Beyond the classroom

University life isn’t confined to a classroom — and neither is the Munk One Program

A hilly road with lined by trees

Challenge yourself to innovate

We’re more than just readings and lectures. Munk One students have the opportunity to participate in the exceptional interdisciplinary community of the Munk School and form partnerships with real-world organizations.

In past years, Munk One students have participated in ethnography practicums in the city, interviewed organizations working on projects to address persistent global problems, and created “devastating facts” video assignments. They have held their own in Munk One debates, small seminar discussions, and developed real interventions of their own to advance the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

One of the great strengths of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto is the array of opportunities that it offers, allowing you to explore your interests and find your place in the university community. If you’re looking for an exceptional first-year experience, consider Munk One’s Foundational Year Program for Arts and Science students.

Our program is about connecting big ideas with students who have an urge to tackle global challenges. A Munk One student is someone who wants to have impact – someone who wants to make a difference – in the global community.

A world globe standing on a desk

Global classrooms

The COVID-19 pandemic has made it easier than ever to connect with partners abroad, thanks to remote delivery of education. The Munk One program used this as an opportunity to pilot global classroom projects with partner universities. Munk One students formed hybrid teams with peers in Mexico and Argentina to develop common research projects, for which students received credit at their respective university.

Group photo of the Munk One case competition 2019 participants

Munk One Case Competition

The Munk One Case Competition is an annual event organized by the second-year alumni class as a legacy gift for the current Munk One cohort. Students are given 24 hours to design a solution to a secret problem with the help of guest speakers and mentors. They are tasked with pitching and defending their initiatives to a panel of esteemed judges as practice for the MUN105Y1 Dragon’s Den pitches. Past topics have included the opioid crisis in Toronto, rural migrant workers’ rights in Ontario, and the settlement and integration of Syrian refugees.