Upcoming Events at the Asian Institute

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November 2019

  • Tuesday, November 19th Book Launch: Policy, Regulation and Innovation in China's Electricity and Telecom Industries

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    China’s innovation ambitions inspire worldwide commentary, much of it poorly informed. Focusing on several sectors central to China’s innovation drive, Loren Brandt (University of Toronto) and Thomas Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) offer a richly detailed account of China’s innovation efforts in their latest book, Policy, Regulation, and Innovation in China’s Electricity and Telecom Industries. The book’s granular studies look beyond specific technologies to incorporate the policy matrix, regulatory structures and global developments into an appraisal of China’s industrial policy and innovation achievements. The massive application of human and financial resources offers great promise, but institutional obstacles and legacies, conflicting objectives, and ill-advised policies inject inefficiencies, resulting in a complex mosaic of success and failure in both technical and commercial dimensions.

    Loren Brandt is the Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade at the University of Toronto. With Thomas G. Rawski, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His current research focuses on issues of industrial upgrading in China, inequality dynamics, and China’s long-run economic growth and structural change.

    Thomas G. Rawski is emeritus Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh. Recent publications include Tales from the Development Frontier (2013), which he co-authored. With Loren Brandt, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His research focuses on the development and modern history of China’s economy, including studies of China’s reform mechanism and achievements.

    Lecture: 4 – 5:30 PM
    Reception: 5:30 – 6:30 PM


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Loren Brandt
    Speaker
    Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade, University of Toronto

    Thomas G. Rawski
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of Economics and History, University of Pittsburgh

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor and Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 20th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    Lecturer, Asian Institute Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute

    Aparna Sundar
    Lecturer, Asian Institute

    Francis Cody
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 21st Takako Hikotani Lecture: Japan’s ‘Value Diplomacy’ and the Rise of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 315 Bloor
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Prime Minister Abe, in both his first and second administrations, has emphasized values: democracy, human rights, and the rule of law, in his diplomatic statements. Does the Abe administration’s rhetorical focus on values signify a substantial change in Japanese foreign policy, or is it just window dressing?

    In this public talk, Professor Hikotani argues: (1) Japan’s foreign policy was never value-devoid; but the “value” that drove Japan in its foreign policy was different from other western countries in its emphasis; to be less explicit about the value being promoted, and that the value promoted, especially with regard to Asia, emphasized development assistance over democracy promotion. (2) External developments (the rise of China in the region), and internal developments (institutional empowerment of the Prime Minister) led more emphasis in the use of values as slogans in foreign policy. (3) While values are more often used as slogans, the substance of Japan’s foreign policy has not changed much. Democracy and rule of law is mentioned more frequently as the natural bond among Australia, India and Japan, Japan is also careful about not to force Asian countries to choose between China and Japan and to antagonize China along the way.

    Speaker Bio:

    Takako Hikotani is Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Columbia University. She previously taught at the National Defense Academy of Japan, where she was Associate Professor, and lectured at the Ground Self Defense Force and Air Self Defense Force Staff Colleges, and the National Institute for Defense Studies. Her research focus on civil-military relations and Japanese domestic politics, Japanese foreign policy, and comparative civil-military relations. Her publications (in English) include, “The Japanese Diet and defense policy-making.” International Affairs, 94:1, July, 2018; “Trump’s Gift to Japan: Time for Tokyo to Invest in the Liberal Order,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2017; and “Japan’s New Executive Leadership: How Electoral Rules Make Japanese Security Policy” (with Margarita Estevez-Abe and Toshio Nagahisa), in Frances Rosenbluth and Masaru Kohno eds, Japan in the World (Yale University Press, 2009). She was a Visiting Professional Specialist at Princeton University as Social Science Research Council/Abe Fellow (2010-2011) and Fellow of the US-Japan Leadership Program, US-Japan Foundation (2000- ).

    Professor Hikotani received her BA from Keio University, MA from Keio University and Stanford University, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University, where she was a President’s Fellow.


    Speakers

    Takako Hikotani
    Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 26th Faith in Formaldehyde: Conversion in the Oldest Cabinet of Curiosity in the Philippines

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the oldest existing museum in the Philippines, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Museum of Arts and Sciences, as a cabinet of curiosity and a catalyst of conversion. By Spanish royal decree, its early collection acquired through colonial expeditions, complex evangelical networks, and commercial expositions formed the classroom materials for the Natural History course taught by Dominican friars. By 1877, the fauna, flora, and mineral—from the minute to the monumental, from the ordinary to the odd—were inventoried in a three-volume catalogue raisonné. Its collection has since elicited a sense of wonder in nature’s perfection and diversity. Within the broader philosophical contexts of natural and revealed theology and the revival of Thomism after Charles Darwin’s publication of his theory of evolution through natural selection, the museum’s pursuit of scientific knowledge masked its pursuit of sacred truth, engendering an epiphany through the embalmed and serving the divine through the drama of its dioramas. Operating as a mode of signification and translation of the Word, the museum became a biblical exegesis of the origin of species to archive God, preserving faith in formaldehyde as a means of maintaining the authority of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines.

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. A two-time Fulbright U.S. Scholar (Student/Faculty Grant), a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and a Faculty Learning Community Participant through the NEH Humanities Initiative Grant, she is the co-editor of Confrontations, Crossings, and Convergence: Photographs of the Philippines and the United States, 1898-1998 (1998) and author of Institutions and Icons of Patronage: Arts and Culture in the Philippines during the Marcos Years, 1965-1986 (2012). Besides teaching art history and museum studies at several institutions in the United States, France, and the Philippines, she also served as Advisor for the Arts at the National Museum of the Philippines before her appointment as Project Manager/Curator of the Philippines at the Venice Biennale by the Department of Foreign Affairs. Currently, Baluyut is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Art Department and Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oneonta and Chair of the College Art Association’s International Committee.


    Speakers

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Art History; Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, State University of New York (SUNY), Oneonta

    Nhung Tuyet Tran
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 27th Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 27, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Pl.
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    Description

    Explore the motivations behind the rapid development of museums in China.

    The University of Toronto’s School of Cities, in partnership with the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Faculty of Information (iSchool) and Lord Cultural Resources, invite you to join us for the launch of Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom, a new book by the Chinese Museums Association and Lord Cultural Resources.

    This event will feature a presentation by co-editor Gail Dexter Lord, followed by a panel of experts who will discuss the role cultural diplomacy plays in China-Canada relations and the role of museums as an approach to urbanism and city building.

    Museum Development in China is an international collaboration which aims to discover how much East and West can learn from each other about museum roles, our publics, what and how we preserve and future sustainability — even as we marvel at the amazing
    accomplishments of China’s museum building boom.

    *This is a free event, please register to attend.

    Copies of Museum Development in China will be available for purchase at the event.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Catching
    Contemporary art curator and museum planner

    Gail Dexter Lord
    Co-Founder and President, Lord Cultural Resources

    Jennifer Purtle
    Associate Professor, Department of Art History and affiliated faculty of the Asian Institute

    Yan Zhou
    Curator and PhD student, Faculty of Information (iSchool)


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto

    The School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Xi Jinping’s ‘Proregress’: Recent Political and Economic Policy Moves

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Xi Jinping’s leadership has been marked by ambiguity and unpredictability. Since becoming China’s top leader in 2012, he has pursued fragile balances: portraying himself as inheritor of the legacies of both Mao and Deng; consolidating power based on both his communist “red nobility” and his understanding of “ordinary people”; promoting market reform in some ways while asserting greater state control in others; and offering contradictory clues as to whether China seeks to be a revisionist power or to preserve the status quo in the post-Cold War international order. It is hardly surprising that public judgments of Xi within China and overseas are so strikingly different.

    Cheng Li’s talk focuses on Xi’s two most recent parallel domestic policy moves: launching an ambitious program for poverty elimination and promoting the country’s largest metropolis clusters for economic growth. Given Xi’s role at the epicenter of these major developments, a discussion of China’s future trajectory requires a comprehensive and balanced assessment of this goal-oriented leader.

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.


    Speakers

    Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director and Senior Fellow, the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2019

  • Wednesday, December 4th On Native Testimony: Military Tribunals, War Crimes, and Imperial Judgment in Guam

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1944, the U.S. Navy established the War Crimes Tribunals Program in Guam, one of several Japanese colonies located in the Pacific. For the next five years, the military commission reviewed war crimes cases about assault, murder, treason, and other acts against white civility. Throughout this period, the tribunal also featured more than 100 indigenous Chamorro and Chamorro-Japanese testimonies about Japanese militarism, policing, and torture in Guam. How did these testimonies support the U.S. effort to eradicate Japan’s sovereignty and remake the political bodies and territorial borders of Guam and the Pacific Islands more generally? By drawing on various philosophies and proverbs about life and death, this talk examines the legal and political impact of military courts, native testimonies, and white supremacist violence.

    Keith L. Camacho is an associate professor in the Asian American Studies Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the author of Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam, the co-editor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific, and the former senior editor of Amerasia Journal.

    * Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam by Keith L. Camacho will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Keith L. Camacho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th Anatomy of a Protest: The Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture in the History of India

    Description

    Kunti, a dalit (“untouchable” caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximately 1.3 million workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This paper explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierarchy in India became the face for an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti’s role in the movement illustrates an important dimension of the abolitionist movement: the construction of the “people” (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in late colonial India.

    Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor (by courtesy) in the Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transregional approaches. She is the author of Colonial Masculinity: The ‘manly Englishman’ and the ‘effeminate Bengali’ in the late nineteenth century (1995) and of Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006), winner of the Joan Kelley Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association and the Albion Book Prize from the North American Conference of British Studies. She is currently working on a book project with the working title, “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” for which she received the 2012 John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Sinha is also a past President of the Association of Asian Studies (2015).


    Speakers

    Mrinalini Sinha
    Speaker
    Alice Freeman Palmer Professor, Department of History; Professor (by courtesy), Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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