Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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February 2018

  • Wednesday, February 28th Unspoken Territories: An evening with filmmaker Marusya Bociurkiw

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMMedia Commons Theatre,
    3rd floor of Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Sometimes outrageous, often funny and always insightful, poet/pedagogue Marusya Bociurkiw’s films and books create an alternative diaspora archive, built on hybridity, intersectionality and the desire to speak to that which has been unspoken.Her body of work – 10 films and 6 books unique to the fields of Slavic Studies and Slavic literature – rewrite the Ukrainian settler narrative and create new queer and intersectional feminist imaginaries that cross ethnic, transnational, and identitarian boundaries. Bociurkiw will show clips from her films and will share footage from her current project, “Post-Revolution.”

    Marusya Bociurkiw is associate professor of media theory and co-director of The Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought , which promotes research-creation and graduate study in the areas of media studies, critical theory, Aboriginal, feminist, and queer studies, and media activism. She holds a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of British Columbia, an M.A.in Social and Political Thought from York University, and a B.F.A from NSCAD University. Dr. Bociurkiw’s academic research is broadly concerned with the intersections of affect, nation and technology, and their gendered, queered and racialized ramifications. She is also a media artist, writer, blogger and scholar whose media works and books about the sexuality, ethnicity , food, and culture have been screened and read all over the world. Her films and videos are in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, The National Archives, and various universities and libraries. A longtime media activist, she founded Emma Productions, a feminist media collective in the 1980’s and is currently engaged in documenting that history. She is the writer/director of nine films and videos, including “Unspoken Territory”, a history of racial profiling in Canada, and “What’s the Ukrainian Word For Sex: A Sexual Journey through Eastern Europe.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marusya Bociurkiw
    Speaker
    Filmmaker; Associate Professor of Media Theory, Ryerson University; Director of the Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought

    Marta Baziuk
    Moderator
    Director of the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium, CIUS, Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2018

  • Friday, March 2nd Searching for Truth in the Transitional Justice Movement: Lessons from the Balkans and Colombia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 201812:00PM - 2:00PMCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    2nd Floor
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    Description

    Dr. Rowen will present key findings from her recently published book, Searching for Truth in the Transitional Justice Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2017), which examines the campaigns for a truth commission to redress human rights abuses committed in the course of the war during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, the decades-long armed conflict in Colombia, and US detention policies in the War on Terror. Drawing on twelve years of fieldwork, over 200 interviews, archival and survey research, Rowen’s book considers how transitional justice developed as an idea around which a loosely structured movement emerged and then became professionalized, eventually making truth commissions a standard response to mass violence. By exploring how this movement developed, as well as efforts to establish truth commissions in the Balkans, Colombia, and the US, this talk will address the different processes through which political actors translate new legal ideas such as transitional justice into political action. As will be argued, the malleability of legal ideas and policy interventions such as transitional justice and truth commissions, is both an asset and a liability for those striving to ensure accountability, improve survivor well-being, and prevent future violence.

    Contact

    Lori Wells


    Speakers

    Dr. Jamie Rowen
    University of Massachussetts - Amherst



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 2nd De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the end of the Old Regime

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Glendon College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 8th Conceiving Hunger in the Soviet Union at War: Between Heroism and Humiliation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 8, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Hunger was a defining feature of the Second World War in the Soviet Union. While hunger was nothing new to many Soviet citizens, the war politicized hunger in new ways and generated distinct ways of conceiving of hunger’s effects. This talk will examine contemporaries’ reflections on the hungry body and the hungry mind in Leningrad and beyond, and will address the way hunger both underpinned and threatened to destabilize wartime myths of sacrifice and solidarity.

    Rebecca Manley is an Associate Professor of History at Queen’s University. She is the author of To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War (Cornell University Press, 2009). She is currently working on a SSHRC funded book length provisionally entitled Tsar Hunger: Conceiving Hunger in Modern Russia. The project offers a fresh perspective on the place of hunger in modern Russian history by examining the way writers and revolutionaries, political economists and physiologists, government officials and philanthropists conceptualized and attempted to come to grips with hunger.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Manley
    Queen's University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 12th German Ostpolitik and the 'Ukraine Crisis': Berlin's Changing Approach to Russia after the Annexation of Crimea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 12, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The spectacular events of 2014 – the annexation of Crimea, start of the war in the Donets Basin, shooting of Malysian airliner MH17 over Eastern Ukraine, etc. – have changed German perceptions of the current Russian leadership fundamentally, as expressed in far going shifts in public discourse and opinion. Gradually, this change of position has also been noted in Ukraine. While there was in summer 2014 still an inapt Ukrainian “Mrs Ribbentropp” against Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor is today perceived, by most Ukrainian political observers, as one of the most pro-Ukrainian Western leaders. Nevertheless, an array of continuing formal and informal ties between Russia and Germany (economic, cultural, political etc.) continues to exert a largely unhealthy influence on German society and politics, as they often are used by the Kremlin to manipulate German decision and opinion making. These attempts are eased by deep-seated pathologies in post-war German foreign political thought including escapist pacifism, anti-Americanism, and mis-perceptions of the East European past and present as well as Germany’s role therein. The continuing significant German trade with Russia, and only slowly improving public knowledge about Ukraine are preventing an already disillusioned political class in Berlin to take a more resolute stance within the current Russian-Western confrontation.

    ANDREAS UMLAND studied politics and Russian affairs in Leipzig, Berlin, Oxford, Stanford and Cambridge. He taught at the Urals State University, St. Antony’s College Oxford, Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Catholic University of Eichstaett and Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. Since 2014, he is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation in Kyiv. He is also general editor of the book series “Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society” and consulting editor for the “Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Andreas Umland
    Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation in Kyiv, Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    John Yaremko Chair in Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 14th Child victims and female perpetrators: Dealing with the Nazi-murder of disabled children in the post-war Soviet Union

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 14, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In November 1943, shortly after the liberation of the occupied Soviet territories by the Red Army, three mass graves with the bodies of 144 children were discovered in a former colony for disabled children in Zaporizhia region. The disabled children had been shot in two mass murder actions by a German SS special unit in October 1941 and in March 1943. In the course of the NKVD investigations of the case, seven former Soviet employees of the colony, among them four women, were put on trial and convicted for complicity with the Germans in the crime. The trial documentation in many ways presents a fascinating historical resource: First, it deals with an understudied context of Nazi-crimes in the Soviet Union in WWII: the murder of disabled people. Second, it shows competing logics and possibilities of action of the Soviet defendants. Third, it is one of the few examples that show how Soviet postwar justice dealt with female collaborators. And fourth, it reveals to a certain extent problems of the Soviet treatment of disabled persons in prewar times.

    Tanja Penter is professor of Eastern European History at Heidelberg University, Germany. Her research interests include: comparison of dictatorships, Soviet war crimes trials, questions of transitional justice and compensation for Nazi crimes and memory policies in the Soviet Union and its successor states. Her books include: Kohle für Stalin und Hitler. Arbeiten und Leben im Donbass 1929 bis 1953 (Essen 2010). She is a member of the German-Russian and the German-Ukrainian Commission of Historians and of the scientific board of the German Historical Institute in Moscow.


    Speakers

    Tanja Penter
    Heidelberg University


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 20th The Rural Voice on Reality TV: The Politics of Timbre in the Ukrainian ‘Voice’

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 20, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper concerns the politics and aesthetics of what is known in post-Soviet Ukraine as the avtentyka singing voice (автентичний голос), which translates literally as the “authentic” voice. My focus is on the problem that this avtentyka vocal timbre creates when it appears in the context of a popular reality TV singing competition called Holos Krainy, or “Voice of the Nation,” part of the global “Voice” franchise that has aired in Ukraine since 2011. Beyond the clashes of style and genre that occur when avtentyka singers who use village timbres sing modern pop hits, I attend to a more general politics of vocal timbre to examine how the avtentyka voice, which sits within a historical trajectory of resistance to state power, challenges the conventional wisdom about how the folkloric necessarily points backwards, toward an essentialized national past. Rather, I consider avtentyka and its iconic vocal timbre as a form of late Soviet expressive culture that also has the somewhat paradoxical potential to operate in today’s Ukrainian mediasphere as a forward-looking expressive form. Rooted in ethnographic research among avtentyka practitioners, I examine how the politicized timbres of avtentyka reject logics of success according to the standards of reality TV “democratainment” and remake failure in the competition as an act of refusal—of the limited musical forms that dominate Ukrainian media and as an assertion of the ungovernable wildness of Ukrainian rural expressivity.

    Maria Sonevytsky is currently Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bard College. Her first book, Wild Music: Sound and Sovereignty in Ukraine, is forthcoming on Wesleyan University Press. In the fall of 2018, she will join the ethnomusicology faculty at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Maria Sonevytsky
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bard College

    Joshua Pilzer
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology in the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    University of Toronto Ethnomusicology Roundtable

    Wilfried Laurier’s Anthropology Program at the Faculty of Arts, Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost, Anthropology Students' Association


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 23rd Putting the Postcolonial into the trente glorieuses: Bidonvilles, the Autoroute A8, and the Aéroport Nice-Côte d’Azur

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 23, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This paper is part of a larger effort, undertaken now by several historians of modern France, to write workers from North Africa back into French history during the period 1945-1975. Most of that work has understandably considered Paris and Marseille, which had the largest concentrations of maghrébin workers. Here the focus is on the French Riviera and the links between transnational mass tourism and the migration of North African workers who helped build hotels, vacation rentals, the new airport (soon the second busiest in France after those of Paris), and France’s first autoroute requiring tolls, A8. They did so while living in bidonvilles (shantytowns), ultimately razed for the autoroute and for the beautification of the airport. North Africans were thus critical in constructing the postwar Côte d’Azur, yet they have been hitherto written out of the historical narrative of this imagined tourist “paradise.”

    Stephen L. Harp is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Akron. He is the author of Learning to Be Loyal: Primary Schooling and Nation Building in Alsace and Lorraine, 1850-1940 (1998), Marketing Michelin: Advertising and Cultural Identity in Twentieth-Century France (2001), Au Naturel: Naturism, Nudism, and Tourism in Twentieth-Century France (2014), and Rubber in World History: Empire, Industry and the Everyday (2016). His current research focuses on the environmental and social impacts of mass tourism on the French Riviera.


    Speakers

    Prof. Stephen Harp
    The University of Akron


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2018

  • Thursday, April 5th Map Men: Lives and Deaths of Geographers in Transnational East Central Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 5, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Conflicts over turf are geo-coded by grievance, particularly in Europe’s tumultuous borderland pasts of German-Polish, Polish-Ukrainian, Polish-Jewish, Ukrainian-Russian, Hungarian-Romanian, and Hungarian-Jewish relations. In tales of flawed “great men” and their selves, historians too conveniently reify categories of nationality, rationality, or modernity to psychologize group behavior by language and religion, instead of delving into the eccentric worlds of individuals and social contexts for generating maps. This lecture re-grounds maps as intersubjective human artefacts, colored in by relational patterns of everyday frustration and status-conscious anxiety, petty jealousy and human pride.

    Where explanations fail, maps offer forensic clues: the obsessive passion for maps in matters of life and death, friendship and war, across borders and oceans from the 1870s to the 1950s. Looking at the mobile worlds of five “transnational Germans” who were also multilingual, Anglophile, and national-scientific geographers—Albrecht Penck (1858-1945) of Germany, Eugeniusz Romer (1871-1954) of Poland, Stepan Rudnyts’kyi (1877-1937) of Ukraine, Isaiah Bowman (1878-1950) of North America, Count Pál Teleki (1879-1941) of Hungary, he recreates the relationships of a generation of aspiring bourgeois experts. By retelling their lives and deaths, he looks at the history of borderland conflict and digs into the personal lives of men whose prejudices helped to shape the emergence of geography and cartography as modern sciences out of pre-1914 Ostmitteleuropa.

    The lecture finally illustrates the ways in which today’s clickbait and functional grids depicted budding graphic projects on surreal and subjective terms. As maps are shipped around ever more dangerously as weapons, Seegel argues that they continue to define tensions of empire that are common to émigré trusteeships for mediating territorial conflict, as well as positions of privilege for a global technical intelligentsia’s multigenerational advancement.

    Steven Seegel is professor of Russian and European history at the University of Northern Colorado. He is the author of Mapping Europe’s Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2012), and Ukraine under Western Eyes: The Bohdan and Neonila Krawciw Ucrainica Map Collection (Harvard University Press, 2013). He has been a contributor to the fourth and fifth volumes of Chicago’s international history of cartography series, and has translated over 300 entries from Russian and Polish for the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, 1933-1945, in multiple volumes, published jointly by Indiana University Press. He is also a former director at Harvard of the Ukrainian Research Institute’s summer exchange program. His most recent book, Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe, is published by University of Chicago Press in April 2018.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Steven Seegel
    Speaker
    Professor of History, University of Northern Colorado

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 6th The History and Afterlives of a Medical Utopia: Exploring the Remains of Colonial Medicine in the Afro-Pacific World

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 6, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Guillaume Lachenal
    Université Paris Diderot


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 19th 2018 Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Lecture: The Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 19, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMroom 100A, Jackman Humanities Institute
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the course of the Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Lecture, Professor Shore will present her new book, the Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution.

    “This is a civilization that needs metaphysics,” Adam Michnik told Václav Havel in 2003. A decade later, on 21 November 2013, Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych unexpectedly reversed the course of his own stated foreign policy and declined to sign an association agreement with the European Union. Around 8 p.m. that day a thirty-two year-old Afghan-Ukrainian journalist, Mustafa Nayem, posted a note on his Facebook page: “Come on, let’s get serious. Who is ready to go out to the Maidan”—Kiev’s central square—“by midnight tonight? ‘Likes’ don’t count.” No one then knew that “likes don’t count”—a sentence that would have made no sense before Facebook—would bring about the return to metaphysics to Eastern Europe. While the world watched (or did not watch) the uprising on the Maidan as an episode in geopolitics, those in Kiev during the winter of 2013–14 lived the revolution as an existential transformation: the blurring of night and day, the loss of a sense of time, the sudden disappearance of fear, the imperative to make choices.

    The book will be available for purchase at the event.

    Marci Shore teaches European cultural and intellectual history. She received her M.A. from the University of Toronto in 1996 and her PhD from Stanford University in 2001. Before joining Yale’s history department, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University‘s Harriman Institute; an assistant professor of history and Jewish studies at Indiana University; and Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies at Yale. She is the author of The Taste of Ashes: The Afterlife of Totalitarianism in Eastern Europe (Crown, 2013), Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (Yale University Press, 2006) and the translator of Michal Glowinski‘s Holocaust memoir The Black Seasons (Northwestern University Press, 2005).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marci Shore
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History, Yale University

    Roman Senkus
    Chair
    Senior Editor, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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