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January 2022

  • Thursday, January 20th Rivers of Iron: Railroads and Chinese Power In Southeast Asia

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    Thursday, January 20, 20228:00AM - 9:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    BOOK TALK

    What can China’s railway initiative teach us about global dominance? Join us for a panel discussion with the authors of the book ‘Rivers of Iron: Railroads and Chinese Power In Southeast Asia’ (University of California Press, October 2020).

    ABOUT THE BOOK:

    In 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping unveiled what would come to be known as the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI)—a global development strategy involving infrastructure projects and associated financing throughout the world, including Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas. While the Chinese government has framed the plan as one promoting transnational connectivity, critics and security experts see it as part of a larger strategy to achieve global dominance. Rivers of Iron examines one aspect of President Xi Jinping’s “New Era”: China’s effort to create an intercountry railway system connecting China and its seven Southeast Asian neighbors (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam). This book illuminates the political strengths and weaknesses of the plan, as well as the capacity of the impacted countries to resist, shape, and even take advantage of China’s wide-reaching actions. Using frameworks from the fields of international relations and comparative politics, the authors of Rivers of Iron seek to explain how domestic politics in these eight Asian nations shaped their varying external responses and behaviors. How does China wield power using infrastructure? Do smaller states have agency? How should we understand the role of infrastructure in broader development? Does industrial policy work? And crucially, how should competing global powers respond?

    The book is available for purchase at: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520372993/rivers-of-iron

    __________________

    Selina Ho is Assistant Professor and Chair (Master in International Affairs Program) at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. She is also nonresident Senior Fellow at the Singapore Institute of International Affairs. She is the author of Thirsty Cities: Social Contracts and Public Goods Provision in China and India.

    David M. Lampton is Professor Emeritus at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and Research Scholar and Oksenberg-Rohlen Fellow at Stanford University’s Asia-Pacific Research Center. He has served as president of the National Committee on United States–China Relations and was the inaugural winner of the Scalapino Prize in 2010. He is the author of Following the Leader: Ruling China, from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping.

    Cheng-Chwee Kuik is Associate Professor and Head of the Centre for Asian Studies, the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies at the National University of Malaysia, and a nonresident Fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute, SAIS Johns Hopkins. He received the 2009 Michael Leifer Memorial Prize, presented by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, for his essay “The Essence of Hedging.”


    Speakers

    Gregory T. Chin
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Politics, York University

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, Munk School and Professor in the Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Selina Ho
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor and Chair (Master in International Affairs Program) at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

    Cheng-Chwee Kuik
    Panelist
    Associate Professor and Head of the Centre for Asian Studies, the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies at the National University of Malaysia

    David M. Lampton
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS); Senior Research Fellow, SAIS Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Belt and Road in Global Perspective Project

    York Centre for Asian Research, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 20th Blood: Populist Eugenics

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    Thursday, January 20, 20224:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Excerpted from my forthcoming book, Mud, Blood, and Ghosts: Populism, Eugenics, and Spiritualism 1870-1930, “Blood” traces my great-grandfather, the Populist Congressman from Nebraska, Omer Madison Kem, in his avid adoption of eugenics as he expressed it throughout the extensive archive he left behind. Focusing on blood as a symbolic marker of value (class, race, and strength) and of bodily vulnerability at once, I explore the concept of blood contamination running through segregationist policies, eugenics, and the anti-immigration crusades of the 1910s and ‘20s. As my own family participated in and benefited from these ideologies, I explore this history from a sense of deep implication, tracing the inexhaustible threads of invitation and rejection, belonging and barrier, weaving through my family’s history and all of our lives now.

    —Speaker Bio—
    Julie Carr is the author of 10 books of poetry and prose, including Real Life: An Installation, Objects from a Borrowed Confession, and a book of essays, Someone Shot my Book. Earlier books include 100 Notes on Violence, soon to be reissued, RAG, and Think Tank. With Jeffrey Robinson she is the co-editor of Active Romanticism (University of Alabama Press, 2015). Her co-translation of Leslie Kaplan’s Excess-The Factory was published by Commune Editions in 2018. Climate, a book of epistolary essays written with the poet Lisa Olstein, is forthcoming from Essay Press.

    Carr was a 2011-12 NEA fellow and is a Professor at the University of Colorado in Boulder in English, Creative Writing, and the Intermedia Art Writing and Performance PhD. She is currently the Chair of the Women and Gender Studies Department. She has collaborated with dance artists K.J. Holmes and Gesel Mason. With Tim Roberts she is the co-founder of Counterpath Press, Counterpath Gallery, and Counterpath Community Garden in Denver. Www.reallifeaninstallation.com; www.juliecarrpoet.com;www.counterpathpress.org

    — Respondent Bio—
    Dr. Cristina Rivera Garza is the award-winning author of six novels, three collections of short stories, five collections of poetry and three non-fiction books. Originally written in Spanish, these works have been translated into multiple languages, including English, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Korean. The recipient of the Roger Caillois Award for Latin American Literature (Paris, 2013); as well as the Anna Seghers (Berlin, 2005), she is the only author who has won the International Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Prize twice, in 2001 for her novel Nadie me verá llorar (translated into English by Andrew Hurley as No One Will See Me Cry ) and again in 2009 for her novel La muerte me da. In 2020, she received a MacArthur Fellowship.
    The Restless Dead, her most recent book of criticism, comparatively explores the contemporary discussions surrounding conceptualist writing in the United States, post-exoticism in France, as well as communally-based writing throughout the Americas.
    She was born in Mexico (Matamoros, Tamaulipas, 1964), and has lived in the United States since 1989.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Julie Carr
    Speaker
    Professor, English and Intermedia Art Writing and Performance; Chair, Women and Gender Studies Department, University of Colorado Boulder

    Nicholas Sammond
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Cristina Rivera Garza
    Discussant
    Distinguished Professor, Department of Hispanic Studies, University of Houston



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 27th Afghan Voices: Pashtana Durrani

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    Thursday, January 27, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Afghan Voices Speakers Series

    Description

    Afghanistan is complex, diverse, and changing. In ‘Afghan Voices’ we invite Afghans from a variety of perspectives to reflect on the past twenty years—from the US invasion in 2001 to the Taliban takeover in 2021. In doing so, they link their own personal stories to questions about Afghanistan’s past and future.

    Pashtana Durrani is an activist, educator, innovator, and writer. She is currently Executive Director of LEARN Afghanistan, Global Youth Representative for Amnesty International, a Malala Fund Education Champion Award winner, and contributes to Afghanistan Times and Kabul Times.

    Pashtana started her journey as an activist and human rights defender. She is now a community development expert focusing on digital literacy, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SHRH), Menstrual Health Management (MHM), and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH). She is the Founder and Director of the grassroots-level non-profit LEARN Afghanistan. Through LEARN’s project Soraya, she has educated 7,000 girls and boys in Kandahar. Through Project Ayesha Durrani, she has trained more than 80 teachers in digital literacy. Through LEARN’s Project Malalai, Durrani has reached out to 150 girls and trained them in Menstrual Hygiene Management.

    Pashtana received the Malala Fund Education Champion award and received a Development Fellowship on sexual and reproductive healthcare from the Aspen Institute. She is also a board member of the UNDP GEF steering committee.

    Pashtana is also the winner of the Tällberg-SNF-Eliasson Global Leadership Prize for 2021.


    Speakers

    Pashtana Durrani
    Speaker
    Executive Director of LEARN Afghanistan

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Eurasia Initiative, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 27th Politicizing prison memoirs: writing collective resistance in Shlissel´burg Fortress, 1884-1906

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 27, 202212:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    In 1884, the first of 68 prisoners convicted of terrorist offences and membership of the revolutionary organization Narodnaia volia, were transferred to a new maximum security prison at Shlissel´burg Fortress near St Petersburg, the Russian Empire’s most notorious penal institution. The regime of indeterminate sentences in total isolation, complete inactivity and constant surveillance, caused severe mental and physical deterioration among the prisoners, over half of whom died. But the survivors fought back to reform the prison, ultimately overcoming the system of solitary confinement and improving the inmates’ living conditions. In this talk Sarah Young defines these works as a collective memoir, creating a biography of the fortress that identifies the inmates through their places within the prison’s topography. She shows how the texts inscribes forms of resistance that metaphorically – and at times literally – break down the prison walls, to build an exemplary prison community. In doing so they construct a unique genre within carceral writing that became a model for revolutionary activity.

    Dr Sarah J. Young is Associate Professor of Russian at University College London, where she teaches nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature, culture and thought. A Dostoevsky specialist, her interests in the ethics of narration and the construction of literary space led to her current research project, focusing on Russian prison and exile writing. Her book Writing Resistance: Revolutionary Memoirs of Shlissel’burg Prison, 1884-1906 was published by UCL Press in 2021.


    Speakers

    Sarah J. Young
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Russian, University College London

    Alison Smith
    Chair
    Professor and Chair of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 27th Reconsidering Reparations

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    Thursday, January 27, 20224:10PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    Most theorizing about reparations treats it as a social justice project – either rooted in reconciliatory justice focused on making amends in the present; or, they focus on the past, emphasizing restitution for historical wrongs. I will argue that neither approach is optimal, and advance a different case for reparations rooted in distributive justice, which I refer to as the “constructive” view of reparations. I’ll also present some of what I take to be the political and policy implications of this view.


    Speakers

    Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Georgetown University

    Ayelet Shachar
    Moderator
    R.F. Harney Chair in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 27th China's Growing Power and a New Era for the US-Japan Alliance

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    Thursday, January 27, 20227:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Dartmouth College’s Initiative for Global Security and the Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the University of Toronto are pleased to co-host an expert discussion of how the US-Japan alliance should adapt to the rise of Chinese power and a changing Indo-Pacific. Speakers will discuss emerging challenges to the US-Japan alliance, and to what extent the alliance is responding (technologically, politically, and militarily) to these challenges.

    —–SPEAKER BIOS—–
    Moderator: Prof. Jennifer Lind (Dartmouth College, Government Department and Dickey Center)

    Jennifer Lind is Associate Professor in the Government department at Dartmouth College, a Faculty Associate at the Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies at Harvard University, and a Research Associate at Chatham House, London.
    Professor Lind’s research focuses on the security relations of East Asia, and U.S. foreign policy toward the region. Her book, Sorry States: Apologies in International Politics (Cornell, 2008), explores how memory and apologies affect international reconciliation. Lind’s current research and book manuscript examines the future global balance of power, arguing that China’s rise has led to a bipolar system: that through “smart authoritarianism” China has emerged as a peer competitor to the United States. Professor Lind has published her research in numerous academic journals, and writes for wider audiences in Foreign Affairs, the Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times.

    Panelists:
    Professor HIKOTANI Takako, Gakushuin University, Japan

    Takako Hikotani is Professor at Gakushuin University International Centre. From 2016 to 2021, she was the Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Columbia University, and continues her affiliation with Columbia as Adjunct Senior Research Scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute. She also serves as the Asia Society Policy Institute Fellow at Asia Society Japan Center. Professor Hikotani previously taught at the National Defense Academy of Japan, where she was Associate Professor, and lectured at the Ground Self Defense Force and Air Self Defense Force Staff Colleges, and the National Institute for Defense Studies. Her research focuses on civil-military relations and Japanese domestic politics, Japanese foreign policy, and comparative civil-military relations. Her publications (in English) include, “The Japanese Diet and defense policy-making,” International Affairs, 94:1, July, 2018; “Trump’s Gift to Japan: Time for Tokyo to Invest in the Liberal Order,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2017; and “Civilian Control and Civil-Military Gaps in the United States, Japan, and China” (with Peter Feaver and Shaun Narine), Asian Perspective 29:1, March 2006. Professor Hikotani received her BA from Keio University, MAs from Keio University and Stanford University, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University, where she was a President’s Fellow.

    Professor MORI Satoru, Hosei University, Japan

    Satoru Mori is the professor of international politics and U.S. foreign policy at the Department of Global Politics, Faculty of Law, Hosei University. Dr. Mori is currently undertaking research on U.S. strategy in Asia, U.S. defense innovation and its implications for U.S. allies, and the history of U.S. defense strategy. Dr. Mori is a former Japanese Foreign Ministry official and holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Tokyo, LL.M. degrees from Columbia University Law School and Kyoto University, and a LL.B. degree from Kyoto University. During his sabbatical leave, he was a visiting researcher at Princeton University (2014-2015) and George Washington University (2013-2015). He currently chairs a security policy project at the Japan Institute for International Affairs as well as two government commissioned projects. His book on U.S. diplomatic history The Vietnam War and Alliance Diplomacy (in Japanese) published from the University of Tokyo Press in 2009 was awarded the 15th Hiroshi Shimizu Prize for Distinguished Academic Work from the Japanese Association of American Studies. English publications include “The Case for Japan Acquiring Counterstrike Capabilities: Limited Offensive Operations for a Defensive Strategy,” (co-authored with Shinichi Kitaoka) in Scott Harold et al., Japan’s Possible Acquisition of Long-Range Land Attack Missiles and the Implications for the U.S.-Japan Alliance, (RAND Corporation, forthcoming) 7-25, “U.S. Technological Competition with China,” Asia Pacific Review 26:1 (2019) 77-120, and “The Promotion of Rules-based Order and the Japan-U.S. Alliance” in Michael J. Green ed., Ironclad: Forging a New Future for America’s Alliances (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019) 97-112. He is also a recipient of the Nakasone Yasuhiro Incentive Award and is also a senior fellow at the Nakasone Peace Institute.

    Professor Andrew Oros, Washington College, USA

    Andrew L. Oros is Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. His latest research project, initiated as a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC in the past year, examines how demographic change – such as shrinking populations, aging societies, and gender imbalances – have and will affect the security environment in the Indo-Pacific region and, in particular, the network of US alliances and partnerships in the region. He conducted research for his last book, Japan’s Security Renaissance (Columbia University Press, 2017), as an invited research fellow at Japan’s National Institute of Defense Studies and as a Japan Foundation Abe fellow at Keio University in Tokyo and Peking University in Beijing. He also is the author of two other books and numerous articles and book chapters on issues related to East Asian security and Japanese politics. He serves as an executive editor of the scholarly journal Asian Security, is a member of the US-Japan Network for the Future (Japan/Mansfield Foundations), and is part of the Mansfield-Luce Asia Scholars Network. He earned his Ph.D in political science at Columbia University, an M.Sc from the London School of Economics as a British government Marshall scholar, and a B.A. from the University of Southern California.

    Discussant: Prof. Phillip Lipscy (University of Toronto, Department of Political Science and Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy)

    Phillip Y. Lipscy is associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto. He is also Chair in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. His research addresses substantive topics such as international cooperation, international organizations, the politics of energy and climate change, international relations of East Asia, and the politics of financial crises. He has also published extensively on Japanese politics and foreign policy. Lipscy’s book from Cambridge University Press, Renegotiating the World Order: Institutional Change in International Relations, examines how countries seek greater international influence by reforming or creating international organizations.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Jennifer Lind
    Moderator
    Government Department and Dickey Center, Dartmouth College

    Phillip Lipscy
    Discussant
    Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Andrew Oros
    Panelist
    Washington College

    HIKOTANI Takako
    Panelist
    Gakushuin University

    MORI Satoru
    Panelist
    Hosei University


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Initiative for Global Security at the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, Dartmouth College


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 28th Ambivalent rebels in the French colonial empire: Haitians in Africa, 1896-1986

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    Friday, January 28, 20224:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Matt Robertshaw is researching the impacts of Haiti on French colonialism in Africa. In this talk he looks at the experiences of Haitians who travelled to Africa between 1896 and 1986. He describes how these travellers—citizens of an independent Black republic that had won its independence from France—engaged with colonialism in French Africa and contributed to the transition to independence in several African states.

    Matt Robertshaw is a PhD candidate in History at York University. He focuses on Haiti, the Caribbean and French colonialism in Africa. He is also a video essayist via Sleeper Hit History on YouTube.


    Speakers

    Matt Robertshaw
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate, York University

    Margaret Schotte
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, York University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 31st The Many Masks of Imperialism: COVID-19 & Consolidation of Power

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    Monday, January 31, 202211:00AM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The 16th annual Peace, Conflict and Justice Student Conference will explore the legacies of colonialism and imperialism, examining how they influence power asymmetries between state actors within the current context of COVID-19. Through four forums featuring scholars, professionals, and student speakers from the University of Toronto and beyond, the conference will analyze the ways in which these legacies persist through practices and structures such as the exercise of soft power, financial interventions, the military-industrial complex, and international legal systems.

    The conference will kick off with a keynote address from Dr. Amitav Acharya, UNESCO Chair in Transnational Challenges and Governance and Distinguished Professor at the School of International Service, American University.

    11:00-11:05 – Opening Remarks
    11:05-11:20 – Keynote Address
    Dr. Amitav Acharya, UNESCO Chair in Transnational Challenges and Governance and Distinguished Professor at the School of International Service, American University

    11:20-12:20 – Forum #1: Financial Interventions
    Dr. Sanjay Ruparelia, Department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University
    Sachini Perera, RESURJ
    Njoki Njehu, Fight Inequality Alliance & Daughters of Mumbi Global Resource Center
    Dr. Carmen Logie, UofT Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work
    David Okojie, Second-Year PCJ Student

    12:20-1:20 – Forum #2: Soft Power
    Dr. Rinaldo Walcott, UofT OISE & Women and Gender Studies Institute
    Laila Omar, UofT Department of Sociology
    Geetha Philipupillai, Goldblatt Partners LLP
    Neha Dhaliwal, Fourth-Year PCJ Student
    Madhurie Dhanrajh, Third-Year PCJ Student

    1:50-2:45 – Forum #3: Military Industrial Complex
    Dr. Terri E. Givens, McGill University Department of Political Science
    Dr. Walter Dorn, Royal Military College of Canada & Canadian Forces College
    Ray Acheson, Reaching Critical Will (Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom)
    Maryam and Nivaal Rehman, Third-Year PCJ Students

    2:45-3:50 – Forum #4: International Legal Systems
    Roojin Habibi, Global Strategy Lab & Canadian International Council
    Bryce Edwards, Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP
    David Walders, Indigenous Innovation Initiative
    Dr. Uchechukwu Ngwaba, Ryerson University Lincoln Alexander School of Law
    Lina Lashin, Fourth-Year PCJ Student
    Roya Aboosaidi, Second-Year PCJ Student
    Hailey Marleau, Fourth-Year PCJ Student

    3:50-4:00 – Closing Remarks

    Forum Descriptions:

    Financial Interventions:
    The Financial Interventions Forum will highlight how COVID-19 pathways to recovery differ between the Global South and Global North. The forum will contextualize these differences by looking at the histories of colonialism and imperialism in conjunction with their current economic impacts. It will identify the disproportionate effect of these impacts on Global South nations through topics such as vaccine apartheid and vaccine hoarding.

    Soft Power:
    The Soft Power Forum seeks to examine the use of immigration policies to attract migrants whose labour, cultural, and political attributes contribute to the advancement of a country’s imperialist interests. The forum will explore topics including precarious labour migration, geopolitics, just immigration, and political considerations when determining an individual’s status as a “refugee.”

    Military Industrial Complex:
    This Forum will analyze the ways in which the military-industrial complex has sustained conflict and contextualize it within the social movements mobilized by the pandemic. The discussion will broadly cover topics including the Canadian Armed Forces aid during COVID-19, arms trade, and defense contracts while examining the relationship between Canada, the United States, and neo-imperialism.

    International Legal Systems:
    The International Legal Systems Forum will explore the power asymmetries between the “developing” and “developed” worlds in international institutions. It will serve as a platform for analyzing peace-keeping, peace-building and humanitarian intervention through different international legal institutions, and how they have been influenced by legacies of imperialism. This forum will also discuss the implication of the response from the international legal system on Canada’s treatment of Indigenous people.

    Speaker Bios:

    Keynote: Amitav Acharya
    Dr. Amitav Acharya is the UNESCO Chair in Transnational Challenges and Governance and a distinguished Professor at the School of International Service, American University. He is the first non-Western scholar to be elected (for 2014-15) as the President of the International Studies Association (ISA), a renowned interdisciplinary association committed to understanding international, transnational and global affairs. Dr. Acharya’s academic interests include Southeast Asia, multilateralism and global governance, human security, and international relations theory. His current affairs commentaries cover subjects such as Asian regionalism, Asian security, the war on terror, and the rise of China and India.
    Dr. Acharya has received two Distinguished Scholar Awards from the ISA. The first was rewarded to him by ISA’s Global South Caucus in 2015, while he was honoured with the second award in 2018 by ISA’s International Organization Section. In 2020, he received American University’s highest honour: Scholar-Teacher of the Year Award.

    Financial Interventions

    1. Sanjay Ruparelia
    Dr. Sanjay Ruparelia is an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University. He is also the Jarislowsky Democracy Chair at Ryerson’s Faculty of Arts. Dr. Ruparelia has written on vaccine hoarding for Global Policy Journal and was a panellist at Ryerson’s conference on vaccine apartheid. His research interests include the politics of democracy, equality and development in the postcolonial world, and the role of parties, movements, and institutions in politics.

    2. Sachini Perera
    Sachini Perera is the executive director for RESURJ, a Global South-led and grounded transnational feminist alliance. She researches the intersections of technology, pop culture, sexual and reproductive justice, and pleasure. She has written on vaccine justice within the context of COVID-19 and holds expertise in sexual and reproductive health, as it pertains to socioeconomic divides.

    3. Njoki Njehu
    Njoki Njehu is the co-founder and executive director of Daughters of Mumbi Global Resource Center and the coordinator of the Pan-African Fight Inequality Alliance. She has worked with various women’s groups, Greenpeace International, and the Greenbelt Movement in Kenya for more than 10 years. Her areas of expertise include women’s land rights, gender justice, community rights, and environmental justice.

    4. Carmen Logie
    Dr. Carmen Logie is an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. She is the Canada Research Chair in Global Health Equity and Social Justice with Marginalized Populations. Her research aims to advance an understanding of, and develop interventions to address, stigma and other social ecological factors related to health disparities.

    5. David Okojie

    Soft Power

    1. Rinaldo Walcott
    Dr. Rinaldo Walcott is the Director of the Women and Gender Studies Institute and an Associate Professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, both at the University of Toronto. From 2002 to 2007, he was the Canada Research Chair of Social Justice and Cultural Studies. His research is in areas of Black Diaspora Cultural studies, gender and sexuality. He is the author of the essay, “The End of Diversity” (2019).

    2. Laila Omar
    Laila Omar is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She co-authored an article entitled “Listening in Arabic: Feminist Research with Syrian Refugee Mothers” (2019). Her main research interests include Education Policy, Immigrant and Refugee Integration, International Development and Middle East Studies.

    3. Geetha Philipupillai
    Geetha Philipupillai is a practising attorney with Goldblatt Partners LLP, specializing in employment law, civil litigation and class actions. She regularly represents labour unions and their members in a range of civil proceedings. Her Master’s thesis explores the branding of Tamil youth in Canada as terrorists and radicals, and how such targeting contributes to a national project of white settler colonialism.

    4. Neha Dhaliwal

    5. Madhurie Dhanrajh

    Military Industrial Complex

    1. Terri E. Givens
    Dr. Terri E. Givens is a Professor of Political Science at McGill University. She was the founding director of the Center for European Studies at the University of Texas and is the author/editor of books and articles on immigration policy, European politics, and the politics of race. Her most recent book is Radical Empathy: Finding a Path to Bridging Racial Divides (2021).

    2. Walter Dorn
    Dr. Walter Dorn is a Professor of Defence Studies at the Royal Military College of Canada and the Canadian Forces College (CFC). At the CFC, he teaches officers of rank from Canada and other countries Canadian foreign and defence policy, the ethics of war, peace operations and international security. His interests cover both international and human security – focusing on UN field operations for peacekeeping and peace enforcement. At the University of Toronto, he was a Research Fellow with the International Relations and Peace, Conflict, Justice Studies Program. Professor Dorn also served as the UN Representative of Science for Peace since 1983 and addressed the UN General Assembly at its Third UN Special Session on Disarmament in 1988.

    3. Ray Acheson
    Ray Acheson is the director of Reaching Critical Will, the disarmament programme of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). They represent WILPF on the steering committees of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, and the International Network on Explosive Weapons. They aim to bring an intersectional feminist approach to disarmament and antiwar activism.

    4. Maryam and Nivaal Rehman

    International Legal Systems

    1. Roojin Habibi
    Roojin Habibi is a lawyer specializing in human rights and global health. She is a PhD candidate at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University) and a research fellow at the Canadian International Council and the Global Strategy Lab. She has advocated for the right to health through organizations including the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, the Canadian Medical Association, the Namibian Legal Assistance Centre and UNAIDS.

    2. Bryce Edwards
    Bryce Edwards is a partner at Olthuis Kleer Townshend LLP. He provides legal and strategic advice on lands and resource matters, intergovernmental negotiations, mining, energy, land use planning, oil & gas projects, and treaty and rights claims. He teaches at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, where he was awarded the Truth & Reconciliation Teaching Award.

    3. David Walders
    David Walders is a securities lawyer and the Deputy Director of the Indigenous Innovation Initiative, a platform to provide funding and support for Indigenous Innovators and entrepreneurs. He is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law and teaches in the area of Aboriginal Law and Policy.

    4. Uchechukwu Ngwaba
    Dr. Uchechukwu Ngwaba is an Assistant Professor at Ryerson University’s Lincoln Alexander School of Law. His research engages multidisciplinary, comparative and socio-legal methods in investigating complex questions affecting health governance frameworks in the Global North and South. Dr. Ngwaba’s areas of expertise include public health and human rights, health systems, and transitional justice.

    5. Lina Lashin

    6. Roya Aboosaidi

    7. Hailey Marleau
    Hailey Marleau is in her final year of her undergraduate studies with a double major in Peace, Conflict and Justice and Ethics, Society and Law and a minor in Political Science. She is passionate about the intersection between climate justice, indigenous justice, and peacebuilding, and the role that law can play in remedying social injustice. She hopes to pursue a career in environmental policy or journalism to promote policy solutions that support climate resilience for vulnerable communities.

    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Economics

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2022

  • Tuesday, February 1st Inter-Asian Forum on Film Censorship

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 1, 202210:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Theory/Praxis/Politics

    Description

    This is the second virtual roundtable discussion for the new series – Theory/Praxis/Politics. This forum highlights film practitioners and programmers’ thoughts and reflections on the practices of censorship across Asia. Join our panelists, Sudarat Musikawong, Raymond Phathanavirangoon, and Thaiddhi, as they articulate their first-hand experiences in the field and unfurl the complexities of censorship both in the production and circulation of cinema.

    Theory/Praxis/Politics is a webinar series working to advocate for and bring together perspectives of academics, filmmakers, programmers, civil servants, and other stakeholders with an interest in the question of censorship across Asia and its diasporas. We consider Asia as a productive site in which theory, practice, and politics overlap. The intersection allows us to question not only our understanding of censorship and the ways in which we engage with cinema in the region but also to reconsider the relationship between theory, aesthetics, and politics.

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    RAYMOND PHATHANAVIRANGOON is a film producer and Executive Director of Southeast Asia Fiction Film Lab (SEAFIC). Previously he was programmer or delegate for Toronto International Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival and Cannes Critics’ Week. Prior, he was Director of Marketing & Special Projects (Acquisitions) for sales agent Fortissimo Films. His producing credits include Pen-ek Ratanaruang’s SAMUI SONG (Venice 2017) and HEADSHOT (Berlin 2012), Boo Junfeng’s APPRENTICE (Cannes 2016), Josh Kim’s HOW TO WIN AT CHECKERS (EVERY TIME) (Berlin 2015), Pang Ho-Cheung’s DREAM HOME (Tribeca 2010) and ABERDEEN (Hong Kong Film Awards Best Picture nominee 2014), the upcoming THIRTEEN LIVES by Ron Howard, among others.

    SUDARAT MUSIKAWONG is an Associate Professor at the Institute for Population and Social Research at Mahidol University in Thailand. She received her Ph.D. and MA in sociology from the University of California at Santa Cruz and her BA in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of California at Santa Barbara. She positions her investigations within cultural-political sociology and ethnographic research. Her publications include with Malinee Khumsupa, “Notes on Camp Films in Authoritarian Thailand,” Southeast Asia Research Journal (2019)Her publications include “Gendered Casualties: Thai Memoirs in Activism,” Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism (2013); “Mourning State Celebrations: Amnesic Iterations of Political Violence in Thailand,” in Identities, Global Studies in Culture and Power (2010); “Between Celebration and Mourning,” in Toward a Sociology of the Trace, (University of Minnesota Press, 2010); “Art for October Thai Cold War State Violence in Trauma Art,” positions: east asia cultures critique, Volume 18, Number 1, Spring 2010.

    THAIDDHI is a Filmmaker, Producer, and also Film Programmer. He studies Filmmaking at FAMU in the Czech Republic for 3 years master’s degree program in Cinema and Digital Media. His first short film “Awake” won Best Short Film at FAMU Fest 2009. He co-founded Wathann Film Festival in 2011 and worked as a Programmer for the festival. In 2013 he founded Third Floor Film Production to produce Myanmar Independent short films and documentary films. He produced a short film Cobalt Blue (2019) by Aung Phyoe which was selected for the Pardi di Domani International Competition at 72nd Locarno Film Festival. He also worked as a Cinematographer in the recent film Money Has Four Legs (2020) by Maung Sun, which was premiered at New Currents (Busan International Film Festival 2020).


    Speakers

    Sudarat Musikawong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Sociology, Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University in Thailand

    Raymond Phathanavirangoon
    Panelist
    Film Producer and Executive Director of Southeast Asia Fiction Film Lab (SEAFIC).

    Thaiddhi
    Panelist
    Filmmaker, Producer, and Film Programmer

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Visual Studies and Cinema Studies Institute; Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Palita Chunsaengchan
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Pan-Asian Seminar Series: The Political Life of Information

    Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 1st Municipalities and the Platform Economy: Where Do We Go From Here?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 1, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The rise of platforms like Uber and Airbnb have created numerous challenges and opportunities for Canadian municipalities. Over the last several years, many municipalities have moved to regulate and tax these services. Some have also partnered with them, including to help bolster transit service.

    On February 1, a panel of academics and practitioners will look at the future of the relationship between municipalities and the platform economy. Looking at examples from across the country the panel will examine questions including: What trends around the platform economy are lasting, which are short term? What new regulation is needed? Are new taxation models or user fee frameworks needed?
    This is the first in a series of three events examining how municipalities in Canada are confronting issues related to new developments in technology and the use of data. Future events will focus on smart city technology and cybersecurity.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Betsy Donald
    Speaker
    Betsy Donald is Associate Vice-Principal Research at Queen’s University, where she is also Professor of Geography and Planning.

    David Wachsmuth
    Speaker
    David Wachsmuth is the Canada Research Chair in Urban Governance at McGill University, where he is also an Associate Professor in the School of Urban Planning.

    Zachary Spicer
    Moderator
    Zachary Spicer is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Policy and Administration at York University in Toronto, Canada.

    Jason Reynar
    Speaker
    Jason Reynar is a lawyer and the Chief Administrative Officer for the City of Windsor.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 3rd Race, Justice, and the Ecological Legacy of the Plantation in Southern Louisiana

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 3, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The humanitarian disaster triggered by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 exposed the racial violence and class domination that structures New Orleans and the broader U.S. South. This talk uses ethnography to explore the social impact of the privatization of public services in Southern Louisiana in the years since Katrina made landfall. With a particular focus on the quasi-privatization of public schools, this presentation analyzes how the politics of space, place, and class in Black New Orleans are being transformed.

    Speaker
    Dr. Justin Hosbey
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
    Emory University

    Dr. Justin Hosbey a cultural anthropologist and Black studies scholar. His research explores Black social and cultural life in the U.S. Gulf Coast and Mississippi Delta regions. His current ethnographic project utilizes research methods from the digital and spatial humanities to explore and visualize how the privatization of neighborhood schools in low income and working class Black communities has fractured, but not broken, Black space and place making in post-Katrina New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

    ——–
    This lecture is a part of the Oxford-Penn-Toronto International Doctoral Cluster speaker series.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Justin Hosbey
    Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Emory University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 4th Stitching the 24-Hour City: Life, Labor, and the Problem of Speed in Seoul

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 4, 20222:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    BOOK TALK

    Stitching the 24-Hour City: Life, Labor, and the Problem of Speed in Seoul (Cornell University Press, 2021)

    Stitching the 24-Hour City reveals the intense speed of garment production and everyday life in Dongdaemun, a lively market in Seoul, South Korea. Once the site of uprisings against oppressive working conditions in the 1970s and 80s, Dongdaemun has now become iconic for its creative economy, nightlife, and fast-fashion factories, and shopping plazas. Seo Young Park follows the work of people who witnessed and experienced the rapidly changing marketplace from the inside. Through this approach, Park examines the meanings and politics of work, focusing on what it takes for people to enable speedy production and circulation and also how they incorporate the critique of speed in the ways they make sense of their own work. Stitching the 24-Hour City provides in-depth ethnographic accounts of the garment designers, workers, and traders who sustain the extraordinary speed of fast fashion production and circulation, as well as the labor activists who challenge it. Attending to their narratives and practices of work, Park illuminates how speed is, rather than a singular drive of acceleration, an entanglement of uneven paces and cycles of life, labor, the market, and the city itself.

    Learn more about the book at: https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501756115/stitching-the-24-hour-city/#bookTabs=1
    _________

    Seo Young Park is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Scripps College and works on the ethnographic approaches to urban environment, labor, and gender in South Korea. Her writings appeared in Journal of Korean Studies and edited volumes. She is currently working on the public anxiety on air quality issues, and gendered platform labor in Korea.


    Speakers

    Seo Young Park
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Anthropology, Scripps College

    Laam Hae
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Politics, York University

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Professor of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 7th Culture Wars: How Countries Perceive Divisions

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 7, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Tension between rich and poor is seen as a key source of division around the world, but what other factors contribute to culture wars? In this third event in the Munk School / IPSOS / CEVIPOF-Sciences Po, Global Advisory Data Series, panellists will discuss the tensions which global citizens perceive to exist between the rich and poor, by divisions of politics, social class, immigration, and between those with different values.

    CEO of Ipsos MORI, Kelly Beaver, will provide data from IPSOS’ Global Advisor Poll and discuss citizens’ perceived culture wars with Professors Lou Safra and Peter Loewen.


    Speakers

    Kelly Beaver
    Speaker
    CEO, Ipsos MORI (UK and Ireland)

    Lou Safra
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, CEVIPOF-Sciences Po, Paris

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor and Director, Munk School


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Co-Sponsors

    IPSOS

    CEVIPOF-Sciences Po, Paris


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 17th Czech-Russian relations and their strategic implications

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 17, 20221:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    After Russia invaded Ukraine in 2014, the strategic situation in Europe has changed. The Czech Republic has faced many challenges, including successful Russian elite capture efforts in Czech politics, massive disinformation and influence campaigns. Since 2014, the Czech Republic has endured many Russian efforts to interfere in its politics, culminating with the Czech government expelling two thirds of Russian diplomatic presence from the Czech territory in April 2020.

    Jakub Janda specializes in the response of democratic states to hostile disinformation and influence operations. He is Associate Fellow at Slovak Security Policy Institute. He serves as a member of the Editorial Board of the expert portal AntiPropaganda.sk and as a proud member of the Active Reserves of the Czech Armed Forces.

    In 2016 – 2017, he was tasked by Czech security and intelligence institutions to consult on “Influence of Foreign Powers” chapter within Audit of National Security conducted by the Czech government, where he was involved in the Czech policy shift on this issue. Since 2015, he was asked to provide briefings or trainings in more than 20 countries. Since 2019, he serves as a member of the Programming Board of the Centre Anne de Kyiv. In the past, he worked for the humanitarian agency ADRA International and was a member of the Czech Parliament.


    Speakers

    Jakub Janda
    Speaker
    European Values Think Tank, Prague

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Professor and Associate Director, CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2022

  • Thursday, March 31st Care and the Commons: Experiments in Alter-politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 31, 20224:10PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    This talk will discuss a set of ethical-political configurations that are increasingly emerging in cities – they take the shape of what I’m calling a decolonial, feminist commons. In the face of extreme inequality and disenfranchisement, people are coming together in various ways to challenge regimes of private property, and to enact new forms of horizontal, structural care (which differ significantly from humanitarian care). I will discuss several such commoning practices, which include the occupations of public spaces and buildings by undocumented migrants, forms of mutual aid such as free fridges and stores, and affective and political configurations that respond to the Covid19 pandemic, often inspired by the Movement for Black Lives. The goal is to think about a non-innocent ethics and politics of living together in a world where – as Covid19 has rendered clear — we are in a life-and-death embrace with each other that no one can escape.


    Speakers

    Miriam Ticktin
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Anthropology, CUNY’s Graduate Center

    Ayelet Shachar
    Moderator
    R.F. Harney Chair in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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