The MGA courses

Academic Year 2020-2021

First Year

First year courses are required core courses. They cannot be substituted for any other courses.

These courses are open only to MGA students. Students from other departments will not be admitted.

The Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy is collaborating with DataCamp.

Fall Term

GLA1012H - Statistics for Global Affairs

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 9am-12pm (LEC0101) & Wednesday 2-5pm (LEC0102) & Friday 9:00-11:00am (TUT0102) & Friday 11:00am-1:00pm (TUT0101)
Instructor(s): Paola Salardi

Description:

This course introduces qualitative and quantitative methods to conduct research for policy purposes. The course discusses research design, case studies, observational and experimental studies, and introduces statistical concepts with a focus on applications. Students will come away with a good grasp of the ideas behind case studies, sampling, bias, causation, correlation and randomization, and the use of data to evaluate policy choices and outcomes.

GLA1003H - Global Security

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 10am-1pm (LEC0101) & 3-6pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay
Room: Online

Description:

Analyses the global security architecture, grand strategy, and contemporary and emerging security challenges. Topics may include the evolution of contemporary national security doctrines, the implications of shifting loci of power for global security, the role and limits of multilateral security arrangements, the role of intelligence and intelligence failure, and threat assessments of emerging or ongoing security problems such as nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and insurgency.

GLA1005H/PPG1005H (Joint Course with the MPP Program) - Decision Making and Strategic Thinking in the Global System

Term: Fall
Day & Time: TBD
Instructor(s): Janice Stein , Peter Loewen

Description:

This seminar introduces students to scholarship on the psychology of decision making and the analytics of strategic thinking. Drawing from the literature on public policy making, behavioral economics, and strategic analysis, the seminar will develop the analytical tools and the practical leadership skills students need to navigate the intersection among the global economy, global institutions, and global civil society. Students are required to analyze and craft strategies to address global public policy problems in the context of the three sectors.

GLA1010H - Microeconomics for Global Affairs

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 9-12:00pm (LEC0101) & Monday 2:00-4:00pm (LEC0102) & Tuesday 3:00-5:00pm (TUT0101)
Instructor(s): Rajshri Jayaraman

Description:

This course covers the principles of microeconomics, with an emphasis on global affairs. In addition to the principles and techniques of microeconomics and models of economic behaviour, this course provides case studies of topics such as international trade, capital markets, international development, and tradeoffs in economic policy, in the context of global affairs.

Winter/Spring Term

GLA1014H - Global Development

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Thursday 10:00am-1:00pm (LEC0101) & 2:00pm-5:00pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Wilson Prichard

Description:

This course introduces the key challenges that shape development policy at the international level. The course comprises three main components: first, an introduction to the main approaches to international development, covering economic (growth), political (governance) and social (civil society) perspectives; second, an overview of the primary international actors shaping development policy and outcomes, with a focus on the management and impact of foreign aid; and, third, detailed discussion of selected key issues, likely including economic liberalization, resource rents, conflict and post-conflict reconstruction, social development and participatory development. By the end of the course students will have a detailed knowledge of the most important contemporary debates in the field along with the analytical tools to engage with a broader range of development issues in practical work.

GLA1009H - Financial Management for Global Organizations

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Friday 9am-Noon (LEC0101) & 1:00-4:00pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Vince Pranjivan

Description:

An introduction to financial planning and budgeting, financial analysis, and financial management in the corporate and public sector from the perspective of the chief financial officer (CFO). The course first introduces basic principles of accounting for students without a background in Finance. It then considers topics in corporate finance such as working capital management and capital budgeting in the context of floating exchange rates, different regulatory environments and global capital markets. Special attention is given to the estimating cost of capital (and by extension, of valuing stocks and bonds) in global financial markets as it pertains to investment and budgeting decisions.

GLA1001H - Macroeconomics: Markets, Institutions, and Growth

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 2:00-4:00pm (LEC0101) & 4:00-5:00pm (TUT0101) , Wednesday 2:00-4:00pm (LEC0102) & 4:00-5:00pm (TUT0102)
Instructor(s): Gustavo Indart

Description:

Introduction to the key concepts of international trade and international finance, with attention to contemporary issues and policy. Empirically assesses alternative trade theories, and examines international commercial policy, international finance and macroeconomics, as well as their relationship to broader global issues. The course is designed to utilize understanding of international trade and international finance to help students think through real world events and design policy responses. The supplementary readings thus deal with key world issues in order to illustrate the more abstract material and to engage with global economic policy challenges.

 

GLA1006H - International Legal Challenges

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 1:00-4:00pm
Instructor(s): Sarah Beamish

Description:

This course introduces students to public international law and its relationship with global affairs and public policy. The course will present foundational information such as the history and sources of international law, international legal personality and key actors in international law, questions of jurisdiction, the relationship between international and domestic law, and the settlement of international legal disputes. It will then consider key topics in international law such as the protection of human rights and the environment, the laws of war, international criminal law, and economic and trade law, considering both the content of the law and its application in selected case studies. This course will draw on a range of views about the nature, impacts, limits, legitimacy, and future of international law, and illuminate the ways that international law shapes and is shaped by politics and power. Students will consider both dominant/”mainstream” voices and ideas in the field, and insights and critiques of those who have often been at its margins, including Indigenous and feminist perspectives.

GLA1011H - Global Innovation Policy

*Students enrolled in GLA1011H LEC0101 on Wednesdays 10:30am-1pm MUST enroll in GLA1014H LEC0101 on Thursdays 10am-1pm.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 10:30am-1pm (LEC0101) & Thursday 10:30am-1pm (LEC0102)
Instructor(s): Dan Breznitz

Description:

This course provides an introduction to cross-national study of the role of the state in industrial development, innovation, and business-government relations. The emphasis is on providing a broad base of the competing theoretical perspectives with particular attention to the different ways in which state and markets interact in rapid-innovation-based industries. Special consideration is given to the role of Science and Technology Industrial Policies, Innovation, and Economic Development. Centering our attention on politics the seminar examines the nature and extent of government in business and business in government.

Second Year

*This schedule is tentative and subject to change.

Choice of 5 (2.5 FCE) elective courses (MGA students in year two only). Second year students are required to complete GLA2000H (Capstone Seminar) and GLA1009H (Financial Management for Global Organizations) at the times specified below.

MGA students have priority in these courses. Limited space available to non-MGA students in select courses only.

Optional – Equipped with core competencies—both theoretical and practical—in the global architecture, students may choose to specialize in one of the program’s emphases. To do so, they must complete at least 1.5 FCEs in that emphasis (see details on the SGS Calendar). Students may use courses taken in other departments towards their chosen emphasis with the approval of the MGA Program Director. Verification of completion of an emphasis will be at the discretion of the MGA Program Director. Students must formally request that the emphasis be listed on their transcript.

MGA’s Policy on Non-Departmental Enrollment in Elective Courses (updated July 5, 2019)

Non-departmental students may request to enroll in any MGA elective unless it is specified that it is open to MGA students only. Students in the MPP and CERES MA program have priority access to MGA elective courses. MPP and CERES students may request enrollment starting Tuesday, September 3, 2019. All other students may request enrollment the week of September 15, 2019.

Students who are interested in enrolling an MGA elective may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the courses they would like to enroll in to the MGA Program Office via email to mga@utoronto.ca or in person. Students will be sent a confirmation e-mail if their enrollment is successful. Please note that all courses will run from September 16, 2019 – November 29, 2019 for the fall term, and January 13, 2020 – March 27, 2020 for the winter. In both cases, some assignments and exams may require students to be physically present on campus for the subsequent weeks.

Please contact the MGA Program Office if you have any questions mga@utoronto.ca

Full Year Term

JCR1000Y - Global Challenges

Term: Full Year
Day & Time: Fridays 9am-Noon
Instructor(s): Joseph Wong

Description:

In order to create sustainable solutions to the world’s most important challenges, global development professionals must reach beyond the traditional boundaries of their field of expertise combining scientific/technological, business, and social ideas in an approach known as integrated innovation. In this project-based course, students from various disciplines (engineering, management, health and social sciences) will work together – using participatory methods with an international partner – to address a locally relevant challenge. Students will be expected to integrate their knowledge and experience of global issues in order to identify technical requirements in the context of existing social frameworks (ethical, cultural), as well as the appropriate business and policy systems required to deliver the product to end users. This will be achieved through regular team meetings with stakeholders and with faculty consultants from each discipline. The course will model real life and lead to innovative solutions to major global challenges.

*This course is open to MGA, Rotman MBA, and Engineering students only.

Fall Term

GLA2888H - MGA Research Paper

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 9:30am-Noon
Instructor(s): Scott Aquanno

Description:

This course provides MGA students with the opportunity to research and write an independent research paper on a selected topic or problem in global affairs. The course will be delivered through regularly scheduled workshops and class sessions. Students who wish to pursue this research paper course must obtain prior approval of the MGA Director or designate, and a faculty member must be available and willing to supervise the research and paper.

*This course is open to MGA students only.

GLA2064H - Topics in Security II: Researching Terrorism

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Friday 10:00am-Noon
Instructor(s): Benoît Gomis
Room: Online

Description:

Focuses on key opportunities and challenges in researching terrorism and terrorism financing. After an analysis of the practice of terrorism research and some of the main pitfalls associated with it, students learn how to access information about terrorism, approach the issue of terrorism financing, build and use databases of terrorist attacks, evaluate counterterrorism policies, and write about terrorism and counterterrorism. These skills are essential for relevant careers in think tanks, academia, government, the media, NGOs, IGOs, and the private sector.

GLA2092H - Topics in Global Affairs III: The Populist Radical Right in Europe

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 11:00am-1:00pm
Instructor(s): Andres Kasekamp
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

A comparative examination of the emergence and upsurge of populist radical right parties in contemporary Europe. The course will begin with historical context, definitions and typologies, before exploring topics including ideology and issues; leaders, members and voters; political parties, organizations and subcultures; transnational influences and networking; patterns of response by mainstream parties and radical right parties in public office. This course will analyze several country cases in detail, including France, Austria, the Netherlands, Italy, Denmark, Hungary, Finland and Estonia. A basic knowledge of recent European history and comparative politics is required.

 

*Please note this course has 10 spots for MGA students and 10 spots for CERES students.

GLA2068H - Topics in Justice III: TBD

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Thursday 1:00-3:30pm
Instructor(s): Todd Foglesong , Ron Levi

Description:

TBD

GLA2063H - Topics in Security I: Pathways into Global Security

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesday 12:00-2:00pm
Instructor(s): Benoît Gomis
Room: Online

Description:

This course provides an introduction into the professional world of global security.
Drawing on guest speaker presentations, short lectures by the instructor, and classroom
exercises, it will help students gain a better understanding of relevant sub-fields, organizations,
and roles within the global security field. Weekly discussions with guest speakers will deliver
insights on their background, current and previous responsibilities, organizations they’ve
worked in and how they operate, and key lessons they learnt throughout their career. Guest
speakers will include mid- to senior-level staff from international government organizations,
defence, foreign, development, and interior ministries, law enforcement and intelligence
agencies, NGOs, training institutes, media, academia, and the private sector. The course will
identify and examine some of the main skills relevant for careers in global security, including
investigative research, writing, networking, public speaking, fundraising, job search, teaching,
conflict management, and time management.

GLA2093H - Topics in Global Affairs IV: Government Relations

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesdays 6:00-8:00pm
Instructor(s): Marc Dupont
Room: Online

Description:

As Government continues to play a key role in the global economy, firms need to engage public officials and ensure that their business interests are taken into account by policymakers. This course examines the practice of government relations in Canada and in other jurisdictions such as the US, the EU and China. Through case studies in international trade, taxation and regulatory affairs, students will learn about the process of lobbying and strategically communicating with governments. We will also be paying close attention to the recent rise of populism and protectionism globally and how it can impact the practice of government relations. Students will also draft advocacy plans and develop the ability to make clear and robust policy recommendations to C-suite executives and members of the board of directors. An interest in politics, public policy and an aptitude for cross-cultural fluency will be helpful for this class.

*Note that course enrollment is by application only.  An email will be sent out to MGA students in August

GLA2069H - Topics in Global Markets I: Bilateral Diplomacy: Canada-Japan and US-Japan Relations

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 1:30-4:00pm
Instructor(s): Phillip Lipscy
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

How do governments conduct bilateral diplomacy? We will explore this topic by
examining the real-world diplomacy of Canada and the United States vis-a-vis Japan. We will
review the academic literature on foreign policy making and the specific context of these
bilateral relationships. We will then engage directly with practitioners at the forefront of
foreign policy making in Canada, Japan, and the United States, exploring contemporary policy
challenges and how the respective governments seek to resolve them. Students will work on
collaborative group projects designed in consultation with practitioners to provide value to
immediate policy making priorities. Students may need to be available outside of the
designated class time occasionally for online meetings with counterparts abroad.

GLA2095H - MGA Reading Course

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring

Description:

This course provides students an opportunity to pursue in depth analysis and independent research through one-on-one interaction with a faculty member. Students must find an appropriate supervisor and obtain the approval of the MGA Director before enrolling. Supervisors must be appointed as a graduate faculty member (full or associate) in the School of Graduate Studies. They can be from other departments other than the Munk School but they must possess the relevant expertise and knowledge to supervise the course.

How to register: Student must complete a SGS Reading and Research Form and return it to the MGA Program Coordinator. *This course is open to MGA students only.

GLA2090H - Topics in Global Affairs I: Governing With and Without the State: Achieving Global Governance Progress in Agenda 2030

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 12:00-2:00pm
Instructor(s): Alan Alexandroff
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

This course explores the making of policy at the international level. It targets global policy commitments in Agenda 2030 and asks the primary question: “How can progress be made in the face of the current global governance architecture?” The Global Order faces rising great power tensions, increasing fragmentation and the rise of many new actors. And, of course there is the dramatic efforts by the U.S. administration to undermine multilateralism and the global institutions that were critical to building a rules-based multilateral order.

We start by examining the many global order challenges: US leadership is fading and more generally nationalism has seen dramatic resurgence in country after country. But the architectural reshaping goes far beyond this.  Power is increasingly dispersed to actors seldom seen acting at the international level. Today’s actors in global governance are not just states and intergovernmental organizations. Slowly subnational actors from provinces and states to cities and even neighborhoods have come to advance global policy making.  Moreover, a host of non-state actors (NSAs) have joined as well: NGOs, research facilities, criminal organizations, private corporations, investment coalitions.

If you were called on to achieve any of the Agenda 2030 goals: “gender equality”, “zero hunger”, “climate action”, how would you do it? You will be called on to map the question and propose a way forward to the great challenges of global governance facing the Global Order today.

*There are 5 spots reserved for MPP students.

GLA2071H - Topics in Markets III: Environmental Economics

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Tuesdays 9:00am-Noon
Instructor(s): Stephan Heblich
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

Environmental concerns have become increasingly prominent as a matter for public debate and policy. Sustainable development, pollution, climate change and the exploitation of renewable and non-renewable resources are fundamentally resource allocation problems on which economics has much to say. This unit will address these real-world environmental problems by building on microeconomic theory and quantitative methods from previous units. We will use these tools to examine how economic choices and activity affect the natural environment. We will also be looking at methods of environmental valuation and at policy instruments designed to improve (or slow down the degradation of) the environment.

GLA2006H - The Political Economy of Money and Finance

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2-4:30pm
Instructor(s): Mark Manger
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

The course introduces students to international monetary and financial relations over the last century, and focuses on the issues of financial power, cooperation, conflict and institutions in the world economy. Topics covered are the politics of exchange rate adjustment, the role of the IMF, the political economy of financial crises, and the domestic and international political implications of global monetary developments. Case studies are used to link theory, policy and practice. For students in the Global Markets stream, this course complements GLA2001H by focusing on “the view from politics” as opposed to “the view from the markets.”

GLA2062H - Topics in Development III: Gender, Conflict and Crisis

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Monday 5:00-7:00pm
Instructor(s): Megan Dersnah
Room: Online

Description:

This course takes a gender-based approach to understanding the challenges, priorities and politics within protracted crises and fragile contexts. It looks at the unique experiences of women and men, girls and boys in crisis settings, including attention to sexual and gender-based violence, toxic and positive masculinities, and the particular needs of children and youth. It focuses on practical global responses to address protracted crises, including the Canadian Feminist International Assistance Policy, as well as highlighting the challenges inherent in these responses.

GLA2030H - Grand Strategy and Global Threats

Streams: Global Institutions
Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 5:00-7:00pm
Instructor(s): Jon R. Lindsay

Description:

TBD

GLA2050H (TRN409N) - Selected Topics in International Studies: Canadian Defense Policy Since the End of the Cold War

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Jack Cunningham

Description:

This course covers changes to Canada’s defence policy and military posture since the late 1980s. Early sessions will address Canada’s Cold War stance, the Mulroney government’s response to the winding down of East-West hostilities, and Canadian involvement in the First Gulf War. Subsequent classes will discuss the impact of the defence spending reductions of the 1990s, the Chretien government’s 1994 Defence White Paper, and the debate over the role of the Canadian military and the military instrument more broadly, in the post-Cold War international environment.

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students. This is a joint course with Trinity College. It is only open to MGA students.

GLA2098H - Topics in Global Affairs VII: Impact and Implications of Covid-19

This course will feature a different guest lecturer each week.

Term: Fall
Day & Time: TBD

Description:

TBD

GLA2014H - Innovation and Economic Development

Term: Fall
Day & Time: Wednesday 10:00am-Noon
Instructor(s): Shiri Breznitz
Room: In-Person/Online

Description:

This seminar challenges you to open your mind and ask crucial questions regarding to innovation and economic development in the global economy. This course provides an introduction to the complex relationships between innovation, technology, and policy. During the course students will acquire improved understanding and critical insight about:

  • Different perspectives on the meaning of economic development and the interpretation of economic development problems.
  • An understanding of globalization and its impact on innovation and economic growth.
  • Context of national and international trends, including issues of competitiveness, technological change, and globalization that influence economic development.
  • New strategies and themes for economic development, including those which focus on knowledge, technological innovation, and creativity.
  • Key aspects of the literature and debates about innovation and local economic development policy and practice, including perspectives of scholars and practitioners.
Winter/Spring Term

GLA2066H - Topics in Justice I: Justice Reforms

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 1:00-3:30pm
Instructor(s): Todd Foglesong

Description:

The course investigates the politics of justice reform in global context in two
ways: first, by examining the indicators of justice that are used by local and national
governments, civil society organizations, and international institutions to induce reform,
manage staff, and otherwise “govern” operations in justice; second, by “commensurating”
change in systems of justice and governance across a range of cities, countries and
institutions. The course is a problem-solving practicum: students will work in teams to
compare the structure of problems in different settings and propose solutions to challenges in
the measurement of some ailment in a foreign justice system.

GLA2062H - Topics in Development III: Health and Education

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Monday 9:30am-Noon
Instructor(s): Rajshri Jayaraman

Description:

This course covers topics in economic development related to health and education. We will begin by discussing why health and education are important for economic well-being, and exploring how the (developing) world fares in terms of human capital attainment. We will go on to examine what the main barriers to good health and educational achievement are in poor- and middle-income countries; and investigate what types of policy interventions may serve to lower these barriers.

 

This course is not going to be technical. However, we will use (informal) economic models to structure our thinking and we will weigh the evidence based on statistically sound methods. If you hate economics or data, then this course is not for you. If you care about poverty and inequality, and want to understand evidence-based health and policy design in developing countries, then this is the elective for you.

GLA2095H - MGA Reading Course

Term: Fall, Winter/Spring

Description:

This course provides students an opportunity to pursue in depth analysis and independent research through one-on-one interaction with a faculty member. Students must find an appropriate supervisor and obtain the approval of the MGA Director before enrolling. Supervisors must be appointed as a graduate faculty member (full or associate) in the School of Graduate Studies. They can be from other departments other than the Munk School but they must possess the relevant expertise and knowledge to supervise the course.

How to register: Student must complete a SGS Reading and Research Form and return it to the MGA Program Coordinator. *This course is open to MGA students only.

GLA2001H - Global Capital Markets

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 6:30-9pm
Instructor(s): Alan Alexandroff

Description:

This course will examine the intersection of the global political economy and investment strategies as the current global economic realignment takes place. It analyzes new players, new structures, and new opportunities as the global economy restructures and examines how strategies are built. Students will analyze cases and prepare two memoranda and a group project. Students will also learn the practical skills required to develop investment strategies.

*There are 5 spots reserved for MPP students.

GLA2010H - Geopolitics of Cyberspace

*Please note this course is open to MGA students only. Non-departmental students may seek enrollment in Department of Political Science's offering of this course POL2240H http://politics.utoronto.ca/graduate/courses/fallwinter-timetable/?id=2709

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 9:30am-Noon
Instructor(s): Ronald Deibert

Description:

New information and communication technologies, such as the Internet, are widely believed to be transforming world politics. While these transformations have brought about important challenges to state power and authority, they have not eliminated power politics and the quest for security and competitive advantage among actors on the world stage. Today, states and non-state actors alike are seeking ways to exploit information and information systems to pursue political objectives. The control of information has long been widely seen as a source of political power, and is manifest today in competition over both the media and the messages of the global communications environment. From the filtering and interception of Internet traffic to the circulation of home-made videos by militant Islamists, a new geopolitics of information and communication technologies is underway.

The Geopolitics of Cyberspace course is an intensive examination of the ways in which states and non-state actors are contesting the newly evolving terrain of global digital-electronic-telecommunications. Topics covered include Internet censorship and surveillance, information warfare, computer network attacks, hacktivism, and governance of global communications. The course is organized as a series of intensive modules. One feature of the class will be a hands-on” analysis of censorship circumvention and network interrogation techniques at the Citizen Lab (http://www.citizenlab.org/).

GLA2080H - Topics in Innovation I: The Ethics of Innovation: Ideas, Interests, Institutions

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 10:00am-Noon
Instructor(s): Daniel Munro

Description:

Technology and innovation are pervasive through our economies and societies
and have profound effects on health, wealth and well-being. Technological innovation has
transformed the ways we work, learn, organize and socialize – in beneficial, harmful and
ambiguous ways. Our attitudes towards technology are shaped by the nature and extent to
which we believe they benefit or harm our economic, social, and cultural interests and values.
But we do not share the same values or interests, nor do we believe that the distribution of
benefits and harm from innovation are always equitable or fair.
In this course we will reflect on the ethics of technology and innovation. How should we decide
if an innovation is good or bad (or neither)? What is a fair distribution of the benefits and risks
of innovation? Who gets to decide? How do ideas, interests, and institutions shape our ethical
reflection and the possibilities for governing innovation? Our discussion will combine
theoretical reflection with concrete examples, including facial recognition, biotechnology,
neurotechnology, social media and communications technologies, and other new and emerging
innovations.

GLA2050H - Selected Topics in International Studies: War and its Theorists

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 2-4pm
Instructor(s): Jack Cunningham

Description:

This course examines the emergence and impact on the international system of nuclear weapons. We will discuss the decisions by various states to acquire or develop nuclear weapons (or not); the evolution of nuclear strategy; and the development of nuclear arms control and disarmament and nonproliferation as central concerns in world politics. We will also examine the dynamics of key nuclear crises such as the Cuban Missile Crisis. Students will be exposed to primary documents and the relevant scholarly literature, and by the end of the course should be able to discuss nuclear issues in their broader context.

 

*Please note this course is capped at 5 MGA students.

GLA2021H - Innovation Scorecards: The Art and Science of Measuring Innovation and Influencing Public Debate

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 4-6:30pm
Instructor(s): Daniel Munro

Description:
  • How do we know if a society is innovative?
  • What is the role of policy in shaping innovation performance?
  • How can innovation measurement shape public and policy debate?

This seminar will focus on answering these three questions in a hands-on, experiential way. To learn about innovation and inclusive growth policy and performance, we will work as a team to design, develop and use a data-driven, cross-national, web-based Inclusive Innovation Scorecard.  The seminar is divided to three modules. First, we will discuss the role and importance of innovation and innovation policy to economic growth, competitiveness, and (in)equality. Second, we will design and build the Innovation Policy Lab Inclusive Innovation Scorecard to help decision-makers and researchers in the public, private and academic sectors track and improve Canada’s inclusive innovation performance. We will discuss the purposes and pitfalls of scorecards (including measurement challenges, communicating insights, and the use and misuse of results); collect, analyze and discuss data and metrics for possible inclusion in the scorecard; explore different approaches to weighing indicators and ranking jurisdictions; and discuss effective ways to present the results. During the third part of the course, we will consider how innovation policy shapes innovation performance and, in turn, the implications of scorecard results for innovation policy. We will work in small teams to write white papers that analyze results from specific indictor categories and/or focus on the overall performance of specific regions/countries.  Teams that produce high quality papers will have opportunities to share their analyses with policy-makers through policy briefings and/or through media channels (e.g., short commentaries, interviews). Those events will be orchestrated by the IPL and our partners during the late spring and early summer after the end of the seminar in conjunction with official unveiling of the scorecard and the accompanying white papers.  By the end of the course, students will have an advanced understanding of innovation data and its role in innovation policy and analysis; deep expertise in one or more innovation metrics and/or jurisdictions; and hands-on experience in writing innovation policy analyses and communicating results with peers and external decision-makers.

*Enrollment is by application only.  Please note this course is closed to non-MGA students.

GLA2061H - Topics in Development II: Politics of China and Democracy in Asia

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 12:00-2:00pm
Instructor(s): Lynette Ong

Description:

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the
underlying forces driving the political landscape in China and other Asian countries. We begin
with the question why China has defied the modernization theory with the persistence of
authoritarian regime. What are the nature of political institutions and state-society relations
that explain this persistent outcome in China? We then examine the polities of South Korea,
Taiwan and emerging Asian democracies to study the underlying patterns of state and societal
forces that led to regime changes. This course seeks to understand the similarities and explain
the differences of the hodgepodge of autocratic and democratic regimes in Asia, and ask “why”
and “why not”. Students should be prepared to read course materials and engage in class
discussion.

JSE1708H - The Development of Sustainability Thought

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Tuesday 10am-Noon & Thursday 10am-Noon
Instructor(s): John Robinson

Description:

This course will examine how attitudes towards human nature and non-human nature have changed over the period from Mesolithic times until the present in Western society. By reading and discussing historical arguments and contemporary documents we will attempt to uncover the underlying assumptions about the world that were characteristic of different periods in the history of Western culture. The underlying question is whether contemporary concerns about sustainability require fundamental changes in the way we conceive of ourselves and our environment.

GLA2025H - Global Economic Policy Lab

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesday 2:00-4:30pm
Instructor(s): Mark Manger

Description:

This lab analyzes current global economic policy challenges. Students write weekly short research notes similar to those produced by research departments and firms in the financial sector, and present their findings in class. Topics are current trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, economic forecasts, and market developments as they feed back into policy making. Following revisions, select research notes are published on the lab website. Students also write an end-of-term longer research note that offers more detailed analysis. The course is aimed at students who seek future employment as economic and policy analysts in the public and private sector.

GLA2067H - Topics in Justice II: Illicit Trade in Drugs

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Friday 10am-12:00pm
Instructor(s): Benoît Gomis

Description:

This courses focuses on the illicit trade in legal and illegal drugs (e.g. opioids, cannabis, tobacco). After an overview of key characteristics, trends, factors, and impacts of illicit trade worldwide, students will learn methods to research illicit trade and estimate the size of illicit markets, and explore challenges associated with illicit trade data overall. Following this introduction, the course will assess to what extent illicit markets are inherently violent, and explore the links between illicit trade and terrorism. Case studies will include the impact of legalization/regulation on the illicit cannabis trade, the complicity of the tobacco industry in the illicit tobacco trade, and the opioid crisis in the U.S. and Canada. Finally, the course will tackle policy options against the illicit trade, in particular the international drug control regime and the WHO FCTC Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products, as well as their implementations at country-level.

GLA2000H - Capstone Seminar

This is a required course for MGA students. It is closed to non-MGA students.

Term: Winter/Spring
Day & Time: Wednesdays 1-4pm (Justice, Markets, Development, Education Policy, Innovation, Sustainability) 1-3 (Security)
Instructor(s): Shiri Breznitz , Mark Manger , John Robinson , Benoît Gomis , Rajshri Jayaraman , Todd Foglesong , Rie Kijima

Description:

The Capstone course will rely on clients –representing the private sector, an international organization, a non-governmental organization, or government — and students will work in teams to tackle a current issue confronting these clients and their organizations. Students will learn to analyze these problems across dimensions of global economy and markets, global institutions, and global civil society. Throughout the course, students will engage in activities designed to assist global problem-solvers, while also looking for opportunities to defend and advance their clients’ organizational interests.

*Please note: Information on the Capstone projects to be released later this year. Students will have the opportunity to indicate their preferences from among a selection of projects.