Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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February 2019

  • Friday, February 22nd Pious Captains: Religion, Masculinity, and Combat in Sixteenth-Century France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 22, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The sixteenth century witnessed a proliferation of military texts written by French noblemen who were veterans of the Italian Wars and religious wars. In these texts, authors developed a new masculine standard through how they represented noblemen in combat. They abandoned the medieval trope of the knight and replaced it with that of the captain. Religious piety was an essential aspect of this change as the authors incorporated a renewed emphasis on crusade in their idealised representation of nobility. In the beginning of the period, authors’ religious ideals conflicted with political realities as they placed crusader imagery alongside gleeful descriptions of France waging war against Popes and allying with Protestants and Muslims against Catholics. These inherent contradictions did not resolve themselves until the latter half of the century when authors’ glorification of holy war dissipated as France plunged into its vicious cycle of religious conflict that shattered the social fabric of the nobility. The bloodshed between Frenchmen over religion meant that representations of noblemen as imagined crusaders ceased to be a favourable trope in military literature. Religious fanaticism was no longer glorified, and thus noblemen needed to present themselves as secular actors devoid of aggressive religious motivations. Authors continued to utilise the trope of the pious captain but without its original crusader rhetoric.

    Benjamin (Benji) Lukas is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation, “From Knights to Captains: The construction of nobility through masculinity and warfare in sixteenth-century France,” examines the changes in the representation of nobility in sixteen-century military literature. His research interests include the study of masculinity, warfare, religious conflict, and sexual violence.


    Speakers

    Benjamin Lukas
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th The Material World of Ukrainian Children during the Holodomor and What Saved Children's Lives

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Skubii’s research aims at broadening and rethinking our understanding of the Holodomor from a material perspective. She will discuss the importance of material items and commodities in saving children’s lives, both within their families and in orphanages. By focusing on children’s consumer goods, she will examine the mechanisms of distribution and allocation of consumer goods, as well as the spaces and practices of consumption by children in 1932-1933.

    Dr. Iryna Skubii is an Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture. Her research interests include economic and social history, gender studies, consumption and materiality, and history of childhood in early Soviet Ukraine. She holds a Ph.D. degree from Karazin National University (2013). In 2016, Professor Skubii was a fellow of the German-Ukrainian Commission of Historians and undertook research at Ludvig-Maximillians University in Munich. In 2016-2017, she won research grants from the Shevchenko Scientific Society in America and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. In 2017, Professor Skubii published her monograph “Trade in Kharkiv in the years of NEP (1921-1929): between the economy and everyday life.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Petro Jacyk Program's co-director, head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre

    Iryna Skubii
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Researcher, Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 27th Resettling the Borderland: State Relocation and Ethnic Conflict in the South Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 27, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central and Inner Asia Speaker Series

    Description

    Farid Shafiyev presents a study of Imperial Russian and Soviet Resettlement policies in the South Caucasus during the 19-20th centuries and their impact on the ethnic conflicts in the region, especially the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict. The book investigates the nexus between imperial practices, foreign policy, religion and ethnic conflicts. Taking a comparative approach Dr. Shafiyev explores the most active phases of resettlement, when the state imported and relocated waves of Germans, Russian sectarians and Armenian settlers into the South Caucasus and deported thousands of others. He also offers insights on the complexities of empire-building and managing space and people in the Muslim borderlands.

    Farid Shafiyev is a diplomat and scholar from Azerbaijan. He holds a PhD from Carleton University and an MPA from Harvard Kennedy School of Government as well as Bachelor of Law and Diploma in History from Baku State University. Farid Shafiyev served as ambassador of Azerbaijan to Canada and currently posted in the Czech Republic. He is author of numerous articles and op-eds.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Farid Shafiyev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th THE REFUGEE AND MIGRATION COMPACTS: COOPERATION IN AN ERA OF NATIONALISM

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Please join the Global Migration Lab for another event in its speaker series examining contemporary issues and challenges in global migration governance.

    Anne Staver: “Of two minds: reasserting national control while negotiating global migration governance”

    James Milner: “Collective action in a time of populism: Everyday politics and the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees”

    Discussant: Jennifer Hyndman, Director of the Centre for Refugees Studies, York University

    Moderator: Randall Hansen, Interin Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Signed in December 2018, the Global Refugee and Global Migration Compacts are an admission that the challenges of migration are best approached through cooperation and collective action.

    The Compact on Refugees recognizes the unequal burden placed on Global South states, which host refugees, and rich Global North states, which pay to keep them in regions of origin. Recognizing that most refugees will not return home or be resettled, the Compact proposes new solidarity, development, and finance mechanisms to foster the inclusion and development of displaced people and host populations alike. While promising, displacement crises continue to proliferate, host states remain under-funded, and programming faces major delivery challenges.

    In terms of the Migration Compact, scholars have long argued that state interests are largely incompatible with attempts at global migration governance. Yet, in 2016 the International Organization for Migration became a UN agency, and the vast majority of states supported the Compact with a goal of facilitating safe, orderly, and legal migration. At the same time, right-wing parties in liberal democracies rallied against the Compact, arguing it would erode state sovereignty, and several prominent states “pulled out”.

    This panel will unpack the potential for global migration governance, responsibility-sharing, and addressing collective action problems in the face of burden-shifting, populism, and a growing desire to assert control.

    James Milner is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Carleton University. He is also currently Project Director of LERRN: The Local Engagement Refugee Research Network, a 7-year, SSHRC-funded partnership between researchers and civil society actors primarily in Canada, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon and Tanzania. He has been a researcher, practitioner and policy advisor on issues relating to the global refugee regime, global refugee policy and the politics of asylum in the global South. In recent years, he has undertaken field research in Burundi, Guinea, Kenya, India, Tanzania and Thailand, and has presented research findings to stakeholders in New York, Geneva, London, Ottawa, Bangkok, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam and elsewhere. He has worked as a Consultant for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in India, Cameroon, Guinea and its Geneva Headquarters. He is author of Refugees, the State and the Politics of Asylum in Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), co-author (with Alexander Betts and Gil Loescher) of UNHCR: The Politics and Practice of Refugee Protection (Routledge, 2012), and co-editor of Protracted Refugee Situations: Political, Human Rights and Security Implications (UN University Press, 2008).

    Anne Balke Staver is a senior researcher at the Oslo Metropolitan University, focusing on migration and integration policies. She holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Toronto and an MSc in Forced Migration from the University of Oxford. She is formerly a research fellow at the Institute for Social Research (Oslo), and has extensive experience from migration policymaking and implementation in the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration, Norwegian Police Immigration Service and the Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees (igc).

    This speaker series is supported in part by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Anne Balke Staver
    Panelist
    Senior Researcher, Oslo Metropolitan University

    James Milner
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Carleton University

    Jennifer Hyndman
    Discussant
    Director, Centre for Refugees Studies, York University


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Utopia’s Discontents: Russian Exiles and the Quest for Freedom, 1830-1930

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Over the course of the long nineteenth century, hundreds of thousands of tsarist subjects left the Russian empire and resettled in western and central Europe. There, they created new communities that they called “Russian colonies.” This talk reconstructs the utopian experiments that emerged in the “Russian colonies,” and examines how they influenced political imaginaries in Russia and in their European host societies. Providing a vivid portrait of a unique émigré milieu, the presentation also argues that the story of the colonies offers a novel perspective on one of the most classic themes in Russian history—the relationship between Russia and Europe.

    Faith Hillis is associate professor of history at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Children of Rus’: Right Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation (Cornell University Press, 2013). The recipient of research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, ACLS, Columbia, and Harvard, she is currently a fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library.


    Speakers

    Faith Hillis
    University of Chicago


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Kyiv, Constantinople, Moscow: an Ecclesial Triangle

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20195:00PM - 6:30PM5 Elmsley Place (next to Brennan Hall on USMC Campus)
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    Description

    In the Summer and Fall of 2018, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, who possesses a primacy of honour among Orthodox worldwide, announced that he would grant autocephaly—i.e. full self-governance—to Orthodoxy in Ukraine. The Russian Orthodox Church protested, and eventually broke communion with Constantinople. Around New Year, The Orthodox Church of Ukraine, as the autocephalous body is
    officially known, was recognized by the Ecumenical Patriarch so that there are now two Orthodox Churches in the country, both claiming canonical status. The presentation will shed light on this complex theological, canonical, and political situation.

    Thomas Bremer is professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Münster, Germany.
    He is author or (co)editor of several books, among them, Eastern Orthodox Encounters of Identity and Otherness: Values, Self-
    Reflection, Dialogue (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014) and Cross and Kremlin (Eerdmans, 2013), a short history of the Russian
    Orthodox Church. His research focuses on ecumenical relations between Eastern and Western Churches, on Orthodoxy in
    Russia, Ukraine, and in the Balkans, and on churches and politics in Eastern Europe.

    For futher information on the event, please contact Dr. Brian Butcher: brian.butcher@utoronto.ca

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Thomas Bremer
    Professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Munster, Germany


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Orthodox School of Theology

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Which Alternative? Lessons from Germany's Past for a Europe in Tumult

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In the past decade, Europe has drifted in and out of crises. The Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis, and the resurgence of the far right have shaken the confidence of some of the most committed defenders of the European political project. Germany has found itself at the center of many of these issues, and its presence has often reinvigorated long-harbored global anxieties about German political power. Germany’s past, however, can teach us a great deal about both the potential and the limits of this current continental search for political alternatives. This talk will offer a set of theses on the recent influx of minorities, the faltering of the European Union, and the gradual transformation of Germany’s political landscape, including the rise of a New Right.

    Jennifer Allen is an assistant professor of modern German history at Yale University. She is working on a book titled Sustainable Utopias: Art, Political Culture, and Historical Practice in Late Twentieth-Century Germany, which charts Germany’s postwar efforts to revitalize the concept of utopia. She argues that, contrary to popular accounts, German interest in radical social alternatives had not diminished by the late twentieth century. Rather, Germans pursued the radical democratization of politics and culture through a series of modest grassroots projects. They not only envisioned a new German utopia but attempted to enact their vision, reclaiming utopian hope from the dustbin of historical ideas. In addition to the themes of utopia and anti-utopianism, Allen’s research explores the theories and practices of memory; counterculture and grassroots activism; and the politics of cultural preservation during and after the Cold War. Her work has been supported by the Volkswagen and Mellon Foundations; the American Academy in Berlin; the Institut für Zeitgeschichte; DAAD; the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego; and the Institutes for European Studies and International Studies at UC Berkeley. Allen received her Ph.D. in history from UC Berkeley in 2015. She is currently the Berthold Leibinger Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin and a visiting researcher at the Dahlem Humanities Center at the Free University in Berlin.

     


    Speakers

    Jennifer Allen
    Yale University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Natalia Roudakova is a cultural anthropologist (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007) working in the field of political communication and comparative media studies, with a broad interest in moral philosophy and political and cultural theory. She has worked as Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication, University of California in San Diego, and as Visiting Scholar in the Media and Communication Department at Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands) and in the Department of Communication at Södertörn University, Stockholm (Sweden). In 2013-2014, Roudakova was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California, where she completed her book, titled Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia which is now out with Cambridge University Press.

    Losing Pravda examines the spectacular professional unraveling of journalism in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union and its broader social and cultural effects. Roudakova argues that a crisis of journalism is unlike any other: it fundamentally erodes the value of truth-seeking and truth-telling in a society. In many ways, Roudakova tracks how a post-truth society comes into being. Russia’s case thus becomes far from unique, illuminating instead the historical and cultural emergence of phenomena such as “fake news,” misinformation (kompromat), and general distrust in politics and public life that have now begun to plague Western democracies as well. Roudakova’s account of one country’s loss of the culture of truth-seeking can serve as an important “wake-up call” for Western nations going forward.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Natalia Roudakova



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th 70 Years of Russian Musical Resistance: From Gulag Songs to Pussy Riot

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Artemi Troitsky is the leading Russian music journalist, radio host, producer, author and critic. He is the author of nine books on the history of Russian and Soviet music and youth culture, and he lectures widely around the world. Troitsky produces weekly shows for Radio Liberty and ARU.TV and regularly contributes to newspapers Novaya Gazeta, Postimees, and The Moscow Times. He is also a frequent contributor on Echo Moskvy, TV Dozhd, and BBC Russian Service.


    Speakers

    Artemi Troitsky
    music journalist and radio host


    Sponsors

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st The Constitution of 1936 and Stalin's Turn to Mass Repressions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In her presentation, Prof. Velikanova discusses a new element in the historical picture explaining why politics shifted to mass repressions in 1937. Besides Stalin’s protracted conflict with regional party/state clans and the inflammatory role of new NKVD head Nikolai Yezhov, the dictator’s conceptualization of popular commentaries on the constitution and the results of the 1937 census could reverse his views on society and the hope that ordinary Soviets were sufficiently Sovietized. Together with international developments in the fall of 1936 that heightened Stalin’s fear of war, popular discussion of the constitution can provide the missing piece in the puzzle for why relative moderation ended and repressions expanded from former oppositionists to the officials and finally to the wider population.

    Olga Velikanova is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Texas and a former alumna of CERES. She obtained her PhD from Saint Petersburg State university. She specializes in Soviet popular opinion studies and works extensively with declassified Communist party and secret police archives. She is author of five books discussing Soviet social mobilization campaigns and popular perceptions of Soviet politics and of Lenin’s image involving historical, anthropological and political culture methods. Her last book, Mass Political Culture under Stalinism: Popular Discussion of the Soviet Constitution of 1936 (Palgrave 2018) is the first full-length study of Stalin’s Constitution, exploring the government’s goals and Soviet citizens’ views of constitutional democratic principles and their problematic relationship with the reality of Stalinism.


    Speakers

    Olga Velikanova
    University of North Texas


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th What US Officials Said about NATO Enlargement, What the Russians Heard, and the Problem of Value-Complexity

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20195:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The fierce scholarly and practitioner debate on the question “did the United States promise not to enlarge NATO” has taken our attention away from an important policy problem and one newly released U.S. and Russian historical materials highlight very well: how do leaders manage tradeoffs and uncertainty? Pursuing one set of interests can harm the achievement of other interests. And sometimes, policies take a while to form, adding to uncertainty in relations among countries. American University Professor James Goldgeier will explain why Bill Clinton and his top advisers convinced themselves that they could both enlarge NATO and keep Russia on a Western-oriented track, despite Boris Yeltsin’s warnings to the contrary, and he will discuss the implications of their approach for U.S.-Russia relations today.

    James Goldgeier is Visiting Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Professor of International Relations at the School of International Service at American University, where he served as Dean from 2011-17. He holds the 2018-19 Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-Russia Relations at the John W. Kluge Center. Previously, he was a professor at George Washington University, where from 2001-05 he directed the Elliott School’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. He also taught at Cornell University, and has held a number of public policy appointments, including Director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council Staff, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Henry A. Kissinger Chair at the Library of Congress. In addition, he has held appointments or fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Hoover Institution, the Brookings Institution, and the Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation. He is past president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, and he co-directs the Bridging the Gap project, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He has authored or co-authored four books.


    Speakers

    James Goldgeier
    American University and Council on Foreign Relations



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Defending the Liberal Revolution in France: The Legislative Assembly and the Demise of the Constitution of 1791

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    On 1 October 1791, the French Legislative Assembly convened in Paris, initiating the constitutional regime that revolutionaries in 1789 had committed themselves to establish. Within a year, however, the monarchy had been overthrown, and the Constitution of 1791 had collapsed. In explaining the French Revolution’s transition during this period from a moderate to a more radical phase, historians have emphasized factors such as the importance of the Flight to Varennes, the rise of the popular movement, and the dynamic of revolutionary discourse. Such explanations have tended to dismiss support for the constitutional regime on the eve of its demise as marginal, insincere, or irrelevant. Yet the advent of republican democracy in France should not completely eclipse the significance of the constitutional monarchy’s failure. This paper suggests that debate within the Legislative Assembly reveals not conflict between republicans and royalists, but a more nuanced struggle between differing conceptions of the revolution, the location of national sovereignty, and the importance of a written constitution. For example, the opposition of some deputies to the declaration of war against Austria on 20 April 1792 reflected determination to defend the constitution and the liberal principles it embodied. Beyond the Assembly, the paper also examines the departmental denunciations of the Paris crowd’s invasion of the Tuileries Palace on 20 June 1792. These addresses and petitions went beyond manifestations of loyalty to Louis XVI to express commitment to the ideal of constitutionalism. Thus this paper argues that there were many in France who still hoped to defend the liberal revolution of 1789, with its promise of individual liberty, property rights, and the rule of law, on the eve of a second revolution which would sweep away the Constitution of 1791.

    Bill Cormack received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario in 1992. In 1995, Cambridge University Press published his first book, Revolution and Political Conflict in the French Navy 1789-1794. Since 1998, he has been a member of the Department of History at the University of Guelph in Ontario, where he teaches modern European history. His new book, Patriots, Royalists, and Terrorists in the West Indies: The French Revolution in Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1789-1802, comes out with the University of Toronto Press in January 2019. His current research concerns the French Legislative Assembly and the demise of the Constitution of 1791.


    Speakers

    William Cormack
    University of Guelph


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2019

  • Friday, April 5th China, the War on Terror, and the Mass Internment of Turkic Minorities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Sean R. Roberts is an Associate Professor of the Practice of International Affairs and Director of the International Development Studies program at The George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Dr. Roberts is an anthropologist by training and wrote his dissertation at the University of Southern California on the Uyghurs of Kazakhstan and their interaction with China’s Uyghurs. In addition to his academic work, he has done substantial work in the field of international development, primarily in the former Soviet Union and especially in Central Asia. Dr. Roberts has published numerous articles in academic journals, edited volumes, and in policy-oriented publications, both about political development in Central Asia and about the Uyghurs. He also frequently provides commentary to major news outlets on these subjects, and he is currently writing a book on the self-fulfilling prophecy of Uyghur militancy. His most recent publication is in the Journal of Critical Asian Studies and is entitled “The biopolitics of China’s “war on terror” and the exclusion of the Uyghurs.”

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sean Roberts
    George Washington University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 26th The French Trials of Cléophas Kamitatu: Refugee Politics, Leftist Activism, and Françafrique in 1970s Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In the 1970s, the French lawyer Jean-Jacques de Félice served as defense counsel for Cléophas Kamitatu-Massamba of Congo-Zaïre, who was expelled from France in 1972 even though he had obtained political refugee status. At the request of Mobutu Sese Seko, the French Minister of the Interior had censored Kamitatu’s critical portrayal of the Mobutu regime, La Grande Mystification du Congo (published by François Maspero Press in 1970). The Kamitatu case illustrates how, even as France ratified the 1967 Protocol of the Geneva Convention on Refugees in 1971, immigration, censorship, and late Gaullist era Africa policies dominated political discussions. The attempts to censure Kamitatu’s book published by a French publisher and to deport him despite his status as political refugee show how various facets of French government engaged with international laws regulating refugees and deportation at the very time that Jacques Foccart, who had oriented France’s Africa policy since 1958, sought to integrate Congo-Zaïre into France’s sphere of influence in Africa. Kamitatu’s story thus exposes the network of Jacques Foccart as detrimental to French civil liberties, African opposition politics, and international refugee protocols alike. The chapter draws primarily on Kamitatu’s legal case files in the archives of his lawyer, Jean-Jacques de Félice. It places cause lawyering in historical perspective, promotes use of the lawyer’s archive as fertile historical method, and considers state and non-state actor networks in a common analytical framework.

    Meredith Terretta earned her PhD in African history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds the Gordon F. Henderson Research Chair in Human Rights and teaches history at the University of Ottawa. She specializes in themes of African liberation movements, legal activism, histories of refuge-seeking, and human rights. She has recently coedited African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights (Ohio University Press, 2015). Her most recent single-authored book is Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence: Nationalism, Grassfields Tradition, and State-Building in Cameroon (Ohio University Press, New African Histories Series, 2014). Her articles appear in numerous journals including The Journal of Contemporary History, The Canadian Journal of History, Matériaux pour l’histoire de notre temps, Politique africaine, The Journal of World History, Human Rights Quarterly, and The Journal of African History. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled Activism at the Fringes of Empire: Rogue Lawyers and Rights Activists In and Out of Twentieth Century Africa. She is President of the Canadian Association of African Studies.


    Speakers

    Meredith Terretta
    University of Ottawa



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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