Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

MPP Courses

MPP students study a core curriculum to give them a foundational knowledge in quantitative and qualitative analysis, governance, the policy process, comparative analysis, and policy implementation. The core curriculum also includes a summer internship in a professional environment.

MPP-Munk Sessional Dates 2021-22

Fall 2021 MPP1 Timetable
Fall 2021 MPP2 Timetable
Winter 2022 MPP1 Timetable
Winter 2022 MPP22 Timetable

Microeconomics Prep course

The Micro Prep course will be piloted for the 2021-22 academic year. It will be held in early to mid-August, and will include a mix of asynchronous videos, some online quizzes and a few synchronous sessions with the instructor to introduce, or refresh, key policy relevant concepts, terms and analysis.

Math-Stats Prep course

Before commencing their Fall term, incoming MPP students are encouraged to complete the MPP math/stats prep course, which provides a review of many of the mathematical tools required for the first-year courses in quantitative methods and economics. At the end of the prep course, all students must complete a required diagnostic of the math-stats topics covered.
While this diagnostic is mandatory of incoming MPP students, there is no “minimum mark” that must be achieved on it. Rather, the purpose of the diagnostic is to provide incoming MPP students with information regarding their readiness for the topics to be covered in our quantitative methods and economics courses.

1st Year Core Courses

PPG1000H: Governance and Institutions

This course is intended to provide foundational knowledge of key governance structures and political institutions at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels in Canada. The course will examine the Constitution, the Westminster parliamentary system, federalism, and the courts. In this course, students will consider emerging challenges to existing institutions, including the rise of cities, demands for self-government among Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples, and the transition from government to governance, and will conclude by reflecting on the quality of Canada’s democratic institutions in comparative perspective.

It is taught in three sections, and meets in plenary from time-to-time.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructors
J. Craft
G. Eidelman

Notes
Required of all first year students.

PPG1002H: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis

This is a course in microeconomic theory for students in the MPP program at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. One objective of the course is to provide students with a foundation in microeconomic analysis and to demonstrate how it can be used to develop and evaluate public policy. Another objective is to increase students’ economic literacy and comfort with economic arguments. The course is designed to be accessible to all students, including those with no previous exposure to economics.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructor
S. Heblich

Notes
Required of all first year students.
*Prerequisite: Knowledge of high school mathematics, particularly algebra, working with graphs and fractions.
*Postrequisite: Students who do not pass PPG1002H must retake the Math-Stats Prep course diagnostic with a grade of at least 60%

PPG1003H: Macroeconomics for Policy Analysis

The purpose of this course is to give MPP students a non-technical and broad-based understanding of macroeconomics and the tools of macroeconomic policy analysis.There are at least two reasons why macroeconomics is part of the MPP program: First, some MPP students will eventually wind up working on macro policy issues. Second, even those who do not will find that their policy work takes place in a broader macroeconomic environment that will inevitably affect them and that they need to understand.

Term
Winter (1st year)

Instructor
P. Dungan

Notes
Required of all first year students.

PPG1004H: Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis

The central objective of this course is to equip students with the tools necessary to tackle issues that involve the empirical analysis of public policy problems of the sort they might encounter in a professional environment. The course will cover probability theory and statistics, with a focus on the sensible application of methods to deal with empirical problems using appropriate data.

The course is designed with twin objectives in mind. The first is to provide students with the ability to analyze critically the empirical analysis done by others at a level sufficient to make intelligent decisions about how to use that analysis in the design of public policy. The second is to provide students with the skills necessary to perform empirical policy analysis on their own or to participate on a team involved in such an empirical analysis.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructor
G. Frazer

Notes
Required of all first year students.
*Prerequisite: Knowledge of high school mathematics, particularly algebra, working with graphs and fractions.
*Postrequisite: Students who do not pass PPG1004H must retake the Math-Stats Prep course diagnostic with a grade of at least 60%

PPG1005H: Social Context of Policy Making

This joint course with the MGA program introduces students to scholarship on the psychology of decision making and the analytics of strategic thinking. Drawing from the literature on public policy making, behavioural economics, and strategic analysis, the seminar will develop the analytical tools and the practical leadership skills students need to navigate the intersection among the global economy, global institutions, and global civil society. Students are required to analyze and craft strategies to address global public policy problems in the context of the three sectors.

Term
Fall or Winter (1st year)

Instructors
A. Parkin
D. Pettinicchio
TBA

Notes
Required of all first year students.

PPG1007H: Strategic Policy Implementation

This is a foundational course in professional policy practice. It is interdisciplinary, drawing on key concepts from science, social science, business and public administration as well as the world of the policy practitioner. This course introduces students to thinking in a critical, integrated way about how to deliver on public policy objectives in the context of a dynamic political and stakeholder environment. Specifically, it examines key considerations in developing an implementation strategy for a policy initiative.

Term
Winter (1st year)

Instructors
M. Bitran (Lec. 0101)
J. Mason (Lec. 0102)
D. Fagan (Lec. 0103 & 0104)

Notes
Required of all first year students. (All four sections of this course will be offered in the Winter term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)

PPG1008H: Program Evaluation for Public Policy

This course will introduce students to both quantitative and qualitative methods in program evaluation for public policy.  Students will gain an understanding of when and how to use various methods of program evaluation and will be exposed to both theoretical concepts and case studies.

This core course will be co-taught in the Winter term. The first 6-weeks will be taught by Prof. Jonathan Hall, followed by 6-weeks of instruction by Prof. James Radner.

Term
Winter (1st year)

Instructors
P. Blanchenay
J. Radner

Notes
*Prerequisite: PPG1004H.
Required of all first year students. (Both sections of this course are in the Winter term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)
Prerequisite: PPG1004H
*Postrequisite: Students who do not pass PPG1008H must retake the Math-Stats Prep course diagnostic with a grade of at least 60%

Along with either GLA2029H OR GLA2034H

GLA2029H: Sustainability in the World: A Living Lab Course

Sustainability is a growing priority for public sector, private sector and civil society organizations all over the world. Many are developing strong sustainability goals and targets. The purpose of this course is to have students engage with practitioners in such organizations, to create ‘living lab’ activities whereby the students help these practitioners to achieve sustainability objectives. Students will be organized in groups, each of which will undertake an applied research project on some aspect of sustainability relevant to their ‘client’ organization, working in close partnership with staff at organizations in the City of Toronto, or at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to produce information relevant to real-world problem-solving across disciplines and fields of study, working with non-academic partners.

Term
Winter (1st year)

Instructor
J. Robinson

Notes
Required of all first year students. (GLA2029H is a joint course with the MGA program)

GLA2034H: Decision Making & Strategic: Thinking in the Global System

This joint course with the MGA program introduces students to scholarship on the psychology of decision making and the analytics of strategic thinking. Drawing from the literature on public policy making, behavioural economics, and strategic analysis, the seminar will develop the analytical tools and the practical leadership skills students need to navigate the intersection among the global economy, global institutions, and global civil society. Students are required to analyze and craft strategies to address global public policy problems in the context of the three sectors.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructor
P. Loewen
J. Stein

Notes
Required of all first year students. (GLA2029H is a joint course with the MGA program)

Internship

PPG2006Y: The PPG Internship

Students are required to complete a policy internship between the first and second year of study, or as otherwise tailored to meet the needs of the student and of the placement setting. Under faculty supervision, the internship allows students to apply their knowledge to significant problems in the public, private or non-profit sectors, and provides students the opportunity to develop and enhance skills in respective areas of professional interest.

The internship helps students clarify their career direction, gives perspective on classroom learning, and assists students in gaining experience and establishing networks of great value in securing employment after graduation. Internships may be voluntary or paid work experiences that relate to any aspect of policy planning, analysis, decision-making and implementation.

School staff work individually with students to help them identify and secure internships appropriate to their program and their career needs and goals. The School promotes and welcomes partnerships with government, community and private sector organizations seeking to provide internship opportunities to MPP students.

Upon completion of the internship, each student submits a written research report to their faculty supervisor providing an original analysis of the policy and/or organizational issues dealt with during the internship. These reports, which may be in the form of case studies, will be evaluated by the faculty supervisor on a credit/no credit basis and may be made available to first year students for review and to teaching faculty, hiring organizations and other practitioners.

Term
Summer

Instructors
Faculty Advisors as selected during the internship process.

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all first year students.
Students with outstanding PPG2006Y requirements may enroll in only PPG2001H and elective courses in the Fall term of their II-year of MPP studies. (Only upon completion of outstanding Internship requirements student may enroll in PPG2002H, PPG2003H, PPG2008H and PPG2022H in the Winter term of their II-year of MPP studies.)

2nd Year Core Courses

PPG2001H: Integrating Seminar: Legal Analysis in Public Policy

SECTION I: Fall

Property Law and Cities

Course Description

This course explores the relationship between property law and policy in cities. There is a mutual dependence between owners and government in cities. Cities today lean on owners to support the provision of local public goods in a variety of ways, whether it is shovelling snow, maintaining POPs (privately owned public spaces) or financing public goods. Property owners rely on cities to provide the framework within which they use property, build communities, and maintain property values. The interaction between cities, owners and non-owners generates a variety of conflicts for decision-makers to resolve but also produces tools and opportunities for cities.
The object of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental building blocks of property law as it bears on how we live together in cities.  The course will begin with a survey of the basic structure of property rights, such as ownership, tenancies, easements, covenants, air-rights, etc. It will then introduce students to the legal concept of the city and in particular the powers of local government in relation to owners, including the powers to take, regulate and tax property in cities.
Building on this foundation, we will go on to consider how property law shapes policymaking on a range of issues relating to homelessness, access to public housing, aboriginal rights, and land use and urban development in general.  We will also study how the law relates to the financing of public goods and the allocation of benefits and burdens of membership in urban communities.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
L. Katz

OR

SECTION II: Fall

Independent Regulatory Agencies: The fourth branch of gov’t?

Course Description

Regulatory Law: Governing the Government.
A central premise of the rule of law is that the exercise of government power is subject to legal norms enforceable by the judiciary. This course unpacks this premise and delves into the rules, conventions and doctrines that govern the relationship between legislatures, governments, regulatory agencies, and courts.
Canadian regulatory law will be compared to other jurisdictions, particularly American and Great Britain who have more developed doctrines and practices. We will critically examine the state of Canadian regulatory law and consider whether international practices should be incorporated into the Canadian model.
Issues to be considered include:
• The constitutional context for executive and regulatory power in the United States, Canada and the UK;
• The rules and conventions constituting and constraining executive power in Canada;
• The meaning of independent regulation;
• The role of the courts in overseeing the government and regulatory agencies; and
• The theoretical basis for evaluating regulation.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
G. Vegh

OR

SECTION II: Winter

Canadian Migration Policy

Course Description

Who gets in? Who is removed? And what are our conceptions and misconceptions of both groups?
As national borders dissolve for trade, capital, communication and culture under globalization, these same borders acquire increasing salience in controlling the movement of people. Migration control thus emerges as the ‘last bastion of sovereignty’.
This course focuses on Canadian policy, law and practice designed to manage and regulate entry, residence and citizenship. The policy answers to the question ‘who gets in?’ will be analyzed in terms of history (who got in to Canada in the past?), current trends (upon what characteristics does Canada currently assess those that wish to get in?), and critical perspectives (how do class/race/ ethnicity/gender affect who gets in?).
The course will examine the role of international and constitutional arrangements in determining the role played by different levels of government (United Nations, federal, provincial and municipal) in immigration, as well as the division of labour between the legislator, the executive and the courts in making and interpreting the rules.
Students will become familiar with the structure of Canadian immigration policy, and the mechanism by which immigration law organizes people into a series of categories and sub-categories: legal/illegal; temporary/permanent; economic/family class; voluntary/coerced etc. Class discussions will be encouraged to critical examine Canadian immigration policy and current events.
The Immigration Refugee Protection Act, Regulations and online Immigration Manual provide the framework for categorizing potential entrants into legal vs. non-legal, visitors vs. permanent residents, and immigrants vs. refugees. These legal instruments set the terms of admission and exclusion, and the processes by which the state makes and implements these determinations.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
M. Battista

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students. Please note that courses offered under the “Integrating Seminar: Legal Analysis in Public Policy” seminar series are subject to change with each new academic year.

PPG2002H: Integrating Seminar: Applied Economics

SECTION I: Summer

Urban and Transportation Policy

Course Description

This course will help students use the tools of economics to think about urban and transportation policy. At the end of the course they will understand the economic forces driving the existence, size, and shape of cities; trade-offs inherent in different approaches to housing affordability; optimal investment and pricing for public transportation and roads; and how new transportation technologies have repeatedly changed cities. This course will help students develop their ability to use economic models to understand policy, to analyze data, and to read and understand research papers.

Term
Summer (2nd year)

Instructor
J. Hall

SECTION I: Fall

International Development

Course Description

This course will explore international development from the perspective of practice. We examine central questions – why so many people are in deep poverty and what can be done about it – by considering the practical levers available to program leaders and policy makers. The course will therefore approach these large questions by iterating between two points of view: first, practical case studies, and second, conceptual frameworks and analytical readings. Students will participate in the interchange, as we progressively deepen our understanding of the core questions. We will interrogate a multi-disciplinary literature from the perspective of cumulative experience in development and immediate issues facing practitioners; we aim for a perspective that enables practitioners to adapt to and learn from the dynamic, uncertain environment in which they must work.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
J. Radner

SECTION II: Fall

Public Finance

Course Description

This course covers material on (I) Welfare Economics and Incidence and Efficiency Cost of Government Policies, (II) Taxation and Redistribution, (III) Social Insurance, (IV) Economics of Mandates. The emphasis will be on the theoretical and empirical evaluation of public policy. The course will be a project-oriented capstone course, designed to give students a background in the economic analysis of public policy, with a focus on empirical (evidence-based) analysis.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
K. Kroft

OR

SECTION I: Winter

Public Finance

Course Description

This course will look at the motivation and operation of major spending programs and revenue-raising tools of Canadian governments. It will explore rationales for government action such as externalities, information failures, redistribution and macroeconomic management, and the principal-agent problems that affect the design, financing and delivery of programs in areas such as healthcare, education, retirement income, and intergovernmental transfers. A key focus of the course is using financial statements and other reports to understand governments’ behaviour and mitigate principal-agent problems.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
M. Oschinski

Notes
*Prerequisites: PPG1002H, and successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.
Courses offered under the “Current Issues/Problems in Public Policy and Practice” seminar series are subject to change with each new academic year.

PPG2003H: Integrating Seminar: Capstone Course: A Canadian Priorities Agenda: Process, Criteria, Choices

SECTION I: Winter
Capstone Course

Course Description

This course is intended to draw on the skills, analytic approaches, and policy knowledge that students have acquired over the course of the MPP program and to bring them to bear on the development of a coherent policy agenda for the current Canadian context.

The course is modelled after the Institute for Research and Public Policy’s Canadian Priorities Agenda (CPA) project, updated to account for the dramatic shifts in the policy environment since the original CPA exercise in 2007. The CPA brought together a group of “agenda-setters” to set priority areas for action, researchers who made proposals for particular policies within each priority area, and a panel of “judges” who recommended new policy agendas for Canada by choosing from among the proposals presented. In this course, the student will act as all three—agenda setters, proponents and judges—in developing and defending an agenda of three policies for their final course assignment.

Unlike in past years, there will be no policy menu from which students choose their options. Rather, the student will conceive, design, develop and justify their own policy options and integrated agenda for improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians. Invited speakers will suggest important policy areas, but they will not necessarily be included in a student agenda.

The course will ask students to showcase integrative thinking, and make reasoned policy choices in the face of budgetary realities and political constraints. Students are expected to engage critically and meaningfully with the material and information presented through course assignments and in breakout groups.

By the end of the course, it is expected students will be able to balance and articulate the political, economic, social, fiscal, and intergovernmental needs and constraints of policymaking in Canada. Additionally, it is expected that by the end of the course students will be able to moderate the complexities of policymaking to address the question: what mix of policy options will most improve the social and economic wellbeing of Canadians?

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructors
L. White
S. Speer
A. Siddiqi
E. Slack

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 5.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.

PPG2008H: Comparative Public Policy

SECTIONS I & II: Fall
Comparative Public Policy

This course is designed to expose MPP students to the scholarly literature on public policy across a wide range of countries. Through the study of public policy in other countries, students will deepen their knowledge of public policy, even Canadian policy.

Major theories and research paradigms will be examined, with a focus on the relationship between theory, research design and measurement. Emphasis will be on comparing wealthy countries, though policies from the developing world will be drawn upon as well. To begin the course will examine the sources of public policy, asking how institutions, ideas and interests shape policy. Then, the course will turn to how policy shapes society, thinking carefully about how we measure policies and how we distinguish outputs from outcomes. To focus the course study, students will explore two policy areas in depth. (Students interested in other areas will have many chances to engage with the relevant literatures.)

There will be somewhat different themes between the two instructors’ sections. While there will be quite a bit of overlap, students who have a strong interest in one of the following themes, should note:
– Fall section (Prof. Wilder): will focus on comparative institutions
– Fall section (TBA): will focus on inequality politics and policy

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
M. Wilder (Fall)
R. Shivakoti (Fall)

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.

 

Plus, either PPG2011H OR PPG2022H

PPG2011H: Ethics and the Public Interest

SECTION I: Fall
Ethics and the Public Interest

*MPP students are to complete either PPG2011H or PPG2022H.

Course Description

Ethics and The Public Interest provides a range of frameworks, drawn from a variety of cultural perspectives, for analyzing and managing the complex ethical dilemmas that public officials confront. It is a course in politically-informed moral reasoning.

The practice of public administration is widely understood to be guided by certain core values and principles. Yet with the growing complexity of the state have come changing demands, structural reforms, and the creation of a more uncertain environment. Participants in this course will be provided with a set of intellectual tools for responding to this new environment, and for thinking about such issues as ethical leadership, public accountability, relating to ministers, and dealing with vague or inconsistent demands. It is organized around discussion of two major issues: first, it asks what values should guide decision-making in areas of administrative discretion; second, it looks at questions of compliance, in order to explore ways that the public service can continue to meet the highest standards of professional ethics.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
A. Stark

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Second year students are required to register in the second year core PPG2011H OR the second year core PPG2022H.

PPG2022H: Moral Foundations of Public Policy

SECTION II: Winter
Moral Foundations of Public Policy

*MPP students are to complete either PPG2011H or PPG2022H.

Course Description

Moral questions abound in framing public policy.  What are the legitimate aims of the state?  How should costs and benefits of policy choices be measured and distributed across the population?  And what ethical constraints are there on the pursuit of state aims? This course will explore these theoretical questions in the context of several distinct policy areas, including health care, environmental protection, tax and economic policy, family policy, and drug control.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructors
A. Franklin-Hall

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Second year MPP students are required to register in either PPG2011H OR PPG2022H.

*Enrollment in core PPG courses (PPG2001H, PPG2002H, PPG2003H, PPG2008H and PPG2011H/PPG2022H) is not available for students outside of the MPP program.

2nd Year Elective Courses

Students can pursue their specific policy interests through a selection of elective courses either at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy or through other departments at the University of Toronto.

PPG2010H: Panel Data Methods for Public Policy Analysis

The goal of the course PPG2010H is to introduce students to statistical methods for the analysis of panel large-scale data. Topics include an introduction to panel data and panel design, statistical modeling of panel data including growth curve models, multilevel linear models and generalized linear mixed models.

At the completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Conduct data management and manipulation procedures to prepare large-scale longitudinal data for statistical analyses
  • Understand the structure of major RDC longitudinal datasets
  • Formulate research problems and select appropriate statistical procedures to address them
  • Utilize statistical software to perform longitudinal analyses on large-scale longitudinal datasets
  • Interpret and communicate the results of statistical analyses
  • Critically evaluate published research papers based on longitudinal data analysis techniques.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
O. Falenchuk

Notes
1. Pre-requisite for enrollment: Security clearance with finger print to access Government data.
2. Given fingerprinting requirement of students for security clearance, enrollment in PPG2010H closes 6-weeks prior to the first class.

PPG2012H Topics in Public Policy I: Policy & Politics

The policy world has never been more political or partisan. Understanding the opportunities and challenges presented by the changing political landscape will be crucial for future policy leaders. Learning through real world examples from all three levels of government, students will learn about the importance of political realities when developing, communicating and implementing public policy.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
J. Steeve

PPG2012H Topics in Public Policy I: Making an Impact from the Outside

This limited-enrolment, experiential learning course exposes students to public policy making from the perspective of non-governmental organizations and provides students with the skills necessary to achieve policy change from outside government. Students will learn how to drive community-led policy initiatives by blending theoretical concepts with concrete skills, such as: design thinking, stakeholder management, public consultation, campaign building, and strategic communication. The course will take students out of the classroom and into the community through site visits, field assignments, and close interaction with experienced practitioners. 

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructors
G. Eidelman

J. Flatt

Notes
This course will be taught as an intensive 6-week seminar.

PPG2013H Topics in Public Policy II: The Limits of Rationality

This course critically examines the relationship between politics, rationality, and public policy-making. The first half of the course surveys dominant rational actor models, critiques of these approaches, and alternative perspectives. The second half of the course explores pathological policy outcomes, arrived at through otherwise rational procedures. Cases include Soviet-era agricultural collectivization campaigns; eugenics; the Holocaust; nontherapeutic medical experimentation; and state-sanctioned torture. Beyond familiarizing students with rational actor models and their alternatives, the course will grapple with difficult dilemmas: How can we square the use governance techniques that are highly rational in terms of their procedures, with outcomes that are morally reprehensible? How do we determine what counts as “costs” and “benefits” in making decisions, especially when they significantly affect individuals’ life chances, health and autonomy? Can certain fundamental goods, such as human dignity, ever be discounted in the pursuit of other goods, such as national security? How can we ascribe responsibility for actions taken by individuals in systems that are hierarchical, technocratic and dependent on those same individuals “following orders”?

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
P. Triadafilopoulos

PPG2013H: Topics in Public Policy II: The Role of Science in Public Policy

From climate change to stem cells there is hardly an area subject to public policy decisions that is not informed by science yet courses that deal on how to assess, weigh and integrate scientific information into policy analyses. This course encourages the development of a critical approach to the use of scientific data in the policy context. To examine the interaction of societal values and scientific information in the development of public policy. To discuss different frameworks for the use of scientific information in the development of public policy.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructors
M. Bitran

PPG2014H: Topics in Publ. Policy III: Financial Services & Monetary Policy (Economics)

This course will look at a range of topics including the link between demographics and monetary policy, how blockchain technology will impact the economy, and the important role of the financial services sector in trade negotiations. It will also focus on the international transmission of monetary policy shocks from the developed to the developing world, as well as the Canadian housing market and the effects of macroprudential regulation.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
J. Kronick

PPG2014H: Topics in Publ. Policy III: Digital Governance and Policy

Digital government is now a worldwide phenomenon and raises important questions about how government works, and how policy gets made, in an increasingly digital world.  This course looks at digital government experiences and movements within the context of Ontario, Canada, North America, and globally.  It will canvass foundational concepts linked to digital government practice with a focus on critically assessing how governments are attempting to organize and operate in digital ways. It features an applied policy-making emphasis with students exploring how policy is designed and delivered using digital ways of working.  Students will engage with case studies, academic articles, and applied exercises to develop new skills and familiarity with digital government practices including user centered design and agile methods.

TEXTS: A selection of scholarly articles, book chapters, and curated case studies.

FORMAT AND REQUIREMENTS: A three-hour seminar that will be delivered in person or online depending on public health and university advice.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
J. Craft

PPG2015H: Policy Development

Governments face a vast array of complex issues. Public policy professionals are constantly evaluating problems, analyzing issues and proposing solutions.

This course is designed to expose students to the public policy development process, including framing an issue, evaluating important internal and external considerations, developing and analyzing viable options, understanding short and long term consequences of a policy choice, and developing a workable implementation strategy.

The course will involve a combination of lectures and participation on a policy team to address pressing challenges facing government. Students will develop several policy decision-making documents, including a detailed Cabinet Document or Policy Paper in an interactive setting that simulates a realistic policy development process. Students will be exposed to the full range of policy development tools.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
B. Graham
B. Hughes

PPG2015H: Topics in Public Policy Economics

Economic considerations are central to a wide range of public policy issues.
Governments worldwide are grappling with how to advance the prosperity their citizens through promoting economic growth while at the same time considering ways to influence the distribution of income and provide needed supports for all of its citizens.
Topics will include (but are not limited to) government budgets, environment and climate change, labour markets, labour force skills, industrial policies, income distribution, housing and the new challenges and opportunities in the economy related to COVID-19.
Specific examples will be drawn from Canadian government policy developments and Budgets during the session.
To provide an economic framework for the analysis of public policy, the course will use examples of how microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts and analytical methods are applied to the selected topic areas.
The course will evaluate the relative merits of government intervention versus non-intervention in these areas, and also the potential different interventions available. Expected consequences of interventions, risks and unintended consequences will also be explored.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
TBA

PPG2017H: Topics in Publ. Policy IV: Urban Policy

The goal of this experiential, intensive (6-week) course is to challenge students to view public policy through an urban lens. The course explores the complex relationship between cities and public policy — revealing how policy shapes cities, and cities shape policy — and how various levels of government and non-governmental organizations participate in urban governance. To inspire students to pursue policy careers focused on cities, the course is organized around field trips hosted by Munk alumni across the Greater Toronto region.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
G. Eidelman

Notes
The course will be taught as an intensive 6-week seminar.

PPG2018H: The Role of Government

This course explores the complexity of current government policy-making in a comparative perspective. Students will examine the rationales for and the limits to government intervention and will identify the policy levers available to government actors in a dynamic political context. The course explores the government’s role in the financing and delivery of public policy goals while balancing concerns of efficiency and equity. Students will explore substantive and procedural issues in a range of major policy areas such as trade, security, redistribution, health care, the environment, indigenous peoples issues and urban policy.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
M. Cappe

Notes
This will be a joint graduate-undergraduate (PPG401H) course. As a joint graduate-undergraduate course the graduate students will be required to do some additional graded work (i.e., graduate students will required to render a more significant final paper with a substantive research component).

GLA2066H Topics in Justice I: Comparative Migration Law and Policy

TBD

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
Ayelet Shachar

Note
This course is co-listed with the MGA, Munk School

LAW7030H (LAW281H1): Aboriginal Law and Policy

A joint course of the Faculty of Law and School of Public Policy and GovernanceLAW7030H will deal with selected issues in Aboriginal law and policy in Canada.

The objective of this course is to bring together students from two faculties, law and public policy, and to encourage discussion about the nature of the relationship between Canadian governments and Indigenous communities through an approach that deals with history, contemporary issues, and the leading legal cases in this complex and ever changing field.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
B. Edwards with D. Walders

Note
This course is cross-listed with the Faculty of Law, for more course information click here.

HAD5778H: Comparative Health Systems and Policy

Each country’s health system and policies are largely shaped by historical, political, social and economic contexts;

Each country’s health system and policies are largely shaped by historical, political, social and economic contexts; but in general, they face similar challenges such as rising expenditures, limited accessibility and public health and health system threats from both communicable and non-communicable diseases. The comparative health systems and policy course is intended to capture the rapidly expanding field of comparative studies in health systems and policy. It will provide a comprehensive methodological foundation to understand why we compare health systems in different countries or provinces within a country, and what we can learn from those comparisons. In the second part, the course will provide specific examples of health system and policy development in high income countries, and low-and-middle- income countries (LMICs). This is an advanced course and should only be taken once a student has completed the course on Canada’s health care system and, if possible, a course on public policy or health policy theories. Although this is a taught course, the main requirement is to complete a major paper applying theoretical and methodological tools to a comparative health systems or comparative health policy case study including two or more jurisdictions (a province/state and/or country).

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
S. Allin

Note
This course is cross-listed with Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME)

Please note that elective courses are subject to change with each new academic year.

*MPP Policy for Non-Departmental Enrollment in PPG Courses*
Non-departmental students may request enrollment in Elective PPG courses (not Core PPG courses).
If an elective course is not fully subscribed, enrollment requests may be submitted 2-weeks prior to the start of the Fall term, and 4-weeks prior to the Winter term. Enrollment is at the discretion of the MPP Program Office and the course instructor. Once a non-departmental student has verified elective courses space availability, they may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the course(s) in which they would like to enroll, by email munkpublicpolicy@utoronto.ca.

NB: The MPP program does not permit for either core or elective courses to be audited.