Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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February 2018

  • Monday, February 26th A Conversation with BRICS Consulates - From Xiamen to Johannesburg: The Role of BRICS in Global Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 26, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMCombination Room
    Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue
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    Description

    BRICS is an association of the world’s five largest emerging economies – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa. It is also an increasingly important international summit institution. Since 2009, BRICS members have met annually at leader summits to promote the interests and role of developing states in global governance. The most recent BRICS Summit in 2017 was hosted in Xiamen, China.

    In an increasingly fractured world marked by rising protectionist sentiments, looming trade wars and global threats such as climate change, global health, security challenges, – what unique opportunities and potential does BRICS offer? More broadly, what role do rising powers have in addressing global challenges? What leadership potential does BRICS offer in global governance today? This panel aims to address these questions as BRICS group prepares for its tenth annual summit in July 2018, which will hosted and presided over by South Africa in Johannesburg.

    At this event hosted by the BRICS Research Group and Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union, we are honored to be joined by the Consul Generals of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa to Toronto. Five (TBC) BRICS Consul Generals will be addressing the U of T community on their vision and contributions to BRICS. Please join us on February 26th, 4-6pm at the Combination Room of Trinity College for this panel event. Please kindly note that only guests who have registered via the Munk School event listing will be admitted to the event.

    Contact

    Angela Hou

    Co-Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    BRICS Research Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 28th The Director's Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) warmly invites you to the second event of our Research Seminar Series – “The Director’s Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema” with Professor Takashi Fujitani.

    This research seminar series is brought to you by CASSU, and aims to provide a forum for students who share similar interests in Asian social, cultural, and political affairs to engage in dialogue with faculty members. We hope to provide our peers with the opportunity to better understand the practice of academic inquiry through learning about faculty-level research. In this seminar, Professor Fujitani will speak about his experience researching the history of the Asia-Pacific region, with a particular focus on his interest in cinema and his inter-disciplinary approach to history and film in the context of Asian Studies. Please join us in Room 208N of the Munk School North House on February 28th, from 3-5pm. We hope to see you there!

    Speaker Biography

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). A graduate of UC Berkeley, Professor Takashi Fujitani came to the University of Toronto from the University of California, San Diego, where he was a professor of modern Japanese history for two decades. He has held numerous grants and fellowships, including from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Stanford Humanities Center, and Social Science Research Council. He is also editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press). Much of his past and current research has centered on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, gender and cultural production in the Asia-Pacific, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2018

  • Friday, March 2nd Bordering Families: Kinship Migration and Immigration Bureaucracy in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT
    About 45% of foreign residents in South Korea are women, and the majority of them come to South Korea on kinship-related legal status. This talk investigates gendered bordering practices in “temporary ethno-kinship visa programs” which requires migrants to provide proof and justification to immigration authorities when extending their visas. Using extensive ethnographic data, this talk will demonstrate how migrants experience and contest such bordering practices in courts, immigration offices and other government agencies, as well as in their daily lives. Through an in-depth focus on marriage migrants from Vietnam and co-ethnic migrants from China, this talk will discuss how two groups of migrant women make contested kinship claims to the South Korean state:. Using Balibar’s notion of “being a border” and Zelizer’s ideas about the intimate economy, this talk conceptualises the border as a dynamic site where notions of membership, family and speculative capital are contested. Focusing on the technical aspect of defining and adjudicating family through immigration measures will allow us to see the performative account of “governmentality” and procedural contradictions in the grey areas of the law. It will also enable us to analyse state actions and migrant responses to them organically as each traverses justifications of family, immigration and economy.

    BIOGRAPHY
    Sohoon Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. Her postdoctoral research project explores the ‘informal’ politics between the migrant care workers and their employers in the liminal space of immigration, social protection and labour. Building upon her PhD thesis, she is currently working on a book manuscript on the temporality of ethno-kinship migration in South Korea through a combination of ethnography, in-depth personal and group interviews and analysis of laws and policies. Her research interests also include multicultural (damunhwa) policies in South Korea, return migrants and bottom-up development in Indonesia, and NGO-Trade Union relationship in migrant movement in South Korea. Prior to her PhD studies, she worked at Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) in areas of ASEAN human rights mechanisms, indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia, and documentation of human rights violation. She has also undertaken consultancies with UN Women, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES), and other NGOs to write on topics of migrant domestic workers, intersectionality and discrimination and labour rights protections in South Korea.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Cynthia Cranford
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Sohoon Lee
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 6th Re-storying Indigenous Geographies: a story of urban Ainu migration in comparative context

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 6, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Questions of Indigeneity in the Asia-Pacific Seminar Series

    Description

    Abstract:

    In recent years, the task of “restorying” has been identified as an important strategy in making space for the counternarratives of the nation-state from the perspective of Indigenous histories. Here, I use four stories to start to tell a different history of Indigenous Ainu life in Japan. The stories recount Ainu experiences of migration to Tokyo and other cities since the early 1900s. Beyond their narrative content, I explain how these stories are part of a broader political project that urban Ainu leaders have used for over forty years to contest and resist the ‘regionalization’ of Indigenous Ainu affairs to Hokkaido. Using the Ainu situation as my reference point, I develop a comparative conversation about the transformation of Indigenous geographies across the Pacific and elaborate on the fraught politics but also moral value of thinking with urban mobilities. I end with reflections on an exchange between Tokyo Ainu and Montreal Inuit in Osaka in 2003 and its relevance for my current project.

    Biography:

    Mark Watson is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. His main area of research concerns the comparative analysis of urban Indigenous collectivity, self-organization and mobility. This focus informs broader, on-going interest in practices and theories of action-oriented and collaborative research.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Mark Watson
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 9th Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 9, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Biography:

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lee Novetzke
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 10th Community Screening of Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼 & Conversations with the Director JO Se-young and Korean feminist activist-scholars

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 10, 20182:15PM - 5:30PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
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    Description

    *******TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION HERE: https://variety-survival-talkshow.eventbrite.ca/

    *Open to Public; Tickets are free of charge; Bilingual (English subtitle & Korean-English interpretation for the panel is provided) (감독과의 대화: 한국어/영어 통역)

    Title: Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼
    Director: JO Se-young
    Genre: Documentary
    Production: South Korea 2009
    Running time: 72 min (panel and open Q&A the director will follow screening)
    Doors Open: 2:15pm
    Screening Starts: 2:30pm
    Audio: Korean (English subtitles)

    Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼, an award-winning documentary, follows the narrative of South Korean women who have come together to break the silence about sexual violence. It is a story of survival and resilience, but also desires, intimacy, and collective solidarity for social change. On the International Women’s Day in 2018, in the #MeToo moment across national borders, we hope this documentary and the discussion with the Director Jo Se-young, together with feminist activist-scholars Youn Joung Kim and Hae Yeon Choo, will inspire us think through what women’s citizenship means, reminding us how the personal is ever more political.

    Director JO Se-young has directed numerous critically-acclaimed feature documentaries with a focus on gender and sexual politics in South Korea. She made her debut in film directing in 2005 with . She received the Jinbo Award at the Seoul Independent Documentary Film and Video Festival with (2009). She also won the White Goose Award at the DMZ Korean International Documentary Film Festival and other awards with , on women’s experiences with abortion.

    Youn Joung Kim is a feminist activist-scholar and Ph.D. student in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University. She appears in this documentary as a member of the feminist group against sexual violence in South Korea. Her research interests revolved around sex work and U.S. militarization in South Korea.

    Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Affiliated Faculty of the Asian Institute and the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) on labor and marriage migration and the question of migrant rights and citizenship in South Korea.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    JO Se-young
    Film director

    Youn Joung Kim
    Ph.D Student, Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies, York University

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Hope21: Korean Progressive Network in Canada

    Toronto Korean Film Festival (TKFF)

    Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU) at the University of Toronto

    Centre for Feminist Research at York University

    Gender, Feminist, & Women's Studies at York University

    York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 12th Impunity as State Formation: A New History of Post-Absolutist Thailand

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 12, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Max Weber famously characterized the state as the entity holding the monopoly on legitimate violence in the polity. What if, instead, the state is formed through the exercise of impunity, or the persistent and repeated failure to be held to account for illegitimate violence? In this paper, I develop a framework of impunity as state formation grounded in a new history of post-absolutist Thailand. Three key moments since the end of the absolute monarchy in 1932 – a 1958 coup that claimed to respect the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an investigation into state violence at the height of the Cold War that enhanced its cover-up, and the emergence of a dialectic of who can be killed with impunity and who cannot be impugned in the late reign of Rama IX – are key components of this history and invite new approaches to the study of law, human rights, and sovereignty.

    Biography:

    Tyrell Haberkorn is an Associate Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and writes about state violence and dissident cultural politics in Thailand. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law and Violence in Northern Thailand (University of Wisconsin Press, 2011) and In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand (University of Wisconsin Press, 2018). Her essays and translations have appeared in Dissent, Foreign Affairs, openDemocracy, and Prachatai.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 15th China’s 19th Party Congress: Leadership, Decision-Making, and Political Succession

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 15, 201810:00AM - 11:30AM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    China’s 19th Party Congress of October 2017 is a landmark in Xi Jinping’s leadership. Predictably Xi was “re-elected” as general secretary and he began his second term in a new position of strength, although he is still subjected to a number of constraints. The important personnel changes at the Party Congress will be fleshed out at the National People’s Congress in early March 2018 when Premier Li Keqiang forms his cabinet. This will provide more clues to the continuities and changes in China’s leadership changeover, decision-making specifics, and the pattern of political succession. In addition to these issues, the paper will also attempt to address the opportunities and challenges confronting the Xi Jinping leadership. As such, the paper is a third in a series of talks about the 19th Party Congress sponsored by the Asian Institute.

    Biography:

    Dr. Alfred L. Chan is professor of political science at Huron University College, London, Ontario. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one on power and policy during the Xi Jinping era and another one on the Hu Jintao era.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred Chan
    Professor, Department of Political Science, Huron University College


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 15th Trade and Economic Growth in Asia and the Pacific: A Multilateral Development Bank Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 15, 20182:00PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Stephen Groff, Vice President of Operations for Southeast/East Asia and the Pacific at the Asian Development Bank will discuss how regional cooperation and integration, technology, and value chains all help contribute to trade and economic growth in Asia and the Pacific.

    Stephen P. Groff is responsible for the full range of ADB’s operations in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. His mandate includes establishing strategic and operational priorities in his areas of responsibility, producing investment and technical assistance operations amounting to approximately $5 billion annually, managing an existing portfolio of about $31 billion, and leading about 650 staff.

    In addition, Mr. Groff supports ADB’s President in managing ADB’s overall operations, represents ADB in high-level multilateral fora, and contributes to managing its relationships with its 67 member country shareholders, other multilateral financial institutions, and key government, private sector, and civil society partners.

    Prior to joining ADB, Mr. Groff was Deputy Director for Development Cooperation at the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) where he led OECD’s work on a wide range of development-related economic and political issues. He also served as OECD’s envoy to the G20 Working Group on Development and was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council. Prior to this he was the Deputy Vice-President for Operations at the Washington-based Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where he helped set up the agency and led MCC programs while advising the CEO on development issues, strategy, and policy. Prior to MCC, Mr. Groff held several staff positions at the ADB. Before this, Mr. Groff was the deputy director and chief economist on a large U.S. Agency for International Development project designed to encourage private sector development in the southern Philippines, a Program Director for the U.S. Refugee Program, and a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer.

    Mr. Groff has worked across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and writes regularly on development issues. He also serves on a number of advisory boards for development-related organizations.

    Mr. Groff holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Biology from Yale University.


    Speakers

    Stephen Groff
    Vice President of Operations for Southeast/East Asia and the Pacific at the Asian Development Bank


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 16th Media Politics in China: Improvising Power Under Authoritarianism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 16, 20182:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Who watches over the party-state? In this engaging analysis, Maria Repnikova reveals the webs of an uneasy partnership between critical journalists and the state in China. More than merely a passive mouthpiece or a dissident voice, the media in China also plays a critical oversight role, one more frequently associated with liberal democracies than with authoritarian systems. Chinese central officials cautiously endorse media supervision as a feedback mechanism, as journalists carve out space for critical reporting by positioning themselves as aiding the agenda of the central state. Drawing on rare access in the field, Media Politics in China examines the process of guarded improvisation that has defined this volatile partnership over the past decade on a routine basis and in the aftermath of major crisis events. Combined with a comparative analysis of media politics in the Soviet Union and contemporary Russia, the book highlights the distinctiveness of Chinese journalist-state relations, as well as the renewed pressures facing them in the Xi era.
    The book will be available for sale at the venue.

    Biography:

    Maria Repnikova is a scholar of political communication in illiberal contexts, with a focus on Chinese media politics. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Global Communication and a Director of the Center for Global Information Studies at Georgia State University. Maria’s work examines critical journalism, political propaganda, cyber nationalism, and global media branding in China, drawing some comparisons to Russia. Her work appeared in the China Quarterly, New Media & Society, Journal of Contemporary China, as well as in Foreign Affairs andForeign Policy, amongst other venues. Her book, Media Politics in China: Improvising Power Under Authoritarianism, is just out with Cambridge University Press. In the past, Maria was a post-doctoral fellow at the Annenberg School for Communication. Maria holds a PhD in Politics from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Maria Repnikova
    Assistant Professor, Global Communication, Georgia State University


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 16th Not Yet: Indigeneity, Antiblackness, and Anticolonial Liberation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    In the song “Immigrants (We Get the Job Done)” from Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton Mixtape, the settlement of the Americas is framed through liberal understandings of arrival and immigration that transform chattel slavery and forced labor into the exceptional narratives of pulling oneself up from hard labor to freedom. It reflects current political mobilizations against xenophobia and immigration bans that insist that we are all immigrants to the Americas. And it erases completely the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples and lands. At the same time, Indigenous studies has come under critique from a range of scholars who argue that assertions of sovereignty and land hinge on the afterlife of slavery, the endemic possessive logics of antiblackness constitutive of new world politics, and the xenophobia of territories and borders. Rather than approach these discussions as representative of a historical and ontological impasse, this talk will engage recent work in Indigenous critical studies and Black studies to think through how antiblackness and colonization produce dispossession. How might we imagine anticolonial liberation outside and beyond the structures of settler whiteness?

    Biography:

    Jodi A. Byrd is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and associate professor of English and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she is also a faculty affiliate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. She is the author of Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism (Minnesota, 2011). Her articles have appeared in American Indian Quarterly, Cultural Studies Review, Interventions, J19, College Literatures, Settler Colonial Studies, and American Quarterly. Her teaching and research focuses on issues of indigeneity, gender, and sexuality at the intersections of political studies, postcolonial studies, queer studies, comparative ethnic studies, and technology studies. Her current manuscript in process, entitled Indigenomicon: American Indians, Videogames, and Structures of Genre, interrogates how the structures of digital code intersect with issues of sovereignty, militarism, and colonialism.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jodi A. Byrd
    Associate professor, English and Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 26th Book Talk: The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 26, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The Killing Season examines one of the largest and swiftest instances of mass killing and incarceration in the twentieth century—the shocking anti-leftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some five hundred thousand people dead and more than a million others in detention. Challenging conventional narratives that portray the violence as arising spontaneously from religious, cultural, and social conflicts, the book argues that it was instead the product of a deliberate campaign led by the Indonesian Army. It also details the critical role played by the United States, Britain, and other major powers in facilitating the mass murder and incarceration – and the more than 50 years of silence and inaction that followed. In contrast to prevailing approaches, The Killing Season seeks to locate Indonesia’s experience in a comparative historical framework. In doing so, it engages wider theoretical debates about the logic and legacies of mass killing and incarceration, as well as the histories of human rights, US foreign policy, and the Cold War.

    Speaker Biographies:

    Geoffrey Robinson is a Professor of History at UCLA where he teaches and writes about political violence, genocide, human rights, and mass incarceration. He received his PhD from Cornell University. His major works include: The Dark Side of Paradise: Political Violence in Bali (Cornell, 1995); East Timor 1999: Crimes against Humanity (Elsham & Hak, 2006); “If You Leave Us Here, We Will Die”: How Genocide Was Stopped in East Timor (Princeton, 2010); and most recently, The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66 (Princeton University Press, 2018). Before coming to UCLA, Robinson worked for six years at Amnesty International’s Research Department in London, and in 1999 he served as a Political Affairs Officer with the United Nations in Dili, East Timor. He is currently co-editing a book of photographs and images related to the mass violence of 1965-66 in Indonesia.

    Margaret MacMillan is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and the former Warden of St. Antony’s College.
    She is the author of the Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Geoffrey Robinson
    Keynote
    Professor, Department of History, UCLA

    Margaret MacMillan
    Opening Remarks
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2018

  • Tuesday, April 3rd Tian Xia and the Evolution of Chinese Leadership: former New York Times Asia Correspondent Howard French on his Book “Everything Under the Heavens"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 3, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    French describes the foundation of a resilient Pax Sinica as “a basic proposition that was reasonably consistent: accept our superiority and we will confer upon you political legitimacy...”, a tribute system that dates back as far as the Han dynasty. Through its nine-dash- line diplomacy and beyond, China is now “increasingly determined to brook no rivals in the region”, including the USA. Join Howard French in an insightful discussion of how, based on its history, China might exercise its growing national power in the decades ahead.

    Biography:

    Howard French reported from Africa for The Washington Post and at The New York Times was bureau chief in Central America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa; Japan; and China. He has also written for The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, and Rolling Stone, among other U.S. publications. His work has earned him two Overseas Press Club awards and two Pulitzer Prize nominations. He is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa and China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa. Mr. French is on the faculty of the Columbia University School of Journalism and lives in New York City.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Howard French
    Speaker
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York


    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 6th Pathways Magazine Volume 2, No. 2 Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 6, 20181:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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