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Courses

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What are the course options for an MA in European & Eurasian Studies?

There are three required courses, and many options including electives offered directly through CEES, jointly with CEES, and directly through other departments. 

Required courses

Gateway Proseminar in European and Eurasian Studies (ERE2001H1F)

This course is required during first year

This course will explore the major events that have shaped European politics since Age of Absolutism in Europe.  We will focus in particular on the rise of mass politics, end of monarchical rule, and how people’s empowerment brought both democracy in some cases but extreme violence and terror in others.  How did the mass public enter the political sphere?  What types of democratic/autocratic institutions emerged during this process? Why, in some cases such as France and Russia, was mass inclusion associated with so much violence? How has the shifting nature of great power politics affected the evolution of democracy and autocracy over the last two centuries? Finally, what has been the role of the individual as opposed to more impersonal structural forces in shaping European history?

Mondays 10 am – 12 pm
Location: Scheyball Room, Room 14352, 14th Floor, John P. Robarts Library Building
Instructor:  Lucan Way
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

Core Interdisciplinary Research Seminar (ERE2000Y1)

This course is required during first year

This course will provide an overview of qualitative methods aimed at providing students with the tools for writing the Major Research Paper (MRP).  The course consists of a few formal classes dealing largely with methods and methodology. The remaining classes will be a mix of one on one consultations and attending talks at the Munk School to better understand approaches to research. Students who plan to include human subjects in their research should attend a special seminar explaining the submission process. Details on these workshops will be available in January.

Mondays 10 am - 12 pm
Location: Scheyball Room, Room 14352, 14th Floor, John P. Robarts Library Building
Instructor: Edward Schatz, Robert Austin

Term: starts in the Spring semester, continues into second year
Credit: 1.0

International Internship (ERE1165H1)

This requirement can be completed in the spring or summer terms

Learn more about our internship and exchange programs. 

Elective courses offered through CEES

Topics in Ukraine: Ukrainian History and Politics (ERE1195HF)

On 24 February 2022 Russia attacked Ukraine. How did we get there? This course will explore the complex relationship between Ukraine, Russia, and the West on the eve of Russia’s war in Ukraine. We will cover Ukraine’s pre-Soviet, Soviet, and post-Soviet history, with special attention to the country’s current political, social, and cultural issues, including the legacies of the past in post-1991 Ukraine, corruption and the ambitious anti-corruption reforms, the power of oligarchs, the role of mass civic protests such as Euromaidan, Ukraine’s new cultural achievements, decommunization, post-Soviet urbanism, and the shaping of an inclusive civic identity in the wake of the Russian invasion. The course will also provide students with tools for verifying information in the fast-moving context of war. Finally, students will be asked to think about and develop postwar scenarios.

Wednesdays 2-4 pm
Location: Scheybal Seminar Room, 14th Floor of Robarts Library
Instructor:  TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

The Tobacco Industry Playbook (GLA2068HF)

*This course is offered jointly with MGA. It is open to MA CEES and MGA students only.

Description: This course provides students with an opportunity to learn about and reflect on the continuously evolving tobacco industry playbook. The course will begin   with an overview of the industry (e.g. key products, harms, figures, and players), before delving into its history. This will include the role of European settlers in colonizing and industrializing tobacco, the emergence of the industry in the US and Europe in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the intricate relationship between the industry and the two world wars (including post-WWII reconstruction in Europe), and the consolidation and entrenchment of the industry into Big Tobacco (i.e. Philip Morris International, British American Tobacco, and Imperial Brands – all headquartered in Europe, and Japan Tobacco International). After looking into research methodologies, the course will then explore the industry’s main business and political strategies and tactics overtime, with a particular focus on Europe and Eurasia. These notably include producing and distributing addictive products (e.g. sales and marketing strategies, tobacco product supply chains), controlling information (e.g. concealing evidence of harms, funding research and influencing media to sow doubt and push certain narratives), undermining policy and lack of government capacity in particular in LMICs (i.e. through direct lobbying and allies), and rebranding itself as the solution to problems it created, e.g. to smoking with vaping, and to illicit trade with anti-illicit trade initiatives. Key case studies will include China (the world’s largest cigarette producer) and Russia and Ukraine, with an exploration of how Big Tobacco captured post-Soviet Union markets through smuggling, how Ukraine long served as a smuggling hub for Big Tobacco companies, and how those companies responded to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. We will then explore how the tobacco industry playbook has been replicated in other industries, and discuss implications for research, policy, and practice.

Thursdays: 1:00 - 3:00 pm 
Location:
Scheybal Seminar Room, 14th Floor of Robarts Library
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5 

The E.U., Why, How, and Where Next? (GLA2097HF)

*This course is offered jointly with MGA. It is open to MA CEES and MGA students only.

Description: The aim of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of how and why the EU came into existence, how it became a world power, how it takes decisions and why the United Kingdom first hesitated to join, then joined and subsequently - having spent fifty years reforming the EU in its own image – chose to leave again. A glimpse into future scenarios will look at the potential impact of this development, particularly with regard to relations between the EU and North America. Through a series of lectures, student research presentations, film showings and discussions with visiting speakers, course participants will be encouraged to ask questions and seek answers to the major strategic implications of the EU’s emergence and its role in the world today.

Thursdays 10 am - 12 pm
Location: Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.5

Topics in European and Eurasian Studies: Russian disinformation campaigns: How do they work, what makes them a threat, how can we counter them? ERE1180HF

** This is an intensive workshop. 3 hour sessions will be held on October 21, 22, 24 and 25   The workshop is worth .25 credits.

Russian disinformation campaigns: How do they work, what makes them a threat, how can we counter them?

The Kremlin has a long tradition of disinformation campaigns. After a brief period following the dissolution of the USSR, the Kremlin renewed its information aggression during and after the Revolution of Dignity in Ukraine, and the annexation of Crimea. The “most amazing information warfare blitzkrieg we have ever seen” has developed into a long war of attrition in the information space that targets hundreds of millions of people in dozens of countries.

This course will discuss the tactics and techniques of Russian disinformation campaigns; their aims and objectives; their successes. It will introduce students to the main topics and goals of the Kremlin’s information aggression, and to the ecosystem helping its spread.

Finally, we will discuss the possible countermeasures against disinformation – be it already implemented best practices, or ideas for new measures.

October 21, 22, 24 and 25  4:00-7:00 pm 
Location: Scheybal Seminar Room, 14th Floor of Robarts Library

Instructor: TBA
Term: Fall
Credit: 0.25

 

Policing, Crime, and Justice - Topics in Russian and Eurasian Studies (ERE1161HS) 

This course examines the responses of justice system institutions to concerns over crime and violence. Our substantive focus will be on how police and other justice institutions (such as prosecution and courts) respond to crime, violence, and insecurity, the outcomes of these interventions, and the views, hopes, concerns, and aspirations of individuals who experience them. We will also examine concerns and proposed solutions regarding police violence, bias, discrimination, and the effects of justice interventions for inequality and social cohesion, including the social upheavals and political disputes generated by high-profile events, current and past. Course readings will draw from a wide range of materials, ensuring that each week students engage with diverse perspectives, including social science research, legal texts, official documents, and journalistic accounts. Since the course is thematic, we will include research and examples from a range of countries, likely including France, Denmark, and Sweden, along with attention to the UK, and with occasional comparisons with North America. This discussion-based seminar requires students to complete all assigned readings before class and to engage in collective discussions weekly.

Day and time: Tuesdays, 12:00-2:00 pm
Location: Scheyball Room, Room 14352, 14th Floor, John P. Robarts Library Building
Instructor: Ron Levi
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

Topics in European and Eurasian Studies: Global War and Failed Peace in Afghanistan (ERE1180H1S)

** This is a six-week workshop, which meets once per week. The workshop is worth .25 credits.

This workshop will explore how the Doha Peace Process led to the dramatic collapse of Afghanistan's National Security Forces and its Government in 2021, paving the way for the return of the Taliban. The workshop will examine the oblivious and counterproductive role of the US and European stakeholders in setting up the framework for peace negotiations amidst the hostility towards their military presence from regional players such as Russia and Afghanistan's neighbors. 

The workshop will primarily focus on contextual analysis and relevant historic events linking the content to the situation in Afghanistan and the region today.

Wednesdays 4:00-6:00 pm (Jan 8,15,22,29, Feb 5 & 12)
Location: Scheybal Seminar Room, 14th Floor of Robarts Library

Instructor: TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.25

 

Independent Reading Course (ERE1999H1F)

Independent Reading Course offered in Fall

Hungary's 21st- Century Challenges - Independent Reading Course (ERE1997H1S)

OPEN BY APPLICATION ONLY:

This course is part of CEES's Hungarian Studies Program and is made possible with support from Tom and Irene Mihalik. As this is a limited enrollment course, with up to 8 students from years one and two, admission to the course is by application only.  Applications from all disciplines are welcome. Please note that priority goes to students who have not been to Hungary. The course includes a one-week research trip in Budapest to take place December 4-12, 2024 (costs for air travel up to 1100 CAD, transportation in Budapest, and hostel accommodation as well as most meals will be covered). Ground transport in Canada is not covered. Students are expected to depart Toronto on the 4th and arrive in Budapest on the 5th. Students are expected to make their own travel arrangements.

Interested students are asked to submit a two-page research proposal for the field-work component in Budapest. You will be writing a 20 page research paper based on secondary research and the fieldwork. In the proposal you are expected to identify a research question and provide a key list of a minimum of 5 potential stakeholders in Budapest who will be interviewed.  Questions will be designed prior to departure. During the week-long stay in Budapest, students will conduct interviews with their selected stakeholders, attend lectures and seminars, and participate in various cultural activities. The interviews/seminars and field work will then be integrated into the final research essay for the course. The research essay will be due on March 7, 2025. Students who fail to fulfill all course requirements must return the cost of their participation in the field trip.

Prior to departure, students will be required to attend a number of group meetings and other events.  Upon return, students will participate in a de-briefing session and a preliminary presentation of their papers to the group. Students will also be expected to organize a public roundtable to discuss their research finding. The due date for applications is October 1 at 5 pm. Please submit your applications to Professor Robert Austin: robert.austin@utoronto.ca and Katia Malyuzhinets: katia.malyuzhinets@utoronto.ca

 

Strategic Policy Implementation at Home and Abroad (ERE1151HS)

*This course is offered jointly with MGA. It is open to MA CEES and MGA students only.

The first four weeks will focus on the basics of policymaking, particularly from the perspective of the non-partisan public service. How do governments set and prioritize their agenda? What is the process of interaction between political officials, including ministers, and the public service? How do stakeholders – interest groups and citizens alike – engage in the process? How do public servants choose and design delivery methods to turn policy proposals into initiatives. What can go wrong and how can one best avoid this? How are results assessed? How does one communicate appropriately and effectively, including in the era of social media and the 24/7 news cycle.

Specific examples will be cited often. Students will do a Briefing Note assignment individually on a topical issue, based on a template common in government for the written briefing of senior officials and ministers.

The second four weeks will apply these learnings to the global context in which Canada operates and engages, including vis-à-vis Europe. While the first four weeks will be based on lectures, decks and discussions, the second four weeks will also benefit from presentations and discussions with seniors practitioners. Students will prepare and present a Minister’s Briefing deck on a topical issue of importance to Canada’s global interests and values and/or international policy broadly. This presentation is designed to mimic what its like inside government. Students will work in teams of four, applying a template common in government for the oral briefing of senior officials and ministers.

Students will be assessed on a marking rubric of: 40 per cent for the briefing note assignment, 40 per cent for the minister’s briefing assignment and 20 per cent for class participation.

Emphases: How policymaking is really done
Term: Winter/Spring

Day & time: Thursday 1:00-4:00 pm
Instructor(s): Drew Fagan
Room: CG-361, 14 Queen's Park, Canadiana Buildin

Topics in Ukraine: Ukrainian History and Politics (ERE1195HS)

Topics in Ukraine: Ukrainian History and Politics (ERE1195HS)

 

Wednesdays 2-4 pm
Location: Scheybal Seminar Room, 14th Floor of Robarts Library
Instructor:  TBA
Term: Spring
Credit: 0.5

Departmental course offerings

Anthropology

A number of courses offered at the graduate level in Anthropology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings in Anthropology, please view the department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Comparative Literature

A number of courses offered at the Centre for Comparative Literature may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Centre for Comparative Literature, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

A number of courses offered at the graduate level by the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Centre’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings, please view the Centre’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Germanic Languages & Literatures

A number of courses offered at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Global Affairs

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses:

Non-departmental students may request to enroll in any MGA elective unless it is specified that it is open to MGA students only. Students in the MPP and CERES MA program have priority access to MGA elective courses. CERES students may request enrollment starting Friday, September 1, 2023

Enrollment is not guaranteed and is at the discretion of the MGA program and the course instructor. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office via email to mga@utoronto.ca or in person. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful.

Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions mga@utoronto.ca.

For more information, please check https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/mga/courses/mga-courses.

History

A number of courses offered at the Department of History may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled.

Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of History, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Political Science

A number of courses offered at the Department of Political Science may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Political Science, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

All fall (H1F), full/year (Y1Y) and spring term (H1S) courses administered through the Department of Political Science will have an enrollment  window exclusively for political science graduate students.  For fall and full year courses the window will be September 1st through 14th and for spring term courses , September 1st through January 11th.  From September 15th to the 21st for fall/winter courses and Jan 12th through 18th for spring term courses, enrollment may open up to students on wait lists and those from outside the department if instructors indicate they would like us to do so and provided there is space in the classroom.

Slavic Languages & Literatures

A number of courses offered at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

Sociology

A number of courses offered at the Department of Sociology may be of interest to CERES MA students.  ADD/DROP forms are required, and enrollment opens to CERES students only after the Department’s own students have enrolled. Please note also that research projects and essays written for these courses must be focused on the region.  For a complete list of course offerings at the Department of Sociology, please view the Department’s Graduate Course Descriptions and Course Schedule.

** Note that add/drop forms are required for these courses. Always check with the offering department for updated details.