Major

To complete a major program in Peace, Conflict and Justice, students must take 7.5 FCEs. These 7.5 FCEs are categorized in three clusters as listed below. Each course requirement is individual and cannot be used more than once.  A course taken on a CR/NCR basis may not be used to satisfy program requirements.

Students, after their first year in the program, are strongly encouraged to fill out a POS (program of study) form and submit it to both the director and the program administrator for approval. Please consult the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts and Science Annual Calendar before creating your POS form.

Cluster 1

HIS103Y1 or ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1; PSY100Y1 (or PSY100H1 + PSY220H1) or SOC101Y1 ( or SOC102H1 + SOC103H1 or SOC100H1 + SOC150H1); POL208Y1.

Except for POL208Y1, substitutions will be considered for other introductory courses in relevant disciplines, based on a student’s rationale and on approval of the program director.

Cluster 2

PCJ260Y1; PCJ360H1; PCJ362H1 or PCJ363H1; PCJ460H1

Cluster 3

Consists of 2.0 FCE of complementary courses  on the approval of the director. At least 1.0 FCE must be at the 300+ series level.

The following courses have been pre-approved:

ECO230Y1; GGR239H1; GGR439H1; HIS241H1; HIS242H1; HIS300H1; HIS343Y1; HIS344Y1; HIS377Y1; HIS401Y1; HIS412Y1; HIS445H1; HIS482Y1; HPS306H1; PHL278H1; PHL378H1; POL201Y1; POL304H1; POL310Y1; POL313Y1; POL321H1; POL323H1; POL326Y1; POL340Y1; POL346H1; POL417Y1; POL437Y1; POL454Y1; PSY220H1; PSY270H1; PSY322H1; RLG100Y1; SOC210Y1; SOC330Y1; SOC340Y1.  0.5 FCE from either MUN101H1 or MUN102H1 is also pre-approved.

Please note that H or Y designations may change each academic year.


Specialist

To complete a specialist program in Peace, Conflict and Justice, students must take 12 FCEs. These 12 courses are categorized in four clusters as listed below. Each course requirement is individual and cannot be used more than once. A course taken on a CR/NCR basis may not be used to satisfy program requirements.

Students, after their first year in the program, are strongly encouraged to fill out a POS (program of study) form and submit it to both the director and the program administrator for approval. Please consult the University of Toronto Faculty of Arts and Science Annual Calendar before creating your POS form.

Cluster 1

HIS103Y1 or ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1; PSY100Y1 (or PSY100H1 + PSY220H1) or SOC101Y1 ( or SOC102H1 + SOC103H1 or SOC100H1 + SOC150H1); POL208Y1.

Except for POL208Y1, substitutions will be considered for other introductory courses in relevant disciplines, based on a student’s rationale and on approval of the program director.

Cluster 2

PCJ260Y1; PCJ360H1; PCJ362H1 or PCJ363H1; PCJ460H1; PCJ461H1

Cluster 3

Consists of 3.0 FCEs from ONE of following alphabetized groups. At least one course must be at the 300+ series level. Courses from cluster 1 cannot be repeated in this cluster. Please note that H or Y designations may change each academic year.

Group A (History)

HIS103Y1, 106Y1, 202H1, 241H1, 242H1, 243H1, 244H1, 250Y1, 251Y1, 271Y1, 296Y1, 303Y1, 311Y1, 319H1, 325H1, 329H1, 334Y1, 338Y1, 343Y1, 344Y1, 347H1, 355Y1, 356H1, 359H1, 364H1, 370H1, 376H1, 377Y1, 386Y1, 390Y1, 401Y1, 405Y1, 407H1, 408Y1, 412Y1, 414H1, 415H1, 421Y1, 424Y1, 436Y1, 451H1, 453H1, 458Y1, 461H1, 473H1, 475H1, 480H1, 488H1, 491Y1, 492Y1, TRN421Y1, JHP435Y1, 440Y1, NMC278H1, 474H1

Group B (Political Science)

POL 108Y1, 201Y1, 242Y1, 301Y1, 304Y1, 305Y1, 312Y1, 313Y1, 321Y1, 323Y1, 324Y1, 326Y1, 330H1, 340Y1, 342H1, 343Y1, 345H1, 354Y1, 358Y1, 364H1, 370Y1, 405Y1, 412Y1, 416Y1, 417Y1, 419Y1, 422Y1, 428H1, 429Y1, 432H1, 442H1, 447Y1, 448H1, 459Y1, 463Y1, 464H1, 465H1, 467H1, 468H1, 476H1, 479H1, 480H1, 486H1, 487H1, JHP440Y1, JMC301Y1, NEW250Y1, NMC476H1, 477H1

Group C (Psychology)

PSY100Y1, 201H1, 210H1, 220H1, 270H1, 280H1, 300H1, 311H1, 312H1, 314H1, 320H1, 321H1, 322H1, 324H1, 326H1, 328H1, 331H1, 334H1, 370H1, 372H1, 420H1, 471H1, JLP374H1, 471H1

Group D (Geography & Environmental Studies)

ENV200Y1, 234Y1, 235Y1, GGR 107Y1, 124Y1, 203H1, 220Y1, 314H1, 331H1, 333H1, 338H1, 343H1, 368H1, 393H1, 398H0, 399Y0, 409H1, 415H1, 418H1, 435H1, 439H1, 452H1; 494H5, PHL 273H1, 373H1

Group E (Anthropology & Sociology)

ANT100Y1, 204Y1, 357H1, 358H1, 363Y1, 364Y1, 395Y0, 396Y0, 425H1, 426H1, 427H1, 440Y1, 448H1, 450H1, 452H1; SOC 205Y1, 210Y1, 212Y1, 213Y1, 215Y1, 220Y1, 250Y1, 301Y1, 306Y1, 312Y1, 320Y1, 330Y1, 336H1, 344Y1, 355Y1, 356Y1, 360Y1, 365Y1, 367Y1, 386Y1, RLG250H1, 333H1

Group F (Philosophy)

PHL232H1, 235H1, 240H1, 244H1, 247H1, 271H1, 273H1, 275H1, 317H1, 340H1, 341H1, 351H1, 357H1, 365H1, 370H1, 373H1, 375H1, 379H1, 380H1, 394H1, COG250Y1, JPP343H1

Cluster 4

Consists of 3.0 FCEs of complementary courses with either a disciplinary, regional or thematic focus relevant to Peace, Conflict and Justice, upon approval of the director. At least one course taken must be at the 300+ series level. Courses used in clusters 1 and 2 cannot be repeated in this cluster. Up to 1.0 Munk ONE credits are pre-approved to be used.

Disciplinary focus (must be a different focus from the discpline chosen in cluster 3)

3.0 FCEs from one of ANT, ECO, GGR and Environmental Studies (combined), HIS, HPS, PHL, POL, PSY, RLG, SOC.

Regional focus

3.0 FCEs on, for example, Canada, Southern Africa, the Middle East, or Latin America.

Thematic focus

3.0 FCEs on a topic such as, but not limited to, negotiation and conflict resolution, diplomatic history, gender and conflict, morality of war, quantitative analysis, group-identity conflict, economic development and conflict, or environmental change and conflict.


Core Courses

PCJ260Y1 - Introduction to Peace, Conflict and Justice

The course provides a basic survey of key issues in peace, conflict, and justice. It complements POL208Y1, the Political Science introduction to International Relations, by emphasising theory and research not covered or only lightly treated in that course, and by examining some POL208Y1 topics from alternative perspectives. In particular, PCJ260Y1 considers conflict within societies; it reviews in detail modern thinking on the causes of revolution, rebellion, insurgency, and ethnic conflict. The course draws on a wide range of disciplines, including socio-biology, anthropology, sociology, social-psychology, economics, and political science. The course also gives students a practical understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of current negotiation and conflict resolution theory.

Historical examples are used liberally for illustration of theoretical ideas. Students are also encouraged to develop a general knowledge of current events by participating in class debates about important social, national, and international conflicts in the modern world.

Taught by Professor Nancy Bertoldi (2017-2018)
2015-16 syllabus – PCJ260Y1
 

PCJ360H1 - Topics in Peace and Conflict

An in-depth exploration of selected issues introduced in PCJ260Y1. Topics may include: negotiation theory; ethnic and group-identity conflict; feminist perspectives on peace and war; mathematical modelling of arms races and war; decision-making theory and conflict; environmental change and conflict; and traditional perspectives on statecraft.

Taught by Professor Carmen Cheung (2017-2018)
2015-16 syllabus – PCJ360H1F

PCJ362H1 - Service Learning

In cooperation with the Center for Community Partnerships, students will be given a service learning placement that aligns with their academic interests. These placements will happen in community organizations and other organizations based in the GTA. Class will meet once a week and students will serve up to 10 hours total per week in their placements. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.

Taught by Dr. Dylan Clark (2017-2018)

PCJ363H1 - Study Abroad Module

Using Blackboard, students will meet once a week online in a virtual class that will assign readings, provide writing assignments, and culminate in a group assignment that situates the training from the PCJ program within the new materials that each student is experiencing in their new university. Each student will have to reflect on how their thinking has changed, what they will do with their new perspectives when they come back to U of T, and how this affects their thinking about peace, conflict, and justice.

Taught by Dr. Dylan Clark (2017-2018)

PCJ460H1 & PCJ461H1- Causes of War and Peace

A colloquium (fall term) and research seminar (winter term) on security ontology and various meanings of security. Topics to be considered include planetary, ecospheric, state, societal, and human security.

Taught by Dr. Mark Kersten (2017-2018)
2015-16 syllabus – PCJ460H1F
2015-16 syllabus – PCJ461H1S

ELECTIVE COURSE : PCJ499H1/PCJ499Y1 - Peace and Conflict Study Independent Studies Course

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore topics not covered in the curriculum, or to develop a more detailed focus on topics covered. Approval of the program director is required. The student must obtain written agreement of the instructor who will supervise the independent study, submit the proposal to and obtain approval from the director and program administrator, who will then add the student to the course.

Applications are due August 23, 2017.

PCJ499H1 proposal


Experiential Learning

The Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice understands that in order for students to leverage the academic training they obtain from the program, they must also have direct exposure to these topics.  To that end, beginning in academic year 2016-2017, students enrolling in a PCJ Program of Study (POS) will have an enroll in an experiential learning course in their third year. They will choose between two “tracks”: service learning or study abroad.

 
*Alternative options can be arranged on a case-by-case basis for those unable to fulfill this requirement.

Service Learning:

Students who select service learning will enroll in PCJ362H1S.  They will be matched with a local host organization, spending several hours on site and an additional two hours in the classroom, per week.   Students will contribute ideas and practices learned from the PCJ curriculum to the organization, and bring their experiences back into the classroom to compare with peers.  Through readings, assignments, and discussion, the course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and engage in questions of how such structures are needed to resolve conflict, broker peace, and achieve justice.

The Trudeau Centre is working with existing partner organizations and joining with the Centre for Community Partnerships to create new service learning opportunities.  While opportunities vary, and are subject to change, we strive to place students in organizations that align with their academic interests.  We look for organizations that focus on:

  1. Accessibility services
  2. Conflict resolution training
  3. Environment/conservation
  4. Health
  5. Indigenous rights
  6. Legal assistance
  7. Minorities and multiculturalism
  8. Refugees and immigration
  9. Social justice advocacy (religious or secular)
  10. Homelessness/employment services
  11. Women’s issues
  12. Youth issues

If you work for an organization that is interested in partnering us, please send an email to: pcj.program@utoronto.ca

Study Abroad:

Students who select study abroad will engage in a traditional international exchange through the Centre for International Experience, but with the added requirement of completing a distance-learning course: PCJ363H1S.

Using Blackboard, students will meet once a week online in a virtual class that will assign readings, provide writing assignments, and culminate in a group assignment that situates the training from the PCJ program within the new materials that each student is experiencing in their new university.  Each student will have to reflect on how their thinking has changed, what they will do with their new perspectives when they come back to U of T, and how this affects their thinking about peace, conflict, and justice.


Admissions

The program seeks students with a variety of different experiences and qualifications.

While we welcome students with diverse experiences, this is a limited enrolment program that can only accommodate a limited number of students. A number of criteria will inform your admission decision. Due to the limited enrolment nature of this program, students are strongly advised to keep their options open and consider other programs as well.

To apply, you must have completed 4.0 FCE.

While it is NOT a prerequisite for program admission, students in their first year who are interested in the program in Peace, Conflict and Justice are advised to take three introductory courses in History, Economics, Psychology, Sociology and/or International Relations (courses listed in cluster 1 for the major and specialist).

Application Instructions

Step 1: Online application and supplementary documents

Students may request a Peace, Conflict and Justice subjectPOSt from the Faculty of Arts & Science’s website. Students may choose to request a major program and/or specialist program.

After choosing either a major or specialist subject POSt, you will be prompted to:

  1. Write a 500-word essay answering one of the following:
    • What is peace? Justify your response with a real-world example.
    • Tell us about a present day conflict and propose a solution to end it.  It your solution just and why (or why not)?
  2. Upload a writing sample (essay) from this past year in university, in PDF format. Max of 10 pages.
  3. Upload a resume in PDF format.

We recommend having the supplementary documents prepared in advance of submitting your subjectPOSt application request on the website. Please do NOT include any spaces in your filenames as this will result in invalid characters.

Step 2: Interview Process

Not all students will be invited for an interview. If you are selected, you will receive an email with interview dates and times. Arrangements will be made for those who are unable to come in for an interview. During the first request period, interviews typically occur late June, and during the second request period, in early September.

Step 3: Results

Students will be notified of their results by the date(s) specified on the Faculty of Arts & Science’s subjectPOSt website. Some students may be placed on a waitlist; however, this does not guarantee admission into the program. Students who are not admitted into the program during the first round cannot reapply during the second round.

Step 4: Registration

Once invited to the program, students are accountable for accepting the invitation on ROSI. Students admitted into the program have guaranteed entry into our core courses.


Documents

POS Form Instructions

  1. Complete every section of the form. The program can only approve complete programs of study, and not individual course substitution requests. We need to understand the context in which you are making the request including how the requested courses are linked together.  Even if you haven’t taken a course yet, we need to know what your plans are.
  2. Make sure each section fulfills the required credit amounts. If cluster three requires 2.0 FCE, please ensure your requested courses (preapproved and/or substitution) add up to the required number of credits.
  3. Include rationale for all requested substitutions. Please be concise and to the point.  We need to know why you want to take the course, and how it fits into your academic objectives.   For example, if you are interested in a particular aspect gender equality, please explain how the requested courses fit into that, and how that theme connects to PCJ.
  4. Please send completed POS forms to pcj.program@utoronto.ca

POS Submission Deadlines

POS forms will only be reviewed on the following dates.  Please submit your form prior to each date.  Further dates will be announced in April 2018.

Deadline to submit to pcj.program@utoronto.ca PCJ will respond on this date
September 12, 1017 September 19, 2017
October 27, 2017 November 3, 2017
January 9, 2018 January 16, 2018
February 12, 2018 February 20, 2018
March 6, 2018 March 13, 2018

POS Forms

POS form – major

POS form – specialist

Students admitted prior to June 2016:

POS form – major

POS form – specialist


Frequently Asked Questions

I’m a first-year student interested in PCJ, but I didn’t take HIS103Y1 or ECO100Y1 or ECO105Y1; PSY100H1 + PSY220H1 ; SOC101Y1; POL208Y1 this year. Can I still apply to the subject POSt?

Yes. You can apply to a PCJ major/specialist subject POSt even without any of these courses. They are program requirements and NOT admission requirements; therefore, as long as you have 4.0 FCE in any subject and complete these courses before you graduate, you are eligible to apply.

What’s a POS form?

A POS form is short for a “program of study” form. The form helps you design your major/specialist program and can be downloaded from the “documents” section. Students are encouraged to fill out the appropriate form and email it to the program administrator and director after completing their first year in the program.

Why do I need to make sure I have an updated POS form?

The nature of the program is such that you are to take courses that are complementary so that you get a more focused understanding of peace, conflict and justice as it relates to your own interests. If you register for courses without approval, there is no guarantee that they will be accepted as necessary credits to graduate. In this instance, you may be required to take additional courses. It is important to the integrity of the program that you take courses that fit the scope of the program, and to obtain approval.

What is meant by complementary courses?

You are encouraged to design a program of study that will allow you to apply PCJ themes to your own interests. Courses that are complementary are ones that relate to a certain issue or topic you would like to focus on in peace, conflict and justice. For instance, if you were interested in global health in relation to peace, conflict and justice, courses that are complementary are: AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa, issues in Global Health, etc. Courses that are not complementary would be Trade in China and AIDS and Sub-Saharan Africa.

Your rationale for the courses you have chosen for your program of study is what is crucial to having your program of study approved.

Occasionally there are issues with complementary courses – typically this occurs with PCJ majors who are enrolled in another major and are using one course as a program requirement for two programs. If you are a PCJ major intending to graduate soon, you are encouraged to check with your registrar to make sure you are satisfying your degree requirements.

The requirements of the program are clear and exceptions will not be made for those students who want to graduate but do not have complementary courses.

Can a language course be a complementary course?

While knowledge of a language other than English can be very valuable to your program of study and future studies, language credits will not satisfy any of your program requirements. Language courses do not provide substantive information relevant to PCJ program themes.

Can I my transfer credits from another university to fulfill my core course requirements?

No PCJ course can be substituted with a course from another university.


Events

Check back soon for more events.

Support the Centre

support the growth for study in peace, conflict and justice

Donate Now

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.