be given to Year Two CERES students doing the Global Affairs option.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office from September 19th-23rd. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful.

Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions mga@utoronto.ca

Full Year Term

JCR1000Y - Global Challenges

Term: Full Year
Day & Time: Fridays 9am-Noon
Instructor(s): Joseph Wong
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

In order to create sustainable solutions to the world’s most important challenges, global development professionals must reach beyond the traditional boundaries of their field of expertise combining scientific/technological, business, and social ideas in an approach known as integrated innovation. In this project-based course, students from various disciplines (engineering, management, health and social sciences) will work together – using participatory methods with an international partner – to address a locally relevant challenge. Students will be expected to integrate their knowledge and experience of global issues in order to identify technical requirements in the context of existing social frameworks (ethical, cultural), as well as the appropriate business and policy systems required to deliver the product to end users. This will be achieved through regular team meetings with stakeholders and with faculty consultants from each discipline. The course will model real life and lead to innovative solutions to major global challenges.

*This course is open to MGA, Rotman MBA, and Engineering students only.

Fall Term

GLA2005H - Negotiating Internationally

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 5pm-7pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

From the US-Iran nuclear agreement to the UNFCCC climate conferences, international negotiations are shaping essential aspects of the world we live in. This course offers a practitioner’s perspective on how these negotiations take place, the effects of emergent small state and non-governmental actors within the international negotiating arena, and the types of skills required to engage in 21st Century bilateral and multilateral negotiations. The objective of this course is to enable students to analyze international negotiations from various stakeholder perspectives and to create successful negotiating strategies of their own.

GLA2006H - The Political Economy of Money and Finance

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2pm-4pm
Instructor(s): Mark Manger
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course is one of the second-year electives in the MGA program, and only open to non-MGA students with explicit permission of the instructor. The course provides an overview of international monetary and financial relations over the last century. Topics covered are the accumulation of foreign reserve assets, the political economy of exchange rates, the operations of banks and other institutions in international money and capital markets, flows of investment, and the domestic and international political implications of global monetary developments.

GLA2888H - MGA Research Paper

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course provides MGA students with the opportunity to research and write an independent research paper on a selected topic or problem in global affairs. The course will be delivered through regularly scheduled workshops and class sessions. Students who wish to pursue this research paper course must obtain prior approval of the MGA Director or designate, and a faculty member must be available and willing to supervise the research and paper.

*This course is open to MGA students only.

JMG2020H - Big Data and Global Cities; Solving City Problems with Data Analytics

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 2pm-5pm
Instructor(s): Enid Slack , Mark Fox
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

As urban populations grow, cities need to provide basic services (e.g. water, sanitation, public safety, transit) and address the negative externalities associated with rapid growth (e.g. air and water pollution, congestion). Ultimately, cities will have to find the fiscal resources to pay for services and infrastructure. This course will provide an introduction to data analytics and show how these tools can be applied to a variety of city problems such as transportation gridlock, shortage of affordable housing, deteriorating water and sewer infrastructure, inadequate fiscal resources, and other problems. Each problem will be described, ways to approach the problem from a data analytics perspective will be determined, and the type of data available to analyze the problem and work toward solutions will be identified.

*Please note this course is a joint course with Engineering. There are 15 spaces for MGA students and 15 spaces for Engineering students. Engineering students interested in taking JMG2020H should contact mga@utoronto.ca for enrollment.

GLA2015H - Economic Competitiveness and Social Protection

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Darius Ornston
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This class explores how communities can design effective systems of social protection without sacrificing economic competitiveness. The course opens by addressing several misconceptions about the welfare state, including the connection between economic competition and social protection, the relationship between social spending and inequality, and the private provision of social protection. The second part of the course examines the politics of reform in four critical areas: Pensions, health care, unemployment, and childcare/maternity policy. The course concludes by exploring three contemporary challenges: Immigration and the welfare state, the politics of social protection in the Global South, and the challenge of designing global social safety nets. By the end of the course, students are expected to develop a politically feasible, economically competitive strategy to reform social policy in a community of interest.

GLA2096H - Topics in Global Affairs V: Justice Reforms in Global Context: Measurement, Accountability, and Choice

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): Todd Foglesong , Ron Levi
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

The course investigates the politics of justice reform in global context by examining the ideas and indicators of crime, safety, and justice that are currently used by national governments, civil society organizations, and international institutions to govern justice. The course takes a comparative approach, analyzing policies and innovations that seek to advance justice, safety, and rule of law in a range of dissimilar countries. By the end of the course, students will be able to measure, evaluate, and account for justice or safety policies in a global context, and independently appraise the value of the goals and targets in new schemes for global governance.

GLA2014H - Innovation and Economic Development

*This course is open to MGA students only.

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): Shiri Breznitz
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course focuses on economic development globally, regionally, and locally, and attends to regional competitiveness within a global economy. In so doing, the course focuses global affairs students to the importance of economic development policy, the role of national and regional innovation systems, and the work of economic development agencies. Topics to be covered will include the role of global cities, industrial districts, universities, high technology, and the creative class.

GLA2091H - Topics in Global Affairs II: Conflicts and Socioeconomic Development

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 3pm-5pm
Instructor(s): Paola Salardi
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will explore the links between violent conflict and socioeconomic development. The first part will first focus on the micro and macro-level processes that contribute to the outbreak of civil wars, insurgencies and political violence. It will explore the role of both state and non-state actors, and on exploring the variety and complexity of civil conflict in the contemporary world. The second part will investigate how conflict and political violence affect people’s lives at the household and community levels, looking, amongst others, at impacts on (a) health and education, (b) employment and growth and (c) on gender equality and gender based violence. The third part will then explore the links between civil conflict, economic outcomes and political dynamics at the national level, with a particular focus on the relationship between civil conflict, state institutions and good governance. To explore these questions the course will draw on a combination of theory and empirics, using detailed country specific and cross-country empirical evidence to critically understand the emergence of conflict and its consequences.

GLA2002H - Global Development and Change

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-1pm
Instructor(s): Wilson Prichard
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Introduces the key ideas, debates and actors that have shaped development policy at the international level. The course comprises three main components: first, an introduction to the main approaches to international development, covering economic (growth), political (governance) and social (civil society) perspectives; second, an overview of the primary international actors shaping development policy and outcomes, with a focus on the management and impact of foreign aid; and, third, detailed discussion of selected key issues and debates in international development, likely including economic liberalization, resource rents, conflict and post-conflict reconstruction, social development and participatory development. By the end of the course students will have a detailed knowledge of the most important contemporary debates in the field along with the analytical tools to engage with a broader range of development issues.

GLA2093H - Topics in Global Affairs IV: Government Relations

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesdays 7-9pm
Instructor(s): Marc Dupont
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

As Government continues to play a key role in the global economy, firms need to engage public officials and ensure that their business interests are taken into account by policymakers. This course examines the practice of government relations in Canada and in other jurisdictions such as the US, the EU and China. Through case studies in international trade, taxation and regulatory affairs, students will learn about the process of lobbying and strategically communicating with governments. Students will also draft advocacy plans and develop the ability to make clear and robust policy recommendations to C-suite executives and members of the board of directors. An interest in politics, public policy and an aptitude for cross-cultural fluency will be helpful for this class.

GLA2050H - Selected Topics in International Studies: Canadian Defence Policy Since the End of the Cold War (TRN409H1)

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Jack Cunningham , Bill Graham , John English
Room: LA200

Description:

This course covers changes to Canada’s defence policy and military posture since the late 1980s. Early sessions will address Canada’s Cold War stance, the Mulroney government’s response to the winding down of East-West hostilities, and Canadian involvement in the First Gulf War. Subsequent classes will discuss the impact of the defence spending reductions of the 1990s, the Chretien government’s 1994 Defence White Paper, and the debate over the role of the Canadian military and the military instrument more broadly, in the post-Cold War international environment.

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students.

GLA2092H - Topics in Global Affairs III: Small States in Global Affairs: Seeing Taiwan

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): Joseph Wong
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Much attention is paid to the world’s largest states, as if they have lessons to offer the rest of the world. The fact is, however, that large states such as the United States and China are anomalies. They have scale advantages that most other states do not. Most states in global affairs are in fact quite small, and with that comes challenges that are distinctive to their ‘smallness.’ This team-taught seminar will examine prevailing global challenges – such as security, national autonomy, democracy, innovation, immigration, financial risk, among others – through the lens of small states and their limited capacities. Specifically the seminar will focus on the case of Taiwan, though comparative and global discussion and debate will be encouraged. Instructors for the course include faculty from the Munk School, the Asian Institute, the department of Political Science and the School of Public Policy and Governance.

GLA2097H - Topics in Global Affairs VI: Global Justice Advocacy

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-Noon
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Globally, advocates for social change employ justice and rights-based approaches in attempts to influence policy, behaviours, and outcomes. In this project-based course, we will explore what it means to be a social justice advocate in theory and practice. Through projects undertaken with partner organizations, students will have the opportunity to participate in advocacy under the supervision of the course instructor. We will examine how advocacy strategies are developed, engage in hands-on comparative research and analysis, and learn about different methods of public engagement. Finally, we will also reflect on ethical issues relating to social justice advocacy, the impact of increasing professionalization of the social justice sector, and the role of reflexivity in social justice practice.

GLA2090H - Topics in Global Affairs I: Intelligence and Special Operations

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Twenty first century threats blur the boundaries between military and civilian affairs and between peace and war. Policymakers rely on intelligence to navigate a complex strategic environment, and they sometimes look to covert means to accomplish controversial objectives. Military commanders depend on intelligence to project power and conduct complex operations in foreign societies. Cyberspace in particular increases both the supply of and demand for intelligence, offering unprecedented data collection opportunities while also creating new threats to safety and security. This course examines the clandestine dimension of statecraft and conflict. Topics include the intelligence process, counterintelligence, space and cyber technologies, special operations and covert action, drone warfare, and the ethics of state secrecy.

Winter/Spring Term

GLA2001H - Global Capital Markets

This course is only open to MGA students. Enrollment preference will be given to those students in the global markets stream.

Streams: Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 7-9pm
Instructor(s): Alan Alexandroff
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine the intersection of the global political economy and investment strategies as the current global economic realignment takes place. It analyzes new players, new structures, and new opportunities as the global economy restructures and examines how strategies are built. Students will analyze cases and prepare two memoranda and a group project. Students will also learn the practical skills required to develop investment strategies.

*Closed to non-MGA students.

GLA2010H - Geopolitics of Cyberspace

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Ronald Deibert
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

New information and communication technologies, such as the Internet, are widely believed to be transforming world politics. While these transformations have brought about important challenges to state power and authority, they have not eliminated power politics and the quest for security and competitive advantage among actors on the world stage. Today, states and non-state actors alike are seeking ways to exploit information and information systems to pursue political objectives. The control of information has long been widely seen as a source of political power, and is manifest today in competition over both the media and the messages of the global communications environment. From the filtering and interception of Internet traffic to the circulation of home-made videos by militant Islamists, a new geopolitics of information and communication technologies is underway.

The Geopolitics of Cyberspace course is an intensive examination of the ways in which states and non-state actors are contesting the newly evolving terrain of global digital-electronic-telecommunications. Topics covered include Internet censorship and surveillance, information warfare, computer network attacks, hacktivism, and governance of global communications. The course is organized as a series of intensive modules. One feature of the class will be a hands-on” analysis of censorship circumvention and network interrogation techniques at the Citizen Lab (http://www.citizenlab.org/).

GLA2025H - Global Economic Policy Lab

Non-MGA students are only allowed with permission of the instructor, but MBA students are particularly welcome.

Streams: MGA Lab Courses
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Mark Manger
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This lab analyzes current global economic policy challenges. Students write weekly short research notes similar to those produced by research departments and firms in the financial sector, and present their findings in class. Topics are current trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, economic forecasts, and market developments as they feed back into policymaking. Following revisions, select research notes are published on the lab website. Students also write an end-of-term longer research note that offers more detailed analysis. The course is aimed at students who seek future employment as economic and policy analysts in the public and private sector.

GLA2050H - Selected Topics in International Studies: Nuclear Weapons and International Politics

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Jack Cunningham
Room: LA200

Description:

Since their invention, nuclear weapons have shaped the conduct of war and diplomacy and the workings of the international system. The question of who has them, and who doesn’t, has become central to global stability, and has never been more relevant than it is now. This course begins with the breakthroughs in nuclear physics of the early 20th Century, and the emergence of the power of the atom as a symbol of the future. We will proceed to cover the development and use of the first atomic weapons during the Second World War, and the failure of early efforts to place nuclear weapons under international control.

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students.

GLA2018H - Innovation and the City

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 11am-1pm
Instructor(s): Darius Ornston
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

One of the ironies of globalization is that the forces that were supposed to make distance less relevant have concentrated innovative activity within regions. As a result, some of the most important policy and business decisions are made locally. This course explores how municipal actors can navigate the opportunities, and challenges, associated with globalization. After explaining why innovation is concentrated in cities, the course debates why some cities are more innovative than others. To this end, the course discusses the role of size, government policy, human capital, social capital, branding and other issues. Two additional questions frame the analysis. How can municipal actors, who lack the fiscal resources and regulatory tools of a nation-state, promote innovation? And if innovative activity is concentrated in a handful of large cities, what options are available to smaller communities? By the end of the course, students are expected to develop a strategy to promote innovation in Toronto (or another community).

GLA2021H - Innovation, Institutions, Governments and Growth

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 4-6pm
Instructor(s): Dan Breznitz
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This 2nd year advance seminar focuses on teaching and applying central concepts in the cross-national study of global innovation and institutions broadly defined. The emphasis is on providing a broad base of the competing theoretical perspectives and then applying them working with a leading organization on strategic problems.

*Please note this course is closed to non-MGA students.

GLA2090H - Topics in Global Affairs I: Global Journalism

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Robert Steiner
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Journalism is an increasingly vital, but underused skill in a wide range of global professions. Development professionals need to train journalists to support emerging civil society. Leaders of global businesses, NGOs and government agencies are increasingly creating proprietary news organizations to raise the profile of issues central to their work. Advocates use the tools of journalism to advance their causes. And, of course, specialists of any type need journalism skills to tell untold stories in their disciplines. Many global professionals will deploy a combination of these skills in their careers. This course will help second year MGAs gain a professional edge by introducing them to journalism tools they can integrate into their careers. Students will learn frameworks for training media in emerging civil society, and for developing proprietary news organizations in business and agency settings. They will also learn essential skills for their own journalism and advocacy. The course will be highly practical and geared towards students’ own career goals.

Robert Steiner is Director of the Fellowships in Global Journalism at the Munk School. He is a former foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, where he won two Overseas Press Club awards and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has also held senior executive positions in media, communications strategy and Canadian federal politics. Steiner received his MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

GLA2092H - Topics in Global Affairs III: Humanitarian Practice

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): David Michalski
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine the ideals of humanitarian principles and contrast them with the reality on the ground in war zones and disaster areas. The course will cover the history of the humanitarian movement, its ethics and goals, and contrast them with the goals of development work over the course of the past three decades. In addition to lectures and seminar discussions, this course will expose students to humanitarian practice through case studies, role plays and interactive conversations with field workers. Current and ongoing challenges to humanitarian work will also be examined in depth, including the blurring of military and security objectives with humanitarian goals, and the practice of humanitarianism in the context of political and security challenges.

GLA2098H - Topics in Global Affairs IIV: Risk and Risk Governance

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursdays 4pm-6pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course provides a multidisciplinary perspective on risk and risk governance. Students will be introduced to an array of perspectives on risk including probabilistic, economic, behavioural, social and cultural perspectives. Students will be introduced to a risk governance methodology introduced by the International Risk Governance Council which deploys a multidisciplinary approach to pre-assessment, appraisal, risk evaluation, concern evaluation, risk management and communication. We will apply this methodology to a variety of contemporary risk concerns. We will study the deficits that often arise when adopting risk management methodologies that may impact the objectivity of risk governance. Finally, the course will consider the unique challenges inherent in assessing emerging risks and systemic risks.

GLA2093H - Topics in Global Affairs IV: Innovation Systems

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): David Wolfe
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course survey a broad range of social, political and economic factors that influence the determination of innovation policy across a range of industrial countries in Europe, North America and Asia. It adopts the systems of innovation perspective to analyze how these various factors interact in the context of different national institutional structures to influence the range of policies that are used to promote innovation. It will survey the literature on innovation policy instruments and assess their relative degree of effectiveness, but also try to explain why policies which may work effectively in one national context may not readily be transferred to a different context.

GLA2097H - Investment Growth in Emerging Markets

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 4-6pm

Description:

This seminar will examine the role of the private sector in economic development from a legal and institutional perspective. With global economic integration, the role of government has increasingly been seen as creating an enabling environment that allows the private sector to act as the primary agent of growth. Governments create that enabling environment through the enactment of laws and the creation of institutions to implement, administer and enforce those laws. The course will begin by examining the legal and institutional implications of a range of theories regarding the relative roles of the public and private sectors. It will then examine some of the persistent problems facing countries making the transition from colonial or communist regimes to market economies. The majority of the classes will focus upon the specific laws and institutions in five areas that allow for effective private sector activity: human capital development; foreign direct investment; information technology adoption; entrepreneurship; and business finance. Classes will also be devoted to the process of creating effective institutions and a case study.

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students.

GLA1009H - Financial Management for Global Organizations

*This is a required course for MGA students. It is closed to non-MGA students. Instructor for GLA1009H1S LEC 0101 is TBD.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Friday 10am-1pm & 2-5pm
Instructor(s): Vince Pranjivan
Room: TBA

Description:

An introduction to financial planning and budgeting, financial analysis, and financial management in the corporate and public sector from the perspective of the chief financial officer (CFO). The course first introduces basic principles of accounting for students without a background in Finance. It then considers topics in corporate finance such as working capital management and capital budgeting in the context of floating exchange rates, different regulatory environments and global capital markets. Special attention is given to the estimating cost of capital (and by extension, of valuing stocks and bonds) in global financial markets as it pertains to investment and budgeting decisions.

JSE1708H - The Development of Sustainability Thought

*This course is open to only MGA students and Environmental Studies students.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon & Thursday 9-11am
Instructor(s): John Robinson
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine how attitudes towards human nature and non-human nature have changed over the period from Mesolithic times until the present in Western society. By reading and discussing historical arguments and contemporary documents we will attempt to uncover the underlying assumptions about the world that were characteristic of different periods in the history of Western culture. The underlying question is whether contemporary concerns about sustainability require fundamental changes in the way we conceive of ourselves and our environment.

GLA2096H - Topics in Global Affairs V: International Trade

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Darius Ornston
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course covers the politics of trade, from the national policy-making process to the institutions that govern the global economy. The class begins by providing the historical and theoretical context to understand contemporary trade policy, culminating in a detailed discussion of the World Trade Organization. The second part of the course applies this knowledge to a range of current issues, including intellectual property, innovation policy, environmental regulation, labor standards and the most recent trade negotiations (e.g. the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership). By the end of the class, students should be prepared to develop and defend a coherent and politically feasible proposal to strengthen Canadian trade policy (or trade policy in another country).

GLA2091H - Topics in Global Affairs II: Grand Strategy and Global Threats

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Grand strategy is state policy governing the use of military force for national security interests. The contemporary threat environment is incredibly complex as a result of new technologies, economic globalization, and political economic transformation. The proliferation of nuclear weapons to new actors, the development of sophisticated conventional weapons in a number of states, ubiquitous dependence on cyberspace and satellites, and the emergence of global terrorism pose major challenges for the formulation of national security policy. This course examines the impact of sociotechnical complexity on grand strategy through historical case studies and assessments of contemporary challenges in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

GLA2000H - Capstone Seminar

This is a required course for MGA students. It is closed to non-MGA students.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesdays 1-4pm or Thursday 1pm-4pm
Instructor(s): Shiri Breznitz , Ron Levi , Stephen J. Toope , John Robinson , Mark Guslits

Description:

The Capstone course will rely on clients –representing the private sector, an international organization, a non-governmental organization, or government — and students will work in teams to tackle a current issue confronting these clients and their organizations. Students will learn to analyze these problems across dimensions of global economy and markets, global institutions, and global civil society. Throughout the course, students will engage in activities designed to assist global problem-solvers, while also looking for opportunities to defend and advance their clients’ organizational interests.

*Please note: Information on the Capstone projects to be released later this year. Students will have the opportunity to indicate their preferences from among a selection of projects.