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December 2018

  • Monday, December 10th Regional Integration Trends in Developing Asia & the Economic and Business Impacts of the Trans-Pacific Trade Conflict

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 10, 20185:00PM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How has the trans-Pacific trade conflict impacted economics and business in Asia? What are the implications for Canada? Join us on December 10 as Bart W. Édes discusses these regional integration trends and more.

    Biography:

    Bart W. Édes has served as the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) Representative in North America since October 2, 2017. In this capacity, he mobilizes financing for ADB’s developing member countries; shares development knowledge and experience; establishes and deepens partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raises public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.

    His earlier ADB experience includes leading teams responsible for knowledge management, social development, gender equity, the social sectors, civil society engagement, ICT for Development, inclusive business, governance, and public sector management. He guided the formulation of ADB’s Public Communications Policy, which set a new global benchmark for transparency and information sharing among the international financial institutions. Mr. Édes has also served as Alternate Chairperson of ADB’s Appeals Committee, and Member of the ADB Integrity Oversight Committee.

    Between 1994 and 2000, Mr. Édes managed communications at SIGMA, a joint initiative of the European Union and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development providing support to public governance reform in Central and Eastern European countries. Mr. Édes has also worked as a journalist, researcher, policy analyst, and specialist on international trade and foreign direct investment.


    Speakers

    Bart W. Édes
    Speaker
    North American Representative, Asian Development Bank

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 11th The Orthodox Church in Ukraine: A Century of Separation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 11, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In light of recent developments in Ukraine toward establishing a unified Ukrainian Orthodox Church, coupled with the ecclesial conflicts between Constantinople and Moscow, this book’s appearance is very timely. In his presentation, Prof. Denysenko will provide an overview of the history of Orthodox Christianity in Ukraine from the early twentieth century to the present. He will touch upon the dynamics of church and state in the attempts to restore an authentic Ukrainian religious identity in the contemporary Orthodox churches, and how these dynamics have played out in the current movement to overcome the divisions among the three Orthodox Churches in Ukraine. This book launch is the second in a series of events looking at Ukrainian Orthodox Christianity and the question of autocephaly hosted by the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies; the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; the Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; and the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Nicholas E. Denysenko
    Speaker
    Emil and Elfriede Jochum Professor and Chair, Valparaiso University

    Myroslaw Tataryn
    Discussant
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Religious Studies; Chair, Department of Religious Studies; Director of the Centre for Responsible Citizenship at St. Jerome's University, University of Waterloo


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Orthodox School of Theology at Trinity College

    Research Program on Religion and Culture, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, U of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 14th The Rohingya Crisis - How Did it Happen, and What Can We Do?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 14, 20185:00PM - 6:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    There have been numerous reports that genocide and ethnic cleansing have been committed against the Rohingya people by Burmese security forces. How did Myanmar, a country that seemed to show such promise and potential, end up committing this genocidal campaign against the Rohingya and what responses are available to achieve justice and accountability for the victims and survivors of these crimes?

    A panel of experts will seek to answer these questions on 14 December 2018. The event features Canadian Special Envoy to Myanmar Bob Rae, in conversation with Kate Cronin-Furman (University College London), Fannie Lafontaine (Laval University), Sebastiaan Verelst (United Nations), Jacques Bertrand (Munk School, University of Toronto), and Mark Kersten (Munk School, University of Toronto). The event is organized by Mark Kersten (Munk School) and Martin Mennecke (University of Southern Denmark) and made possible by the support of the University of Southern Denmark, the Canadian Partnership for International Justice, and the Wayamo Foundation.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2019

  • Thursday, January 10th Marching in Garuda's Nest: East Timor's Path to Independence through Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Biography:

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael is a former refugee goatherd and currently a stateless person. He is an Associate Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of History at Queen’s University. He holds a Ph.D. in history and LL.M. in public international law. He studied the history and politics of Northeast Africa and Southeast Asia and wrote a dissertation on the East Timorese and Eritrean struggles for independence from Indonesia and Ethiopia, respectively. He is the author of Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and East Timor Compared (Cambridge, 2013), among others. He has since been researching Northeast African political economy of conflict and his book on the root causes, dynamics and consequences of maritime piracy in Somalia has just been published (Piracy in Somalia: Violence and Development in the Horn of Africa). He has previously held teaching and research positions at African, European and U.S. universities; and has worked for United Nations peacekeeping and The Carter Center election monitoring.


    Speakers

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael
    Department of History, Queen's University


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 25th Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States
    Protests, political activism and the growth of social and political movements have been a defining feature of the Russian political landscape during the 1990s. With the arrival of Vladimir Putin in 2000, political activism declined, only to be brought back to life after the contested parliamentary election of 2011. Since then, the Russian political landscape has become diverse with groups ranging from pro-Western liberals to hard-line nationalists and left-wing Marxists. This presentation offers an overview of the transformation of the non-systemic left-wing political movements in post-Soviet Russia, paying particular attention to the formidable revival of these movements since the late 2000s and the structural impediments to their further participation in the political system. This case study is part of a bigger ongoing book project that provides insights into the factors undermining the development of the left-wing politics and the consolidation of the leftist forces in the post-soviet states.

    Elena Maltseva is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Canada. Elena holds a PhD degree in Political Science from the University of Toronto (2012). Her current research focuses on left-wing politics in post-Soviet states, social security reforms, labour issues and regime stability in post-communist countries.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 25th Indigenizing New France: Where Are We Now?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    From whatever subject position we “indigenize”, we are always indigenizing something–something deeply entangled with colonial processes. What has this meant in the case of New France? As early modern spatial or political phenomenon, it was elusive even to contemporaries. As historiographic artifact, it has been naturalized in startlingly different ways. Efforts to recreate the lived experience and vantage points of indigenous polities have been ongoing for decades now; in recent years, they have been deeply enriched by deliberate, community-based cultural revitalization projects. But the politics of cross-cultural knowledge remain complex, and play out differently in France, the United States, Quebec, and elsewhere in Canada. Efforts to dismantle colonialist understandings of New France are correspondingly fractured. Still, they have been fruitful, and shed important light on the workings of the early modern empires.


    Speakers

    Catherine Desbarats

    Associate Professor
    Department of History and Classical Studies
    McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2019

  • Thursday, February 7th “Hail Hubert!”: Holy Hubert Lindsey, Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement, and the Birth of Campus Preaching.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 7, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 1964, students at the University of California, Berkeley staged a mass demonstration in an attempt to remove the university’s ban on political activities. Present among the free speech advocates, civil rights activists, and anti-Vietnam war protesters was Hubert Lindsey, a lone Southern Baptist preacher and self-identified missionary to the radical student population. Known as “Holy Hubert” among the students, Lindsey popularized a form of aggressive campus preaching that is still practiced today. This presentation will explore how Lindsey’s mission to Berkeley, as well as the campus preaching movement it inspired, helps us historicize and clarify the pressing cultural politics of free speech and hate speech on college campuses today.


    Speakers

    Kyle Byron
    Kyle Byron, PhD Candidate Department for the Study of Religion University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Phonographic Visions of America: Harry Smith and Woody Guthrie

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Description to follow.


    Speakers

    Ryan Stafford
    PhD Candidate Department of English University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Embedding Research Excellence: Perspectives from Sub-Saharan Africa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Governments and regional bodies across Sub-Saharan Africa are increasingly eager to support science. Regional and national policy documents and programmes reflect this enthusiasm and ambition and commitments to more resource for science, research and innovation (SRI). This is matched by rising levels of financial support from funders outside the region looking for new ways to support research that conform to Sub-Saharan African aspirations and needs.

    Behind this consensus about the need to support SRI however lays some stark differences about the criteria that should be used to evaluate the contributions of science. In this talk I will reflect on recent research and focus on the complex array of expectations about what science can and should deliver. National, regional and international funders adopt a variety of sometimes ambiguous rationales about the pathways through which these contributions from science funding are delivered, with distinctions between ‘basic’ and ‘applied’ science failing to provide significant clarity. On the one hand there is a desire for excellent research as sanctioned by academics acting with high degrees of autonomy and, on the other, for science that is deeply embedded in local social and policy realities and whose success or failure requires input and evaluation by a much broader array of stakeholders.

    These aims are not impossible to resolve, but reconciliation is far from straightforward and significant policy and communication rifts make it difficult to achieve. The talk will identify a number of relatively straightforward ways in which the process of supporting science can be improved and enhanced so that science contributes to multiple agendas. However, it will also highlight more fundamental challenges which confront science funders across the globe related to the ways in which support for research is framed and provided.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Joanna Chataway
    Professor of Science and Technology Policy (SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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