Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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October 2021

  • Friday, October 29th 'A L’Immortalité': Power, Propaganda, and the Académie royale des sciences under the Sun King

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 29, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    How did images function within the early Académie royale des sciences? During the Academy’s formative period, from its inauguration in 1666 to the death of King Louis XIV in 1715, the Academy produced a wealth of images in the form of drawings, prints, medallions, and paintings. Like England’s Royal Society, the Academy was pivotal in the development of early modern natural philosophy as one of the first and best-funded scientific institutions in Europe.
    This talk will examine how the images produced by and for the Academy fit into the larger image production machine of Louis XIV. The King’s ministers strategically crafted his public image throughout his reign to promote various messages of his sovereignty, power, and gloire. After the creation of the Academy in 1666, natural philosophy became another source of state power and consistently appeared in various manifestations of royal imagery. I argue that the Academy’s images—produced by both the Academy and state ministers—functioned politically by conflating the power of science and state. Through an analysis of prints, paintings, and medals, I show that, across all media, the Academy and its achievements were depicted as monumental events in the reign of the Sun King, on par with military and political triumphs. Similarly, the repeated visual depiction of the monarch with the Academy reminded viewers that the King was responsible for these scientific victories and, indeed, harnessed their power.

    Katherine M. Reinhart is a fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. A historian of art and science in early modernity, her publications span various aspects of scientific visual culture, and she is the co-editor (with Margaret Carlyle) of a forthcoming special issue of KNOW: A Journal on the Formation of Knowledge on anatomical material culture.


    Speakers

    Katherine Reinhart
    Speaker
    IRH Fellow, University of Wisconsin

    Eric Jennings
    Chair
    Distinguished Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2021

  • Thursday, November 11th Plumbing the Depths: The Moscow Canal as Cultural Icon & Atypical Gulag Site

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 11, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    This presentation will trace the history of the construction of the Moscow Canal by forced labor. Building on this foundation we will then explore the myriad cultural products and programs that were produced and implemented during the waterway’s construction by the very same “canal soldiers” who were building the canal. These cultural elements emanated from a desire to spatially inscribe, showcase, and glorify Stalinist ideology through a major Gulag construction project, the likes of which was never seen before. Arguably this impulse continues to infuse and affect the project’s legacy as succeeding generations of its observers and users attempt to reconcile the Moscow Canal’s deathly past with its evolving future.

    Cynthia Ruder is Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Kentucky where she teaches Russian language, literature, and culture. Her first book Making History for Stalin: The Story of the Belomor Canal explored the construction of this waterway with special attention paid to the concomitant volume published to celebrate it The History of the Construction of the Stalin White-Sea Baltic Canal. Her most recent book Building Stalinism: The Moscow Canal and the Creation of Soviet Space unravels the nexus of gulag-culture-memory by examining the spaces and places they occupied within the context of a Gulag construction project and contemporary Moscow. In her current project she hopes to translate and annotate booklets in the Library of Reforging series authored and produced in the Dmitlag camp that constructed the Moscow Canal to give voice to those gulag inmates from whom little is often heard.


    Speakers

    Cynthia Ruder
    Speaker
    Professor, University of Kentucky

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 15th Material Culture Wars: Lessons from Italy

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 15, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    More than seven decades after the collapse of Mussolini’s regime, the physical and iconographic traces of Italian Fascism – monuments, buildings, inscriptions, artworks – remain a lightning-rod of controversy. In this talk, historian Joshua Arthurs considers the central role played by Fascist material culture in contemporary debates over the future of Italian democracy and national identity, race and immigration, and memory and modernity. He also considers the implications of Italian debates for current memory politics in Canada and around the globe.

    Joshua Arthurs is an Associate Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto-Scarborough, specializing in the cultural, social, and intellectual history of modern Italy and Europe. His interests include fascism and the far right; the politics of memory, monuments and museums; ideologies of race, empire, and the classical tradition; and everyday life in wartime and dictatorship. He is the author of Excavating Modernity: The Roman Past in Fascist Italy (Cornell University Press, 2012) and co-editor of Outside the State? The Politics of Everyday Life in Fascist Italy (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017). His current book project, Forty-Five Days: Emotion, Experience and Memory after Mussolini, under contract with Oxford University Press, examines popular responses to the collapse of the Fascist regime in 1943. He has also written extensively on the afterlives of Fascist monuments in contemporary Italy and contested heritage in a global context.


    Speakers

    Joshua Arthurs
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, UTSC

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Professor, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 24th Policing Prostitution: Regulating the Lower Classes in Late Imperial Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 24, 202112:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    From the 1840s until 1917, prostitution was legally tolerated across the Russian Empire under a system known as regulation. Like other systems of regulation that were in place across the European continent and beyond, women who sold sex in the Russian Empire were required to register their details with the police, attend regular gynaecological examinations, and abide by a whole host of restrictions. The regulation system had a far-reaching impact upon the lives of various groups within urban society. Brothel madams bickered with urban residents over the visibility and audibility of prostitution in urban space. Poorly paid police agents forged advantageous financial relationships with registered prostitutes and their managers. As the Russian government became more concerned with combatting rising venereal diseases amongst the population in the early twentieth century, the bodies of certain groups of lower-class men also became objects of state intervention.

    In this talk, Siobhán Hearne will present an overview of her book Policing Prostitution: Regulating the Lower Classes in Late Imperial Russia (OUP, 2021). This book approaches the history of state regulation from the perspectives of those working, using, or encountering the commercial sex industry on a regular basis. Examining the lives, challenges, and voices of registered prostitutes, their clients, their managers, the police, and the urban communities who shared their streets with state-licenced brothels allows us to examine the rich tapestry of urban life in the final decades of the Russian Empire.

    Siobhán Hearne is a historian of gender and sexuality in the Russian Empire and Soviet Union. She received her PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2017 and is currently a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Durham University. Her work has appeared in the journals Kritika, Journal of Social History, Revolutionary Russia, Social History, and the Journal of the History of Sexuality.


    Speakers

    Siobhán Hearne
    Speaker
    Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, Durham University

    Alison Smith
    Chair
    Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 25th Historicizing Roma in Central Europe: Between Critical Whiteness and Epistemic Injustice

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 25, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    We look forward to our talk and would like to discuss following questions that led us to writing this book:
    How to pose the struggle against anti-Gypsism, if claims of eliminating racism seem to be unrealistic or, even more, bringing risks to historical justice for Romani people?
    What is the role of critical whiteness in shaping the agenda of desegregation for Romani people? Who are the potential agents of critical whiteness and what are the specific ways of practicing it in Central and Eastern Europe?
    Was nation-building, or more generally, the building of national identities in Central Europe a decisive factor in rooting the segregation of Romani people? What was the historical impact of Central European racially minded experts on legitimizing the segregation of Romani people?
    And why do all these questions have a continuing relationship with Czech race science, and the history of state police and medical surveillance across Central Europe?

    Victoria Shmidt brings together the issue of historical roots of segregation with the legacy of colonial and socialist policies in Central Eastern European countries. Since 2019 Victoria leads the project “Race science: Undiscovered Power of building the nations” at the University of Graz.

    Bernadette Nadya Jaworsky is associate professor of sociology at Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic), and Faculty Fellow at Yale University’s Center for Cultural Sociology.


    Speakers

    Victoria Shmidt
    Speaker
    Historian and Head Researcher for the project 'Race Science: Undiscovered Power of Building the Nations', University of Graz

    Bernadette Nadya Jaworsky
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Masaryk University (Brno) and Faculty Fellow, Centre for Cultural Sociology at Yale University

    Ana Petrov
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 26th 'Monster Saharan Dust Plume Heading for Europe': A Cultural History of the French Bomb, 1960-2021

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 26, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    From 1960 to 1966, after more than a century of colonial occupation in Algeria, the French military exploded multiple nuclear bombs in the region of the central Sahara: four atmospheric “tests” at Reggane, followed by another 13 underground, southeast at In Ekker. The health, environmental, political, cultural, and psychological effects of these detonations in the Sahara have continued to radiate for decades since. In this talk, Dr. Panchasi will be sharing a set of historical objects and questions from her current book project, The “French Bomb” in Culture and Empire, 1945-1962.

    Roxanne Panchasi is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in modern France and empire. She is the author of Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars (Cornell University Press, 2009). Her current research focuses on the cultural politics of French nuclear weapons and testing since 1945. Her most recent publication related to this project, “‘No Hiroshima in Africa’: The Algerian War and the Question of French Nuclear Tests in the Sahara,” appeared in the Spring 2019 issue of History of the Present.


    Speakers

    Roxanne Panchasi
    Associate Professor of History, Simon Fraser University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2021

  • Tuesday, December 7th Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War I

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 7, 20213:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Organized in the wake of World War Two by the victorious Allies, the Nuremberg Trials were intended to hold the Nazis to account for their crimes and to restore a sense of justice to a world devastated by violence. As Francine Hirsch reveals in her groundbreaking new book, a major piece of the Nuremberg story has routinely been left out: the critical role of the Soviet Union. Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg offers a startlingly new view of the International Military Tribunal and a fresh perspective on the movement for international human rights that it helped launch.

    Francine Hirsch is Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she teaches courses on Soviet history, Modern European history, and the history of human rights. Her first book, Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union (2005), received several awards, including the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association and the Wayne S. Vucinich Prize of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Her second book, Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II (2020), was awarded four book prizes: the 2021 Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship from the American Society for International Law, the Heldt Prize of the Association for Women in Slavic Studies, the Barbara Jelavich prize of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and the Beer Prize of the American Historical Association. Hirsch has started work on a new book project on the history of Russian-American entanglement, with a focus on economics, science, culture, and international law.


    Speakers

    Francine Hirsch
    Speaker
    Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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