Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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April 2018

  • Thursday, April 26th – Friday, April 27th Inside-Outside: Spatial Connotations of the Urban Culture of the Newars. Conversations with Niels Gutschow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 26, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, April 26, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, April 27, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Each talk is expected to take an hour or a bit more. The presentations are divided into three sessions each in order to allow communication at an early moment. Interruptions are welcome.

    1. Domestic Space (Thursday, April 26 10am – 12pm)
    An introduction into the anthropology of habitation (German “Wohnen”, “Behausung”) or dwelling which in a western context has to do with changing demands and aspirations, with taste and life style. The 20th century turned the obvious into a question of education.
    The presentation reflects the recent experience in the western world (1), in contrast to the way the Newars of the Kathmandu Valley use domestic space, inside and outside (2) and how much this changed within the present generation (3).

    2. Urban Space and Ritual of Bhaktapur (Thursday, April 26 2pm – 4pm)
    The Mesocosm of the city, a term used by Robert Levy to describe an “organized meaningful world intermediate to the microcosmic worlds of individuals and the culturally conceived macrocosm, the universe, at whose center the city lies”. The presentation focusses on the Navadurga and Astamatrka in their manifold manifestations: the definition of urban space by the aniconic seats (pitha) of the Eight Mother Goddesses (1), the Nine Durgas as human actors, their rebirth on the Victorious Tenth Day (in October) (2), and their representation as a group (gana) of Virgin deities, Kumaris (3).

    3. Earthquake and Rebuilding (Friday, April 27 4pm – 6pm)
    Earthquakes causes renewal in regular intervals. The last earthquakes in 1833, 1934 and the most recent one in 2015 resulted in loss of domestic structures, temples and human life (380 in Bhaktapur 2015). In historic times, new temples replaced the lost ones at the same place, fragments were discarded. At present the philosophy (or ideology) of architectural conservation demands the rescue of the smallest fragments in order to ensure the material authenticity. Repairs and replacement are mandatory. The presentation recalls earlier projects of conservation in 1971 and 1990 (1), and focusses on the craftsmen (whose ancestors once shaped the originals) as the embodiment of “authentic, living heritage” (2), and the act of recreating lost iconographical details (3), considered in the west as the fall in conservation practice.

    Biography:
    Niels Gutschow, born in 1941 in Hamburg, Germany, studied architecture in Darmstadt and completed his PhD in 1973 about the early 17th century urban history of Japan (The Castle Town – Jokamachi). He visited Nepal first in 1962 and since 1970 he keeps working there as a conservation architect and architectural historian focusing of urban space and ritual (publications in 1974, 1975, 1882 and 2017) and architecture (The Nepalese Caitya, 1997 and The Architecture of the Newars, 2011). At present he is associated with the Kathmandu Valley Preservation Trust, aiming at the rebuilding of ten buildings at Patan’s Darbar Square, of which four totally collapsed in the 2015 earthquake. As Honorary Professor he is associated with the South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Niels Gutschow
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Culture and Religious History of Asia, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 27th – Saturday, April 28th Migrations and New Mobilities in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 27, 20188:30AM - 7:30PMUniversity of California, Berkeley
    Saturday, April 28, 20189:30AM - 5:30PMUniversity of California, Berkeley
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    Description

    This conference proposes to look anew at issues concerning migration and Southeast Asia. Migrations have characterized Southeast Asian lives and livelihoods in different ways in different eras; they have affected work, settlement patterns, resource use, small and large investments, religion, and culture. Migrations have formed and changed the composition of Southeast Asian societies and given rise to complex cultural, social, environmental, and political problems and opportunities. Past and present, migrations have been both forced and voluntary: forced to make way for certain kinds of development; triggered by violence and war; but also intentional and, at times, pioneering: to change lives, secure new livelihoods, or explore new ecologies. Contributors to this conference will discuss continuities and changes in migration practices, patterns, and personnel, addressing a wide range of historical periods, disciplines, and themes.

    (Schedule)

    FRIDAY, APRIL 27
    180 Doe Library

    Registration

    Welcome & Opening Remarks

    Pheng Cheah, Professor of Rhetoric; Chair, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

    Nancy Lee Peluso, Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, College of Natural Resources; core faculty, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, UC Berkeley

    Rachel Silvey, Professor of Geography; Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    PANEL 1: Migrant Labor and the Law

    Democracy and Indonesian Migrant Workers: Rising Political Salience and Contestation at Home and Abroad
    Ann Marie Murphy, Seton Hall University

    Development and Nation: The Evolution of Malaysian Immigration Laws
    Oanh Nguyen, University of Minnesota

    Absurd Journeys: The Costs of Becoming Legal
    Maryann Bylander, Lewis & Clark College

    Citizen, Refugee, Muslim?: A Preliminary Typology of Rohingya Migration and Membership Politics across Polities
    Nabila Islam, McGill University

    Break

    PANEL 2: Repressive Labor and Forced Mobilities

    Deportable Refugees, Transnationalism and Cambodian-Americans
    Jennifer Zelnick, UC Irvine

    From Sea to City: Migration and Social Wellbeing in Coastal Cambodia
    Furqan Asif, University of Ottawa

    Blood Bricks: Debt-bondage, Carceral Geographies and the (Im)mobile Lives of Brick-kiln Laborers in Cambodia
    Katherine Brickell, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Migration and Refuge in Central and East Java during the Violence of 1965-66
    Siddharth Chandra, Michigan State University

    Chair & Discussant: George Dutton, UCLA

    Lunch Break

    PANEL 3: Place-making and Networks

    The Things They Carried (and Kept): Socialist Mobilities and Vietnamese Remittances from East Germany
    Christina Schwenkel, UC Riverside

    Urban Footprints: Migration, Place-making and the Politics of Presence in Hanoi, Vietnam
    Timothy Karis, Western Oregon University

    Tracing Mining Migration through Indonesia’s National Gold Networks
    Matt Libassi, UC Berkeley

    Labor Migration and Agrarian Change in Indonesia’s Industrial Rural Landscapes
    Lisa Kelley, University of Hawaii-Manoa (co-authored with Nancy Peluso, UC Berkeley; Kim Carlson, University of Hawaii-Manoa; and Suraya Afiff, University of Indonesia)

    Chair & Discussant: Emily Hertzman, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Break

    PANEL 4: Imaginaries and Transformations of Home

    Flexible Filipinas: Global Economic Restructuring, Gendered Labor Migration and the Feminization of Overseas Work in Contemporary Philippine Anglophone Literature
    Alden Sajor Wood, UC Irvine

    Art and the Rantau: Tracking Minangkabau Migration
    Katherine Bruhn, UC Berkeley

    Migration and Da’wa: Exploring the Nexus in the Pen Circle Forum
    Monika Arnez, University of Passau

    ‘Kisah Sukses’: Stories of Indonesian Migrant Worker Returnees Living in Greater Jakarta
    Kilim Park, University of British Columbia

    Chair & Discussant: Sylvia Tiwon, UC Berkeley

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS
    Migrant Worker Protection in ASEAN [tentative title]
    Anis Hidayah, Migrant Care (Indonesia)

    SATURDAY, APRIL 28
    Morning session
    180 Doe Library

    Registration

    PANEL 5: Brokering, Labor and Bodily Controls

    The Policing of Female Marriage Migrants: Case Studies from Southeast Asia
    Gwenola Ricordeau, CSU Chico

    Unbound and Bound Spheres of Globalization: The Regional Pocket of Free Travel in Asia and Asymmetries in Global Mobility
    Maria Cecilia Hwang, Rice University

    Manufacturing Global Care Workers: Regimes of Labor Control in Indonesia’s Transnational Migrant Industry
    Andy Chang, UC Berkeley

    The Ethnic H-Rê Experiences: Labor Migration from Vietnam to Malaysia and Return
    Angie Ngoc Tran, CSU Monterey Bay

    Chair & Discussant: Catherine Ceniza Choy, UC Berkeley

    Lunch Break

    Afternoon session
    Geballe Room
    220 Stephens Hall, Townsend Center for the Humanities

    Plenary Panel 1
    Migration in Southeast Asia – Structural Shifts, Patterns and Continuities

    Michele Ford (University of Sydney), Johan Lindquist (Stockholm University),
    Aihwa Ong (UC Berkeley), Brenda Yeoh (National University of Singapore)

    Moderator: Rachel Silvey, University of Toronto

    Break
    Plenary Panel 2
    Political Ecology and Migration in Southeast Asia

    Nicole Constable (University of Pittsburgh), Rebecca Elmhirst (University of Brighton),
    Deirdre McKay (Keele University), Christine Padoch (NY Botanical Garden)

    Moderator: Nancy Peluso, UC Berkeley

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    UC Berkeley Center for Southeast Asian Studies

    UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies

    Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 30th PATHWAYS MAGAZINE Vol. 2: Chinese-Canadian Mothers and Daughters

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 30, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Pathways Research Lab

    Description

    Pathways Magazine presents collections of diverse stories of peoples’ mobilities and identities from, between, and within Asia and Canada, produced by undergraduate students working in the Asian Pathways Research Lab. In the Spring 2018 volume of Pathways, we delve into the stories of thirteen pairs of Chinese-Canadian mothers and daughters, exploring their relationships, their mobilities, and their process of negotiating specifically gendered Chinese-Canadian identities across generations and geographies. This research is inspired by the work of Harriet Evans, whose research about the transformation of mother-daughter relationships in the context of post-Cultural Revolution urban China taught us about the connections between political change, social restructuring, and changing family dynamics and intimate relationships. To this body of knowledge, we contribute these thirteen stories, all of which add to the aforementioned context the additional experience of transnational family immigration to Canada. In this session, our undergraduate researchers will present their findings and experiences working at the Asian Pathways Research Lab.

    PRESENTERS:
    EMILY HERTZMAN, Manager, Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute
    AILIN LI, Research Assistant, Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute
    ANGELAH LIU, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    JAMIE CHEN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    JEEBY SUN, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    KATE CHEN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    KELLY LEUNG, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    MIRAGE WU, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    NANCY QIN, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    NATALIE BELL, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    XIAOHAN XU, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    YIRAN LI, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    ERIN LI, Mandarin Translator, undergraduate student, University of Toronto
    CYNTHIA JUTRAS, undergraduate student, University of Toronto

    Addendum

    Poster for Pathways Magazine Volume 2. Includes painting of a tree against a blue sky and details about the event (which are also in text form on this page).

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2018

  • Tuesday, May 1st Oil Palm Capital: A Feminist Ecology Lens on Mobile Labour and Accelerated Dispossession in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Rebecca Elmhist is a leading feminist political ecologist and human geographer with two decades of research and teaching experience on struggles over environmental governance, migration and social justice in the global South. Her work explores new ways to rethink feminist political ecology by linking theories associated with material feminism to empirical work on mobility, environmental change and gender in Southeast Asia.

    All are welcome!

    This event is presented as part of the Ecologies on the Edge programme by the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, and the York Centre for Asian Research and the Graduate Programme in Geography at York University.

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/171064526946881

    More information: ycar@yorku.ca

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rebecca Elmhirst
    University of Brighton


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Graduate Programme in Geography at York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 2nd A new take on Palestine/Israel: The violence of bureaucracy, and the potential of justice

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 2, 201811:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Palestine/Israel is often described in a sequence of battles or ‘clashes’ regarding ideology, land, violence, economy and international relations. In the media and beyond, these overshadow the everyday experiences of structural or bureaucratic violence. Through a visual tour and narrative presentation, Nadia Abu-Zahra shares her work (completed with Adah Kay) chronicling how millions of Palestinians have been denationalized through the bureaucratic tools of census, population registration, blacklisting and a discriminatory legal framework. Based on first-hand accounts and extensive fieldwork, the presentation shows how identity documents continue to be used as a means of coercion, extortion, humiliation and informant recruitment. The violence of bureaucracy, however, is resisted by Palestinians, Israelis and internationals who refuse to be displaced and divided, to be bound by movement restrictions, and to accept the structural injustice of ‘systematic oppression’ (a term used in international law).

    Biography:
    Dr. Nadia Abu-Zahra is Associate Professor of International Development and Global Studies and a member of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa. She also serves on the Reconciliation Committee of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. She was previously based at the University of Oxford, and has worked on projects for Oxfam, UNICEF, the European Union, the Open Society Foundation, and Global Affairs Canada. As co-Director of Community Mobilization in Crisis — a project to extend higher education to host and refugee communities through blended/distance learning — her collective efforts have garnered several awards.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nadia Abu-Zahra
    Associate Professor, International Development and Global Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ottawa


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dept of Geography and Planning


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 7th Kim Thúy Talks About Her Novel “Vi”

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 7, 20185:30PM - 7:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Kim Thúy reads from her novel Vi followed by audience Q&A.
    CBC News describes Vi as “exploring the lives, loves and struggles of Vietnamese refugees as they reinvent themselves in new lands.”
    Citation for quote: http://www.cbc.ca/books/vi-1.4480676

    The book will be available for sale at the venue.

    Bio:
    Born in Saigon in 1968, KIM THÚY left Vietnam with the boat people at the age of ten and settled with her family in Quebec. A graduate in translation and law, she has worked as a seamstress, interpreter, lawyer, restaurant owner, and commentator on radio and television. She lives in Montreal and devotes herself to writing.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Thuy
    Governor General’s Award-Winning Vietnamese Canadian Author Kim Thúy


    Co-Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Asian Canadian Studies

    Asian Canadian Writers Workshop

    Department of French

    Vietnamese Canadian Students Association

    Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library

    Departmet of English

    Penguin Random House Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 9th ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CEREMONY

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 9, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMMetro Hall
    55 John Street
    Toronto, ON M5V 3C6
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    Description

    Featured talks by Chinese Canadian Legend Award Recipients The photo exhibition will be on “Diversity – Fusion – Unity” with about 80 photographs by members of the Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST), including special exhibits of photographs by Dr. Neville Poy, CCPST Honourary Advisor Mr Stephen Siu, CCPST President Mr Edwin Ho, and international award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Mr. Justin Poy, CFACI Honourary Patron
    Topic: “The challenge of Canadian Asian Media in 2018”
    Local Canadian ethnic media in Asian communities was thriving in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Why? Because these were some of the only ways that immigrants could keep in touch with news from home and stay in touch with their community. Local TV stations would broadcast older shows but still satisfied the masses, local movie houses would screen films that were launched a year ago back home, but many here hadn’t seen them yet. Then the internet happened, followed by social media and now streaming media. How has this affected local media businesses as they attempt to find relevance and provide value to local Canadian immigrants from Asia? Can print, local radio and TV and website survive? And if so, which ones have the advantage?

    Mr. Stephen Siu, Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto
    Topic: “The Fusion of Cultures in Chinese Architecture”
    A talk with slide show of pictures recently taken by Stephen Siu in Shanghai, Nanjing and Ningbo on architectural heritage and modern structures, and the history and stories behind. With China’s booming economy and infrastructure programs, the migration to urban areas has increased. New architectural structures rise up over old neighbourhoods. The blend of heritage and contemporary architecture influenced by both eastern and western cultures is ever-present in these cities which have historically enjoyed the fusion of cultures.
    The speaker will also discuss the disappearing alleys (hutongs), once the lifeblood of Beijing, against the backdrop of the high-rise glamour of the modern capital city, with photographs provided by award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Co-Organizers: Asian Heritage Month-Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto; WE Artists’ Group; Social Services Network Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    CFACI Honourary Patron

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 10th Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 10, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library
    8th floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George St
    Toronto, ON
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    Series

    Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies

    Description

    The York Centre for Asian Research and the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library are co-presenting the Second Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies, titled “Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream” on Thursday, May 10th, 2018 at 4-6PM. This seminar will take place at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George St, Toronto).

    We are pleased to announce that Professor Elizabeth Sinn from the University of Hong Kong and author of Pacific Crossing: California Gold, Chinese Migration, and the Making of Hong Kong will be the keynote speaker for this event. Professor Sinn will be speaking on Hong Kong as an “in-between place” during Chinese migration to California for various opportunities in the latter part of the 19th century. The concept of “in-between places” during migratory periods can also offer a new paradigm for migration studies, which typically only focus on the sending or receiving countries.

    Other notable speakers and participants for the event include:

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy, Chancellor Emerita at the U of T and retired Senator of Canada
    Miss Florence Tsang, Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office (Toronto)
    Professor Abidin Kusno, Director at the York Centre for Asian Research
    Mr. Larry Alford, Chief Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries
    Professor Lisa Mar, Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies at the U of T

    This event is free of charge and light refreshments will be provided.

    For additional information, please visit

    Please RSVP before May 3rd by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    Professor Elizabeth Sinn
    Keynote
    University of Hong Kong

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Speaker
    Chancellor Emerita, U of T Retired Senator of Canada

    Miss Florence Tsang
    Speaker
    Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, Toronto

    Professor Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Director, York Centre for Asian Research

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Speaker
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

    Professor Lisa Mar
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Chair, Chinese Canadian Studies, U of T


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    The York Centre for Asian Research

    Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2018

  • Monday, June 11th The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks In China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 11, 20185:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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