European Affairs Undergraduate Program

Undergraduate studies of Europe, Russia & Eurasia

Seven EU flags on flag polls outside a building

Are you an undergraduate student interested in the history, culture, politics, languages, and geography of Europe, Russia, and Eurasia? 

Do you want to understand the role of the European Union? Would you like to join a tight-knit academy community with opportunities for hands-on experiences, small class sizes, international opportunities, and language learning? Enhance your undergraduate experience with European Affairs – offered either as a Major or a Minor program.

Why study European Affairs?

Access resources and activities
Integrated with CERES and the Munk School
Join a small and vibrant community
A boutique program with only 100 students
Gain valuable language skills
European languages to advance careers or graduate studies
Get an interdisciplinary education
Courses from twelve departments across U of T
I have the privilege of connecting with faculty in a meaningful ways and attending events which are tailored to my program and interests
- Arina Dmitrenko, alumnus
I learned to observe European affairs through a variety of lenses and made friends within the tight-knit community
- Ericsson Sing, alumna

European Affairs Major Program

Degree requirements

Most students apply for the European Affairs Major program in the first or second year of their undergraduate degree.

You must complete 7.0 credits, including at least 2.0 credits at the 300+ level, 0.5 of which must be at the 400-level. The distribution is as follows:

  • A two-year progressive sequence of courses in a single language totaling 2.0 credits. Specific language choices are listed below.
  • An additional 1.0 credit in the single language already chosen, or 1.0 credit in non-language courses related to your chosen language of study. Variations on this can be discussed with the Program Coordinator.
  • 2.0 credits in the required core courses: 1.0 credit offered by the Departments of History (EUR200Y1) and 1.0 credit from POL219H1, POL324H1, POL358H1, POL359Y1, POL359H1, POL387H1,  or any POL course with European content approved by the Program Coordinator
  • EUR498H1 – Special Topics in European Studies, worth 0.5 credit.
  • The remaining 1.5 credits in elective courses chosen from a list of eligible electives or any course with European content approved by the Program Coordinator.
Advising notes
  • Students are expected to consult with the Program Coordinator for assistance with and advice on course selection.
  • After consultation with the Program Coordinator, exceptions may be made in certain cases regarding the sequence of language courses based on prior, documented, exposure to the language in question.
  • Some of the courses listed on the Calendar may have prerequisites; some may be offered in alternate years.
1st year

1.0 credit from one the following languages:

  • Estonian: EST100H1 and EST101H1
  • Finnish: FIN100H1 and FIN110H1
  • French: FSL100H1, FSL102H1/FSL120H1 and FSL122H1
  • German: GER100Y1
  • Hungarian: HUN100Y1
  • Italian: ITA100Y1
  • Modern Greek: MGR100H1 and MGR101H1
  • Portuguese: PRT100Y1
  • Russian: SLA100H1 and SLA101H1
  • Czech: SLA105Y1
  • Polish: SLA106Y1/(SLA106H1 and SLA116H1)
  • Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian: SLA107Y1
  • Ukrainian: SLA108Y1
  • Macedonian: SLA109Y1
  • Spanish: SPA100Y1
2nd year
  • EUR200Y1
  • 1.0 credit from one of the following languages:
    • Estonian: EST200H1 and EST201H1
    • Finnish: FIN200H1 and FIN210H1
    • French: FSL220H1 and FSL222H1
    • German: GER200Y1/GER300Y1/(GER370H1 and GER372H1)
    • Hungarian: HUN200Y1
    • Italian: ITA250Y1
    • Modern Greek: MGR245Y1
    • Portuguese: PRT220Y1
    • Czech: SLA204Y1
    • Polish: SLA206H1 and SLA207H1
    • Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian: SLA257H1 and SLA277H1
    • Ukrainian: SLA208Y1
    • Macedonian: SLA209H1
    • Russian: SLA220Y1
    • Spanish: SPA220Y1
3rd year
  • POL324H1, POL358H1, POL359Y1, POL359H1, POL387H1,  or any POL course with European content approved by the Program Coordinator.
  • 1.0 credit from one of the following languages, or 1.0 credit in non-language courses related to your chosen language of study, selected in consultation with the Program Coordinator:
    • Estonian: EST300Y1
    • Finnish: FIN300H1 and FIN340H1
    • French: FSL321Y1/FSL421Y1/(FSL442H1 and FSL443H1)
    • German: GER300Y1/(GER370H1 and GER372H1)/GER400H1
    • Hungarian: HUN310Y1
    • Italian: ITA350Y1
    • Modern Greek: MGR300H1 and MGR301H1
    • Portuguese: PRT320Y1/PRT322H1/PRT364H1/PRT420H1
    • Czech: 1.0 credit can be fulfilled through an independent study or another course approved in joint consultation with CERES and Slavic undergraduate coordinators. Please consult with CERES and Slavic departments to get approval.
    • Polish: SLA306H1 and SLA336H1
    • Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian: SLA337H1, and additional 0.5 credit can be fulfilled through an independent study or another course approved in joint consultation with CERES and Slavic undergraduate coordinators. Please consult with CERES and Slavic departments to get approval.
    • Ukrainian: SLA308Y1
    • Russian: SLA320Y1/SLA321H1
    • Spanish: SPA320Y1/SPA323H1/(SPA420H1 and SPA421H1)
4th year
  • EUR498H1
  • Remaining courses to be selected from the list of eligible electives below. The most up-to date list of electives is on the program website. Students may also petition the Program Coordinator to take other courses in the calendar as electives, provided they have substantial European and/or Eurasian content.
Courses and room assignments

Courses and room assignments are listed in the Timetable Builder.

European Affairs Minor Program

Degree requirements

European Affairs Studies minors must complete 4.0 credits with at least one 300- or 400-level credit:

  • 2.0 credits in the required core courses: 1.0 credit offered by the Departments of History (EUR200Y1) and 1.0 credit from POL219H1, POL324H1, POL358H1, POL359Y1, POL359H1, POL387H1, or any POL course with European content
  • Two full credits in eligible elective courses listed in the European Affairs Major
Courses and room assignments

Courses and room assignments are listed in the Timetable Builder

Enrolment & prerequisites

How to apply

Apply for the European Affairs Major and European Affairs Minor programs through:

* Please note that both programs are Type 2: limited programs

Prerequisites
  • To apply for both the Major and Minor programs, you must have completed 4.0 credits, preferably with at least 1.0 credits from History or Political Science
  • For the major program only, you must have completed 1.0 credits from either a 100-, 200-, or 300-level language course with a final grade of 65% in one of the following languages: Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian; Czech; Estonian; Finnish; French; German; Hungarian; Italian; Modern Greek; Polish; Portuguese; Russian; Spanish; Ukrainian; or Yiddish
  • Students are also invited to design an individual language learning plan in consultation with the Program and Academic Coordinators

Financial aid

Undergraduate scholarships in Hungarian Studies
  • Békássy-Tassonyi Award in Hungarian Studies: awarded to undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts and Science taking Hungarian related courses in CERES to assist with travel to Hungary to further a program of study, internship, research or exchange. Academic merit will also be considered.
  • Ferenc Harcsar Memorial Fund: awarded to the top student in the Hungarian history class.
  • Dr. Zoltan Mester Scholarship: established through the generous donations from the family and friends of Zoltan Mester; awarded to students of Hungarian Studies on the basis of need and ability.
  • Husky Energy Hungarian Student Exchange Program: established through a generous donation from Husky Energy Inc. to support the travel and tuition costs of undergraduate and/or graduate students in the Hungarian Studies Program wishing to take advantage of exchange and/or study abroad opportunities. Academic merit and financial need will be considered.
  • Karoly Szel Undergraduate Scholarship in Hungarian Studies: established by Marcella Szel and supported through donations of friends; awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of academic merit and financial need.
  • Rakoczi Prize in Hungarian: established by the Rakoczi Foundation; awarded to outstanding students in any year, either full-time or part-time, who have achieved an A average and who obtain the highest standing in the Hungarian course(s). 
  • Szechenyi Society Inc. Undergraduate Scholarships in Hungarian Studies: established through a generous donation from the Széchenyi Society Inc.; awarded to students in the Hungarian Studies Program on the basis of financial need and academic merit.
Funds for undergraduate students from the Czech Republic
  • Maria and George Hanus Scholarship: awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.
  • Ladislav and Maria Kroupa Scholarship: awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto. The student must be registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science.
  • Martina and Milan Plch Scholarship in Czech Studies: awarded to an undergraduate student coming from the Czech Republic to take part in an established exchange program between a Czech University and the University of Toronto in the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies.
  • Students interested in these scholarships must be formally nominated by either Charles University or Masaryk University to take part in an exchange at the University of Toronto.

FAQs

I am considering applying to European Affairs program. What makes it so special?

It’s a boutique program with tailored degree requirements based on your needs and interests. There are about 100 students enrolled in the major and minor. We offer:

  • a small interactive class setting
  • an Interdisciplinary approach
  • deep knowledge of European culture, history, and politics
  • in-depth European language study
  • vibrant student union
  • access to CERES and Munk School resources and activities
  • great pathway to an academic or professional career in Canada or abroad
I am a program student. How do I get involved in the community?

Join ESSA! ESSA — the European Studies Students’ Association — is a great way to get involved and meet people. It publishes Messages in the Media, an annual journal that studies the media of Europe and is funded by CERES. ESSA also offers a variety of other activities — career talks, socials, movie nights and lectures.

What is the language requirement for the program major? 

Language competence is at the center of the European Affairs program. Students can start their foreign language training in any year depending on their placement by the respective department. The first two years they take progressive sequence of courses in a single European language totaling 2.0 credits. Then they can choose to either take an additional 1.0 credit in the single language already chosen, or 1.0 credit in non-language courses related to the same language. For example, they can start with ITA100Y1 and ITA250Y1 in their first and second year respectively. In their third year, they can either take ITA350Y Language Practice or tale 1 credit from courses related to Italian culture such as ITA340H Italian Neorealist Cinema. Variations on this can be discussed with the Program Coordinator.

Are all the elective courses listed on this website?

No. The selection of courses varies from year to year. Please check the list of courses offered at relevant departments. Students can take courses in any department with the approval of the instructor and the undergraduate coordinator, provided that the student submits course work related to Europe. Courses and room assignments are listed in the Timetable Builder.

What are opportunities for international experiential learning?
What are the career pathways for European Affairs students?

Recent graduates have gone on to successful careers in academia, the federal and provincial governments, international NGOs, and the private sector. Many students decide to continue studying the region on a graduate level at CERES or other comparable institutions. With a strong language skills that the program offers the European Affairs graduates find themselves working in various government, non-government organizations as well as in a private sector. Use the opportunity to get involved in the ESSA activities such editing or writing for the journal Messages in the Media, attend conferences and events at CERES and the Munk School etc. — the opportunities for networking are limitless.

The Career Centre is dedicated to helping students and recent alumni (up to 2 years) map out the career path best suited for them and putting them in touch with work opportunities. A personalized, student-centred web site provides 24-hour access to thousands of part-time, summer, full-time employment and volunteer listings. The Centre’s Career Resource Library contains valuable information on career development, further education and employment. The Career Centre is located in the Koffler Student Services Centre.

The EU flag

One of the highlights of the program is The European Studies Students’ Association (ESSA) — a great way to get involved and meet people. ESSA offers a variety of activities throughout  the year and publishes an annual journal Messages in the Media.

Areas of focus - Victor Dementiev/Unsplash

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE EUROPEAN AFFAIRS UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM?

TANYAA MEHTA

CERES Events and Program Coordinator

 

PROFESSOR ROBERT AUSTIN

Undergraduate Academic Coordinator