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November 2017

  • Thursday, November 23rd Qazaqlïq, or Ambitious Brigandage, and the Formation of the Qazaqs: State and Identity in Post-Mongol Central Eurasia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 23, 20174:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room
    Bancroft Building 200B
    4 Bancroft Avenue
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Book Presentation and Seminar

    The first book to comprehensively cover the emergence of Kazakh identities within the broader cultural and political context of Central Eurasia. Avoiding the pitfall of projecting national identity back in time it shows what early Kazakhs thought made them distinct from other groups. The author brings historical phenomena such as the Zaporozhian Cossacks of Ukraine and the Don Cossacks of southern Russia into a much larger Central Eurasian world by focusing on the post-Mongol institution of qazaqlïq (cossackdom). The book is concise and engaging, as it tackles a vast geographical area, a number of ethnic groups, and a premodern time period. The work is impressive in terms of the breadth of research and the multilingual nature of the sources, both primary and secondary. It is a true exemplar of Central Eurasian studies and is also provocative — the author is clear about where his arguments and interpretations are building on or conflicting with interpretations of other scholars.

    Winner of the Central Eurasia Society Studies 2017 Best Book Award


    Speakers

    Dr. Joo-Yup Lee


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 23rd Book Launch: Trudeau's Tango: Alberta Meets Pierre Elliott Trudeau, 1968-1972 by Darryl Raymaker

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 23, 20176:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In this insightful and lively history, Liberal insider Darryl Raymaker recalls the attempt to broker “a marriage from hell” between the federal Liberal Party and Alberta’s Social Credit government in the late 1960s. Raymaker uses his deep connections and backroom knowledge to trace the tangled political relationships that developed when charismatic statesman Pierre Trudeau confronted the forces of oil and agriculture in Canada’s west. Part memoir, part chronicle, Trudeau’s Tango provides a window into Canadian history, politics, economics and the zeitgeist of the late 1960s.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 24th Policing the Media in the French Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 24, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.

    Jane McLeod is associate professor of history at Brock University. She is the author of Licensing Loyalty: Printers, Patrons and the State in Early Modern France (University of Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011). Her interest in state-media relations continues in her current SSHRC-funded project, “Printers Confront the French Revolution: Profits, Principles and Perils.”

    Her paper presents an argument about the nature of media control in the reigns of Louis XV and XVI and explores how this changed in 1789 with the advent of Freedom of the Press. Case studies of printers’ careers are used to explore the high levels of persecution experienced by printers from early in the Revolution.


    Speakers

    Jane McLeod
    Brock University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 27th A Global Education Strategy for Canada - Findings from the Global Education Report

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 27, 201710:00AM - 11:30AMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Canada is not preparing its young people to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world.

    On November 27, the Munk School of Global Affairs will host the Toronto launch of a landmark report by the Study Group on Global Education, an independent group of university and college presidents, private sector leaders, and policy experts.

    The report sounds an urgent warning and call to action.

    International learning is vital.
    It fosters the knowledge and skills that young Canadians will need to succeed in the 21st century workplace, and the global connections that Canada will need to succeed in a more complex world.

    Canada performs poorly.
    Relatively few Canadian students go on international learning programs, and those who do overwhelmingly travel to just a few countries and study in their native language.

    Other countries are racing ahead.
    Peer countries like the United States, Australia, and members of the European Union have all launched ambitious global education strategies, with impressive results. Canada has no such strategy – and it shows.

    Canada must act.
    The report sets out a plan for Canada’s governments, educational institutions and private sector to dramatically increase the number of young Canadians participating in international study, co-ops, and work traineeships over the next 10 years.

    This event will include a brief presentation of the report’s findings, followed by a panel discussion. Speakers include:

    Margaret Biggs
    Study Group Co-Chair and Matthews Fellow on Global Public Policy, Queen’s University

    Roland Paris
    Study Group Co-Chair and Professor and University Research Chair, University of Ottawa

    Delila Bikic
    Alumnae, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Junior Fellow, Massey College, University of Toronto

    Zabeen Hirji
    Strategic Advisor and former Chief Human Resources Officer, Royal Bank of Canada
    Member of the Study Group on Global Education

    Joseph Wong
    Vice-Provost & Associate Vice-President, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Moderator
    Randall Hansen
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    View the report: Global Education for Canadians: Equipping Young Canadians to Succeed at Home and Abroad.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Margaret Biggs
    (Study Group Co-Chair) Matthews Fellow on Global Public Policy, Queen’s University

    Delila Bikic
    Alumnae, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Junior Fellow, Massey College, University of Toronto

    Zabeen Hirji
    Strategic Advisor and former Chief Human Resources Officer, Royal Bank of Canada
    Member of the Study Group on Global Education

    Roland Paris
    (Study Group Co-Chair) Professor and University Research Chair, University of Ottawa

    Joseph Wong
    Vice-Provost & Associate Vice-President, International, University of Toronto Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 28th Digital government: what's working, what's not, and what's next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 28, 20179:00AM - 11:30AMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Presented by the School of Public Policy and Governance

    Big data. Algorithms. Mobile devices. The Internet of things. Digital technologies are undeniably disrupting society and government. Moving beyond the rhetoric of ‘going digital’, come and hear firsthand from leading experts at “Digital government: what’s working, what’s not, and what’s next”.


    Speakers

    Hillary Hartley (@hillary)
    Chief Digital Officer and Deputy Minister for Digital Government, Government of Ontario

    Kent Aiken (@kentdaitken)
    Open Government Outreach and Engagement, Government of Canada

    Paula Kwan (@PaulaKwan):
    Director, Civic Innovation Office, City of Toronto

    Bianca Wylie (@biancawylie)
    Head, Open Data Institute Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 28th China After the 19th Party Congress

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 28, 20172:30PM - 4:00PMRoom 2165, Bahen Centre for Information Technology, 40 St. George St. (at the intersection of College St. and St. George St.)
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    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) presents “China After the 19th Party Congress”

    The 19th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party took place in Beijing from October 18th – 24th, 2017. This week-long meeting attracted the attention of China-watchers from within and outside of the country, as the Congress defines a blueprint for the next five years of the CCP governance during President Xi Jinping’s second term. Within the Chinese Communist Party, the Congress reflected informal party norms of elite politics, and revealed new appointments to the echelon of power in the Politburo Standing Committee alongside amendments the Party’s Constitution under Xi. Beyond the party itself, the Congress discussed China’s increasingly assertive foreign policy just prior to President Trump’s visit to China. The duration of the conference also witnessed a tightening of security around the circulation of information and travel to accommodate for the Congress.

    What is the legacy and significance of the 19th Party Congress? How will it come to define China’s future, during and beyond the upcoming five years? Our panelists, Professor Sida Liu and Professor Lynette Ong, will analyze the topic from the perspectives of the Chinese legal system and elite politics, respectively.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Sida Liu
    Professor Sida Liu is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto and a faculty fellow at the American Bar Foundation. He is also an affiliated scholar of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University School of Law and the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School. He has previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and directed its East Asian Legal Studies Center from 2014-2016. Most recently, Professor Liu was a member of the Institute for Advance Study in Princeton. His current research interests include the sociology of Chinese law and the legal profession, criminal justice, social theory and more.

    Lynette Ong
    Professor Lynette Ong is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, jointly appointed by the Department of Political Science and the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, where she currently serves as Director of Munk China Initiatives. Professor Ong is a renowned expert in the politics and political economy of China. Her main research interests are authoritarian politics and the political economy of development. She is a published author on issues such as local government debt, contentious politics, protest and land reform, state-led urbanization and more.


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union at the Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Association of Political Science Students

    East Asian Studies Student Union


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 28th The Global Economy, The IMF and G20 Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 28, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Speaker Information;

    Patrick Cirillo, a founding member of the G7 Research Group, is Principal Assistant to the Secretary of the International Monetary Fund. Previously, he served as Deputy Chief of Operations in the IMF secretariat and Deputy Chief of Public Affairs in the IMF’s Communications Department. From 1997 to 2008, he was also the Secretary to the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-Four on International Monetary Affairs and Development (G24), which brings together the major emerging market and developing countries. Prior to joining the Fund, Patrick worked in financial markets in Europe and in academia in Canada and Europe. Patrick attended universities in Switzerland, France and Austria and is a graduate of International Relations Program at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Patrick Cirillo
    Principal Assistant to the Secretary, International Monetary Fund


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 28th 2017 Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture by Jars Balan

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 28, 20176:00PM - 9:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    JARS BALAN, Interim Director of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS), University of Alberta, will deliver the 20th Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture, “Tell the Kremlin we are starving; we have no bread!” Rhea Clyman’s 1932 Odyssey through the “Famine Lands” of Ukraine.

    Jars Balan will discuss the life of journalist Rhea Clyman, one of the only journalists to witness and write about the Ukrainian Famine of 1932-33 known as the Holodomor. Born in Toronto to a poor immigrant Jewish family, Clyman encountered adversity early in life, losing part of one leg in a streetcar accident. In September 1932, Clyman, then 28 years old, made a journey by car through the agricultural heartland of the Soviet Union just as the Holodomor was beginning to exact its terrible toll. Her road trip took her from Moscow through Eastern Ukraine all the way to Tbilisi, Georgia, where she was arrested and given twenty-four hours to leave the country, accused of spreading false news about the Soviet Union. Her expulsion, the first by Soviet authorities of a Western journalist in eleven years, was reported in scores of newspapers around the world. Clyman’s vivid eyewitness accounts of the “Famine-Lands” were published in the London Daily Express before appearing in twenty-one feature articles in the Toronto Telegram in 1933. Balan will discuss the passion, courage, and perseverance that Clyman exhibited both in her reporting and in life.

    Balan has been involved with CIUS for almost four decades and has an extensive list of scholarly publications. Since 2000 he has overseen the administration of the Ukrainian Canadian Studies Program, and in 2007 he was appointed coordinator of Kule Ukrainian Canadian Studies Centre (CIUS). He is working on a book about Rhea Clyman.

    THE TORONTO ANNUAL FAMINE LECTURE began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past lecturers have included James Mace, Norman Naimark (Stanford University), Alexander Motyl (Rutgers University), Anne Applebaum (Washington Post), Timothy Snyder (Yale University), and Serhii Plokhy (Harvard University).

    Contact

    Marta Baziuk
    (416) 923-4732


    Speakers

    Jars Balan
    Interim Director of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS), University of Alberta


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 29th Times are Changing in Indian Journalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 29, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    ROM Masterclasses at U of T

    Description

    As a complement to the ROM’s inaugural Annual South Asia Lecture, the Asian Institute hosts a “ROM Masterclass at the UofT” with Mumbai-based journalist Sidharth Bhatia of TheWire.in. Bhatia will be leading a two-hour session with faculty and graduate students titled “Times are Changing in Indian Journalism.”

    This masterclass will focus on how, in a large and diverse country like India, the media industry (newspapers and TV channels) is doing well commercially, while professional standards are declining and large media houses have become very pro-establishment in the last three and a half years. In this context, we will discuss how a handful of small media outlets, mainly in the digital space, are upholding professional standards.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Sidharth Bhatia
    Mumbai-based journalist and writer Sidharth Bhatia is one of the founding editors of The Wire, a non-profit media venture that publishes independent journalism. He was among the editors who launched Daily News and Analysis (DNA) in 2005 and managed its editorial and opinion section. He writes on politics, society and culture. An Associate Press Fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge University, Bhatia's last book was India Psychedelic, the story of a Rocking Generation.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 29th Escape Velocity? How to Overcome Secular Stagnation in Japan and Abroad

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 29, 20172:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan Inaugural Symposium

    Description

    For over two decades now, Japan has found itself at the forefront of economic policymaking. The bursting of the bubble economy ushered in an era of zero interest rates and unconventional monetary policy, long before such measures were widely adopted elsewhere during the Global Financial Crisis. Japan’s demographic trends presage continental Europe’s future. Many policy choices have been copied, even though their effectiveness continues to be debated in Japan as abroad. This event brings together leading members of the policy community from Japan and North America to discuss Japan’s experience. The purpose is not to take stock of Japan’s (alleged or real) malaise, but to identify common themes that provide useful lessons for other countries.

    Innovation and Economic Growth in Japan: Firm-Level Approach by Nobuyuki Kinoshita

    Slowdown in TFP and capital stock accumulation are the two main causes of Japan’s long-term economic stagnation. I analyze this problem on the firm-level approach. Nowadays ICT innovation has changed our way of lives everywhere in the world. Under this circumstance, Japanese firms do invest in ICT and R&D too, but something is weighting down on TFP growth. Actually, they stick to their own R&D and collaborate less with other organizations. Besides, entry of innovative entrepreneurs and exit of unproductive firms are remarkably weak in Japan. As a result, Japanese firms all in all get older and less active. My presentation gives the policy implication that the Japan’s enterprise system should be reformed and that the speed up of the industries restructuring is particularly critical.

    Nobuyuki KINOSHITA (Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo), Noboyuki Kinoshita, formerly with the Ministry of Finance and then the Bank of Japan, is an expert on corporate governance reforms in Japan and their macroeconomic implications. He served as Executive Director at the Bank of Japan from 2010 to 2014. He is currently senior advisor to Aflac (Columbus, GA), a leading supplemental insurance provider in the US and Japanese markets. He regularly presents to academic and professional audience on Japanese macroeconomic policies.

    Aging in Japan: A Fiscal and Macroeconomic Conundrum by R. Anton Braun

    Japan is in the midst of a demographic transition that is both rapid and large by international standards. Aging is already placing a burden on government finances. Public expenditures on pensions, medical care and long-term care are rising. At the same time, low fertility rates in conjunction with longer life expectancies are increasing the old-age-dependency ratio and workers are facing higher tax burdens. Moreover, Japan’s ability to confront the negative fiscal implications of future aging is constrained by its very high debt-GDP ratio. In my presentation I will detail the size of the fiscal imbalances created by aging, explain how Japan’s fiscal situation is creating a drag on macroeconomic activity and discuss the efficacy of alternative strategies for stabilizing the fiscal situation and boosting economic growth.

    R. Anton Braun is a research economist and senior adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and a visiting professor of economics at Keio University. His research topics include fiscal and monetary policy and aging. Before joining the Bank in 2010 he was a professor of economics at the University of Tokyo where he taught from 2001-2010.

    Symposium chaired by Mark Manger

    Mark Manger (Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto). Professor Manger is an Associate Professor of Political Economy and Global Affairs at the Munk School and the Department of Political Science. He received his doctorate from UBC and joined the Munk School in 2012 following tenure-track appointments at McGill University and the London School of Economics. Professor Manger’s field of specialization is international political economy, with emphasis on trade and finance, and the political economy of East Asia and Japan. He has been a visiting researcher at the Institute of Social Science, University of Tokyo, in 2003 and in 2010, and is an alumnus of the Program on US-Japan Relations at Harvard University, where he was a fellow in 2007-2008.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    R. Anton Braun
    Speaker
    Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, GA

    Mark Manger
    Chair
    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Nobuyuki Kinoshita
    Speaker
    Senior Advisor, AFLAC Insurance Japan, Tokyo


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Japan NOW Lecture Series


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 30th The Public Acceptability of Taxation: Implications for Canadian Cities

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 30, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Room 108N
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    Description

    Aversion to taxes presents a major policy dilemma for elected governments: voters want governments to deliver goods and services but are deeply suspicious of their efforts to raise taxes. When are citizens willing to support major changes to tax policy? IMFG’s 2017-2018 Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Lesch will discuss a new study on whether and how Canadians are likely to accept tax reforms to address three distinct policy problems – climate change, infrastructure, and deficit reduction. The findings hold important policy implications for scholars and practitioners interested in the politics of public finance.

    About the Speaker
    Matthew Lesch is the 2017-2018 Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance, and a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Sociology at Northwestern University. His research specializes in the study of comparative public policy. His main research interests include fiscal policy, taxation, environmental policy, policy learning and cognition, policy feedback effects, and policy diffusion.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 30th Paying Lip Service to Peace: Public Dissent and Foreign Policymaking in the Early Cold War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 30, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 1946, Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace wrote with concern to President Harry Truman over the direction of postwar US foreign policy. With the continued production of atomic bombs, he wrote, “these actions must make it look to the rest of the world as if we were only paying lip service to peace at the conference table.” Fired for perceived Soviet sympathies expressed in this letter, Wallace was both reviled and lauded for his public criticism of the US position on atomic energy control. The controversy surrounding his dismissal is a crucial example of how the Truman administration reacted to public opposition in the emerging Cold War. This talk will explore the intersection between domestic and foreign policymaking in the atomic age, arguing that Wallace’s dismissal presents one of the earliest examples of hardline anti-Communism that would shape the Cold War for years to come.

    Katie Davis is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto where she is a Connaught International Scholar. She holds a Master’s degree in the Theory and History of International Relations from the London School of Economics. Katie’s research interests focus on international nuclear history and the role of public opinion in foreign policymaking. She is also the editor of Past Tense Graduate Review of History.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Katie Davis
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 30th Making a Historical Atlas for a Stateless People

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 30, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMSheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies
    University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto
    Windle House
    5 Elmsley Place (next to St. Basil’s Church)
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    Description

    Book Launch of Professor Paul Robert Magocsi’s latest publication,
    Carpathian Rus’: A Historical Atlas (University of Toronto Press, 2017)

    The Carpatho-Rusyns are noted for their distinctive religious identity. In addition to discussing the art of map-making and the conceptual challenges to mapping a place “without borders,” Professor Magocsi will touch on the religious question among the Rusyns and the mapping of ecclesiastical jurisdictions.

    Signed copies of the book will be available for purchase.
    For more information: Sheptytsky Institute, 416-926-1300 ext. 3095

    About the author:
    Paul Robert Magocsi is a professor of history and political science at the University of Toronto, where since 1980 he has held the endowed John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies. He is the author of over 800 works, including 39 books primarily in the fields of political, cultural, and religious history, sociolinguistics, bibliography, cartography, immigration and ethnic studies.

    Contact

    Sheptytsky Institute
    (416) 926-1300 ext. 3095


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2017

  • Friday, December 1st "From Ojŏk to Nakkomsu: Media and Satire in South Korean Democratization"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 1, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT
    In 1970, the Park Chung Hee regime imprisoned Kim Chi-ha for publishing Ojŏk (Five Bandits), a lengthy satirical poem that dared to call the government a band of thieves. The poet on trial then turned the court into a stage for further dramatizing his resistance. Nearly half a century later, the “candlelight revolution” that brought down Park Chung Hee’s daughter from power turned the streets and social media into a fluid offline-online stage for a phenomenonal drama of resistance. But the candlelight revolution was preceded by what might be called a “podcast revolution,” launched in 2011 by the wildly parodic Nakkomsu (I am a petty cheat). Examining the role of political satire through Ojŏk and Nakkomsu, the talk will address the transformation and media-specific potency of “laughtivism” in South Korean democratization.

    BIOGRAPHY
    Professor Youngju Ryu is Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Director of the Korean Language Program in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan. Professor Ryu specializes in modern Korean literature and her areas of research expertise include aesthetics of dissidence, cultures of authoritarianism, and philosophies of reconciliation in twentieth-century Korea. She is the author of Writers of the Winter Republic: Literature and Resistance in Park Chung Hee’s Korea (Columbia University Press, 2016).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Youngju Ryu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Korean Literature, University of Michigan

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 1st Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 1, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street, Room 2125
    University of Toronto
    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    A. Naomi Paik will address themes raised in her new book, Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps Since World War II, which grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Specifically, this talk will focus on both the bodily practices of and discourses surrounding prisoner practices of self-harm and the U.S. state’s efforts to preserve life—in particular, its force-feeding of hunger strikers at the current Guantánamo camp. By interpreting the testimonies of hunger strikers, Paik examines the prisoner body as a site of power and struggle waged between the U.S. state and the prisoners, who attempt to seize their own form of habeas corpus, taking their bodies back from the camp regime, by inflicting self-harm.

    A. Naomi Paik is assistant professor of Asian American studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American and comparative ethnic studies; U.S. imperialism; social and cultural approaches to legal studies; transnational and women of color feminisms; carceral spaces; and labor, race, and migration. Her manuscript, “Rightlessness: Testimonies from the Camp,” (UNC Press, 2016), reads testimonial narratives of subjects rendered rightless by the U.S. state through their imprisonment in camps. She has published articles on the indefinite detention of HIV-positive Haitian refugees at Guantánamo in Social Text and Radical History Review. She has also published on post-September 11th attacks on academic freedom, particularly on postcolonial studies, in Cultural Dynamics. She earned her doctorate in American studies from Yale University, and held the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow of Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the Early Career Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Humanities Center of the University of Pittsburgh.

    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    A. Naomi Paik
    Assistant Professor, Asian American Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, December 4th What’s Going On with Spain?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 4, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    On October 1st, the government of the Spanish region of Catalonia held a referendum on independence in open defiance of a constitutional court ban. The ensuing police crackdown transformed the long simmering political stand-off from an internal affair to a news item worthy of international headlines. This talk is for anyone interested in the background to the issue, current developments, and future prospects and implications.

    Karlo Basta is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Memorial University of Newfoundland. As part of a broader research project on identity conflict in multinational states, he has followed the rise of Catalan secessionist movement since 2009.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Karlo Basta
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    Francisco Beltran
    Chair
    Lecturer, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 6th A Tale of Sub-human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 6, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    A Tale of Sub-human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh

    The first discussion in the event series, Rohingya in Peril: Buddhist/Muslim tensions in Myanmar and beyond.

    The Rohingyas, considered by the United Nations as the world’s most persecuted people, have recently experienced unprecedented violence and brutality committed by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes. Following alleged attacks on Myanmar police posts and a military base by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces indiscriminately fired on Rohingya civilians, burnt their houses down, raped girls and women, and killed thousands mercilessly in what the United Nations termed as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” This state-sponsored violence spurred 600,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh in the past two months. The Rohingyas have experienced intense, ongoing violence because they are non-citizens in Myanmar. In fact, citizenship is a legal status conferred by the state that makes non-citizens a new ‘other,’ a vulnerable category viewed as less than human that Uddin refers to as being treated as “sub-human.” This talk will focus on the state of the Rohingyas in Bangladesh and Myanmar illuminating an intricate relation of statelessness, human rights and the paradox of the “sub-human.”

    Biography

    Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh and a professor of anthropology at the University of Chittagong. His research interests include statelessness and refugee studies; human rights and non-citizens; indigeneity and identity politics; the state in everyday life; the politics of marginality and vulnerability; and borderlands and border people, particularly those of Bangladesh and Myanmar, the Chittagong Hill Tracts, and South Asia. His publications include To Host or To Hurt: Counter-narratives on the Rohingya (Refugees) in Bangladesh (2012); Life in Peace and Conflict: Indigeneity and State in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (2017) and Indigeneity on the Move: Varying Manifestation of a Contested Concept (2017). Currently he is working on a new monograph, the Rohingyas: A Tale of Sub-Human (2018).

    Contact

    Sherry McGratten
    416-946-8901


    Speakers

    Nasir Uddin
    Speaker
    Professor, Anthropology, University of Chittagong

    Yasmin Khan
    Discussant
    PhD Student, Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 7th Countering Disinformation in the Post-Fact Era

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 7, 20172:00PM - 3:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Colonel Jay Janzen, Director of Military Strategic Communications for the Canadian Armed Forces, will highlight the hybrid disinformation tactics used by the Kremlin and ISIS in an effort to divide alliances, spread fear, and recruit extremists. His view is that the greatest threat to NATO allies is not a biological virus or a nuclear missile, but rather the large-scale ‘weaponization’ of information. Using real-world examples, he will demonstrate potential adversaries are targeting Canada’s government and Canadian military operations. Colonel Janzen will describe best-practices for countering disinformation and fake news, and will provide recommendations for military forces, the media, and citizens to protect themselves from trolls, bots, and echo-chambers.


    Speakers

    Colonel J. Janzen, CD
    Speaker
    Director, Military Strategic Communications, Canadian Armed Forces

    Carmen Cheung
    Moderator
    Professor, Global Practice Executive Director, Global Justice Lab Director, Research Partnerships Associate Director, Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 7th That Is How I Lost My Mother: Jewish Narratives of the Ukrainian Famine 1932-33

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 7, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Based on hundreds of oral histories of Ukrainian Jews, the lecture discusses how Soviet Jews survived Famine, and how they made sense of their experiences.

    Anna Shternshis holds the position of Al and Malka Green Associate Professor of Yiddish studies and the director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. She received her doctoral degree (D.Phil) in Modern Languages and Literatures from Oxford University in 2001. Shternshis is the author of Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1923 – 1939 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006) and When Sonia Met Boris: An Oral History of Jewish Life under Stalin (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). She is the author of over 20 articles on the Soviet Jews during World War II, Russian Jewish culture and post-Soviet Jewish diaspora. Together with David Shneer, Shternshis co-edits East European Jewish Affairs, the leading journal in the field of East European Jewish Studies.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Anna Shternshis
    Speaker
    Al and Malka Green Associate Professor of Yiddish Studies, University of Toronto

    Frank Sysyn
    Chair
    Director, Toronto CIUS Office, University of Alberta


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th CSK Brown Bag Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th Outcasts of Empire: Japan's Rule on Taiwan's "Savage Border," 1874-1945

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In his new book Outcasts of Empire, Paul D. Barclay probes the limits of modern nation-state sovereignty by positioning colonial Taiwan at the intersection of the declining Qing and ascending Japanese empires. Outcasts chronicles the lives and times of interpreters, chiefs, and trading-post operators along the far edges of the expanding international system, an area known as Taiwan’s “savage border.” In addition, Barclay boldly asserts the interpenetration of industrial capitalism and modern ethnic identities.

    By the 1930s, three decades into Japanese imperial rule, mechanized warfare and bulk commodity production rendered superfluous a whole class of mediators—among them, Kondo “the Barbarian” Katsusaburo, Pan Bunkiet, and Iwan Robao. Even with these unreliable allies safely cast aside, the Japanese empire lacked the resources to integrate indigenous Taiwan into the rest of the colony. The empire, therefore, created the Indigenous Territory, which exists to this day as a legacy of Japanese imperialism, local initiatives, and the global commoditization of culture.

    Paul D. Barclay teaches East Asian history at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the general editor of the digital repository East Asia Image Collection and author of Outcasts of Empire: Japan’s Rule on Taiwan’s “Savage Border,” 1874-1945(University of California, 2017). Barclay’s research has received support from the National Endowment from the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the Japanese Council for the Promotion of Science, and the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul D. Barclay
    Speaker
    Chair, Asian Studies Professor, Department of History, Lafayette College

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th JIM DOAK LECTURE SERIES WITH MARK LILLA

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMAlliance française de Toronto
    Spadina Theatre
    24 Spadina Road
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    Description

    **Lecture in English followed by discussion in French and English.

    The May 7 French election has been portrayed in the North American Press as an overwhelming victory against the rise of populism. But a victory of what, exactly? That is an important question at this juncture in the history of the Fifth Republic. Emmanuel Macron’s rise was made possible by the collapse of all the major parties and the failure of social movements and unions to change much of anything in French economic and political life. Yet, despite Emmanuel Macron’s election populism will not disappear if France cannot stop Islamic terrorism. What are the chances of new parties and new movements forming? Is it finally time for a Sixth Republic- and if so, what might it look like?

    Marc Lilla, political scientist, historian of ideas, Journalist, is Professor of Humanities at Columbia University. He has written widely on French Politics and continental philosophy, notably in the New York Review of Books, The New York Times, Le Monde and Le Débat. His numerous publications include The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics (2017); The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016); The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals and Politics (2001); and French Thought: Political Philosophy (1994).

    Sponsors

    Alliance Française de Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Études de la France et du Monde Francophone


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th From Lepsius to WW II – The History of German Egyptology in the 19th and early 20th Centuries

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMEarth Sciences Building,, Room B142
    5 Bancroft Avenue
    University of Toronto
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    Description

    German Egyptology boasts a long and varied history. Political upheavals and academic conflicts within the subject were the catalysts for a number of different developments. The lecture traces the history of the discipline in Germany, its successes and set-backs, from the mid-19th century beginnings under Karl Richard Lepsius to the outbreak of the Second World War.


    Speakers

    Dr. Susanne Voss-Kern
    German Archaeological Institute/DAI


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    SSEA Toronto

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Friday, January 19th How Have the ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaped Japan-South Korea Relations?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 19, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    South Korean and Japanese citizens have become increasingly influential in shaping their bilateral relations. The society-level influence on government interactions is especially clear when a publicized bilateral issue linked to national security prompts emotional involvement of mainstream citizens. For better or worse, democratic political structures of Japan and South Korea enable the two domestic societies to perform a “watchdog” function of limiting policy options available to government officials involved in publicized bilateral interactions.

    This presentation will focus on the Japan-South Korea bilateral relations during the last decade in order to illustrate this point. In the midst of the fast-changing regional security environment during this period, the two societies started to re-evaluate and re-examine their respective national security identities of the Cold War period. Interestingly, these identity-shifts in both countries were first fueled by the changing domestic public attitude toward North Korea.

    The normative transformations initially sparked by the ‘North Korea factors’, however, also led to a ‘mutual security anxiety’ between Japanese and South Korean citizens, as they started to embrace a sense of uncertainty about the other side’s possible future trajectory as a potential threat to their own state. This societal-level mutual distrust from the last decade continues to provide a powerful ideational limit to the government-level bilateral interactions even up to today.

    Biography

    Seung Hyok Lee is currently a Lecturer at the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, and an Associate at the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs. Previously, he was a short-term Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Law, Hokkaido University, Japan, as well as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace and at the Louis Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He also worked as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Renison University College, University of Waterloo, and as a Visiting Scholar at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Dr. Lee received his doctoral degree in Political Science (International Relations) at the University of Toronto in 2011. His research interest is domestic society’s influence on publicized foreign policy issues, with specific focus on Japan and the Korean Peninsula. He is the author of Japanese Society and the Politics of the North Korean Threat (University of Toronto Press, 2016), “North Korea in South Korea-Japan Relations as a Source of Mutual Security Anxiety among Democratic Societies,” (The International Relations of the Asia-Pacific), and “Be Mature and Distinguish the ‘Forest’ from the ‘Trees’: Overcoming Korea-Japan Disputes Based on Incompatible National Historical Narratives.” (Asteion)

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Seung Hyok Lee
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto; Associate, Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Silent Cities: Rachel Carson and the Imagination of U.S. Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caroline Holland
    PhD Candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Feeding France’s Outcasts: Rationing in Vichy’s Internment Camps, 1940-1944

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.


    Speakers

    Laurie Drake
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2018

  • Friday, February 9th Sport and the French: An Erratic Trajectory from Du Guesclin to Coubertin

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 9, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.

    Pierre de Coubertin’s revival of the ancient Olympics was part of his larger program to reform the French educational system in imitation of the English model, i.e., to include physical education and sport as part of the curriculum. His initiative fell on deaf ears and for many decades thereafter French schools—and French people generally—continued to regard participation in sport as foreign to their mission and to their train de vie. This reluctance was, however, at odds with a tradition that had lasted for several centuries. In the Middle Ages and up to about 1650 the French both regarded themselves and were regarded by others as being among the best athletes in Europe. They were credited with having devised the knightly tournament; they were avid jousters; playing tennis was their obsession; they seem to have invented golf and perfected pall mall. The earliest biographies of the great French knights, from Guillaume le Maréchal to Bayard, all insert a section relating their subjects’ youthful sports achievements (Du Guesclin is taken here as emblematic of French feudal chivalry). From Charlemagne to Louis XIII most of the kings were keen athletes, but during the 16th and early 17th centuries sport on the personal level began to be removed from the French agenda.

    The focus of this talk will be to elucidate and understand the manifestations, disappearance, and reappearance of sport in France, from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, why it fell into disfavour in the 16th and 17th centuries, to be replaced by other forms, not simply of leisure activity but of purposeful pursuits. I will be drawing on a variety of sources: biographies, essays, rule books, polemical treatises, and purely “literary,” imaginative texts.

    Prof. John McClelland

    Professor Emeritus, Department of French, and Distinguished Senior Fellow, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

    1993-2003, Associated Professor, Faculty of Physical Education and Health (now Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education)

    Visiting Professor, Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance (Université de Tours, France; University of California at Santa Barbara; Université de Rennes II (France), chaire de littérature du XVIe siècle; Institut für Sportwissenschaften, Georg-August Universität, Göttingen (Germany).

    Co-General Editor for the 6-volume Bloomsbury Cultural History of Sport (forthcoming 2016), with special responsibility for vols. 1, 2, and 3 (Antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance).

    Author/co-editor of four books on French literature and sport, including Body and Mind: Sport in Europe from the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (2007) and Sport and Culture in Early Modern Europe/Le sport dans la civilisation de l’Europe pré-moderne (2009).

    Author of over 60 articles and book chapters on French literature, music, rhetoric, and sport, most recently (since 2014) ” Manuscrit et imprimé : survivances, interférences 1470-2007 : Les deux textes de Montaigne,” “Redefining the Limits: Sport in the Age of Galileo and the Scientific Revolution,” “Sport and Scientific Thinking in the Sixteenth Century: Ruling Out Playfulness,” “Early Modern Athletic Contests: Sport or not Sport,” and “Pantagruel et Gargantua, essais d’autofiction.”


    Speakers

    John McClelland
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Temple Heritage of a Chinese Migrant Community: Movement, Connectivity, and Identity in the Maritime World

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:

    This presentation examines the spread of Chinese temples associated with the veneration of Ruan and Liang buddhas from Sihui County in Guangdong Province, China, through Southeast Asia to the Chinatown in Kolkata, India. Ruan Ziyu and Liang Cineng were followers of the sixth Chan patriarch Huineng (638–713) and are believed to have attained enlightenment and become buddhas during the Song dynasty (960-1279). In the thirteenth century temples dedicated to these two Chinese buddhas were established in the Sihui County. With the migration of people from the region in the nineteenth century, the belief in the two buddhas and the temples associated with them spread to present-day Malaysia and India. These Ruan-Liang temples in foreign settings functioned as religious sites as well as community spaces and heritage markers. By tracing the spread (and evolution) of the Ruan-Liang belief and examining the communal function of the temples through the use of photographs, this paper analyzes the relationship between migration and the diffusion of Chinese religious traditions, the role of temples in the preservation of sub-dialect identity, the mixing of Chinese and local ideas and histories, and the intimate maritime connections between China, Southeast Asia, and India in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century.

    Biography:

    Tansen Sen is Professor of history and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He specializes in Asian history and religions and has special scholarly interests in India-China interactions, Indian Ocean connections, and Buddhism. He is the author of Buddhism, Diplomacy, and Trade: The Realignment of Sino-Indian Relations, 600-1400 (2003; 2016) and India, China, and the World: A Connected History (2017). He has co-authored (with Victor H. Mair) Traditional China in Asian and World History (2012) and edited Buddhism Across Asia: Networks of Material, Cultural and Intellectual Exchange (2014). He is currently working on a book about Zheng He’s maritime expeditions in the early fifteenth century and co-editing (with Engseng Ho) the Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, volume 1. He has done extensive research in India, China, Japan, and Singapore with grants from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the Japan Foundation, the American Philosophical Society, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (Singapore). He was the founding head of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center in Singapore and served on the Governing Board of the Nalanda University.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tansen Sen
    Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Urban Regeneration in Detroit: Examining affordable housing issues and the openings for producing just spaces

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Julie Mah
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 28th The Director's Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Sherry McGratten
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Takashi Fujitani


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2018

April 2018


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