Upcoming Events

Past Events Login

April 2019

  • Sunday, April 21st – Thursday, May 30th Asian Heritage Month Festival 2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, April 21, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMToronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.; Metro Hall Rotunda, 55 John St.
    Thursday, May 30, 20191:00PM - 2:00PMToronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.; Metro Hall Rotunda, 55 John St.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Opening Ceremony with Special Presentations & Launch of Asian Canadian Artists in Digital Age Workshops

    *Please click here to RSVP on Eventbrite*

    @ City Hall Rotunda & City Hall Library (100 Queen St. W.)
    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 | 2-6 PM

    Mr. Justin Poy | “What’s happening in the world of film in China, and its opportunities for Canada”?”

    Over the last two decades we have seen China develop into a blockbuster machine. Yet, Chinese films rarely get much international attention. Is it an intentional snub? Or are Chinese films not made for the international market? Was “Wolf Warrior 2” actually a good action flick? Or was it good considering it came from China? With recent big budget flops like “Asura” (backed in part by Alibaba’s Jack Ma), that cost $122MM USD to make yet only brought in $7.1MM before it was yanked from theatres, to cross over movies like “The Great Wall” starring leading man, Matt Damon, that garnered a dismal audience and reviews — what is actually happening that has made “Chinawood” rethink their movie production formula? How can Canada optimize this opportunity, and what are the implications for Toronto, Hollywood North?

    Mr. Stephen Siu | “Jews in Shanghai — Revisited and Parallels to Canada”

    Stephen is the producer of the “Jews in Shanghai” project in Toronto and a researcher on that period of history who has met with Dr Ho Feng Shan’s daughter Manli Ho in both Winnipeg and Toronto, and interviewed the head of the Jewish Studies Centre in Shanghai. Dr Ho was the Chinese Consul General to Vienna from 1938 to 1940, and he was called “Chinese Schindler” because he saved thousands of Jews. How will this talk rekindle memories of the Holocaust, and in what ways Toronto is serving similar roles as Shanghai in addressing multiculturalism and providing asylum?

    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 – THURSDAY, APRIL 25
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Rotunda

    THURSDAY, MAY 16 – THURSDAY, MAY 30
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Library

    THURSDAY, MAY 30 | 1-2 PM
    Professor Chef Leo Chan’s Presentation at City Hall Library
    “Chinese festivals and Foods” | City Hall Library will focus on the Dragon Boat Festival

    *******************
    @ Metro Hall Rotunda (55 John St.)
    MONDAY, MAY 13 – SUNDAY, MAY 19
    Asian Heritage Month Art & Photo Exhibitions at Metro Hall Rotunda


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Patron, Asian Heritage Month-CFACI

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor and Past Chair, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST)


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Heritage Month - Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.

    Canada Council for the Arts

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Cambridge Food & Wine Society

    Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto

    Department of Canadian Heritage and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Social Services Network

    WE Artists' Group

    The Justin Poy Agency

    York Centre for Asian Research, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, April 23rd Urban Data as Public Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 23, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    At this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Internet companies applied their online knowledge to the analogue world for the first time. Facebook, Palantir, Microsoft and Google tried to impress the business elite with three-storey-high temporary buildings at the most central spots in Davos, and Google revealed its ambition to build an entire suburb of Toronto.

    In this talk Von Borries argues that Google’s “Sidewalk City Lab” applies reinforced learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence (AI), to the real world. (Similar approaches can be observed at Microsoft’s CityNext, Baidou AI City Xiongang, Moscow, Taipei and Singapore Smart Nation, and it is only a question of time until Facebook and Tencent will join in.) This has implications not only for architecture as a creative handcraft, but more importantly for the relationship between people (especially minorities, notoriously overlooked by code based on statistics), as well as social relations, and the private sector.

    In this new setting, city planning and architectural design are sourced through machine learning algorithms fed by the big data collected from anyone involved— be they future tenants or critics—potentially any user of Google’s services, in the case of Toronto. Ultimately, we all become unconscious architects as our digital lives are exploited as data. Still, for some time, the results will be unpredictable, even for Google’s coders. It remains to be seen if this can be interpreted as an opportunity or as a failure.

    The Taiwanese architect Hsieh Ying-Chun has another approach to collaboration. He considers architecture and town-planning a collective endeavour and a participatory effort.

    Smart city algorithms lead to the disappearance of the architect. This lecture aims to highlight how “Urban Data as Public Space” is actually working and how it is different from supposedly similar developments on China’s New Silk Road. Lanzhou New Area is a rather top-down, centrally planned development, reminiscent of Corbusier’s 90 year-old Plan Voisin for Paris, but pimped up with cinema-city style theme parks. Last but not least, Von Borries will connect this discussion to central Moscow, where urban facades mimic a clichéd Russian-ness for the football World Cup and beyond, combined with facial recognition software for all.

    The lecture will be accompanied by excerpts of Christian von Borries’ upcoming social science fiction film AI is the Answer – What was the Question?

    Christian von Borries is a musician and film director who was guest professor for architecture at Nuremberg’s Art Academy. He is a visiting professor at the School of Inter-Media Art at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou. He lives in a self developed green house on top of an old warehouse building in Berlin. His artistic practice can be read in the tradition of the Situationist’s psychogeography. He just cocurated a tech fair in Seoul and Beijing called A BETTER VERSION OF YOU. Together with Andreas Dzialocha, he is AI Unit.


    Speakers

    Christian von Borries
    Speaker
    Musician and film director; Visiting Professor at the School of Inter-Media Art, China Academy of Art in Hangzhou

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Academic Director, Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, Graduate Department of History


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 24th Julian Jackson: Interpreting de Gaulle

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the early summer of 1940, when France was overrun by German troops, one junior general who had fought in the trenches in Verdun refused to accept defeat. He fled to London, where he took to the radio to address his compatriots back home. “Whatever happens,” he said, “the flame of French resistance must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished.” At that moment, Charles de Gaulle entered history.

    For the rest of the war, de Gaulle insisted he and his Free French movement were the true embodiment of France. Through sheer force of personality he inspired French men and women to risk their lives to resist the Nazi occupation. Sometimes aloof but confident in his leadership, he quarreled violently with Churchill and Roosevelt. Yet they knew they would need his help to rebuild a shattered Europe. Thanks to de Gaulle, France was recognized as one of the victorious Allies when Germany was finally defeated. Then, as President of the Fifth Republic, he brought France to the brink of a civil war over his controversial decision to pull out of Algeria. He challenged American hegemony, took France out of NATO, and twice vetoed British entry into the European Community in his pursuit of what he called “a certain idea of France.”

    Julian Jackson’s magnificent De Gaulle, the first major biography in over twenty years, captures this titanic figure as never before. Drawing on the extensive resources of the recently opened de Gaulle archives, Jackson reveals the conservative roots of de Gaulle’s intellectual formation, sheds new light on his relationship with Churchill, and shows how he confronted riots at home and violent independence movements from the Middle East to Vietnam. No previous biography has so vividly depicted this towering figure whose legacy remains deeply contested.

    De Gaulle has been recognized with the Amercian Library in Paris Prize 2018 for the best book about France written in English, the Franco-British Literary Prize 2018, and the prestigious Duff Cooper Prize for Non-Fiction 2018. It is being translated into French, Portugese, Hebrew, Chinese, and Japanese and was noted a ‘book of the year’ by several British newspapers.


    Speakers

    Julian Jackson
    Queen Mary University of London


    Sponsors

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, April 24th Hon. Kevin Rudd: China-Canada-U.S. Relations: What Happens Next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 24, 20195:00PM - 6:00PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto
    105 St George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    About Our Speaker: Kevin Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute as its inaugural President in January 2015. He served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister from 2007 to 2010, then as Foreign Minister from 2010 to 2012, before returning as Prime Minister in 2013. As Prime Minister, Rudd led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis. Australia’s fiscal response to the crisis was reviewed by the IMF as the most effective stimulus strategy of all member states. Australia was the only major advanced economy not to go into recession. Rudd is also internationally recognized as one of the founders of the G20, which drove the global response to the crisis and in 2009 helped prevent the crisis from spiraling into a second global depression. As Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Rudd was active in global and regional foreign policy leadership. He was a driving force in expanding the East Asia Summit (EAS) to include both the U.S. and Russia in 2010. He also initiated the concept of transforming the EAS into a wider Asia-Pacific community to help manage deep-rooted tensions in Asia by building over time the institutions and culture of common security in Asia. On climate change, Rudd ratified the Kyoto Protocol in 2007 and legislated in 2008 for a mandatory 20 percent renewable energy target for Australia. Rudd launched Australia’s challenge in the International Court of Justice with the objective of stopping Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean. Rudd drove Australia’s successful bid for its current non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council and oversaw the near-doubling of Australia’s foreign aid budget. Rudd is Chair of the Board of the International Peace Institute, and Chair of Sanitation and Water for All. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, a Distinguished Fellow at Chatham House in London, a Distinguished Statesman with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Paulson Institute in Chicago. Mr. Rudd is a member of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization’s Group of Eminent Persons. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the Schwarzman Scholars program at Tsinghua University, and is an Honorary Professor at Peking University. Rudd is proficient in Mandarin Chinese. He remains actively engaged in indigenous reconciliation.

    Contact

    Daniel Ellul
    (416) 978-6119


    Speakers

    Hon. Kevin Rudd
    26th Prime Minister of Australia
    President, Asia Society Policy Institute
    Senior Fellow - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Thursday, April 25th Steering Low-Carbon Growth in Emerging African Cities: Insights from Dar es Salaam

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 25, 20194:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    By the end of the 21st century, over 30 African cities will have populations exceeding 10 million people, placing them among the world’s largest megacities. The region’s rapid urbanization will stimulate investments in new urban infrastructure, including power plants, roads, and residential buildings, which will push city-level energy use and carbon emissions to new levels. The region’s impending urbanization and infrastructure growth presents an opportunity in the global fight against climate change. By coordinating efforts now, urban planners, infrastructure service providers, and municipalities can “get it right” and invest in sustainable and low-carbon infrastructure to avoid locking into carbon-intensive patterns of urban growth.

    Using findings from interviews and stakeholder workshops undertaken over three months of fieldwork in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, this presentation will explore three key questions: What role do African cities and municipal governments play in producing low-carbon urban growth? Which institutions or governing bodies should take the lead, and why? And what are the opportunities to scale up investments to finance sustainable technologies and infrastructure? The presentation will elucidate possible governance and financing options for Dar es Salaam as well as their relevance for other cities in the region.

    SPEAKER

    Chibulu Luo is the recipient of the 2018-2019 Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. She is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Toronto. Chibulu is also a former Young Scientist with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); a Doctoral Research Awardee with International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Canada; a Doctoral Scholar with the University of Toronto’s Centre for Global Engineering; and a researcher with the Engineering Education for Sustainable Cities in Africa (EESC-A) project within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

    Chibulu has worked extensively in environmental policy and development, including with the Earth Institute at Columbia University, the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and the World Bank. She holds Master’s degrees in Engineering Management and Mechanical Engineering.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 26th History of a Day: Time, Terror, Agency and the Overthrow of Maximilien Robespierre

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room
    Sidney Smith 2098
    100 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    On 27 July 1794 – 9 Thermidor year II in the new Revolutionary Calendar – Maximilien Robespierre, the most notorious politician of the French revolution, was toppled from his position on the Committee of Public safety which was running the Terror in France. He was executed the followjng evening. His overthrow is conventionally viewed as marking the beginning of the end of the Terror. Events on 9 Thermidor started with a parliamentary coup in the national assembly led by many of his colleagues on the Committee of Public Safety. It was followed by a mobilisation of the Parisian popular movement in support of Robespierre led by the Paris Commune, before the national assembly reorganised and won the day. Many historians have seen the ootcome of the day as inevitable. Yet for those who were caught up in it, it was anything but. The forces behind Robespierre looked superior to those of his opponents and the outcome of the action wavered dramatically over the 24 hours. It was a day that involved tens of thousands of Parisians. How, then, does one tell the story of those 24 hours, in ways which do justice to the experience of those Parisians and the forces of sheer contingency and chance?

    Colin Jones is Professor of History at Queen Mary University of London and since 2018 is also Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. He is Fellow of the British Academy and Past President of the Royal Historical Society. He is the author of many books on the history of France including The Great Nation. France from Louis XIV to Napoleon (1715-99) (2002), Paris: Biography of a City (2004), The Smile Revolution in 18th-century Paris (2015) and Versailles (2018).


    Speakers

    Colin Jones
    Queen Mary University


    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, April 26th The French Trials of Cléophas Kamitatu: Refugee Politics, Leftist Activism, and Françafrique in 1970s Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    In the 1970s, the French lawyer Jean-Jacques de Félice served as defense counsel for Cléophas Kamitatu-Massamba of Congo-Zaïre, who was expelled from France in 1972 even though he had obtained political refugee status. At the request of Mobutu Sese Seko, the French Minister of the Interior had censored Kamitatu’s critical portrayal of the Mobutu regime, La Grande Mystification du Congo (published by François Maspero Press in 1970). The Kamitatu case illustrates how, even as France ratified the 1967 Protocol of the Geneva Convention on Refugees in 1971, immigration, censorship, and late Gaullist era Africa policies dominated political discussions. The attempts to censure Kamitatu’s book published by a French publisher and to deport him despite his status as political refugee show how various facets of French government engaged with international laws regulating refugees and deportation at the very time that Jacques Foccart, who had oriented France’s Africa policy since 1958, sought to integrate Congo-Zaïre into France’s sphere of influence in Africa. Kamitatu’s story thus exposes the network of Jacques Foccart as detrimental to French civil liberties, African opposition politics, and international refugee protocols alike. The chapter draws primarily on Kamitatu’s legal case files in the archives of his lawyer, Jean-Jacques de Félice. It places cause lawyering in historical perspective, promotes use of the lawyer’s archive as fertile historical method, and considers state and non-state actor networks in a common analytical framework.

    Meredith Terretta earned her PhD in African history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds the Gordon F. Henderson Research Chair in Human Rights and teaches history at the University of Ottawa. She specializes in themes of African liberation movements, legal activism, histories of refuge-seeking, and human rights. She has recently coedited African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights (Ohio University Press, 2015). Her most recent single-authored book is Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence: Nationalism, Grassfields Tradition, and State-Building in Cameroon (Ohio University Press, New African Histories Series, 2014). Her articles appear in numerous journals including The Journal of Contemporary History, The Canadian Journal of History, Matériaux pour l’histoire de notre temps, Politique africaine, The Journal of World History, Human Rights Quarterly, and The Journal of African History. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled Activism at the Fringes of Empire: Rogue Lawyers and Rights Activists In and Out of Twentieth Century Africa. She is President of the Canadian Association of African Studies.


    Speakers

    Meredith Terretta
    University of Ottawa



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Monday, April 29th Between Trauma and Nostalgia: Public Opinion and Identities in Donbas after 2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Oleksii Polegkyi is a Bayduza Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Contemporary Ukraine Studies Program, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta and member of Political Communication Research Unit at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. Previously he was a research fellow at the Graduate Institute of Russian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan and visiting post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg in Hungary. He earned PhD in Political Sciences from the University of Wroclaw, Poland and the University of Antwerp, Belgium. He received an MA in Philosophy from the T. Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine and was a recipient of the Taiwan Fellowship Program, Lane Kirkland Fellowship, Open Society Foundation Fellowship as well as research grants from Polish National Science Centre, Erste Foundation and others. His research interests include post-communist transformations in post-Soviet area, media and political discourse in Ukraine, foreign policy, nation and identity building in the post-Soviet states.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oleksii Polegkyi
    Speaker
    Bayduza Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Contemporary Ukraine Studies Program, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, April 30th Migrants, Muslims and the Future of Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 30, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative

    Description

    Nine minutes before attacking two mosques and killing 50 Muslim worshippers in Christchurch, the shooter released a 73-page manifesto outlining his anti-immigration and white supremacist agenda. World leaders condemned the terrorist attack, but continue to face serious questions about their own immigration and border security policies at home.

    Across North America and Europe, migration is a point of fierce debate. Proponents argue that immigrants make a positive social, economic, and cultural impact, while others express concerns that unchecked migration threatens security and jobs.

    Exploiting this reasonable debate are white extremist groups that frame migration as a “race war” and declare that Muslims should be purged. These radicalized white extremists have developed globalized digital networks that have inspired horrifying terrorist attacks in Oslo, Quebec City, and Christchurch.

    Has the democratic debate about migration become irreversibly securitized? How can analysts and policymakers reasonably and responsibly debate immigration policies, without fuelling dangerous anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim extremism? What does the hard evidence have to say about the effects of migration on the future of democracy?
    To answer these pressing questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School presents a dynamic panel discussion with renowned experts.

    Chris Cochrane is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He is the author of Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas (MQUP, 2015) and co-author of Canadian Politics: Critical Approaches (Nelson, 2014). His current research looks at ideology, political disagreement, and anti-immigrant sentiment in Canada and other democratic countries.

    Doug Saunders is a distinguished author and award-winning journalist with a regular column with The Globe and Mail. An expert on migration and international affairs, he is the author of the acclaimed books “The Myth of the Muslim Tide” (2012) and “Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough” (2017).

    Naseem Mithoowani is a prominent Canadian lawyer, who served as co-counsel for Zunera Ishaq, a Muslim woman who challenged the legality of a policy requiring her to remove her facial covering at a citizenship oath ceremony. Naseem has lectured at the University of Toronto on the human rights of women and minorities, and helped develop a specialized seminar to help Muslim women to identify and report hate crimes.

    Aisha Ahmad (moderator) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough. She is the author of Jihad & Co.: Black Markets and Islamist Power (Oxford UP, 2017). She has conducted research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Kenya, Mali, Lebanon, and Iraq on the economics of jihadist insurgencies.


    Speakers

    Aisha Ahmad
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto

    Chris Cochrane
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto

    Naseem Mithoowani
    Speaker
    Lawyer, Waldman & Associates

    Doug Saunders
    Speaker
    Journalist, International Affairs Columnist, The Globe and Mail



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

May 2019

  • Thursday, May 2nd Book Launch Mackenzie King in the Age of the Dictators by Roy MacLaren

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 2, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Until the outbreak of hostilities in 1939, Mackenzie King prided himself on never publicly saying anything derogatory about Hitler or Mussolini, unequivocally supporting the appeasement policies of British prime minister Neville Chamberlain and regarding Hitler as a benign fellow mystic. In Mackenzie King in the Age of the Dictators Roy MacLaren leads readers through the political labyrinth that led to Canada’s involvement in the Second World War and its awakening as a forceful nation on the world stage.

    Roy MacLaren has been a diplomat, businessman, minister in three federal cabinets, and Canada’s high commissioner to the United Kingdom.

    The Bill Graham Centre is a joint undertaking of Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, in the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Friday, May 3rd Glenn Gould Roundtable 2019: Japanese and Other Perspectives on the Canadian Icon of Music and Technology

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 3, 20192:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    A gathering of colleagues, friends, writers/artists and scholars of Glenn Gould (1932-1982) to develop new perspectives by sharing memories, recent news and achievements as well as forthcoming events and projects. The event will involve presentations and a film screening.

    PRESENTATIONS:
    “Glenn Gould and Japan: A Two-Way Street”
    Junichi Miyazawa
    Junichi Miyazawa, Ph.D., is music/literary critic and award-winning professor of humanities at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo. In 2018/19 he is Visiting Scholar at Massey College; Visiting Professor at Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University, and St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto. He is one of the world’s leading Glenn Gould scholars. His major books are: Glenn Gould: A Perspective (Tokyo, 2004), McLuhan’s View (Tokyo, 2008), and Thinking Music (co-authored, Tokyo, 2017).

    “Malleability and Machines: Glenn Gould and the Technological Self”
    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Edward Jones-Imhotep is a cultural historian of science and technology and Associate Professor of History at York University. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. His book,The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press), won the 2018 Sidney Edelstein Prize for the best scholarly book in history of technology.

    “Evolving Interpretative Approach in Glenn Gould’s Recordings of Alban Berg’s Piano Sonata”
    Michael Thibodeau
    Dr. Michael Thibodeau is a recent graduate of the University of Toronto. Equally at home in the library carrel as on the piano bench, Michael has spent unreasonable amounts of time researching the interpretative processes performers use to bring notation into sound. His dissertation is an ontological examination of concepts belonging to common practice—namely, musicality and authenticity.

    “Matter of North: An Anthology”
    Anthony Cushing
    Anthony Cushing received his Ph.D. in musicology from Western University in 2013. He completed an undergraduate degree in music at Acadia University where he majored in composition and cello performance. In 2003, he had the distinction of being the first graduate student in music at the University of Southern Maine where he studied composition with J. Mark Scearce and Elliott Schwartz. His current research interest is in Glenn Gould’s Solitude Trilogy radio documentaries.

    FILM SCREENING:
    Radio as Music (1975)
    A long-forgotten film in which Gould talks about composing radio documentaries with interviewer John Thompson and sound technician Donald Logan. (30 minutes)

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Anthony Cushing
    Speaker
    Independent Scholar

    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, York University

    Michael Thibodeau
    Speaker
    Pianist

    Peter Goddard
    Panelist
    Music Journalist

    David Jaeger, C. M.
    Panelist
    Music Producer, Composer & Broadcaster

    Caryl Clark
    Chair
    Professor, Music History & Culture, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

    Junichi Miyazawa
    Co-Chair/Speaker
    Visiting Scholar, Massey College, University of Toronto

    Visiting Professor, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University and St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Professor, School of Cultural & Creative Studies, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo

    Brian Levine
    Panelist
    Executive Director, Glenn Gould Foundation

    Donald Logan
    Panelist
    Sound Technician

    Faye Perkins
    Panelist
    Representative for Glenn Gould Estate/Primary Wave

    Lorne Tulk
    Panelist
    Sound Technician


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Faculty of Music

    Primary Wave


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Tuesday, May 7th “A Hell of a Lot Worse Than Waterboarding”?: Law and American State Violence From Bush to Trump

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 7, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Donald Trump has notoriously promised to “bring back a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding” along with other unlawful practices. Furthermore, his administration has advanced policies that undermine international human rights commitments, particularly related to migration and refugees. While Trumpism is undoubtedly shocking, it exists within a continuum of American challenges to international law, justified in the name of national security. Drawing from Sanders’ new book, Plausible Legality (Oxford University Press, 2018), this talk traces how the Bush and Obama administrations, to varying degrees, legally rationalized torture, targeted killing, and mass surveillance after 9/11. What do these largely successful efforts to construct legal cover for human rights abuses tell us about the capacity of legal rules to constrain state violence, both in the past and today? Can the law prevent “worse” from occurring in the future?

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Dr. Rebecca Sanders
    Department of Political Science, University of Cincinnati


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +
  • Wednesday, May 8th Prospects for Japan's G20 Osaka Summit

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 8, 20199:00AM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Japan is hosting the 2019 G20 summit in Osaka on June 28-29, 2019. In anticipation of that meeting, the Centre for the Study of Global Japan and the G20 Research Group of the University of Toronto are hosting a one-day symposium on May 8, 2019 to survey the agenda for the summit and provide an assessment of its prospects.

    In addition to leaders of G20 countries, other leaders and the heads of many international organizations have been invited. It will be the largest summit Japan has ever hosted. According to Prime Minister Abe, “At the Osaka Summit, Japan is determined to lead global economic growth by promoting free trade and innovation, achieving both economic growth and reduction of disparities, and contributing to the development agenda and other global issues. Furthermore, we will discuss how to address the digital economy from an institutional perspective and issues that arise from an aging society. We will introduce Japan’s efforts, including the productivity revolution amid a “Society 5.0” era, towards achieving a society where all individuals are actively engaged.”

    The day-long U of T symposium will be held in the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place on May 8, beginning at 9AM. A range of distinguished officials and scholars from Japan, Canada, Europe, and the United States will discuss the evolving G20 agenda. All are welcome to attend. More details will follow.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    G20 Research Group, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



    +

Newsletter Signup Sign up for the Munk School Newsletter

× Strict NO SPAM policy. We value your privacy, and will never share your contact info.