Centres & Programs

Centres

  • Asian Institute

    As global attention continues to shift eastward, Asia’s political, economic, and cultural resources are the subject of increasing curiosity. The Asian Institute is shaping the global conversation about Asia in our research, teaching, and dialogue with the community. But we are also illuminating and articulating Asian conversations about the global. We are excavating and interrogating the ongoing debates about Asia’s so-called rise, its histories, its multiple modernities, and its speculative futures. With nearly 140 academic events presented each year and over 150 undergraduate students enrolled in our academic programs, the Asian Institute is a lively intellectual space.

    The key imperative that organizes the Asian Institute is multi-disciplinary inquiry. Home to over 100 affiliated faculty members, the Institute encourages collaborative research and teaching across the social sciences and humanities. Critical voices from the humanities and applied social scientific knowledge equally drive our research agendas and academic programs. We also encourage thematic research, rather than country-specific modes of inquiry, and we are committed to innovative pedagogy and experiential learning for our students.


  • Canada Centre for Global Security Studies

    The Canada Centre for Global Security Studies was established in the spring of 2010 with a grant of $25 million from the Government of Canada. Its research seeks to understand the complex issues associated with global security including cyber espionage, global health, and conflict strategy, in addition to region-specific concerns such as the security of the Arctic, post-Soviet Europe, the new Asian powers, and the Americas. By doing so, the Centre seeks to improve security both domestically and internationally and to promote Canadian leadership in this field.

    The Centre is directed by Ron Deibert, a professor of political science at the University of Toronto and an expert in technology, media and world politics. Its research draws on the expertise of scholars at the faculties of law, engineering, and medicine, and the Rotman School of Management. The Centre also hosts a number of Senior Fellows and Visiting Researchers who specialize in related subjects.


  • Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    The Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) is one of North America’s leading academic institutes for the study of the member countries of the European Union, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and Central and Eastern Europe. The Centre promotes interdisciplinary scholarship and teaching in the social sciences and humanities. Each year CERES organizes several regionally focused seminar series and is host to a number of scholars in residence. Drawing upon the expertise of more than fifteen departments and dozens of faculty members, CERES also sponsors an undergraduate degree program in European Studies and a Master’s degree program in European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. Through its intensive relations with the European Commission, the German Academic Exchange Service, the wider local community in Toronto, and institutions of higher learning across Europe, Ukraine, and Russia, CERES supports the exchange of ideas and scholars across the Atlantic.


  • Centre for South Asian Studies

    Established in 1981, the University of Toronto’s Centre for South Asian Studies (CSAS) fosters academic research, teaching and public discussion on South Asia in an effort to address global questions. Now a constitutive unit of the Asian Institute at the Munk School for Global Affairs, the Centre is supported by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences with core faculty across the University of Toronto’s three campuses. It is a key international hub for critical conversations across the humanities and social sciences on South Asian worlds, both inside and outside the subcontinent.

    CSAS conversations also address incarnations of “South Asia” and its regions as objects of knowledge, from mythic to governmental to geopolitical. The Centre’s programming thus reflects an interface of approaches that has distinguished research on South Asia in recent years, incorporating deep specialist and empirical knowledge, transnational methods, gendered readings and cutting-edge theoretical investigation. Delving into local contexts, CSAS programming addresses questions as wide-ranging as the workings of postcolonial democracy, law and activism; histories and contemporary configurations of the sacred and secular; political economy and cultures of capitalism; media, technology and the public sphere; the material and imaginative terrains of literary and visual cultures; and the present life of ancient civilizations.


  • Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    The University of Toronto houses one of the strongest concentrations of scholars in North America working on Southeast Asia in the social sciences and the humanities. The Centre for Southeast Asian Studies is comprised of scholars working and teaching on Southeast Asia at the University of Toronto. The Centre’s mandate is to provide a forum to discuss, initiate, plan, and coordinate research, teaching, and other activities relating to Southeast Asia. As a constituent unit of the Asian Institute, the Centre seeks to complement the broader coordinating role of Asian Studies at the University of Toronto by providing a more focused attention to teaching, research, and other activities relating to Southeast Asian studies.


  • Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World / Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone (CEFMF)

    The CEFMF is an interdisciplinary institute devoted to the study of France and the francophone world at the University of Toronto. It sponsors a wide range of programs bringing together scholars and students within the University, from across Canada, and from around the world. The Centre supports pathbreaking interdisciplinary research into various aspects of the francophone world, encourages its study at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and engages in outreach towards the broader community across the Greater Toronto Area.


  • Centre for the Study of Korea

    The Centre for the Study of Korea was established in the fall of 2006 with the goal of promoting critical approaches to the research of Korea. It aims to develop pedagogical materials for teaching about Korea both in the university and to the public. The Centre also has a constantly evolving line-up of speakers from North America, Asia, and Europe featured in lectures and events throughout the academic year. Participation in events is open to from members of the university community as well as communities throughout the Greater Toronto Area.

    The Centre does not itself offer any teaching programs but it supports courses on Korea through the Faculty of Arts and Science. Please see the Department of East Asian Studies website for further information.


  • Centre for the Study of the United States

    The Centre for the Study of the United States (CSUS) represents the largest collection of U.S.-focused scholars in Canada, as well as the greatest concentration of U.S. expertise in Canada’s history. With over 66 faculty affiliates, we have unprecedented strength in U.S. expertise and in American Studies, both institutionally and nationally. CSUS and American Studies bridge the social sciences and the humanities in three major areas of activity: undergraduate teaching, research, and programming for the university community and beyond.

    CSUS was established in 1999 to build and promote the University’s resources in American Studies and U.S.-focused research and teaching. Its vision is to build on its position as the nation’s premier site of interdisciplinary U.S.-focused research, teaching, and public programming. The Centre bridges the social sciences and the humanities in its work, as well as collaborates closely with scholars in law, business, and public policy. In addition to bridging the social sciences and the humanities, it balances a focus on the U.S. as an object of study with transnational, comparative, and international approaches.


  • Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The extraordinary growth of economies in the Asia Pacific region in the past two decades, in combination with a revolution in communications and the shattering forces of globalization, has transformed national societies, redefined relations among nations and people, and established new links connecting the region with the rest of the world. Whether we are discussing economic development, peace and conflict, the activities of multi-national corporations, religious tolerance, the well being of children or simply the distribution of power within nations, Canadians need comparative knowledge of cultures in the Asia Pacific and the capacity to use the languages of countries about which questions are posed.

    The Dr. David Chu Program is a place where the study and learning of this important region of the world takes place. The goal of the Program is to work cooperatively, both inside and outside the University, to gain new perspectives in the study of the Asia Pacific. The Program has direct ties with the Department of East Asian Studies. Our major activities include undergraduate teaching, scholarships, the distinguished leaders program, visiting scholars and research projects, and a community network involving speakers, seminars, and workshops.

    For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the Asia-Pacific Studies website.


  • The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History is a collaborative program between Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs. Currently located in offices at Trinity College, the program involves graduates and undergraduates, particularly those with interests in the fields of international relations, international history, and international law. With a focus on contemporary international history, the Centre contributes to both teaching and research at the University of Toronto and involves undergraduates in the International Relations program through special lectures, visiting professors, workshops and conferences.


  • Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict, and Justice

    Established as a degree program in 1985 and as a centre in 2001, the Trudeau Centre gives a select group of undergraduates, from Canada and around the world, the practical knowledge they need to advance the cause of peace. Students pursue either a major or a specialist degree in a multidisciplinary undergraduate program. The Centre also provides a study-abroad program to augment classroom work, opportunities to conduct original research in the field, and direct engagement with some of the world’s top researchers on the causes and resolution of violence.

    Scholars associated with the Centre work within and beyond the traditional purview of international affairs, studying interstate war as well as major conflict inside countries, including revolution, insurgency, ethnic strife, guerrilla war, terrorism, and genocide. They seek to identify the deep causes of this strife—from poverty, resource scarcity, and weapons proliferation to competing claims for justice and failures of foreign-policy decision making.


Teaching

  • American Studies

    The American Studies Program is designed to provide students with a broad, yet deep, education about the United States. To ensure breadth, students are required to take an interdisciplinary core course that ranges widely both with respect to the themes covered and disciplinary perspectives applied. As well, the Program offers a wide selection of courses from participating departments and programs in the Faculty, giving students broad exposure to fundamental themes of American life. To ensure depth, the American Studies Program relies heavily on upper level courses, including its own capstone seminars at the 400-level. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the American Studies website.


  • Collaborative Master’s/PhD Program in South Asian Studies

    The Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies offers entry into a graduate student community, as well as a basic methodological grounding for students already accepted into a graduate program in one of the collaborating departments (listed on the program website). The program is designed to give students an interdisciplinary overview for the critical study of South Asia as a field of expertise and as a lens through which to read a wide range of global processes. Engagement with these questions through the collaborative program will be noted on the transcripts of participating students.

    All students who wish to participate in the collaborative program, at the Master’s or PhD level, are required to take the core course, SAS2004H, Critical Issues in South Asian Studies: A Region and the Disciplines. This course aims to familiarize students with aspects of the construction and critique of area studies, the history of disciplinary engagement with the region, and major contemporary debates in the field.

    Students in the program are also required to be active participants in the Centre for South Asian Studies lecture and seminar series. The wide range of events organized by the Centre and the Asian Institute offers a significant opportunity for students to think critically about the role of area studies in providing new perspectives on problems of universal significance, as well as to meet regularly and build a community. For further information about the program requirements and collaborating departments, please visit the Centre for South Asian Studies website.


  • Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The Asia-Pacific region has emerged in the past half century as a major force in global economics and politics. The interdisciplinary Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies is designed for students wishing to pursue professional careers that will require them to understand this vibrant and sometimes tumultuous part of the world, whether their chosen fields are in academia, business, government, international or non-governmental organizations. Located at Canada’s premier research university, the program limits the number of students to 20 in order to facilitate learning and intellectual exchange in a small group setting.

    The program provides graduates with advanced training in traditional disciplines and also interdisciplinary expertise in historical and social science studies of modern East and Southeast Asia. It also provides a strong background for a doctoral-level academic focus on Asia-Pacific. The major topical areas of study include political economy, modern and contemporary social history, international relations, gender and the family, political and social change, economic development, and cultural studies.

    Please note that this is not a standalone graduate program. Students wishing to be admitted to the collaborative program must apply online to one of the home departments. For more information about the application process, including a list of participating home department units, please visit the program website.


  • Contemporary Asian Studies

    The Contemporary Asian Studies (CAS) program prepares undergraduate students for new global dynamics, of which Asia’s rise over the past century has been a key component. Several of the world’s largest and fastest-growing economies are in Asia, yet the outcomes of modernization across the region have been varied, as seen through differing approaches to democracy, the distribution of wealth, ethnic diversity, gender dynamics, human rights, and immigration policy. The pathways to modernity in Asia are also varied, with diverse colonial/independent histories, roads to democracy, and strategies for economic growth. The CAS program provides undergraduate students with the knowledge and analytical tools to dissect these outcomes and processes and draw meaningful linkages between them. The CAS program provides a multidisciplinary lens through which to examine the links between Asia’s history, its emergence onto the global stage, the challenges and opportunities inherent in its modernity, and its future(s) in the global arena. Both the major and minor programs are thematically-driven and pan-Asian in geographic scope, providing empirical and critical coverage of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Students will encounter multiple disciplinary approaches to the study of the region, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the Contemporary Asian Studies website.


  • European Studies

    Europe, like other major regions of the globe, has long been a significant focus of study at the University of Toronto. In recognition of the increasingly major role played by the European region on the global stage, and the importance of understanding the continent in a comprehensive way, the Munk School of Global Affairs offers an undergraduate major program in European Studies and a minor program in European Union Studies.

    Drawing on the expertise of thirteen departments, the program is designed for students who desire the linguistic competence, the cultural comprehension, and the specialized knowledge necessary to operate effectively in the “new” Europe. The major provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to focus on the region through a wide variety of courses and disciplines. It offers preparation either for further specialized study at the graduate level or for work either in Europe itself or within a Canadian-based organization dealing with Europe. Students may also take a minor program in European Union Studies, which consists of four full credits. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the European Studies website.


  • Fellowships in Global Journalism

    Each year the Munk School of Global Affairs awards 20 Fellowships in Global Journalism to qualified candidates. Over the course of eight months, Fellows report on their own discipline for major media outlets, study at the University of Toronto, attend lectures from leading journalists around the world, and receive direct mentorship from a “bureau chief” – an experienced journalist whose job it is to hone skills and help launch careers.

    When the program is completed, Fellows can return to their profession able to cover their discipline as a global journalist and use their outstanding knowledge of media to add value to their professional work. Fellows can go on to become “super-freelancers” with the skills and relationships to sustain a career for a portfolio of media organizations around the world. They can also compete for staff jobs with media companies that want the unique mix of specialization, reporting experience, global understanding and business ability that is gained through participation in this program.

    For those who have already earned advanced knowledge, this opportunity is a powerful running start into global journalism in less time than most Master’s degrees. In order to qualify for admission, candidates must have a graduate degree, professional degree, or a few years’ work experience in their discipline and must possess strong communication instincts. In addition, they must be hungry to cover their disciplines as journalists for media around the world, in all platforms including print, on-line, broadcast and radio. For more information about the program and application process, please visit the Fellowships in Global Journalism website.


  • Hungarian Studies

    The Hungarian language is spoken by ten and a half million inhabitants of present-day Hungary, about three million people in the neighboring countries, and perhaps as many as an additional two million around the world. Despite the isolation that might have been imposed by the uniqueness of their language, Hungarians have been engaged with, and participants in, greater European affairs since their arrival in the Carpathian basin more than a thousand years ago. Hungarians have made signal contributions in the fields of arts, science, and mathematics, winning Nobel prizes in Chemistry, Medicine, Physics, Economics, and Literature.

    Hungarian Studies at the University of Toronto includes both a major and minor program for undergraduate students at the Faculty of Arts and Science. These programs focus on the history, language, literature, and culture of Hungary and on its international role – particularly on Hungarian immigration to Canada. For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the Hungarian Studies website.


  • International Relations

    The International Relations Program is based at Trinity College and has offices in the Munk School of Global Affairs. It offers undergraduates at the University of Toronto interdisciplinary major and specialist programs that emphasizes the history, politics and economics of international relations. Particular emphasis is given to the role of Canada as an international actor.

    This program is designed to examine the origins, development and expansion of the international state system and international institutions and their effects on political, economic, and humanitarian issues. Much of the teaching is done by practitioners – people with experience as professional diplomats or in international agencies. It is also the host of the very successful G8/G20 research group; The Attaché Journal of International Affairs, an academic journal of student publications; and a vibrant International Relations Society. There is a range of in-course and graduation scholarships available to International Relations students, and since the year 2000 three graduates have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships.

    For more information on the program and its requirements, please visit the International Relations website.


  • Master of Arts in European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Recognized as one of the best of its kind in North America, the MA Program at the University of Toronto’s Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) offers students the opportunity to engage in a comprehensive, rigorous and hands-on study program. In addition to the top faculty in their fields, CERES provides generous funding to MA candidates through fellowships or financial support for internships, language training and study abroad opportunities. In fact, students typically are engaged in research or training internationally, with advisory and logistical support from CERES. This field component alone sets the program apart from other MA programs.

    CERES also provides students with unique learning opportunities outside the classroom.

    The diverse array of courses available to students of the MA program is supplemented by short intensive workshops. Workshops can be taken for academic credit and CERES hosts two or more per year on specialized topics of regional interest. This is in addition to the Centre’s busy agenda of seminars and conferences. Every week, top specialists from around the world take part in an engaging series of debates at the Munk School. Students are encouraged as well to develop their own projects and initiatives, and every year CERES students host their own graduate student conference.

    For more information on the program and the application process, please visit the Centre’s website.


  • Master of Global Affairs

    The University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs combines training in analytical methods and practical management skills with an immersion in the latest thinking on global issues. The Master of Global Affairs degree positions graduates to accelerate their careers in business, government and NGOs, as these sectors pursue their strategies in an increasingly interconnected and multipolar world.

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is a hub for scholars and practitioners at the forefront of research, debate, and action in global affairs. Against the backdrop of one of the world’s most diverse cities, the University of Toronto’s new professional school is curating a vital dialogue about the challenges, organizations, and ideas that are reshaping the international landscape—creating an environment which will equip students to thrive in a world where working internationally demands not only professional skills but strategic agility and cultural fluency.

    Immersed in this unfolding conversation, students enhance the value they derive from their formal studies even as they expand their networks to include hundreds of global alumni, scholars, mentors, and employers.

    For more information on the application process, please visit the Master of Global Affairs’ website.


  • Munk One Program

    Think Big. Work in teams to solve real world problems. Innovate. Munk One provides students with a focus on innovation and global problem-solving. Through case studies of complex challenges worldwide, Munk One students identify innovations that succeed, how successful innovation can be fostered, and why innovative solutions sometimes fail to address global problems. Beyond the classroom, you are placed in cutting-edge global affairs policy labs that are tackling real-world problems. Join a community of students engaging the role of innovation in areas such as cyber security, health, development and sustainability, and human rights.

    • Number of credits: 2 credits
    • Program structure: Two small half year seminars and one full year lab course
    • Eligibility: Faculty of Arts & Science (St. George) undergraduate applicants

  • Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies

    The Program in Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies confronts some of humanity’s most complex challenges. It offers an undergraduate B.A. degree that emphasizes the integration of practical and theoretical knowledge, the interdisciplinary nature of peace and conflict studies, and the value of incorporating research into undergraduate education.

    Ninety selected undergraduates gain a wide-ranging understanding of the causes and nature of violence and peace. This degree program, which is guided by three distinct perspectives, moves beyond traditional international studies. It examines violent strife, from war between countries to revolution, insurgency, ethnic clashes, terrorism, and genocide within countries. Students study the underlying causes of this strife, including poverty, resource scarcity, weapons proliferation, competing claims for justice, and failures of foreign-policy decision making.

    Based at the Munk School of Global Affairs in the University of Toronto, The Trudeau Centre gives students access to all the resources of the University of Toronto, considered the leading research university in Canada. Access to Trudeau Centre faculty and the broad range of courses and faculty in related disciplines allows students to tailor their programs according to their interests.

    Students apply for acceptance into either the specialist or major program after completing four full-year university credits. For more information on the program and the application process, please visit the website for the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict, and Justice.


  • South Asian Studies

    The Minor in South Asian Studies, offered by the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, allows students to study South Asia in an approach attentive to global formations. With access to the faculty and resources of the Contemporary Asian Studies program, students are introduced to the study of South Asia—Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka—through a wide angle view of Asian modernities, political economies, and cultures, all the while delving into to specialist close-ups of South Asia. The program poses crucial questions for understanding global processes and diverse worlds—the tribal forest land, the bazaar, sacred sites, and the urban slum, among many others—preparing students for globally-minded careers and advanced social science and humanities research.

    With a curriculum motivated by the moving present—the changing face of South Asia today—the minor offers rigorous training in major debates and questions in the rich field of South Asian Studies, and provides a basic foundation for many directions of future study. From historical contexts of ethnic conflict, to postcolonial readings of ancient traditions, to the politics of religious and ethnic identities, to the workings of vast-scale democracy and capitalism, to the worlds of cinema and public culture, students are exposed to the dynamic landscapes—political, material, and mythic—that constitute present-day South Asia. Through open access to comparative courses in the Contemporary Asian Studies program, students can learn from tenured and tenure-track faculty specialists in South, East, and Southeast Asia. For more information about the program and its requirements, please visit the Centre for South Asian Studies website.


  • The Dynamics of Global Change Collaborative Doctoral Program

    The Dynamics of Global Change (DGC) is a multi-disciplinary doctoral program at the Munk School of Global Affairs that explores the frontiers of global change across a wide range of issues. In a rapidly evolving, complex, and loosely structured global system, it is essential to understand the sources, structure and pace – in short, the dynamics – of change. From their home departments, students may take up questions from their own disciplines and explore them through the kaleidoscopic perspective created by multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    Students must be admitted to a doctoral program in a collaborative home department in order to take the DGC program. Please note that DGC is not a standalone doctoral program. For more information about the application process, including a list of participating departments and institutions, please visit the program’s website.


Research and Public Education

  • Atlantik-Bruecke Canada

    The Atlantik-Bruecke Canada, founded over thirty years ago, has focused on the advancement of mutual understanding between Germany and Canada. It is currently housed at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    This program enables conversations and the exchange of knowledge on topics of global significance. Current issues in foreign, economic and security policy are on the agenda, in addition to bilateral questions of mutual interest.

    Conferences, study tours, as well as student and expert exchanges, facilitate these conversations. The Canadian and German governments, as well as many leading businesses and institutions in both countries, have been strong supporters of these activities as they often result in important commercial and academic projects.

    For more information, contact Nina Boric, Executive Director, Atlantik-Bruecke Canada.

    For


  • Canada-Montenegro Education Initiative

    The Initiative is the result of a major gift to support collaborative projects between the Munk School of Global Affairs and the University of Montenegro. The program also partners with the Canadian Embassy in Serbia and Ryerson University’s School of Hospitality and Tourism Management. Its principal goals are to provide financial assistance to young students in the Kotor and Tivat municipalities of Montenegro to pursue higher education in Montenegro and Southeastern Europe. It also provides for teaching and library resources for the University of Montenegro’s Faculty of Tourism and Hotel Management in Kotor. Finally, the project offers a joint undergraduate/graduate workshop on issues of importance to Montenegro and Southeastern Europe in general.


  • Canadian International Council

    The Canadian International Council (CIC) is Canada’s foreign relations council. It is an independent, member-based council established to strengthen Canada’s role in international affairs. The CIC reflects the ideas and interests of a broad constituency of Canadians who believe that a country’s foreign policy is not an esoteric concern of experts but directly affects the lives and prosperity of its citizens. The CIC uses its deep historical roots, its cross-country network, and its active research program to advance debate on international issues across academic disciplines, policy areas, and economic sectors. The CIC’s digital media platform, OpenCanada.org, is Canada’s hub for international affairs. The CIC’s research program is managed by the national office in Toronto. Its 16 branches across Canada offer CIC members speakers’ programs, study groups, conferences, and seminars.


  • Central Asia Program

    The Central Asia Program is dedicated to the study of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, as well as their many and vibrant links with Afghanistan, China, Iran, Russia, and other states. It is a part of the Centre of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (CERES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

    CERES offers several MA programs through which students may focus on Central Asia, working with faculty and visitors with areas and comparative expertise. CAP sponsors the Central Asia Lecture Series.


  • Citizen Lab

    The Citizen Lab is an interdisciplinary laboratory based at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, Canada focusing on advanced research and development at the intersection of digital media, global security, and human rights.


  • Comparative Program on Health and Society

    Founded in the year 2000, the Comparative Program on Health and Society (CPHS) is a vital and growing research institute based at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. Generously funded by The Lupina Foundation, CPHS is designed to promote innovative, interdisciplinary, comparative perspectives on health, broadly defined. Our program builds on the scholarly strengths of the University of Toronto in the social sciences, humanities and public health. We offer doctoral, post-doctoral, new faculty, and distinguished visitor fellowships as well as numerous events throughout the year.


  • Consular Lab

    The consular function of 2013 operates in a rapidly changing environment. Countries have long sought to protect “citizens in distress” overseas. But demand for consular services has exploded with greater numbers of travelers, new kinds of emergencies, and mounting expectations of assistance. Consular affairs, once the poor cousin of diplomacy, now represents a central foreign policy duty for all governments.

    WHY THE CONSULAR LAB?

    National governments face common challenges in responding to the complexity, scale, cost, and political risks of discharging their consular responsibilities abroad and at home. The Consular Lab will track these challenges through collaborative academic study partnering researchers and institutions across the globe. Governments, academics in related fields, informed publics, and the media should find significant value in the study of specialized consular issues (e.g. inter-cultural differences in child custody disputes) and more integrative analysis (e.g. how law, politics, international relations, and media merge in the management of consular tasks). These and other topics are ripe for continued study within and outside governments.


  • G8/G20 Research Group

    Founded in 1987, by Professor John Kirton, the Research Group consists of a global network of scholars, professionals in the media, business, government and research communities, and students interested in the ongoing activity of the G7 and G8, and closely related bodies such as the G20. It is managed from the University of Toronto and assisted by a Professional Advisory Council of eminent experts on the G7/8 and Special Advisors with expertise in specific areas. Within the university, its work is supported by the International Relations Program based at Trinity College, the Munk School of Global Affairs, Robarts Library, Trinity College’s John Graham Library, the Department of Political Science, and other units.

    During the year, the G8 Research Group conducts programs related to research, teaching, and public education. At the time of the annual G8 Summit, the G8 Research Group mounts programs at the summit and in the host country related to documentation, media assistance, analysis, an academic symposium, a public policy conference, lectures, seminars, courses and related activities.

    Before and during the summits, the G8 Information Centre also assembles, verifies and posts documents on the meetings, the available official documentation of all past summits and ministerial meetings (in all G8 languages), scholarly writings and policy analyses, research studies, scholarship information and links to related sites.


  • Global Order/Disorder: A Multi-National Research Initiative

    Global Order/Disorder is a multi-national, multi-disciplinary collaborate research project co-sponsored by The Canada Centre for Global Security Studies & The Conflict, Security and International Order Research Group, University of Bath. The project was launched at a University of Bath workshop on March 24-25, 2011 – where the initial focus was on delineating and comparing European and Latin American perspectives.

    Participants included Ana Covarrubias (Colegio de Mexico), Philippe De Lombaerde (United Nations University-CRIS, Bruges), Jorge di Masi (La Plata National University), Gian Luca Gardini (University of Bath), Fuat Keyman (Sabanci University), Anne-Marie Le Gloannec (CERI-Science Po, Paris), Andrés Malamud (University of Lisbon), Theo Papadopoulos (University of Bath), José Raul Perales (George Washington University), Ronald Pruessen (University of Toronto), Federico Romero (European University Institute, Florence),

    Flavio Sombra Saraiva (UNB, Brasilia).

    These participants worked together to determine how different states are regions are assessing shifts in the distribution of power in the global arena and how perceptions of “re-centering” or power shifts have affected the rationales and dynamics of regional cooperation and institutions. Furthermore they also sought to understand how significant the recent global economic crisis has been in re-shaping national and regional strategies.


  • Global Summitry Project

    The Global Summitry Project at the Munk School of Global Affairs promotes global governance research and evaluation. The Project has created an on-line library of authoritative documentation from key multilateral organizations and meetings. It also follows and analyzes the agenda setting of officials between summits through ‘Global Reports.’ Its signature publication is a peer-reviewed ejournal on global governance and global summitry called Global Summitry—with stellar editorial and global advisory boards and analysis from world experts and analysts from across the G20 and beyond—that reports on the successes and failures of key international organizations and global meetings.

    The Global Summitry Project has developed a series of partnerships with world ranking research institutes, think tanks, academic centers, and experts around the globe. They contribute the authoritative documentation and research reports and analyses that have established the Global Summitry Project as a must-visit site for global governance.

     


  • Halbert Exchange Program

    The Halbert Exchange Program, based at the Munk School of Global Affairs in the University of Toronto, is designed to foster and support collaborative research networks between faculty and students from the University of Toronto and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

    Applicants from the social sciences, humanities, education and law are welcome to apply to either the Halbert Network Fellowship (for Faculty) or the Halbert Post-Doctoral Fellowship.


  • Humanities Initiative

    The Humanities Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs, founded in 2001, specializes in the interdisciplinary study of opera. Initiated by musicologist Caryl Clark and literary theorist Linda Hutcheon, the organizing committee has expanded to include a second musicologist, Sherry Lee, and Katie Larson, a specialist in literature with operatic interests. The annual symposium series is co-organized in partnership with the Canadian Opera Company, and are aimed for both an academic and general audience.

    The Humanities Initiative is in association with The Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto, and the Faculty of Arts and Science at the University of Toronto.


  • India Innovation Institute

    A joint initiative of the Munk School of Global Affairs and the Rotman School of Management, the India Innovation Institute is a multidisciplinary hub for faculty and students researching the field of innovation.


  • Innovation Policy Lab

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is home to a wide range of researchers, teaching programs and international partnerships, all of which share a strong focus on innovation.

    The existing strengths at the Munk School in the field of Innovation Policy are spread across a number of different centres and research programs, whose collective research and teaching initiatives describe a unique and exciting approach to the study of innovation.  The Innovation Policy Lab will provide a new institutional home for these initiatives. .

    A major focus of the Innovation Policy Lab will be an analysis of the ways in which innovation is occurring in both the industrial countries as well as in the global south, reflecting the growing reality of distributed innovation across a wide range of nodes around the globe. The Lab will pool the knowledge that scholars at the Munk School and from across the University of Toronto have generated about “demand-driven” innovation and develop shared explanations of the impact of policy on innovation across different economic sectors and at different geographic scales.  We understand demand-driven as innovation that succeeds in meeting the needs of a wide range of end-users; is reflected in increasing rates of adoption, and improves outcomes and/or generates efficiencies.

    The Innovation Policy Lab will work to disseminate policy-relevant knowledge about “demand-driven” innovation to interested policy-makers and attentive publics, in Canada and abroad.  Research, teaching programs and international partnering activities will focus on new ways of sharing knowledge about adoption among both academic researchers and relevant policymakers in Canada and other countries.


  • Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    The Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) focuses on the fiscal health and governance challenges facing large cities and city-regions. It is the only institute in Canada that focuses specifically on municipal finance issues and on large cities and city-regions. It is also the only institute that supports students at the graduate level in the fields of municipal finance and governance so that they can develop the expertise to work on in these areas in government and the private sector or to undertake further academic research.

    The mandate of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance is to develop solutions to the fiscal problems facing Canada’s large cities and city-regions: Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, and Halifax. The Institute focuses its research on financial tools and local governing structures that support local fiscal autonomy. As part of its mandate, the Institute disseminates its research findings to a wide audience.


  • Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Established by a grant from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (German Academic Exchange Service) and funds from the University of Toronto, the Joint Initiative is a program of cross disciplinary support for research and scholarship at the University of Toronto in the area of German and European studies. It supports dissertation fellowships and research and travel grants, exchanges of faculty and graduate students between U of T and German universities, summer research projects for senior undergraduate students in the area of German and European Studies, workshops, seminars, conferences, and a modest program of “seed money” for faculty research. For more information on applications for financial support, please visit the program website.


  • Lionel Gelber Prize

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was founded in 1989 in memory of Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber (1907-1989). The largest juried award of its kind, it seeks to deepen public debate on significant global issues by recognizing the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs. A prize of $15,000 is awarded to the winner. The award is presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation, in partnership with Foreign Policy Magazine and the Munk School of Global Affairs.


  • Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Established in 2001 with the support of Petro Jacyk and the Petro Jacyk Educational Foundation, the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine focuses on contemporary Ukraine, as well as its history and culture. The major themes covered by the Program focus on “Challenges of Independent Ukraine” and include: building an effective state; foreign policy and international relations; and education, culture and national identity.

    The mission of the Program is to promote scholarly understanding of the government, economy and society in contemporary Ukraine, as well as the country’s history and culture. Primarily through the encouragement and support of collaborative projects – typically involving workshops, conferences, lectures, seminars, and visiting scholars – and through the support of graduate students studying Ukraine at the University of Toronto.

    The Program actively encourages scholars in Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto and Ukrainianists at other North American institutions to develop joint projects, and facilitates the study of Ukraine by organizing workshops, conferences, lectures and seminars. The Program brings visiting scholars from Ukraine and invites Ukraine’s statesmen and cultural figures to speak in its guest lecture series.


  • Program on Global Environmental Governance

    This research program examines the processes and implications of fragmentation in governing authority over global environmental problems. Global environmental governance is rapidly becoming multilevel as diverse actors assert their authority to shape behaviors toward the environment. The once dominant model of governing environmental problems through interstate treaties and inter-governmental organizations is eroding as corporations, private-public partnerships, sub-state governments, social movements and even local communities of individuals have begun conceiving and implementing governance initiatives to manage global environmental problems. Decentralization has the potential to profoundly influence the development of global responses to environmental problems and to challenge received notions of the dynamics and processes of global governance. This research program will address this phenomenon from two related directions.

    First, the research program will focus on just how this decentralization is unfolding across environmental issues like climate change, biodiversity loss, desertification, and deforestation. It will examine how actors at multiple levels (attempt to) become authoritative and how they pursue governing. It will also explore how different governance initiatives interact. The goal is to understand how authority and rule-making are evolving in the sphere of the global environment.

    Second, the research program will explore the significance and impact of decentralization in global environmental governance. It will ask if the emergence of multiple, potentially authoritative, actors constitutes a significant challenge to dominant (state-centric) forms of global governance. It will explore contestation and complementarities amongst governance initiatives, considering the obstacles to and possibilities for linkages and synergies. The ultimate goal is assess the possibilities for effective and equitable governance of global environmental problems.


  • Program on Global Health Diplomacy

    The Global Health Diplomacy Program aims to determine how actors at all levels can conduct more effective, comprehensive and coherent diplomacy to innovate in the global governance of the inherently internationalized health risks brought by globalization. Directed by John Kirton and James Orbinski, at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Trinity College at the University of Toronto, the program focuses on the role of intergovernmental and transnational institutions and networks and the role of state and non-state actors in their creation and governance. Its projects include “Innovation in Global Health Governance,” “Forging the Health-Diplomacy Link,” “Strengthening Summit Diplomacy for Global Health,” and “Canadian Foreign Policy for Global Health.”


  • Program on Globalization and Regional Innovation Systems

    The process of globalization is marked by two related processes: the growing integration of individual economies in terms of investment, trade, research and development, and even product identification and marketing; as well as the emergence of a new set of information technologies that link computers, telecommunications and media together in digital form. Together, these processes are affecting the ability of governing institutions to efficiently and equitably assist firms and their workers to adapt to these changes. The Program on Globalization and Regional Innovation Systems (PROGRIS) at the Munk School of Global Affairs was established in 1998. Directed by Professor David A. Wolfe, the mandate of PROGRIS is to study how these firms and institutions interact to foster the innovation process in an urban and regional context.

    While attention has traditionally focused on the role of the nation state in the global economy, the new forces at work are shifting interest towards the sub-national and regional levels of government. The trend towards globalization reinforces the role of regions in several ways. The geography of production in the new economy is marked by a paradoxical consequence of globalization: the increasing importance of the locality as a site for innovation. The role of knowledge and creativity in this economy places a premium on the kind of localized, or regionally-based, innovation that is fostered by proximity. Innovative capabilities are frequently sustained through regional communities that share a common knowledge base and interact through common institutions. The forms of collaboration and interaction which occur in these communities draw attention to the role that regional institutions can play in supporting innovation in a global economy. The goal of PROGRIS is to investigate how the interaction of firms and regional institutions in Canada and other countries facilitates, or impedes, the process of innovation and social learning that is critical for success in the new global economy.


  • Program on Water Issues

    The Program on Water Issues (POWI) creates opportunities for members of the private, public, academic, and not-for-profit sectors to join in collaborative research, dialogue, and education.

    The Program is dedicated to giving voice to those who would bring transparency and breadth of knowledge to the understanding and protection of Canada’s valuable water resources. Since 2001, The Program on Water Issues has provided the public with analysis, information, and opinion on a range of important and emerging water issues.

    Its location within the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto provides access to rich analytic resources, state-of-the-art information technology, and international expertise.


  • R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    This program offers students with interests in ethnic and pluralism studies the opportunity to widen their horizons – to expand their knowledge beyond a single disciplinary base, and to take advantage of the wealth and diversity of academic resources available at the University of Toronto – a great university situated in a large and culturally-cosmopolitan city.

    Each participating faculty provides a distinctive perspective and knowledge-base for the study of topics such as ethnic and race relations, international migration and immigration, cultural and linguistic communities, inter-group dynamics, nationalist movements, aboriginal affairs, and human rights. The program also features a basic interdisciplinary seminar on “Ethnic Relations Theory, Research, and Policy.” This wide range of program opportunities makes it valuable for students planning careers in academic research and teaching, policy research, and professional practice and administration.

    Students may also take advantage of special lectures, conferences, and workshops sponsored by the Robert F. Harney Professorship and Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies. These events bring eminent researchers and practioners from around the world to enhance the research community at the University of Toronto, and to further broaden the foundation for professional development.

    Ethnic and Pluralism Studies at the University of Toronto is not a degree granting program. Rather it is a collaborative graduate program open only to students who have been admitted to and enrolled in a Master’s or Doctoral program in one of the affiliated departments. Upon successfully completing the requirements, in addition to a Master’s or a Doctoral degree in their disciplines, students will receive a specialization noted on their transcripts as “Completed Collaborative Program in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies.” For more information on the application process, including a list of participating departments, please visit the program website.


  • The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair in Israeli Studies

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair in Israeli Studies is dedicated to teaching and scholarship on modern Israeli society and provides leadership in developing this field across disciplines within the University, in building strong ties with Israeli institutions, in communicating research to the public constituency through annual Andrea and Charles Bronfman Lectures, and in encouraging research in Israel and related study by young scholars.

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Student Award Fund in Israeli Studies offers support to undergraduate and graduate students who are traveling to Israel for study or research, or who are pursuing study or research in Canada related to Israel. The Fund also offers awards for the best papers based on research conducted in Israel by students in receipt of research support from the Fund.


  • The Global Justice Lab

    The Global Justice Lab is based at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. This Lab draws together research across academic disciplines, including law, the social sciences, and diplomacy, to study the growth and effects of the global justice field. Our research focuses on studies of the accountability models, both international and national, that seek to address political violence, atrocities, and human rights violations. The Global Justice Lab explores how this global field has been built, its ongoing changes, and the effects of this global justice field for diplomatic relations, legal institutions, militaries, journalists, NGOs, corporate actors, and the well-being of populations in post-conflict states.


  • Toronto International Relations Seminar

    The Toronto International Relations Seminars are a series of lectures on subjects related to global affairs.



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