The MGA courses

Academic Year 2018-2019

First Year

First year courses are required core courses. They cannot be substituted for any other courses.

These courses are open only to MGA students. Students from other departments will not be admitted.

The Munk School of Global Affairs is collaborating with DataCamp.

Fall Term

GLA1012H - Statistics for Global Affairs

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-1pm (LEC0101) & Wednesday 2-5pm (LEC0102) & Thursday 1-5pm (TUT0101/0102/0103/0104)

Description:

This course introduces qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct research for policy purposes. The course discusses research design, case studies, observational and experimental studies, and introduces statistical concepts with a focus on applications. Students will come away with a good grasp of the ideas behind case studies, sampling, bias, causation, correlation and randomization, and the use of data to evaluate policy choices and outcomes.

GLA1003H - Global Security

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-1pm (LEC0101) & 3-6pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay

Description:

Analyses the global security architecture, grand strategy, and contemporary and emerging security challenges. Topics may include the evolution of contemporary national security doctrines, the implications of shifting loci of power for global security, the role and limits of multilateral security arrangements, the role of intelligence and intelligence failure, and threat assessments of emerging or ongoing security problems such as nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and insurgency.

GLA1004H - Global Policy Analysis

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon (LEC0101) & Thursday 10am-1pm (LEC0102)

Description:

Explores the processes of global policy development and change. Applies tools of policy analysis to explain and understand the forces that act on policy development and the impact and limits of global policies in producing political, legal, economic, social, and environmental change. The course will draw from the emerging literature on global public policy, which applies some of the same tools and methodologies as its domestic counterpart, but adapts them to policy development within the increasingly visible arena of global policy. It also pays explicit attention to the multiple nodes through which global policy is made and implemented, including national, transgovernmental, intergovernmental, non-state, and marketplace actors, networks, and institutions. In so doing, it encourages students to see policy development from multiple perspectives of different kinds of actors and networks, their influences and limits in producing policy change, and the processes through which policy is developed and put into action across or transcendent of national jurisdictions.

GLA1005H - Decision Making and Strategic Thinking in the Global System

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 9-11:15am (LEC0101) & Tuesdays 11:45am-2pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Janice Stein , Peter Loewen

Description:

This seminar introduces students to scholarship on the psychology of decision making and the analytics of strategic thinking. Drawing from the literature on public policy making, behavioral economics, and strategic analysis, the seminar will develop the analytical tools and the practical leadership skills students need to navigate the intersection among the global economy, global institutions, and global civil society. Students are required to analyze and craft strategies to address global public policy problems in the context of the three sectors.

GLA1010H - Microeconomics for Global Affairs

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 3-5pm (LEC0101) & Friday 10am-Noon (TUT0101)
Instructor(s): Peter Morrow

Description:

This course covers the principles of microeconomics, with an emphasis on global affairs. In addition to the principles and techniques of microeconomics and models of economic behaviour, this course provides case studies of topics such as international trade, capital markets, international development, and tradeoffs in economic policy, in the context of global affairs. This is a required course, but is not require for students who have taken microeconomics and received at least a B + within the last two years.

Winter/Spring Term

GLA1014H - Global Development

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 11:00am-2:00pm (LEC0101) & 3-6pm (LEC0102)

Description:

This course introduces the key challenges that shape development policy at the international level. The course comprises three main components: first, an introduction to the main approaches to international development, covering economic (growth), political (governance) and social (civil society) perspectives; second, an overview of the primary international actors shaping development policy and outcomes, with a focus on the management and impact of foreign aid; and, third, detailed discussion of selected key issues, likely including economic liberalization, resource rents, conflict and post-conflict reconstruction, social development and participatory development. By the end of the course students will have a detailed knowledge of the most important contemporary debates in the field along with the analytical tools to engage with a broader range of development issues in practical work.

GLA1001H - Macroeconomics: Markets, Institutions, and Growth

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon (LEC0101) & Monday 2-4pm (LEC0102)

Description:

Introduction to the key concepts of international trade and international finance, with attention to contemporary issues and policy. Empirically assesses alternative trade theories, and examines international commercial policy, international finance and macroeconomics, as well as their relationship to broader global issues. The course is designed to utilize understanding of international trade and international finance to help students think through real world events and design policy responses. The supplementary readings thus deal with key world issues in order to illustrate the more abstract material and to engage with global economic policy challenges.

Each week will consist of two blocks of two hours. The first block will be used for lectures, the second for tutorials and tests.

GLA1006H - International Legal Challenges

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 9:30-11:00am & Thursday 9:30-11:00am
Instructor(s): Jutta Brunnee

Description:

Introduces students to public international law and the global legal environment, with an emphasis on legalization and the interaction of law, institutions, civil society, and the global marketplace. Students will be introduced to: the sources of international law (treaties, custom, and the debates about the role of other sources); the concept of international legal personality (the concept of the sovereign state; the evolving role of other international actors, such as international organizations, non-governmental organizations, firms, and individuals); questions of jurisdiction over territory and persons; the relationship between international and domestic law; the peaceful settlement of international disputes in multiple issue areas. Students will also be introduced to topical areas in international law, such as the evolving roles of UN organs such as the Security Council and the International Court of Justice; the law relating to the use of force; the law of state responsibility; the protection of human rights and the environment; international criminal law; international humanitarian law; international economic and trade law; and the law of the sea.

GLA1011H - Global Innovation Policy

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-Noon (LEC0101) & Wednesday Noon-2pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Dan Breznitz , Darius Ornston

Description:

This course provides an introduction to cross-national study of the role of the state in industrial development, innovation, and business-government relations. The emphasis is on providing a broad base of the competing theoretical perspectives with particular attention to the different ways in which state and markets interact in rapid-innovation-based industries. Special consideration is given to the role of Science and Technology Industrial Policies, Innovation, and Economic Development. Centering our attention on politics the seminar examines the nature and extent of government in business and business in government.

Summer Term

GLA1007H - Global Internship

Term: Summer

Description:

Students must complete an internship in the summer between the first and second year of study. Students will be matched to an appropriate internship related to one of the program’s three sectors (global institutions, global markets, or global civil society). The internship allows students to apply their knowledge to significant global problems from the vantage point of one of the program’s three sectors, and provides an opportunity to develop and enhance skills, and build networks, in areas of professional interest. A report on the internship will be required and will be graded pass/fail. A faculty member, in consultation with relevant teaching faculty in the program, will grade the report. Internships may be paid or unpaid.

Second Year

*This schedule is tentative and subject to change.

Choice of 4 (2.0 FCE) elective courses (MGA students in year two only).

MGA students have priority in these courses. Limited space available to non-MGA students in select courses only.

Equipped with core competencies—both theoretical and practical—in the global architecture, students specialize in one of the program’s emphases.

MGA students are required to take at least 1.5 elective FCEs in their chosen emphases. Courses from other departments or units may be counted toward an appropriate emphasis at the Director’s discretion.

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses (updated April 2018)

Non-departmental students may request to enroll in any MGA elective unless it is specified that it is open to MGA students only. Students in the MPP and CERES MA program have priority access to MGA elective courses. MPP and CERES students may request enrollment starting Tuesday, September 4, 2018-Friday, September 14, 2018. All other students may request enrollment the week of September 17-21, 2018.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office via email to mga@utoronto.ca or in person. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful.

Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions mga@utoronto.ca

Full Year Term

JCR1000Y - Global Challenges

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Full Year
Day & Time: Fridays 2-5pm
Instructor(s): Joseph Wong
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

In order to create sustainable solutions to the world’s most important challenges, global development professionals must reach beyond the traditional boundaries of their field of expertise combining scientific/technological, business, and social ideas in an approach known as integrated innovation. In this project-based course, students from various disciplines (engineering, management, health and social sciences) will work together – using participatory methods with an international partner – to address a locally relevant challenge. Students will be expected to integrate their knowledge and experience of global issues in order to identify technical requirements in the context of existing social frameworks (ethical, cultural), as well as the appropriate business and policy systems required to deliver the product to end users. This will be achieved through regular team meetings with stakeholders and with faculty consultants from each discipline. The course will model real life and lead to innovative solutions to major global challenges.

*This course is open to MGA, Rotman MBA, and Engineering students only.

Fall Term

GLA2015H - Economic Competitiveness and Social Protection

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Darius Ornston
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This class explores how communities can design effective systems of social protection without sacrificing economic competitiveness. The course opens by addressing several misconceptions about the welfare state, including the connection between economic competition and social protection, the relationship between social spending and inequality, and the private provision of social protection. The second part of the course examines the politics of reform in four critical areas: Pensions, health care, unemployment, and childcare/maternity policy. The course concludes by exploring three contemporary challenges: Immigration and the welfare state, the politics of social protection in the Global South, and the challenge of designing global social safety nets. By the end of the course, students are expected to develop a politically feasible, economically competitive strategy to reform social policy in a community of interest.

GLA2050H (TRN409N) - Selected Topics in International Studies: Canadian Defense Policy Since the End of the Cold War

This course is taught by Prof. Jack Cunningham.

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2-4pm
Room: LA200

Description:

This course covers changes to Canada’s defence policy and military posture since the late 1980s. Early sessions will address Canada’s Cold War stance, the Mulroney government’s response to the winding down of East-West hostilities, and Canadian involvement in the First Gulf War. Subsequent classes will discuss the impact of the defence spending reductions of the 1990s, the Chretien government’s 1994 Defence White Paper, and the debate over the role of the Canadian military and the military instrument more broadly, in the post-Cold War international environment.

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students. This is a joint course with Trinity College. It is only open to MGA students.

GLA2090H - Topics in Global Affairs I: Governing With and Without the State: Achieving Global Governance Progress in Agenda 2030

This course is taught by Prof. Alan Alexandroff.

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 4-6pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course explores the making of policy at the international level. It targets global policy commitments in Agenda 2030 and asks the primary question: “How can progress be made in achieving progress in the face of the current global governance architecture?”

First, we look briefly at the global order challenges: US leadership is fading and more generally nationalism has seen dramatic resurgence in country after country. But the architectural reshaping goes far beyond this.  Power is increasingly dispersed to actors seldom seen acting at the international level. Today’s actors in global governance are not just states and intergovernmental organizations. Slowly subnational actors from provinces and states to cities and even neighborhoods have come to advance global policy making.  Moreover, a host of non-state actors (NSAs) have joined as well from NGOs, research facilities, criminal organizations, private corporations, investment coalitions. If you were called on to achieve and of the Agenda 2030 goals: “gender equality”, “zero hunger”, “climate action”, how would you do it?

You will be called on to map the question and propose a way forward to the great challenges of global governance.

GLA2014H - Innovation and Economic Development

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2-4pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course focuses on economic development globally, regionally, and locally, and attends to regional competitiveness within a global economy. In so doing, the course focuses global affairs students to the importance of economic development policy, the role of national and regional innovation systems, and the work of economic development agencies. Topics to be covered will include the role of global cities, industrial districts, universities, high technology, and the creative class.

PHM1139H - Diagnosing Corruption in the Health Sector

*This course is open to a select number of MGA students only.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 10am-Noon

Description:

Corruption understood as, “the misuse of entrusted power for private gain”, is considered to be one of the biggest barriers for development and growth. Corruption is without borders; it can be found in any country, in different forms, levels, and types of organizations and institutions. Corruption impedes economic growth, political stability and government legitimacy, jeopardizes the allocation of resources to sectors crucial for development, and encourages other types of illegal activities. Each year, an estimated US$ 5.3 trillion is spent worldwide on providing health services; yet as much as 6% or US$300 billion is lost to corruption and errors. Corruption negatively impacts public health budgets, the price of health services and medicines, the quality of care and medical products, and threatens a country’s ability to provide universal health coverage by increasing the price of health care. Corruption, in short, undermines public trust in their governments and the services they provide and also undermines the morale of health professionals as well as for patients to make use of health services.

 

This graduate course will introduce interested and curious students to the core concepts associated with corruption generally and corruption and the health sector specifically, with a particular focus on the pharmaceutical sector. We will start the seminar with a broad discussion about corruption, what it is, how to define it and examine how it is measured. We will then examine how international organizations are dealing with corruption in their development projects. The course will then move on to specific modules dealing with core topics related to corruption and the health sector. The course will consist of lectures, class discussions and group work through case studies. Research papers and presentations will provide students with the opportunity to probe an issue of interest.

GLA2888H - MGA Research Paper

This course is taught by Prof. Scott Aquanno.

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course provides MGA students with the opportunity to research and write an independent research paper on a selected topic or problem in global affairs. The course will be delivered through regularly scheduled workshops and class sessions. Students who wish to pursue this research paper course must obtain prior approval of the MGA Director or designate, and a faculty member must be available and willing to supervise the research and paper.

*This course is open to MGA students only.

GLA2098H - Topics in Global Affairs: Risk and Risk Governance

*This course is open to MGA students only.

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday Noon-2pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course provides a multidisciplinary perspective on risk and risk governance. Students will be introduced to an array of perspectives on risk including probabilistic, economic, behavioural, social and cultural perspectives. Students will be introduced to a risk governance methodology introduced by the International Risk Governance Council which deploys a multidisciplinary approach to pre-assessment, appraisal, risk evaluation, concern evaluation, risk management and communication. We will apply this methodology to a variety of contemporary risk concerns. We will study the deficits that often arise when adopting risk management methodologies that may impact the objectivity of risk governance. Finally, the course will consider the unique challenges inherent in assessing emerging risks and systemic risks.

GLA2095H - MGA Reading Course

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring

Description:

This course provides students an opportunity to pursue in depth analysis and independent research through one-on-one interaction with a faculty member affiliated with the Munk School. Students must find an appropriate supervisor and obtain the approval of the MGA Director before enrolling

How to register: Student must complete a SGS Reading and Research Form and return it to the MGA Program Coordinator. *This course is open to MGA students only.

HAD5022H - Politics, Policy, Public Health and Health Technology

*This course is open to a select number of MGA students only.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 1-4pm

Description:

 Health technologies (drugs, devices, diagnostics, information and communication systems, surgical interventions, etc.) have complex roles in health systems, with the potential to improve health outcomes and quality of life, and to support change in service delivery for more effective, sustainable and person-centred care. But though real, this potential is often not realized, due to the partial alignment between R&D interests and public health needs, as well as cost or access issues, evidence limitations, the risk that technologies will prove ineffective or harmful, and challenges of misuse, overuse or underuse.

Adding to these challenges for health policy and health systems are the broader roles of technologies within political economies and public policy. Governments play significant roles in the development of health technologies, sometimes advancing policies that are in conflict with the aims of population health or health equity, but which may be seen to align with the aims of science, industry or trade policy. As well, there is increased policy attention to the role of health systems as generators of both “health” and “wealth,” with the latter aim served by health system support for research and development as well as the adoption and use of novel products and services. Whether and how this “double promise” can be realized, and whose health and wealth will be enhanced, remains politically contentious.

The aim of this course is to explore these complex contexts. Specifically, we look at the developmental and regulatory institutions through which public policy seeks to shape health technology development, adoption and dissemination, and we consider the health and innovation systems within which these institutions operate. As well, we consider the underlying interests and ideas that shape the operation and effects of these institutions and systems. Throughout, we consider the implications of these policies, systems, institutions, interests and ideas for the meaning of population health and its equitable distribution (i.e., health equity).

GLA2012H - The Political Economy of Trade

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Darius Ornston
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course covers the politics of trade, from the domestic policy-making process to the institutions that govern the global economy. Tracing the history of the international economy, the course introduces students to several, competing theoretical approaches to trade. The second part of the course applies this knowledge to a range of current issues, including dispute resolution, regional integration, investment, innovation, environmental regulation, labor standards and economic development.

GLA2093H - Topics in Global Affairs IV: Government Relations

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesdays 7-9pm
Instructor(s): Marc Dupont
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

As Government continues to play a key role in the global economy, firms need to engage public officials and ensure that their business interests are taken into account by policymakers. This course examines the practice of government relations in Canada and in other jurisdictions such as the US, the EU and China. Through case studies in international trade, taxation and regulatory affairs, students will learn about the process of lobbying and strategically communicating with governments. Students will also draft advocacy plans and develop the ability to make clear and robust policy recommendations to C-suite executives and members of the board of directors. An interest in politics, public policy and an aptitude for cross-cultural fluency will be helpful for this class.

GLA2002H - Issues in Development Policy and Practice: Tax and Development

This course is taught by Prof. Wilson Prichard.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 9am-Noon
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course interrogates the key tensions and challenges in the field of development through an in-depth exploration of one sub-field: tax and development.  Key debates and issues in development are frequently presented in relatively broad terms.  Doing so captures key challenges and trade-offs, but often offers few answers or ways forward. This course seeks to provide a more focused investigation of these key development debates and issues, through an applied deep dive into the field of tax and development.  Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the rapidly emerging sub-field of tax and development – part of the broader ‘financing for development’ agenda – while using this sub-field to understand broader development debates as they occur in practice.   Key overarching topics will include, among others: (a) the roles of capacity, policy, institutions and politics in shaping outcomes, (b) linking the local, national and international in understanding and addressing development challenges, (c) the financing for development agenda, local ownership and donor coordination, (d) linking research, evidence and practice in development, (e) effective design and implementation of reform programs, (f) pathologies of aid programs and delivery, and (g) ‘doing development’ in a changing global context.  The course will draw on the instructor’s active involvement in research, policy formulation and implementation for tax and development programs, and will aim to design key assignments that feed directly into ongoing policy, research and reform processes.

GLA2091H - Seeing Taiwan

This course is taught by Prof. Tong Lam.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday Noon-2pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course uses Taiwan as a site to examine some of the most pressing contemporary and historical issues. They include state-building, environmental politics, colonialism and empire, the politics of memory, innovation and urbanism, as well as visual culture. In so doing, students do not only acquire a body of knowledge about Taiwan and its dynamic global connections; they also develop interdisciplinary skills to improve their understanding of major global issues.

GLA2092H - Topics in Global Affairs III: The Populist Radical Right in Europe

This course is taught by Andres Kasekamp.

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

A comparative examination of the emergence and upsurge of populist radical right parties in contemporary Europe. The course will begin with historical context, definitions and typologies, before exploring topics including ideology and issues; leaders, members and voters; political parties, organizations and subcultures; transnational influences and networking; patterns of response by mainstream parties and radical right parties in public office. This course will analyze several country cases in detail, including France, Austria, the Netherlands, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, Finland and Estonia. A basic knowledge of recent European history and comparative politics is required.

 

*Please note this course has 10 spots for MGA students and 10 spots for CERES students.

GLA2006H - The Political Economy of Money and Finance

This course is taught by Prof. Mark Manger.

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 2-4pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

The course introduces students to international monetary and financial relations over the last century, and focuses on the issues of financial power, cooperation, conflict and institutions in the world economy. Topics covered are the politics of exchange rate adjustment, the role of the IMF, the political economy of financial crises, and the domestic and international political implications of global monetary developments. Case studies are used to link theory, policy and practice. For students in the Global Markets stream, this course complements GLA2001H by focusing on “the view from politics” as opposed to “the view from the markets.”

Winter/Spring Term

GLA2025H - Global Economic Policy Lab

This course is taught by Prof. Mark Manger.

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 2-4pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This lab analyzes current global economic policy challenges. Students write weekly short research notes similar to those produced by research departments and firms in the financial sector, and present their findings in class. Topics are current trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, economic forecasts, and market developments as they feed back into policy making. Following revisions, select research notes are published on the lab website. Students also write an end-of-term longer research note that offers more detailed analysis. The course is aimed at students who seek future employment as economic and policy analysts in the public and private sector.

GLA2096H - Topics in Justice I: Justice Reforms

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday Noon-2pm
Instructor(s): Todd Foglesong
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

The course investigates the politics of justice reform in global context by examining the ideas and indicators of crime, safety, and justice that are currently used by national governments, civil society organizations, and international institutions to govern justice. The course takes a comparative approach, analyzing policies and innovations that seek to advance justice, safety, and rule of law in a range of dissimilar countries. By the end of the course, students will be able to measure, evaluate, and account for justice or safety policies in a global context, and independently appraise the value of the goals and targets in new schemes for global governance.

GLA2050H - Selected Topics in International Studies: War and its Theorists

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Jack Cunningham
Room: LA200

Description:

This course examines the nature and dynamics of war throughout history, as they have been understood by major thinkers and writers from the ancient Greeks to contemporary theorists.

 

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students.

GLA2090H - Topics in Global Affairs I: Global Journalism

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): Robert Steiner
Room: Transit House, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

Journalism is an increasingly vital, but underused skill in a wide range of global professions. Development professionals need to train journalists to support emerging civil society. Leaders of global businesses, NGOs and government agencies are increasingly creating proprietary news organizations to raise the profile of issues central to their work. Advocates use the tools of journalism to advance their causes. And, of course, specialists of any type need journalism skills to tell untold stories in their disciplines. Many global professionals will deploy a combination of these skills in their careers. This course will help second year MGAs gain a professional edge by introducing them to journalism tools they can integrate into their careers. Students will learn frameworks for training media in emerging civil society, and for developing proprietary news organizations in business and agency settings. They will also learn essential skills for their own journalism and advocacy. The course will be highly practical and geared towards students’ own career goals.

Robert Steiner is Director of the Fellowships in Global Journalism at the Munk School. He is a former foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, where he won two Overseas Press Club awards and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has also held senior executive positions in media, communications strategy and Canadian federal politics. Steiner received his MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

GLA2093H - Global Migration Governance: State Sovereignty, Geopolitics, and Migrant Rights

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 5-7pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course takes an in-depth look at the quest for global migration governance: an issue area that has eschewed attempts to build international regimes and is often characterized by zero-sum state policies and reactive migration controls. Our seminar will ask when and how states with often competing and conflicting interests can cooperate over international migration, unpack the connections between domestic politics and interstate behavior, and ask how the seemingly inherent tensions between state interests and the need for global migration governance affect normative commitments to the rights of migrants, and vice versa. Substantively, we will examine the politics of the international refugee regime, regional migration regimes, human smuggling and trafficking, externalized and securitized migration controls, the negotiation of the Global Refugee and Migration Compacts as a means of addressing the global refugee crisis, and the nexuses between migration and development, security, and terrorism. The course will include guest lectures from policymakers and service-providers. Students should be prepared to lead discussions, produce a substantive research project with policy recommendations, and deliver their recommendations in a final presentation.

GLA2001H - Global Capital Markets

Streams: Global Institutions, Global Markets
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 7-9pm
Instructor(s): Alan Alexandroff
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine the intersection of the global political economy and investment strategies as the current global economic realignment takes place. It analyzes new players, new structures, and new opportunities as the global economy restructures and examines how strategies are built. Students will analyze cases and prepare two memoranda and a group project. Students will also learn the practical skills required to develop investment strategies.

*There are 5 spots reserved for MPP students.

GLA2000H - Capstone Seminar

This is a required course for MGA students. It is closed to non-MGA students.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Various. See separate timetable.

Description:

The Capstone course will rely on clients –representing the private sector, an international organization, a non-governmental organization, or government — and students will work in teams to tackle a current issue confronting these clients and their organizations. Students will learn to analyze these problems across dimensions of global economy and markets, global institutions, and global civil society. Throughout the course, students will engage in activities designed to assist global problem-solvers, while also looking for opportunities to defend and advance their clients’ organizational interests.

*Please note: Information on the Capstone projects to be released later this year. Students will have the opportunity to indicate their preferences from among a selection of projects.

GLA2095H - MGA Reading Course

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring

Description:

This course provides students an opportunity to pursue in depth analysis and independent research through one-on-one interaction with a faculty member affiliated with the Munk School. Students must find an appropriate supervisor and obtain the approval of the MGA Director before enrolling

How to register: Student must complete a SGS Reading and Research Form and return it to the MGA Program Coordinator. *This course is open to MGA students only.

GLA2061H - Gender and Protracted Crises

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 4-6pm
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course takes a gender-based approach to understanding the challenges, priorities and politics within protracted crises and fragile contexts. It looks at the unique experiences of women and men, girls and boys in crisis settings, including attention to sexual and gender-based violence, toxic and positive masculinities, and the particular needs of children and youth. It focuses on practical global responses to address protracted crises, including the Canadian Feminist International Assistance Policy, as well as highlighting the challenges inherent in these responses.

JSE1708H - The Development of Sustainability Thought

*This course is open to only MGA students and Environmental Studies students.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon & Thursday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): John Robinson
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine how attitudes towards human nature and non-human nature have changed over the period from Mesolithic times until the present in Western society. By reading and discussing historical arguments and contemporary documents we will attempt to uncover the underlying assumptions about the world that were characteristic of different periods in the history of Western culture. The underlying question is whether contemporary concerns about sustainability require fundamental changes in the way we conceive of ourselves and our environment.

GLA1009H - Financial Management for Global Organizations

*This is a required course for MGA students. It is closed to non-MGA students.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Friday 9am-Noon & 1-4pm
Instructor(s): Vince Pranjivan

Description:

An introduction to financial planning and budgeting, financial analysis, and financial management in the corporate and public sector from the perspective of the chief financial officer (CFO). The course first introduces basic principles of accounting for students without a background in Finance. It then considers topics in corporate finance such as working capital management and capital budgeting in the context of floating exchange rates, different regulatory environments and global capital markets. Special attention is given to the estimating cost of capital (and by extension, of valuing stocks and bonds) in global financial markets as it pertains to investment and budgeting decisions.

GLA2060H - Topics in Development: Humanitarian Practice

Streams: Global Civil Society, Global Institutions
Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 12-2pm
Instructor(s): David Michalski
Room: B019, 315 Bloor St. West, Munk School of Global Affairs

Description:

This course will examine the ideals of humanitarian principles and contrast them with the reality on the ground in war zones and disaster areas. The course will cover the history of the humanitarian movement, its ethics and goals, and contrast them with the goals of development work over the course of the past three decades. In addition to lectures and seminar discussions, this course will expose students to humanitarian practice through case studies, role plays and interactive conversations with field workers. Current and ongoing challenges to humanitarian work will also be examined in depth, including the blurring of military and security objectives with humanitarian goals, and the practice of humanitarianism in the context of political and security challenges.