Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

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December 2018

  • Tuesday, December 11th The Orthodox Church in Ukraine: A Century of Separation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 11, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In light of recent developments in Ukraine toward establishing a unified Ukrainian Orthodox Church, coupled with the ecclesial conflicts between Constantinople and Moscow, this book’s appearance is very timely. In his presentation, Prof. Denysenko will provide an overview of the history of Orthodox Christianity in Ukraine from the early twentieth century to the present. He will touch upon the dynamics of church and state in the attempts to restore an authentic Ukrainian religious identity in the contemporary Orthodox churches, and how these dynamics have played out in the current movement to overcome the divisions among the three Orthodox Churches in Ukraine. This book launch is the second in a series of events looking at Ukrainian Orthodox Christianity and the question of autocephaly hosted by the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies; the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; the Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; and the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Nicholas E. Denysenko
    Speaker
    Emil and Elfriede Jochum Professor and Chair, Valparaiso University

    Myroslaw Tataryn
    Discussant
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Religious Studies; Chair, Department of Religious Studies; Director of the Centre for Responsible Citizenship at St. Jerome's University, University of Waterloo


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Orthodox School of Theology at Trinity College

    Research Program on Religion and Culture, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, U of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2019

  • Friday, January 25th Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States
    Protests, political activism and the growth of social and political movements have been a defining feature of the Russian political landscape during the 1990s. With the arrival of Vladimir Putin in 2000, political activism declined, only to be brought back to life after the contested parliamentary election of 2011. Since then, the Russian political landscape has become diverse with groups ranging from pro-Western liberals to hard-line nationalists and left-wing Marxists. This presentation offers an overview of the transformation of the non-systemic left-wing political movements in post-Soviet Russia, paying particular attention to the formidable revival of these movements since the late 2000s and the structural impediments to their further participation in the political system. This case study is part of a bigger ongoing book project that provides insights into the factors undermining the development of the left-wing politics and the consolidation of the leftist forces in the post-soviet states.

    Elena Maltseva is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Canada. Elena holds a PhD degree in Political Science from the University of Toronto (2012). Her current research focuses on left-wing politics in post-Soviet states, social security reforms, labour issues and regime stability in post-communist countries.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 25th Indigenizing New France: Where Are We Now?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    From whatever subject position we “indigenize”, we are always indigenizing something–something deeply entangled with colonial processes. What has this meant in the case of New France? As early modern spatial or political phenomenon, it was elusive even to contemporaries. As historiographic artifact, it has been naturalized in startlingly different ways. Efforts to recreate the lived experience and vantage points of indigenous polities have been ongoing for decades now; in recent years, they have been deeply enriched by deliberate, community-based cultural revitalization projects. But the politics of cross-cultural knowledge remain complex, and play out differently in France, the United States, Quebec, and elsewhere in Canada. Efforts to dismantle colonialist understandings of New France are correspondingly fractured. Still, they have been fruitful, and shed important light on the workings of the early modern empires.


    Speakers

    Catherine Desbarats

    Associate Professor
    Department of History and Classical Studies
    McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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