Upcoming Events at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Past Events Login

October 2019

  • Thursday, October 24th Internet Voting in Estonia, 2005-2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Internet voting in Estonia 2005-2019
    How Does It Work and Why Does 50% of the Population Vote Online?

    In 2005, Estonia was the first country in the world to offer universal remote internet voting in all national elections. Since then, the usage numbers have gradually grown in all e-enabled elections. A new milestone was reached in 2019 when close to 50% of all votes given were electronic. The lecture explores the uptake and usage patterns of internet voting, employing both survey and system log data on voter behavior. Specific attention is devoted to what drives usage growth given that every second vote in Estonia is now given online, but voter turnout has hardly changed over the course of 15 years of internet voting.

    Mihkel Solvak (PhD) is a senior research fellow in technology studies and head of institute at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies. His research interest include remote internet voting, electoral behavior, uptake and diffusion patterns of digital public services, data driven and machine learning enabled public services. He is affiliated with the Center of IT Impact Studies (CITIS), a research group that prototypes and builds digital public services for Estonian e-government.


    Speakers

    Mihkel Solvak, PhD
    Director, Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, University of Tartu, Estonia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th "Not in Our Town“ – a case study of civic/youth engagement against intolerance and radicalism in Slovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Ivan Chorvát is Associate Professor at the Department of Social Studies and Ethnology, Faculty of Arts, Matej Bel University in Banská Bystrica (Slovakia) and at the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, The University of Trnava (Slovakia). He studied Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Charles University in Prague, Society and Politics at the Central European University in Prague (Czech Republic), and completed his doctoral studies at The Institute for Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava (1998). His main areas of research include the sociology of family, tourism, leisure and consumption, and the study of sociological theory. I. Chorvát is the author of monographs Man – Father in the Contemporary Family (1999), Travel and Tourism in the Mirror of Time (2007), Leisure in Slovakia from a Sociological Perspective (2011), Consumption and the Consumer Society (2015) and co-editor of Family in Slovakia in Theory and Research (2015) and Leisure, Culture and Society: Czech Republic and Slovakia (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ivan Chorvat



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th – Saturday, October 26th Difference and Alterity: Critical Models in Modern Thought

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20192:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Saturday, October 26, 201910:00AM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Friday October 25

    2:00-2:15 Opening Remarks

    2:15-3:00
    Idit Dobbs-Weinstein, The Same Is the Different: Nature, Fortune, History in Machiavelli

    3:00-3:45
    Oleg Gelikman, The Quake of the Real: on the Ontology of Relation in Montaigne

    3:45-4:15 Coffee Break

    4:15-5:00
    Willi Goetschel, Writing Otherwise: Montaigne and La Boëtie

    5:00-5:45
    Warren Montag, “To Quit the Principles of Human Nature:” Locke’s Notion of the Inhuman

    Saturday October 26

    10:15-11:00
    Tracie Matysik, Substance as Contingency in the Young Karl Marx

    11:00-11:45
    Michael Rosenthal, On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Aesthetics to Make Sense of Immorality in Politics: Exempla, Thought-Images, and the Eichmann Trial

    12:00-1:30
    Lunch

    1:30-2:15 James McNaughton, Beckett’s Political Aesthetic

    2:15-3:00 David Suchoff, De-Colonizing Dialect: Beckett’s Palestinian and Irish Canines

    3:00-3:15
    Coffee Break

    3:15-4:00
    Omar Rivera, Resistance as Alterity in Decolonial Aesthetics

    4:00-4:45
    Amogh Sahu, Skepticism and the Philosophy of Difference

    5:00-5:30
    Open Discussion

    Sponsors

    Department of German Languages and Literatures

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 29th The Two Solitudes of Russia Abroad: The Exiled Intelligentsia and the Second World War in France

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk addresses the tensions which arose in the Russian emigre community in France during and after WWII. These tensions resulted from the divergent experiences and interpretations of the war by the Russian and Russian-Jewish cultural elites who had emigrated to France after the communist coup of 1917. Examining, on the basis of largely unpublished archival materials, attitudes toward Nazi Germany and the Vichy regime among exiled Russian-speaking writers and intellectuals, those who stayed in war-time France and those who took refuge in the United Stated, the talk will focus on Russian reactions to German and French anti-Semitic policies. The goal is to deepen our understanding of the precipitous decline of the Russian emigre cultural community, which thrived in interwar France, by exploring a taboo aspect of its final years, obfuscated in scholarly literature — namely, its fracturing along ethnic lines under the impact of the Holocaust. The talk will argue that traumatic war experience, including the manifest or perceived political attitudes of ethnic Russians in France, modified the cultural identity of the exiled Russian-Jewish intelligentsia, which had been the backbone of interwar Russian emigre cultural life, weakening its commitment to Russia Abroad and thereby accelerating the cultural community’s fragmentation and decline in France.

    Leonid Livak is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Centre for Jewish Studies, and an associated researcher at the Centre d’études des Mondes Russe, Caucasien & Centre-Européen (EHESS-Paris). He has published extensively on Russian-French and Russian-Jewish cultural history, and on Russian and transnational modernism. Among his books are: How It Was Done in Paris: Russian Emigre Literature and French Modernism (2003); Le Studio franco-russe (2005); Russian Emigres in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Interwar France (2010); The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination (2010); In Search of Russian Modernism (2018). As part of his current research project, “The Final Chapter of Russia Abroad,” he is writing the cultural history of the decline of the Russian emigre community in France.


    Speakers

    Leonid Livak
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMFather Madden Hall
    Carr Hall
    St. Michael’s College
    100 St. Joseph St.
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    Description

    “Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity”
    A conversation with Jacek Dukaj

    To RSVP, please email Prof. Aleksandra Swiecka at aleksandra.swiecka@utoronto.ca

    Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2019

  • Monday, November 4th The Ukrainian Bureau in London and Its Documents Related to the Holodomor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 4, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Wysocki will discuss the activity and archival heritage of the Ukrainian Bureau in London, which was established in 1931 with the aim of informing international opinion about the Ukrainians in Galicia, then part of Poland. Although the office was to exist for about two years, it continued to operate until the outbreak of World War Two. During its existence, the Ukrainian Bureau played a key role in the area of Ukrainian civic diplomacy and disseminating information on the situation in Ukraine, especially on the Holodomor.

    Historian Roman Wysocki is a lecturer at the Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on Polish-Ukrainian relations between the two world wars and on Ukrainians and Belarusians in Poland. His areas of interest include Ukrainian political thought, Polish-Ukrainian history in the twentieth century, Ukrainian emigrants in Poland, reactions to the Holodomor, and the Orthodox Church in Poland.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Roman Wysocki
    Speaker
    A lecturer at the Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland.

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Konstanty Reinert Chair of Polish Studies, Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th The Battlegrounds of Ukraine: Ongoing Revolution(s) in Identity, Post-Industrialism, and Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Mychailo Wynnyckyj
    Associate Professor of the Department of Sociology and Kyiv-Mohyla Business School, Director of the Doctoral School, National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th The newest wave of Russian emigration and its implications for Russia and the West

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Sergei Erofeev is currently a lecturer at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He has been involved in the internationalization of universities in Russia since the early 1990s. Previously, Dr. Erofeev served as a vice rector for international affairs at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, the dean of international programs at the European University at Saint Petersburg, and the director of the Center for Sociology of Culture at Kazan Federal University in Russia. He has also been a Hubert H. Humphrey fellow at the University of Washington. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Erofeev was a concert pianist, and has worked in the area of the sociology of the arts.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sergei Erofeev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Dangerous Liaisons: The Forbidden Love Affairs of French Prisoners of War and German Women in the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Tens of thousands of French prisoners of war (POWs) and German women had to stand trial in Nazi Germany for having engaged in a love relation with each other. The prisoner and the woman both faced severe punishment, and the woman had to suffer public shaming. What do the trials reveal about Franco-German relations in World War II? How did French POWs and German women perceive each other? How did German village and factory communities react to these international love relations? Why did the relations never become part of memory in either country? The project examines Franco-German collaboration and international relations from a new perspective grounded in the everyday life experience in wartime Nazi Germany.

    Raffael Scheck is Katz Distinguished Teaching Professor of Modern European History at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. He has published five books and 40 articles on German right-wing politics and on French colonial prisoners of war. His book on the German army massacres of black French prisoners in 1940 was translated into French and German. He has completed a book manuscript on forbidden love relations between western prisoners of war and German women in World War II and is beginning to write a book on the German campaign in the West in 1940.


    Speakers

    Raffael Scheck
    Colby College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 25th Central Europe's Repeating Troubles with Great Powers: the Role of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    China is a new great power entering a geopolitically tense region of Central Europe, where Russia, Western Europe, and the U.S. have competed throughout the 20th century for influence. China benefitted from growing scepticism towards the West after the 2008 crisis and was looked upon by many in the region as an alternative. At the same time, with most of the economic expectations of China remaining unfulfilled, the frustration of China has grown as well, aided also by the different outlooks of Communism and the general suspicions of great powers in the region. The presentation will look into political, economic, and social aspects of China-Central Europe relations and its implications for Europe, in general, to show that even though China has presented new challenges, it is unlikely to compete on equal footing with the established great powers in the region.

    Richard Q. Turcsányi is a Key Researcher at Palacky University Olomouc, Assistant Professor at Mendel University in Brno, and Program Director at the Central European Institute of Asian Studies (www.ceias.eu). He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations and further degrees in economy and political science. In past, he conducted long-term study and research stays at the University of Toronto, Peking University, National Chengchi University in Taipei, and the European Institute for Asian Studies in Brussels. His research interests include Chinese foreign policy, relations between China and (Central and Eastern) Europe, and international relations of Asia-Pacific.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Richard Turcsanyi


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    European Studies Students' Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Empire’s Legacy: Roots of the Far Right in Contemporary France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk introduces Empire’s Legacy (Oxford University Press, forthcoming), which challenges the claim that globalization and its losers explain right-wing populism today. In France, a potential born of older relations between colonizers and colonized has revitalized the party of Jean-Marie and Marine Le Pen. Starting with the French conquest of Algeria in 1830, Empire’s Legacy analyzes shifting settler identities under colonialism; and their place, nature, and transmission in the postcolonial Fifth Republic. Drawing on archival research, subject interviews, and electoral surveys, Empire’s Legacy charts an interdisciplinary course between history, sociology, political science, and discourse analysis. It also combines analysis at the local, national, and international levels. This shows the importance of ethnic cleavages, social milieus, government probity, and political responses. As such, Empire’s Legacy has implications for other party families, social movements, and subaltern politics.

     

    John Veugelers is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. He has written widely on the far right, immigration politics, social movements, and voluntary associations in Canada, France, and Italy. His articles have appeared in a range of scholarly journals that includes: Ethnic and Racial Studies, International Sociology, British Journal of Sociology, Comparative European Politics, European Journal of Political Research, Sociological Quarterly, Current Sociology, Acta Sociologica, and West European Politics. A recipient of awards for outstanding teaching at the University of Toronto, he has been a visiting professor at universities in Europe, Asia, and Africa; and a visiting fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France.

     


    Speakers

    John Veugelers
    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2019

  • Saturday, December 7th Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, December 7, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    As the anthropologist Rubie S. Watson once asked, “How do people remember events that ‘did not occur’? How do people ‘remember what is meant to be forgotten”? This lecture will explore the decade between 1945 and 1955, when the Holodomor was “first remembered”. It will examine the active construction and transmission of a social memory of the Terror-Famine among post-war refugees from the Soviet Union. It will also consider how remembrance of the Holodomor shaped and, in turn, was shaped by the emerging Cold War.

    After 1945, the Holodomor became part of making the case in the West for legal recognition and assistance for refugees fleeing Communism. As the Cold War escalated, famine survivors were increasingly called on as witnesses in a fierce political debate in the U.S. about the nature of the Soviet Union and U.S. policy towards the Soviet Union.

    Olga Andriewsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Trent University. She teaches and researches in the area of late imperial and Soviet history. She is the author of “Towards a Decentered History: The Study of the Holodomor and Ukrainian Historiography” (Contextualizing the Holodomor). She has also written numerous articles on identity and politics in late Imperial Russia. Her article “The Russian-Ukrainian Discourse and the Failure of the ‘Little Russian Solution’, 1782-1917” in Culture, Nation, Identity: The Ukrainian-Russian Encounter, 1600-1945 was awarded the AAUS prize for best academic article in 2004.


    Speakers

    Olga Andriewsky
    Associate Professor in the Department of History at Trent University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2020

  • Friday, January 10th The Czech Republic and Central-Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Velvet Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 10, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    MARK KRAMER is Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has taught as a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria, where he was the Panitza Distinguished Professor. Originally trained in mathematics at Stanford University, he was formerly an Academy Scholar in Harvard’s Academy of International and Area Studies and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He has written many books and articles on a wide range of topics, including Imposing Maintaining, and Tearing Open the Iron Curtain: East-Central Europe and the Cold War, 1945-1990, which was named by Foreign Policy as one of the ten best books published in the field of International Relations in 2014, and he has long served as editor of Harvard’s Cold War Studies Book Series and of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a prize-winning quarterly journal published by MIT Press. His latest book, on the Russian Chechen wars of 1994-1996 and 1999-2009, will be published in 2020.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Mark Kramer
    Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Wednesday, February 12th Political correctness and language of the media – before 1989 and nowadays

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Address: Alumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400.

    Elena Krejčová is Associate Professor at the Department of Slavic studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia). She studied Czech Studies, Bulgarian Studies, English and American Studies at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski (Bulgaria), and completed her doctoral studies at Masaryk university in Brno (1999). Her main areas of research include political linguistics, sociolinguistics, contrastive linguistics of Slavic languages, theory of translation. Elena Krejčová is the author of monographs Slavonic Babylon (2016), Quo Vadis, Philologia? (2017), The Power of Public Speech (2017) and author of dictionaries Czech- Bulgarian Law Dictionary (2015) and Czech-Bulgarian Specialized Dictionary of Legal, Economic and Socio-political Terminology (2016).

    Political correctness as a way of forming the principles of communication and in particular the verbal behaviour is very strongly connected with the period of totalitarianism in the countries of the former socialist block (including Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.). The idea of “right” and “wrong”, i.e. unacceptable speaking, thinking, behavior that is treated as a crime, the battle of ideas and ideologies is well presented in media as a tool of propaganda before 1989, this close relation between communication and political systems was a part of the state policy. What happened after 1989 – did we finally gain freedom of speech? Media after the “Velvet revolution” changed a lot – from the feeling of freedom with no restrictions that ended up to vulgarization of language to the new requirements in society to treat people without prejudice and discrimination.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Elena Krejčová
    Associate professor, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia)



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