Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

Past Events Login

September 2019

  • Thursday, September 26th Transformative Student Research at the Asian Institute

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 26, 201912:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Featuring presentations from the Asian Institute’s 2018-19 RICHARD CHARLES LEE INSIGHTS THROUGH ASIA CHALLENGE (ITAC) & BIG IDEAS COMPETITION: EXPLORING GLOBAL TAIWAN Student Research Awardees

    Event Program

    12:00-1:15PM
    Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) Presentations

    Yujuan (Emmy) Fu, Ethics, Society & Law; Literature & Critical Theory
    Jennifer Han, Peace, Conflict & Justice and Political Science
    Sites of (Un)belonging: Spaces/Faces of Honjok Youth in Seoul, South Korea

    Amrita Kumar-Ratta, MGA, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning
    Shades of Brown Girl: The Many Colours of Transnational South Asian Femininity

    Katie Kwang, Psychology; Economics
    Benita Leong, History; Political Science (UTM)
    Hui Wen Zheng, Contemporary Asian Studies; Peace, Conflict, and Justice
    Moving in and moving out: understanding the effects of social exclusion on the mental health of rural-urban migrants in Shenzhen

    Zixian Liu, PhD Candidate, Department of History
    Rural Land Marketization, the Displacement of the Urban Poor and the Neoliberalizing Developmental State in Beijing

    Habiba Maher
    Aliza Rahman
    Asian Modest Fashion in the Museum Space

    Minh Anh (Mia) Nguyen, Contemporary Asian Studies; Political Science
    Unwanted Children

    Man (Angela) Xu, Sociology Department
    The Invisible Hand of South-South Globalization: A Study of Chinese Migrants in Tehran

    1:15-1:45PM
    Lunch Break

    1:45-3:00PM
    Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan Presentations

    Adam Zivokinovic (“Zivo”) – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Ji Chen (Tony) Yin – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    The Referendum

    Anson Au, Department of Sociology; Department of Chinese Literature (Joint Appointment), National Sun Yat-Sen University
    The Everyday Politics of LGBTQ Minorities in Taiwan: Discrimination, Legalization, and Community

    Sabrina Teng-io Chung, PhD, East Asian Studies
    Exhibiting In-Justices: Human Rights Discourses in Taiwan’s Recent Redress Efforts

    Yiwei Jin, MA student, Department of Political Science
    Hsieh-Piao and the Politics of Personalization in Taiwan

    Niki C Yang, Criminology
    Celina B. Servanez, Criminology and Sociolegal Studies (graduate department)
    Sohrab Naderi, Political Science and Criminology
    Anti-Death Penalty Efforts in Taiwan

    3:00-4:00PM
    Reception

    About the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC)
    The Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) is an interdisciplinary experiential learning program at the Asian Institute that offers students the opportunity for an academically rooted, life-changing field research experience in Asia. On the vanguard of supporting the University’s wider goals of internationalization, redesigning undergraduate teaching, and increasing student mobility, ITAC supports students through the complete trajectory of their research, providing workshops on proposal writing, project management, research methods, ethical research practices, and data analysis as well as direct mentoring. Encouraging students to produce their research in various forms ranging from policy reports to documentary films or something else entirely, ITAC is open to undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines, across all three UofT campuses. Out of approximately 100 applications, five to seven research teams are awarded annually by an academic jury. More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/rcl-itac/

    About the Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan
    The Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan is a student research competition, which supports selected undergraduate and graduate student teams to conduct their outstanding research and creative projects in Taiwan. The Competition provides opportunities for student experience in Taiwan by combining research on issues connected to Taiwanese culture/society with travel, taking classroom learning into the field in order to develop academic research skills and self-confidence. The program is enthusiastically interdisciplinary, encouraging student-researchers across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences to collaborate with complementary skills and knowledge bases.

    Throughout the winter, awarded teams collectively participated in workshops on project management, research methods, ethical research practices, data analysis, and safety abroad. Teams work closely with an academic mentor and Asian Institute staff, rigorously developing their research projects before departing for field research in the summer semester. Spending up to a month immersed in local cultures, developing cultural fluencies, and conducting research, students return to write up final reports and produce their projects in the late summer.
    More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/global-taiwan-studies-program-big-ideas-competition/

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2019

  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    King’s College London


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 cases studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to secure the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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