Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

October 2018

  • Tuesday, October 16th Taking Roots: Coding & Design for Platform Co-Ops

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Before the 2018 Platform Coop Consortium (PCC platform.ccoop/2018, Sept. 28, 29) formal conference began, Huang SunQuan organized a two-day co-ops+hackathon (coopathon 2). Preceded by a series of panel discussions held in Taipei, Kaohsiung, Hangzhou, and Hong Kong, over forty interested programmers, artists, social innovators, and international tech organizations from greater China and other countries participated. The previous coopathon 1 was held in Shanghai in 2016. The aim of these coopathons is to figure out the collaborative possibilities of coders and cooperatives, addressing fundamental issues before more deeply thinking about the platform of cooperativerism, particularly in the Chinese context.

    A difference exists between coops and hacker geeks, which extends beyond the pursuit of economic equality to differences in cultural and political values. Cooperativism asks for the participation of all or nothing at all, while the hacker geek model mostly pursues individual, ‘genius’ achievement. Coops are threatened by privatization, while the latter is an updated neoliberal version of the Californian ideology of accelerationism and solutionism (1995, Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron). The former pursues economic justice—that is, better relations of production; the latter pursues efficiently productive forces. Hackers don’t like doors that can’t be opened, but cooperatives hope the door will always open.

    These two groups are more or less unaware of the commonalities they share. They both need a sustainable model, and they both rely on the results of sharing and mutual benefit. In this talk, Huang SunQuan will share some of his experiences of coopathons and some Chinese cooperatives which he deeply engaged in, discussing strategies for introducing a social aspect into coding and the design of platform coops.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Huang SunQuan (PhD, Building and Planning from National Taiwan University) is Professor at the China Academy of Art and Director of the Institute of Network Society, School of Inter-Media Art, CAA. He is an artivist engaging in architecture, media, social movements, and art, known for his long-term research and intervention in media, internet culture, and social activism.

    Huang SunQuan was the editor-in-chief of POTS Weekly (established in 1994) and the director of Cultural Express from 2007 to 2009. He organized the first anti-gentrification movement in Taiwan under the slogan “Against City Government’s Bulldozers” (1997) and made the documentary film Green Bulldozer: the Rise of Your New Homeland. In 2004, he created one of the most influential blogs in Taiwan (twblog.net) and the Taiwan Independent Media Center (tw.indymedia.org) as part of the network of Global Independent Media Center (indymedia.org).

    In recent years, he has undertaken a curatorial and artistic practice, running Monkey-Wrenching Art Center in the southern Taiwan. He has participated in the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture (2007, 2013), “Memoscape” at Cube Project Space, “Juke Box of Kaohsiung” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, and mounted a solo show, “U-topophilia”, at the Red Brick Art Museum, Beijing, among other projects. Curatorial projects include “Treasure Hill GAPP (Global Artivist Participation Plan)” (2003, 2004), “Lulu Shur-tzy Hou Solo Exhibition—Look toward the other side-Song of Asian Foreign Brides in Taiwan” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Arts (2010), and a migrant workers exhibition at Kaohsiung Labor Museum (2011-2012), etc.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Huang Sun-Quan
    Speaker
    Professor and Director of Institute of Network Society, China Academy of Art

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Director, Global Taiwan Studies Program


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Daniels Faculty University of Toronto, Master of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 19th Uncollecting India: Hidden Histories of a Museum

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 19, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, has the largest collection of Indian artefacts outside India, which was mostly acquired during colonial times. The V&A’s Indian collections can be used to track a history of the impulses and opportunities underlying colonial collecting: artefacts entered the collection as loot, as gifts, and as documentation of resources available in the colony.

    Alongside a history of collecting, however, there is a history of uncollecting, where collections are trimmed and refined through the removal of artefacts that are considered unimportant or irrelevant to the museum’s changing aims. The process of “de-accessioning” is one that museums seldom discuss in public, but the museum’s records keep traces of this less visible process.

    This talk will track the fate of four grand, architectural-scale Indian artefacts that were collected by the V&A in the 19th century but are no longer available to view. Each of these four artefacts was collected in response to different impulses; each was hailed in its time as an important acquisition and was prominently displayed; each fell out of favour and was removed from the galleries for a different reason and in a different way. By tracking the histories of these objects the talk will open the door to a hidden history of the museum.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Kavita Singh is Professor of Art History and is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she teaches courses on the history of Indian painting and the history and politics of museums. She has published essays on issues of colonial history, repatriation, secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialisation of difficult histories as they relate to museums in India and beyond. She has also published essays on aspects of Mughal painting.


    Speakers

    Kavita Singh
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th The Genealogies of Dalit Learning and Humanist Buddhism in 19th and 20th Century India

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 201810:00AM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the modern historiography of Dalit learning in Southern India certain names stand out: Ayothee Thass Pandithar (1845-1914) and Bhimrao Ambedkar (1891-1956) being the most prominent. Much of the historiographical narrative of their scholarly achievements tends to be placed against the backdrop of colonial modernity and particularly tied to the emergence of “Buddhism” as the religion favoured by modernists in the colonial period. Though much recent work has been done on Ambedkarite Buddhism there is still much more that remains to be done on its local
    and vernacular iterations within specific Dalit regional locations and communities and how it has specifically comes to be used as a vehicle for new religious imaginaries and for an ethical and humanist approach to living. This one-day workshop plans to focus on the resonances of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its South Indian (Tamil and Maharashtrian) context to address some of these issues. It is the intention of this workshop to bring into conversation these two seemingly divergent strands of Dalit learning in showing how in their convergence on the issue of religious authority and “caste” and in their complex negotiation of these we might be able to not just perceive certain common genealogies but that these, in turn, might also to enable us to gain new perspectives on the nature of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its specifically South Indian iterations.


    Speakers

    Dr. Jon Keune
    Michigan State University

    Dr. Stalin Rajangam
    American College, Madurai


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    The Buddhist Education Foundation for Canada

    The Dr. Ho Centre for Buddhist Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th Asian-Canadian Futures

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    What does the future of Asian-Canadian relations hold? Ever-deepening connections with Asia are reshaping the ways that Canadians participate in global media, transnational business, international education, and cultural and historical production. This panel reflects on the influences of Asian-Canadian dynamics in transforming the speakers’ fields of expertise, including business and media, immigration politics, historical memory, curatorial and archival work, and university education.

    Reception to follow


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2018

  • Friday, November 2nd “Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This research project examines the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry in South Korea to demonstrate how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested, negotiated, and reconstructed by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors, gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries. This study envisions reproductive ethics as part of a transnational feminist agenda by examining the ethical issues raised by the complicated relationships between intended parents and gamete donors/gestational surrogates. Drawing on three years of multi-sited ethnographic research conducted in South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine, this project disputes the unilateral understanding of ART, which is typically conceptualized as having a unidirectional flow from the “West” to Asia, by focusing on the complex relations between Korean intended parents and non-Korean gamete providers and gestational surrogates.
    Dr. Sunhye Kim is currently the Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow in Korean Studies at the Korea Institute, Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland in 2018. She received her B.A. and B.A in Sociology at Yonsei University, Seoul, and worked at the Korean Women’s Development Institute as a researcher. Sunhye’s research and teaching interests are related to the politics of human (re)production in transnational Asia; in particular, her research centers on the study of the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry as a site of interdisciplinary inquiry.


    Speakers

    Sunhye Kim
    Korea Institute, Harvard University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 9th Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang: The Epistemological Stakes of Two Realisms in New Taiwan Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    If, as Umberto Eco has argued, a work of art can be read as an “epistemological metaphor,” then the fictional world created by a film can also be read as an analogical comment on the knowability of the “real” world. This paper explores two models of cinematic realism, one totalizing and one apophatic, the former represented by Edward Yang’s Yi Yi and the latter by the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien. The former raises the ideal of cinema as a means of revealing even the hidden aspects of reality and thereby providing increased epistemological certainty. In contrast, through techniques including editing ellipses and the mobilization of off-screen space, Hou’s realism paradoxically represents a reality that defies or exceeds representation and therefore can only be represented in a negative or subtractive manner. It will further be argued that the two modes of realism reflect opposing impulses in a central dialectic of modernity.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Jason McGrath is Associate Professor in Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota, with affiliations in Moving Image Studies and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. His current book project is entitled Inscribing the Real: Realism and Convention in Chinese Cinema from the Silent Era to the Digital Age.


    Speakers

    Jason McGrath
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th The Indo-Pacific: Security Governance for Peace

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20184:00PM - 6:30PMKaneff Research Tower, York University, 4700 Keele Street
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    Series

    Second in the Series of Annual Workshops on Ocean Frontiers

    Description

    About the Workshop:

    This second round of the annual series of workshops on Ocean Frontiers focusses on “The Indo-Pacific”. This workshop brings together scholars, officials and research experts to discuss a range of trans-frontier security issues emerging from the Indo-Pacific region. Of critical importance is clarity on what the “Indo-Pacific” construct means and implies, both as an epistemic category of geostrategic vision and as a geophysical domain in the larger context of perilous maritime-space-nuclear nexus. The workshop also aims to promote insights into international security governance norms, Canada’s role in Indo-Pacific security governance, and Canadian engagement in trans-pacific peace processes through ASEAN, NATO, and the U.N. The larger purpose is to foster critical thinking on geostrategic issues management, and promote discussions on peaceful ways of establishing global security governance mechanisms.

    Program Plan:

    4 – 4.30p.m: Reception & Registration: workshop participants (scholars, officials, researchers), York’s AVP Research, Heads of Depts. and faculty members (Political Science, Science & Technology Studies; Geography; Environmental Studies; Int. Law) & Science for Peace Committee members

    4.30 – 5.30p.m:
    I. Welcome Address: by AVP Research Dr. Celia Haig Brown/York U President, Dr. Rhonda Lenton; Exec. Dir., York Center for Asian Research, Dr. Abidin Kusno

    II. Introduction to the workshop objectives; on the 3 areas of focus, and on exploratory research questions – Venilla Rajaguru (York U; Science for Peace)

    5.30- 6.30p.m: Keynote Address by Canadian Ambassador to the UN (ret’d) Peggy Mason on Security Governance for Peace (past lessons, current challenges, policies and security norms for peace)

    Q & A with audience 15-20mins


    Speakers

    Peggy Mason
    President, Rideau Institute and Canadian Ambassador to the UN (ret'd)


    Sponsors

    Science for Peace, Canada

    Conference of Defence Associations Institute (CDAI)

    York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: This Shaking Keeps Me Steady

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    The registration for this event is now open

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave (entrance off of St. George Street)

    Pakistan 2017
    61:00
    Urdu with English subtitles
    14A • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Shehrezad Maher

    Official Selection
    2018 Montreal International Documentary Film Festival
    2017 Visions du Reel

    This visually reflective documentary by Shehrezad Maher attempts to reconstruct trauma — both of first responders in Karachi, confronted with death every day, and of the victims and survivors whose experiences are shown via televised re-enactments replayed for mass entertainment.

    Originating from a prompt to two ambulance drivers in Karachi to retell their recurring dreams, this film explores the permeable boundaries between memory and fiction, and between lived trauma, its recollection, and its re-enactment. First responders reflect on the aftermath of violent events, while television re-enactment actors audition for, and perform the gendered roles of victim, perpetrator, and witness in scenarios ranging from the banal to the tragic. Unfolding through rituals, preparations, dreams, and performance, we never see the tragic events themselves, but instead catch traces of the extent to which they have been internalized by a society. -KE

    Shehrezad Maher was born and grew up in Karachi, Pakistan (1988) and is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. She studied visual arts at Bennington College and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale University (2014). Her work has screened at institutions and festivals such as Visions du Réel (Nyon, Switzerland), RIDM (Montréal, Canada), the LA Film Forum (Los Angeles, CA), Anthology Film Archives (New York, NY), and Experiments in Cinema (Albuquerque, NM).

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th How Democratic Should Vietnam Be?: Anticommunist Nationalists and the Debate on the Constitutional Transition in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN), May-December 1955

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the eyes of many foreign observers, one of the most puzzling aspects of the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam) was the continual in-fighting among anticommunists. Most accounts depict these internal conflicts as simply a struggle for power, but I contend that they also constituted a battle of ideas. Specifically, the presentation examines the debate between Ngô Đình Diệm and rival anticommunist nationalists in the summer and fall of 1955. Virtually all anticommunists agreed that the regime should become a constitutional republic, and they unanimously called for a democracy. Yet the seeming consensus belied starkly different definitions of democratic government. Diệm’s faction and the political parties associated with the southern sects called for a hybrid regime, that is, a regime that combined elements of authoritarianism and democracy. The sect parties demanded greater pluralism than Diệm, though the difference was of degree rather than of kind. The debate took a decidedly more liberal direction under the influence of the émigré politician Phan Quang Đán. Đán advocated for a militant democracy, that is, a full-fledged democracy that minimally limited liberty only to protect itself from extremist forces seeking to subvert democracy. In the end, Diệm prevailed over his rivals because he and his followers controlled the government. By seriously examining the diversity of political ideas in the RVN, the presentation suggests that the regime’s seeming intractable factionalism arose from substantive disagreements rather than factional squabbling.


    Speakers

    Nu-Anh Tran
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: A Time To Swim

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    The registration for this event is now open

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave. (entrance off of St. George Street).

    Canada/Malaysia 2017
    82:00
    English, Malay with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Ashley Duong (in attendance)

    Cast
    Mutang Urud
    Noeli Urud
    Agan Urud
    Natasha Blanchet-Cohen

    Official Selection
    2018 CAAMFest
    2017 LA Asian Pacific Film Fest

    Much has changed in Sarawak, Malaysia since Mutang Urud was exiled to Montreal, Canada, more than 20 years ago. A renowned activist for Indigenous rights, Mutang has started a family and now lives as a stay-at-home dad. Filmmaker Ashley Duong follows Mutang as he travels with his family back to Borneo to reunite with his village relations, their travel visa contingent on Mutang staying away from the local politics.

    The remote village in Sarawak, however, is not like he remembers it. His cousins who once fought for the forest alongside him have joined forces with the logging companies that are destroying it. Despite the threat of a lingering arrest warrant, Mutang can’t deny his activism. A Time To Swim traces Mutang’s search for belonging in a village where everyone is related, yet the very idea of home and heritage seems to be slipping away. – KE

    Ashley Duong is a Montreal-based filmmaker and multimedia storyteller working to amplify marginalized voices. A Time to Swim is her feature-length directorial debut. She has also recently produced Land and Legends, an interactive podcast about the connection between the landscapes and myths of the Kelabit.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 23rd Mahosadha’s Cunning and the Cretan Labyrinth

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 23, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    One of the Buddha Gotama’s numerous epithets was opamma kusalo muni – sage skilled in parables, exemplified in his life as Mahosadha. The remains of an early second millennium Burmese kingdom, named after its ceremonial center, Pagan, preserve several visual narratives of the story. They incorporate a labyrinth image to represent the setting where medicine curing human ailments was dispensed, and riddles and judicial problems were resolved – antecedent of the Bodhimanda – site of Gotama’s Awakening. Sometime in the late 11th century an unknown artisan, guided by a learned though anonymous Buddhist monk, selected the labyrinth image to reference his society’s conception of the human predicament. That monk’s vastly better known Christian counterparts, a millennium earlier and in another part of the world, chose likewise. The lecture speculates on the reasons and significance of the monk’s choice in the Pagan context.

    Biography:

    Lilian Handlin is a historian. She received her doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she taught until 1977. She is the author and co-author of several books, including the four volume Liberty in America,1600 to the Present (New York, 1986 – 1995) as well as articles and reviews in American history. More recently, she began to publish articles concerned with Myanmar’s early history, grounded in the material culture surviving the kingdom of Pagan. One of her publications compares two Pagan era narratives of the Vessantara with its first Burmese vernacular version composed by an influential 18th century Burmese monk and commentator. The article was published in Steven Collins, ed., Readings in the Vessantara Jataka (New York, Columbia University Press, 2016). An examination of the myth of the Buddha’s eye teeth, in the Pagan context, appeared this summer in Cristophe Munier Gaillard, ed., Mural Art, Studies on Paintings in Asia (Bangkok 2018).


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Dr. Lilian Handlin
    Speaker
    Professor, History Department, Harvard University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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