Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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January 2020

  • Friday, January 24th Retrospect and Prospect of Hong Kong Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 202012:30PM - 2:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Diving into the historical development of Postwar Hong Kong film culture reveals complexity beyond our understandings of the typical “rise and fall” narrative. Any investigation into Postwar Hong Kong cinema must entail an examination of Hong Kong’s colonial history and its changing sociopolitical conditions as well. During the 1960s, Hong Kong was the site for numerous ideological struggles between Britain, China, and Hong Kong, and it is this intersection of culture and politics that this symposium hopes to emphasize.

    Dr. Jing Jing Chang will be speaking on her new book Screening Communities, an exciting new analysis that situates Hong Kong cinema within the city’s colonial past. An incredible historical narrative on shaping a local community through film narrative.

    Dr. Jessica Li will be presenting her paper “Eileen Chang: Hong Kong Screenplays in the 1960s.” An insightful research tracing the trajectory of Shanghai writer Eileen Chang who had brought together the cultural interflows between Shanghai and Hong Kong.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Jing Jing Chang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Jessica Tsui-Yan Li
    Speaker
    Associate Professor & Program Coordinator, Chinese Language and Literature, York University

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies & Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of East Asian Studies

    Bart Testa
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    China Studies Workshop

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20201:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This is a book panel on George Anderson & Sujit Choudhry’s recently published edited volume, Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions (Oxford University Press, 2019). This edited volume, and an accompanying policy paper, are the major outputs of the “Territory and Power” project, a 5-year, thematic, collaborative, global research initiative led by the Center for Constitutional Transitions, the Forum of Federations, and International IDEA, that brought together 24 experts from 13 countries. The research question is how territorial claims relate to constitution-making processes and constitutional design during periods of intense political engagement over constitutional reform or “constitutional moments”. The book includes 17 case studies. Anderson & Choudhry will present the main findings of Territory and Power, followed by commentary by Jacques Bertrand & Lucan Way, who were in participants in this project and contributed chapters.

    Sujit Choudhry (WZB Berlin Social Science Research Centre) is one of the world’s leading scholars of comparative constitutional law. His edited volumes include The Migration of Constitutional Ideas (CUP), Constitutional Design for Divided Societies (OUP), the Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution (OUP), Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions(OUP), and Security Sector Reform in Constitutional Transitions (OUP). He is currently working on the public law theory of political parties. He has advised constitutional processes in Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Myanmar, Nepal, South Africa, Tunisia, Ukraine and Yemen.

    George Anderson has been a federal deputy minister, president of the Forum of Federations, and member of the UN’s stand-by team of mediation experts. He is a fellow at Queen’s University’s Centre for the Study of Democracy and Diversity. In addition to his extensive work internationally, he is author of the widely translated Federalism: An Introduction and Fiscal Federallsim: A Comparative Introduction, as well as editor of volumes on oil and gas, water, and internal markets in federal systems.

    Lucan Ahmad Way is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (2015) and co-author of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes After the Cold War (2010). Together with Steven Levitsky, he is completing a book on the durability of autocracies founded in violent social revolution.

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Filiz Kahraman is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and an affiliate faculty member at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies of the Munk School at the University of Toronto. Her research investigates law and politics from international and comparative perspectives. She is currently working on a book manuscript examining why labor activists in Europe pursue human rights law as a new mobilization strategy and how international law has affected the lives of aggrieved workers on the ground.


    Speakers

    Sujit Choudhry
    Speaker

    George Anderson
    Speaker

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Speaker

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker

    Filiz Kahraman
    Chair


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 24th Hong Kong: Global China’s Restive Frontier

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Post-1997 Hong Kong has become the restive frontier of global China – it is the place where the major strategies of global Chinese power are in full display, and where these have provoked the strongest popular resistance yet to Chinese domination. In this talk, I will first analyze Hong Kong as the testing ground for China’s power playbook around the world – (1) economic statecraft (2) patron-clientelism (3) symbolic violence. How do these mechanisms play out in Hong Kong? Second, I will trace the trajectory of countermovements in Hong Kong to generate lessons about the limits and effectiveness of global China.

    Ching Kwan Lee is Dr. Chung Sze-yuen Professor of Social Science at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Professor of Sociology at UCLA. Her latest books include The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor and Foreign Investment in Africa (Chicago 2017) and Take Back Our Future: An Eventful Sociology of the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement (Cornell 2019).

    RELATED EVENT: “Stand with Hong Kong Journalists” Photo Exhibit
    DATES: December 2, 2019 – January 6, 2020
    HOURS: please click here for regular and winter holidays hours
    LOCATION: Hart House, University of Toronto, 7 Hart House Circle
    Please click here for more information
    PRESENTING PARTNERS:
    Hart House, University of Toronto 
    Stand With Hong Kong Journalists (SWHKJ)
    The International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law 


    Speakers

    Ching Kwan Lee
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Panel Discussion on Taiwan Presidential Election 2020: The outcomes and implications

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Taiwan will hold its 7th direct Presidential election on January 11, 2020. The incumbent candidate, President Tsai Ing-wen (Democratic Progressive Party – DPP) will face off the opposition candidates, the Kaohsiung mayor of Han Kuo-yu (Chinese Nationalist Party – KMT), and the People First Party (PFP) candidate, James Soong. After suffering a huge defeat in the 2018 local elections, polls suggest Tsai Ing-wen in the lead. The two key election issues this time are China, particularly in light of Hong Kong protests, and Taiwan’s economy.

    We will bring together a distinguished group of Taiwan specialists to discuss and help us understand the election outcomes and their implications for Taiwan, Canada, global economy and international relations.

    Please join us for the Panel Discussion followed by reception.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Sida Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Speaker
    Vice Provost, International Studies Experiences, Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Catherine Y. M. Hsu
    Speaker
    Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and Public Policy, Department of Sociology, and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto (TAAT)

    Global Taiwan Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Monday, February 3rd Terror Capitalism: Turkic Muslim Dispossession in Northwest China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Description

    A new system of control, made up of a multi-billion dollar industry of computer-vision technologies, militarized policing, and the mass mobilization of civil servants and private industrialists, is attempting to transform Uyghur and Kazakh native societies in Northwest China. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this talk describes the history which produced these forms of surveillance and demonstrates the quotidian experience of their effects on Turkic Muslim social institutions. It argues that this system of “reeducation” is, in fact, a social engineering system that works in concert with a Chinese form of illiberal capitalism to produce forms of family separation and economic production. As it is implemented, it has the effect of partitioning and radically disempowering women and men who are already marginalized within national and international systems.

    Darren Byler is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. His book project titled Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City focuses on the effects of digital cultural production and surveillance industries in the lives of Uyghur and Han male migrants in the city of Ürümchi, Xinjiang.


    Speakers

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History and Global Asia Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Vincent Wong
    Discussant
    William C. Graham Research Associate at the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Between Human, Non-Human, and Woman: An Actress Theorizes Exhaustion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1940, at the height of her stardom, the star-actress Shanta Apte wrote a harsh polemic against the Bombay film industry. I interrogate this curious text – Should I Join the Movies? – by placing it at the intersection of female stardom, the corporeality of cinematic labor, and techno-scientific interest in industrial fatigue. The weariness of the actress, her capacity for “being spent,” is an experiential category that pushes us to think embodiment as production experience. This essay positions Apte’s text as theory from the South that helps us rethink the meanings of gender, embodiment, affective labor, inequality, and human-machine relations at a critical phase in the career of cinema in India. In dialogue with Apte, I think through the materiality of the off-screen world of film work and parse her insistence on embodiment as the grounds for refusal and resistance.

    Debashree Mukherjee is Assistant Professor of film and media in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University. Her first book, Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City (forthcoming from Columbia University Press) brings together insights from film and media studies, feminist cultural studies, new materialisms, and technology studies to narrate the history of Bombay cinema as a history of material practice.


    Speakers

    Debashree Mukherjee
    Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20201:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 15. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Matthew Walton
    Chair
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Diana Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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