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February 2020

  • Monday, February 24th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20201:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 9, 2020. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th EXPLORING THE APPLICABILITY OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE TO THE GLOBAL CLIMATE REGIME

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance lab is excited to welcome Sonja Klinsky from Arizona State University for a talk on February 24, 2020. Sonja Klinsky is an alum of the IDS program at UTSC and is both a Senior Sustainability Scientist at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainabili and Associate Professor, at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. She’s an expert on climate justice and climate policy.

    Abstract : Geopolitical changes combined with the increasing urgency of climate action have the potential to intensify debates about justice within international climate policy. Tensions about historical responsibility have been particularly difficult and could deepen with increased climate impacts and as developing countries face mounting pressure to take mitigation action. Climate change is not the only time humans have faced historically rooted, collective action challenges involving justice disputes. Practices and tools from transitional justice have been used across a range of conflicts at the interface of historical responsibility and imperatives for collective futures. Central to this body of theory and experience is the need to reflect both backwards and forwards-oriented elements in efforts to build social solidarity. This talk integrates arguments emerging from the literature and from a series of international multi-stakeholder workshops that were held to examine the global climate context through the lens of transitional justice. In addition to assessing the potential applicability of a transitional lens to the climate context, including the limitations of this, it then lays out several strategies and practices that could be modified for potential use within the climate regime. This work has recently been released as a book, Klinsky and Brankovic (2018) “The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice” Routledge.


    Speakers

    Sonja Klinsky
    Arizona State University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 25th 2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity "The Case for Open Borders"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 25, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Abstract: Countries have a moral obligation to liberalize their immigration policies. Immigration restrictions violate people’s freedom of movement and deprive them of opportunities to become dramatically richer. Moreover, none of the standard objections to open borders–the potential economic costs, special obligations to fellow citizens, states’ rights of self-determination, and so on–are successful. The talk concludes with a discussion of the relevance of immigration policy to issues like climate change and poverty relief.

    Christopher Freiman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA. His first book, Unequivocal Justice, was published in 2017 and his second book, Why It’s OK to Ignore Politics, is forthcoming with Routledge Press. Chris is the author of over two dozen articles and chapters on topics including democratic theory, distributive justice, and immigration.
    His work has appeared in venues such as the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Utilitas, The Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, Politics, Philosophy, and Economics, and The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. His writing has also been featured in a variety of popular outlets, including Reason Magazine, Aeon, and Inside Higher Education. Chris received a William & Mary Alumni Fellowship Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016. His website is www.cfreiman.com and he blogs at www.BleedingHeartLibertarians.com.

    Commentary to be offered by Joe Carens (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto), whose book The Ethics of Immigration (Oxford UP, 2013) was recipient of the David Easton Award of the American Political Science Association. Randall Hansen (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto) will chair the event.

    This event is co-sponsored by The Institute for Liberal Studies, a non-partisan public affairs venue based in Ottawa.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Christopher Freiman
    Speaker
    Philosophy, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

    Joe Carens
    Commentator
    Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Political Science, University of Toroto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 25th Another World Film Screening & Panel Discussion

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 25, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    We invite you to join the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice for a screening of Rome-based director, Thomas Torelli’s documentary, Another World/Un Altro Mondo. A panel discussion and Q & A session with Thomas Torrelli will follow the screening.

    ANOTHER WORLD is a feature documentary about mankind’s journey to discover our true force and who we truly are, challenging the modern view of the world and reconsidering the world view and value systems of ancient societies such as the indigenous Americans. It’s a quest through science and consciousness, individual and planetary, exploring our relationships with ourselves, the world around us and the universe as a whole. It demonstrates how connected we really all are, as best expressed in the Mayan greeting In Lak’ech, which means “I am another yourself.” It also demonstrates just how unnatural the sense of separation that characterizes much of modern thought really is as opposed to the understanding of unity and oneness found in many ancient traditions.

    Above all it is a transcendental pilgrimage of repossession and empowerment, affirming our place in the universe and asserting mankind as a conscious mankind with real power as individuals and as a collective to create our reality, leaving us with a message that will not only open our eyes, but will hopefully stimulate everyone into generating a better and brighter tomorrow for the benefit of present and future generations.

    Thomas Torelli is an award-winning Italian independent director and producer best known for compelling socially conscious documentaries. His past work includes: ZERO: An Investigation into 9/11 (2007) and Sangue e Cemento (2009). In 2014 he directed and produced the documentary film that revolutionized the concept of independent distribution in Italy: Another World. His latest work includes Food ReLOVution (2017), which analyzes the effects of the meat industry, Choose Love (2018), about the importance of choosing love in every gesture. He is currently the creative force behind UAM.TV, his newly launched independent web television whose intent is to contribute to the creation of a better social and cultural model: another world.


    Speakers

    Thomas Torelli
    Director

    Professor Kevin J. White
    Assistant Professor, Deptartment for the Study of Religion & Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Religion, Medicine, Bioethics, and the Law in End-of-life Care: South Asian Religious Adherent Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk is based on a recently defended doctoral ethnography investigating end-of-life care issues in contemporary India from the perspectives of Indian and Tibetan religious adherents, through the lenses of religious studies, bioethics and the law. The need came in part from a paucity in bioethics studies related to the ancient Indic religious traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, from some studies ignoring the non-theistic Indic traditions altogether and legal challenges in India against Jain fasting at the end of life. Three core themes include attempts to block disclosure of bad news in sharing of sensitive medical information; ritual fasting and immobilization at the end of life; and exposure to and attitudes towards end-of-life care models including pain management, hospice palliative care and assistance in dying. This study is an advocacy anthropology project with hopes that it proves helpful in India and other jurisdictions where South Asian religious adherents receive end-of-life care so that culturally safe care can be better provided.

    Dr. Sean Hillman is a clinical bioethicist with the Centre for Clinical Ethics (CCE), a consultant organization based at Unity Health Toronto and contracted to seven institutions in Ontario. Over the last several years Sean has been the ethics lead for the five-hospital Lakeridge Health system in Durham region. He also is a Buddhist Corrections Chaplain for two facilities in the Kingston region. Sean was a bedside caregiver in hospital for almost two decades and did a year-long fellowship in Clinical and Organizational Bioethics also at the CCE. A medical anthropologist and textualist, Sean recently completed his doctorate in religion and the collaborative programs of bioethics and south Asian studies at U of T.

    A scholar of various Asian philosophies and languages for almost thirty years, with a major focus on the Indic religious traditions, Sean has spent five years living, studying and researching in India. Sean’s current research projects are on maximizing decisional participation by those who might have mental capacity interferences, and on how to better understand why families may request aggressive medical management for their loved-ones despite a poor prognosis (including religious logic such as vitalism, non-harm and filial piety). Sean is a member of Durham Family Resources community advisory committee for their “recognizing capacity” pilot project which advocates for increased inclusion of those with intellectual, cognitive or communication challenges and for including supported decision making in Ontario healthcare law.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Sean Hillman
    PhD, Religion/Bioethics/South Asian Studies, U of T, 2019; Clinical Ethicist, Lakeridge Health (Centre for Clinical Ethics); Buddhist Corrections Chaplain, Bath and Collins Bay Institutions



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Matthew Walton
    Chair
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Diana Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Japan's Abenomics Reforms after Seven Years

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20204:30PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Lecture Abstract:
    When the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan regained power led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in December 2012, Japan’s government embarked on a set of economic policies dubbed “Abenomics.” Abenomics aimed to bring Japan back from stagnation and restore its growth potential. Prime Minister Abe is now the longest serving Japanese Prime Minister in history. Abenomics looks seemingly successful as well. Japan’s economy has been in the longest expansion phase in the post war era. The unemployment rate is so low that many employers claim they cannot find workers. Yet, the major goals of Abenomics set at the beginning, such as 2% inflation rate and 2% real economic growth, have not been achieved. Has Abenomics really succeeded? What challenges remain?

    Speaker Bio:
    Takeo Hoshi is Professor in the Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo. He is the former Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), Professor of Finance (by courtesy) at the Graduate School of Business, and Director of the Japan Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), all at Stanford University. He served in these roles until August 2019

    Prior to 2012, Professor Hoshi was Pacific Economic Cooperation Professor in International Economic Relations at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

    His book titled Corporate Financing and Governance in Japan: The Road to the Future (MIT Press, 2001), co-authored with Anil Kashyap (Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago), received the Nikkei Award for the Best Economics Books of 2002. His other publications include, “Japanese Government Debt and Sustainability of Fiscal Policy” (with Takero Doi and Tatsuyoshi Okimoto), Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 2011; “Corporate Restructuring in Japan during the Lost Decade” (with Satoshi Koibuchi and Ulrike Schaede), “Japan’s Bubble, Deflation, and Long-term Stagnation,” MIT Press, 2011 (Koichi Hamada, Anil K Kashyap, and David E. Weinstein, eds.); “Will the U.S. Bank Recapitalization Succeed? Eight Lessons from Japan” (with Anil Kashyap), Journal of Financial Economics, 2010; and “Zombie Lending and Depressed Restructuring in Japan” (joint with Ricardo Caballero and Anil Kashyap), American Economic Review, December 2008.

    Hoshi received his BA in social sciences from the University of Tokyo in 1983, and a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988.


    Speakers

    Takeo Hoshi
    Professor, Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 27th Technologies of Risk Response in Germany and the United States: 1850-1900

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Technologies of Risk Response in Germany and the United States: 1850-1900

    This talk investigates the history of fire services and the technologies they employed to contribute to the scholarship on infrastructure and power, urban liberalism, and risk management. Specifically, Jan illustrates the fire alarm telegraph’s impact on fire preparedness in Germany and the United States. He argues that this technology materialized the values that guided society’s response to risk. This novel technology led to the rapid decline of the profession of tower watchmen and appeared to democratize fire signaling. By providing evidence about the privileged location and use of the telegraph, Jan puts the notion of democratized fire signaling into perspective. Examining documents from city councils and fire departments in Boston, Philadelphia, Berlin, and Frankfurt, he provides evidence that it privileged use by local officials and police forces. In the formerly free city of Frankfurt, for instance, the fire telegraph allowed Prussia to control potential political threats. His study elucidates a larger insight about risk management during the nineteenth century. Entities worth protecting by fire services were usually not the individual but property. Infrastructures like the fire telegraph mainly benefitted the overlapping groups of property owners, industrials, liberals, and the bourgeoisie.

    Jan Henning is a PhD student in the history of technology and medicine at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at U of T. His research focuses on the history of emergency services in Europe and North America.
    Emergency services, as they developed during the latter half of the nineteenth century, contributed to the idea that risks are an inevitable but controllable part of urban life. The histories of these services illuminate which forms of life and property were deemed worthy of protection. Jan argues that the technologies employed by emergency services materialized the values that guide society’s response to risk.
    Prior to coming to U of T, Jan received a BA (history and philosophy) and MA (history) from the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany), where he won the Aretin Prize for his Master’s thesis Tuberculosis and Race in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century American Culture and Media.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    (416) 946-8972


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 27th “A Room Secured on Every Side”: Terror, Safety, and Security in Franz Kafka

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMNorthrop Frye Hall 113
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    Description

    STEFAN WILLER is professor of modern German literature at Humboldt University Berlin. From 2010 to 2018 he was associate director of the Center for Literary and Cultural Research (ZfL) Berlin. He held visiting professorships at Munich, EHESS Paris, UNAM Mexico City, Stanford and UC Santa Barbara. His research interests include the literary epistemology of the future, the cultural history of generation and inheritance, theories of language and translation, interrelations of literature and music. Select book publications: Oper und Film. Geschichten einer Beziehung (co-editor, 2019); Zukunftssicherung. Kulturwissenschaftliche Perspektiven (co-editor, 2019); Futurologien. Ordnungen des Zukunftswissens (co-editor, 2016); Erbfälle. Theorie und Praxis kultureller Übertragung in der Moderne (2014); Das Konzept der Generation. Eine Wissenschafts- und Kulturgeschichte (co-author, 2008); Das Beispiel. Epistemologie des Exemplarischen (co-editor, 2007); Poetik der Etymologie. Texturen sprachlichen Wissens in der Romantik (2003); Botho Strauß zur Einführung (2000).

    This event is co-sponsored by the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (funded in part by the DAAD with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office) and the Centre for Comparative Literature.

    If you have any accommodation needs, please e-mail german@chass.utoronto.ca, and we will do our best to assist you.

     


    Speakers

    Stefan Willer
    Humboldt University Berlin


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 27th Who Is Afraid of the “Finance Lobby”? Neoliberal Transformation of Turkey’s Economic Management under the New Presidential System of Government

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room, BF200B
    4 Bancroft Ave., 2nd floor
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    The passage to the presidential system of government (PSG) on 9 July 2018 in Turkey, following a two-year-long emergency rule, has meant a leap in the state’s neoliberal transformation since the 1980s. In the economic field, this led to the rise of politicised, centralised, personalised, discretionary, and non-accountable management practices in contrast to the earlier neoliberal mottoes of depoliticization, decentralisation, institutionalisation, rule of law, and transparency. This presentation provides a detailed analysis of economic management in Turkey in the first four months of the PSG, a period which also saw Turkey’s most severe financial crisis since the one in 2001, to highlight the political economic continuities underlying this shift towards re-politicization.


    Speakers

    Pınar Bedirhanoğlu
    Middle East Technical University (Turkey), York University


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th Pop City: Korean Popular Culture and the Selling of Place

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Pop City examines the use of Korean television dramas and K-pop music to promote urban and rural places in South Korea. Building on the phenomenon of Korean pop culture, Youjeong Oh argues that pop culture-featured place selling mediates two separate domains: political decentralization and the globalization of Korean popular culture. The local election system introduced in the mid 90s has stimulated strong desires among city mayors and county and district governors to develop and promote their areas. Riding on the Korean Wave—the overseas popularity of Korean entertainment, also called Hallyu—Korean cities have actively used K-dramas and K-pop idols in advertisements designed to attract foreign tourists to their regions. Hallyu, meanwhile, has turned the Korean entertainment industry into a speculative field into which numerous players venture by attracting cities as sponsors.
    By analyzing the process of culture-featured place marketing, Pop City shows that urban spaces are produced and sold just like TV dramas and pop idols by promoting spectacular images rather than substantial physical and cultural qualities. Popular culture-associated urban promotion also uses the emotional engagement of its users in advertising urban space, just as pop culture draws on fans’ and audiences’ affective commitments to sell its products. Oh demonstrates how the speculative, image-based, and consumer-exploitive nature of popular culture shapes the commodification of urban space and ultimately argues that pop culture–mediated place promotion entails the domination of urban space by capital in more sophisticated and fetishized ways.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th May ’68 at Fifty: Exhibiting les événements in Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Few events in the French twentieth century have been as richly commemorated as May ’68. May’s fiftieth anniversary in 2018 provoked a veritable commemorative frenzy, with five major exhibitions in the Paris region alone. These shows were accompanied by new books by leading French scholars, re-editions of classic texts, commemorative magazines, an online exhibit at the Nanterre campus of the Université de Paris, and two outdoor poster displays in central Paris. This illustrated talk examines the capital’s fiftieth anniversary exhibitions on May ‘68 in the context of recent scholarship on the event and its commemorative history, as well as on 1960s youth. It pays particular attention to the shows mounted by the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Archives nationales, and the municipality of Paris, the last of which aestheticized the events and ended by funneling visitors into a shop selling May-themed souvenirs, including commemorative paving stones priced at 280 or 380 euros.

    Susan Whitney is Associate Professor of History at Carleton University, where she also served as Associate Dean (Undergraduate Affairs) in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences from 2008 to 2011 and 2015 to 2017.  An historian of youth, she is the author of Mobilizing Youth: Communists and Catholics in Interwar France (Duke, 2009).  She is preparing a chapter on 1960s youth culture for the Routledge Handbook of French History and has a chapter in A Cultural History of Youth in the Modern Age (Bloomsbury, forthcoming). In 2018, Professor Whitney received Carleton’s Graduate Mentoring Award for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.


    Speakers

    Susan Whitney
    Carleton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th An Indian Outcast in Reform China: Hindi Film and the Chinese Imagination of Global Culture Post-Mao

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    East Asian Seminar Series

    The late 1970s and early ‘80s saw a Chinese craze for Indian films. Members of the generation that came of age in this time have such fond memories of the foreign and exotic Hindi films that many Indian visitors to China are still serenaded with songs from the handful of films that were screened in that period. This talk examines India’s symbolic role in China’s post Cultural Revolution healing, looking especially at the discourse around popular Hindi films such as Caravan, Noorie, and Awara. The contemporary rethinking of the 1980s in China serves as the larger framework of the talk, emphasizing how the India craze of the early 1980s challenges how 21st century scholars see 1985 as marking China’s entry to “world culture.” Looking at Hindi film in the 1980s interrogates the ways in which “the west” can come to symbolize “the world” in contemporary Chinese cultural studies.

    Krista Van Fleit is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies at the University of South Carolina. Her first book, Literature the People Love, examines culture from the Early Maoist Period, providing a new interpretive framework with which to approach texts from this time. She is currently writing a book titled Bollywood to Beijing: Film Exchange and Cultural Production in China and India.


    Speakers

    Krista Van Fleit
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies, University of South Carolina

    Anup Grewal
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2020

  • Tuesday, March 3rd Innovations in Advancing Gender Equality

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 20202:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Innovations in Advancing Gender Equality

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars, policymakers, and business leaders who are at the forefront of studying and promoting gender equality in a wide range of contexts. The event will highlight innovative efforts to advance gender equality through the promotion of STEM education and design thinking. University leaders from Canada and Japan will discuss the challenges and opportunities of overcoming gender inequalities in an academic context. Finally, we will discuss the UN HeForShe initiative and Japan’s efforts to promote gender equality globally.

    Speakers (tentative):
    Rie Kijima (Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto)
    Daisuke Kan (CEO of Cheerio Corporation)
    Sonia Kang (Associate Professor, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management, University of Toronto)
    Kelly Hannah-Moffat (Vice President, Human Resources & Equity, University of Toronto)
    Aya Okada (Professor, Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University)
    Stephanie Dei (UN Women National Coordinator of WE EMPOWER Canada)
    Edward Wageni (UN Women HeForShe Program Manager)

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Rie Kijima
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Daisuke Kan
    CEO of Cheerio Corporation

    Sonia Kang
    Associate Professor, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management, University of Toronto

    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    Vice President, Human Resources & Equity, University of Toronto

    Aya Okada
    Professor, Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University

    Stephanie Dei
    UN Women National Coordinator of WE EMPOWER Canada

    Edward Wageni
    HeForShe Programme Manager



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 3rd 2020 Walter Gordon Symposium on Public Policy Keynote Lecture: Empty Planet: The Shock of Global Population Decline

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 20206:30PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    The Walter Gordon Symposium is an annual conference on public policy held at the University of Toronto.

    This year’s Symposium is entitled “Policymaking for a Well Society”. It will focus in on three major themes at the core of how our societies thrive or struggle – environment, health and housing. By dissecting each of these policy topics in detail this year’s symposium hopes to make us reflect on where we have done well and where we can do better.

    Keynote Lecture – John Ibbitson of The Globe & Mail

    We are pleased to welcome John Ibbitson of the Globe and Mail as the keynote for the 2020 Walter Gordon Symposium. He will be speaking on his recent book, co-authored with Darrell Bricker, “Empty Planet: The Shock of Global Population Decline” followed by a question and answer session.

    Speakers

    John Ibbitson
    Journalist, The Globe and Mail


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Massey College

    University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Japan: Climate Change Leader?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Japan: Climate Change Leader?

    In 1997, Japan hosted the international meeting that produced the Kyoto Protocol, a major agreement to confront climate change. However, the country’s climate change policies have come under intense scrutiny in recent years. Japan regularly ranks toward the bottom of international climate change rankings, and critics have condemned its promotion of coal-fired power plants. Prime Minister Abe Shinzo has sought to reclaim Japanese climate change leadership, for example highlighting the issue as host of the G20 Osaka Summit. What will it take for Japan to reemerge as a climate change leader? In this panel, Professor Phillip Lipscy will provide an overview of climate change politics in Japan, explaining why Japan has struggled to reduce emissions in recent years. Mari Yoshitaka, a leading expert in environment business and environment finance who has served on numerous Japanese government policy committees, will discuss Japan’s climate resilience and energy security challenges.

    Moderator:
    Matthew Hoffman, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Panelists:
    Phillip Y. Lipscy, Associate Professor of Political Science, Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto

    Mari Yoshitaka, Chief Environmental & Social Strategist for Environmental Strategy Advisory Division at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd.; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hoffman
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Phillip Y. Lipscy
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto

    Mari Yoshitaka
    Panelist
    Chief Environmental & Social Strategist for Environmental Strategy Advisory Division at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd.; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Ukraine's War in the Donbas: Description and Prescription in Conflict Resolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Jesse Driscoll is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California at San Diego. His first book, Warlords and Coalition Politics in Post-Soviet States (2015), was published by Cambridge University Press in the Series on Comparative Politics, and was honored with the Best Book Award by the Central Eurasian Studies Society and the Furniss Award. He has conducted fieldwork in Tajikistan, Georgia, and Ukraine. He has a book forthcoming from Columbia University Press tentatively titled Doing Global Fieldwork: A Social Scientist’s Guide To Mixed-Methods Research in Difficult Places and a book under review (co-authored with Dominique Arel) on the causes and consequences of the ongoing war in Ukraine.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jesse Driscoll
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California at San Diego



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th The Politics of the Fatwa: Modern Islamic Legal Authority and Rise of the Indonesian Council of Ulama

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Fatwas from Islamic organizations are prominent elements of public debates in democratic Indonesia, as well as the broader Muslim world. Yet scholars lack a clear theoretical explanation for the power of fatwas in politics. This paper draws on original archival material to explicate the legal authority of the fatwas from the Indonesian Council of Ulama (Majelis Ulama Indonesia, MUI), which over the past twenty years has become one of the country’s most influential actors. The paper distinguishes three periods in the growth and transformation of MUI’s authority; starting with charismatic authority and state corporatism, MUI later gained formal regulatory authority, and now uses agenda setting, lobbying, mass mobilization, and the threat of violence. By examining how the power of MUI’s fatwas increased as the organization accrued more forms of authority, this periodization demonstrates that explaining the political power of the fatwa requires understanding the modern organizational authority of Islamic actors. In the modern age, Islamic legal authority reflects the dominant logic of political authority in society.

    Jeremy Menchik is Assistant Professor in the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and faculty affiliate in Political Science. His first book, Islam and Democracy in Indonesia: Tolerance without Liberalism (Cambridge University Press, 2016) was the co-winner of the 2017 International Studies Association award for the best book on religion and international relations.


    Speakers

    Jeremy Menchik
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University

    Faisal Kamal
    Discussant
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Reading and Writing "Possessed by the Virgin," with Kristin Bloomer

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Kristin Bloomer’s Possessed by the Virgin: Hinduism, Roman Catholicism, and Marian Possession in South India introduces readers to three women who become possessed by the Virgin Mary: Rosalind, Nancy, and Dhanam. In this rich ethnographic account of Marian possession, healing, and exorcism in Tamil Nadu, Bloomer pays particular attention to the experience of possession as articulated by these women and the various community members that surround them, from the skeptical Catholic priest to the devotees, and everyone in between. This beautifully written ethnography raises questions about possessed subjectivities and agencies, gender, Tamil language, Hinduism and Catholicism in South India, and, more generally, how to write about possession.

    In this panel, a group of graduate students from the University of Toronto, with diverse research interests ranging from Tamil Studies to Possession Studies, will critically engage with the author and her book from various perspectives. The event aims to raise questions, deeply reflect, and start a critical conversation about the book and its contents.

    PANELISTS:

    Henria Aton, Faculty of Information, UofT
    Janani Mandayam Comar, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Stephanie Duclos-King, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Jesse Pruitt, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Kristina Rogahn, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Austin Simoes-Gomes, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT

    __________________

    Kristin C. Bloomer is an Associate Professor of Religion at Carleton College in Northfield, MN. She is currently working on a book about Tamil family gods and lineage deities, with support from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Carleton College.


    Speakers

    Kristin Bloomer
    Speaker
    Department of Religion, Carleton College, Northfield, MN

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology; Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 13th Richard J. Samuels' on his Book Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 13, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Professor Richard J. Samuels of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will visit the Munk School of Global Affairs on March 13, 2020, to talk about his new book, Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community (Cornell University Press, 2019). There will be a book sale and signing by the author following the talk. A foremost expert on Japanese politics and foreign policy, Professor Samuels is the Ford International Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for International Studies at MIT.

    About Special Duty: A History of the Japanese Intelligence Community

    The prewar history of the Japanese intelligence community demonstrates how having power over much, but insight into little, can have devastating consequences. Its postwar history―one of limited Japanese power despite growing insight―has also been problematic for national security.

    In Special Duty, Richard J. Samuels dissects the fascinating history of the intelligence community in Japan. Looking at the impact of shifts in the strategic environment, technological change, and past failures, he probes the reasons why Japan has endured such a roller-coaster ride when it comes to intelligence gathering and analysis, and concludes that the ups and downs of the past century―combined with growing uncertainties in the regional security environment―have convinced Japanese leaders of the critical importance of striking balance between power and insight.

    Using examples of excessive hubris and debilitating bureaucratic competition before the Asia-Pacific War, the unavoidable dependence on US assets and popular sensitivity to security issues after World War II, and the tardy adoption of image-processing and cyber technologies, Samuels’ bold book highlights the century-long history of Japan’s struggles to develop a fully functioning and effective intelligence capability, and makes clear that Japanese leaders have begun to reinvent their nation’s intelligence community.

    Reviews:

    “With deep mastery of Japanese and American archival material and a raft of interviews with key players, Professor Samuels has captured in a single, valuable volume the successes and failures of Japanese intelligence since 1895 and, above all, the political cross-currents and unique restraints under which its agencies have operated since 1945.” – Joel Brenner, former head of US counterintelligence, Office of the Director of National Intelligence and former Inspector General of the National Security Agency

    “Special Duty is a timely book, and a suitable next installment in Richard Samuels’ influential oeuvre on modern Japanese security policy.” – Michael Green, Georgetown University, author of Arming Japan

    “This book is a masterpiece that incisively analyzes the Japanese intelligence community and its activities. I learned a lot from this book. I think that Japan wants to overcome the various problems facing its intelligence and become a part of the Five Eyes as soon as possible.” -Satoshi Morimoto, Former Minister of Defense, Japan

    “This is a truly wonderful book written by a leading and highly respected scholar in the field of Japanese security and politics. It offers much needed insight to academics and policymakers alike as they seek to understand the changes in Japan’s security choices.” -Sheila Smith, Council on Foreign Relations, author of Intimate Rivals

    “Focusing on intelligence gathering by the modern Japanese state from 1895, the author’s insights into pre-war “hubris and debilitating bureaucratic competition” and postwar reliance on the U.S. will attract fans of both geopolitical and military history.” -Japan Times

    “This engrossing history of Japanese intelligence demonstrates how such changes have made Japan a better security partner for the United States while preparing the country to stand on its own if the U.S. security guarantee loses its credibility.” -Foreign Affairs


    Speakers

    Richard J. Samuels
    Ford International Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 16th A New Perspective on the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists’ Activities on Emigration, 1929-1938, in light of previously unknown correspondence

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 16, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The assassination of the Minister of Interior, Bronisław Pieracki, took place on 15 June 1934 in Warsaw. This crime was one of the most shocking political assassinations in the Second Polish Republic. It was at the same time the biggest success and the most crushing defeat of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN), as it negatively affected the strength of the national structures of the organization. The trial attracted the public’s interest in Poland and abroad. The court sentenced several OUN members, including Stepan Bandera, reaching its indictment thanks to the cooperation of Polish and Czechoslovak intelligence bodies. One year earlier, authorities had arrested and searched the premises of seven members of the OUN Board operating within the borders of Czechoslovakia. In the house of Omelian Senyk, one of the closest partners of Yevhen Konvalets (OUN’s leader), authorities found material that was later called Senyk’s archives. If they had examined the documents sooner, they could have prevented the murder of Pieracki. These documents have been assumed missing since the outbreak of the Second World War. They have spurred investigations and generated different hypotheses and myths among not only historians but also the participants and witnesses of the events to which they apply. The archive, comprising over 700 letters, is located in Lviv. Thanks to the rediscovery of Senyk’s archives, a new and different perspective can be developed on how the OUN functioned. The aim of the project is not to focus on the actions of individuals, but rather to try to understand how the organization operated. Examination of the private correspondence – in contrast to other available sources, such as the press or propaganda materials – offers a clearer or more faithful means to understand the actual plans, motivations, and goals of the nationalists, and to understand the OUN’s actions against the Second Polish Republic and in the international area carried out with the aim of gaining independence.

    Magdalena Gibiec is a Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar at the University of Toronto. She is a PhD candidate at the Institute of History, University of Wrocław (Poland), and an intern at the Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Magdalena Gibiec
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar at the University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Prof. Cameron’s talk, which is based upon recent book, The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan (Cornell University Press, 2018), examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this crisis, a quarter of Soviet Kazakhstan’s population, and the disaster transformed a territory the size of western Europe.
    Drawing upon a wide range of sources in Russian and in Kazakh, her talk brings this largely unknown story to light, revealing its devastating consequences for Kazakh society. It finds that through the most violent means the Kazakh famine created Soviet Kazakhstan and forged a new Kazakh national identity. But the nature of this transformation was uneven. Neither Kazakhstan nor Kazakhs themselves became integrated into the Soviet system in precisely the ways that Moscow had originally hoped. More broadly, she shows how the case of the Kazakh famine overturns several assumptions about violence, modernization, and nation-making under Stalin.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 19th Property and Appropriation: "Indian Spirit Guides" in 1890s US Spiritualism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Property and Appropriation: “Indian Spirit Guides” in 1890s US Spiritualism

    19thC U.S. Spiritualism was a progressive and feminist movement; it was also fraught with racial projection, appropriation, and longing. This talk focuses on the racialization of ghosts in the white Spiritualist movement—particularly the “Indian spirit-controls” that many white Spiritualists claimed were inhabiting their bodies. As I underscore the entanglement between settler-colonialism and Spiritualism, I focus on two particular narratives, my own great-grandfather’s 40-year “relationship” with a fantasized Indian healer and the story of Spiritualist leader Mary Pepper Vanderbilt and her “spirit-control” “Bright Eyes”—a complex narrative of class, gender, and race. In the words of Avery Gordon, I “reckon with haunting out of a concern for justice.”

    Speaker Biography:
    Julie Carr is the author of 10 books of poetry and prose, including Real Life: An Installation (Omindawn 2018), Objects from a Borrowed Confession (Ahsahta, 2017), and Someone Shot my Book (University of Michigan Press, 2018). Earlier books include 100 Notes on Violence (Ahsahta, 2010), RAG (Omnidawn, 2014), and Think Tank (Solid Objects, 2015). With Jeffrey Robinson she is the co-editor of Active Romanticism (University of Alabama Press, 2015). Her co-translation of Leslie Kaplan’s Excess-The Factory was published by Commune Editions in 2018. A chapbook of prose, “The Silence that Fills the Future,” was released as a free pdf from Essay Press: http://www.essaypress.org/ep-19/
    Carr was a 2011-12 NEA fellow and is a Professor at the University of Colorado in Boulder in the English department and the Intermedia Arts Writing and Performance Ph.D. She has collaborated with dance artists K.J. Holmes and Gesel Mason. With Tim Roberts she is the co-founder of Counterpath Press, Counterpath Gallery, and Counterpath Community Garden in Denver. Www.reallifeaninstallation.com; www.juliecarrpoet.com; www.counterpathpress.org

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Julie Carr
    Professor, Department of English and Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance PhD program University of Colorado, Boulder



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic **BILINGUAL EVENT**

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This event will be conducted partially in English and partially in French.

    De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the End of the Old Regime

    Après un doctorat en médecine vétérinaire (DMV) obtenu en 1992 à l’Université de Montréal,Swann Paradis a exercé la médecine vétérinaire (animaux de compagnie) au Québec pendant plusde 15 ans, parallèlement à ses études littéraires. Ses champs d’intérêt incluent l’histoire naturelleau XVIIIe siècle (littérature, philosophie et sciences), de même que le « roman terrifiant » et le« Romantisme noir », la poésie québécoise et franco-ontarienne contemporaine et l’écriturepoétique. Il prépare actuellement une monographie qui devrait paraître quelque part au XXIe sièclechez Hermann, dont le titre provisoire est : Le sixième sens de la taupe. Buffon dans la fabriquedes quadrupèdes. Il travaille actuellement sur un projet de recherche ayant reçu l’appui d’une« Subvention Savoir » du CRSH (2016-2020), pour le projet intitulé : « De la ménagerie du Princed’Orange au Jardin du Roi : Arnout Vosmaer (1720-1799) dans l’ombre de Buffon (1707-1788) ».


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Collège Glendon


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Empire’s Tracks Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Empire’s Tracks boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. In this meticulously researched book, Manu Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business records, Karuka deftly explains the imperial foundations of U.S. political economy. Tracing the shared paths of Indigenous and Asian American histories, this multisited interdisciplinary study connects military occupation to exclusionary border policies, a linked chain spanning the heart of U.S. imperialism. This highly original and beautifully wrought book unveils how the transcontinental railroad laid the tracks of the U.S. Empire.

    Manu Karuka is the author of Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad (University of California Press, 2019). He is a co-editor, with Juliana Hu Pegues and Alyosha Goldstein, of “On Colonial Unknowing,” a special issue of Theory & Event, and with Vivek Bald, Miabi Chatterji, and Sujani Reddy, he is a co-editor of The Sun Never Sets: South Asian Migrants in an Age of U.S. Power (NYU Press, 2013). His work appears in Critical Ethnic Studies, J19, Settler Colonial Studies, The Settler Complex: Recuperating Binarism in Colonial Studies (UCLA American Indians Studies Center, 2016, edited by Patrick Wolfe), and Formations of United States Colonialism (Duke University Press, 2014, edited by Alyosha Goldstein). He is an assistant professor of American Studies at Barnard College.


    Speakers

    Manu Karuka
    Assistant Professor of American Studies, Barnard College


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 26th Fighting Prison Nation: The Nation of Islam's Challenge to Criminalization in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 26, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    “Fighting Prison Nation: The Nation of Islam’s Challenge to Criminalization in the United States”

    Garrett Felber will discuss his new book, Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Struggle, and the Carceral State (UNC Press, 2020), a definitive political history of the NOI which documents the interplay between law enforcement and Muslim communities in the postwar United States. The book illuminates new sites and forms of political struggle as Muslims prayed under surveillance in prison yards and used courtroom political theater to put the state on trial. His talk will highlight familiar figures in new ways–Malcolm X the courtroom lawyer and A. Philip Randolph the Harlem coalition builder–while highlighting the forgotten organizing of rank-and-file activists in prisons such as Martin Sostre. Felber decisively shows how state repression and Muslim organizing laid the groundwork for the modern carceral state and the contemporary prison abolition movement which opposes it.

    Speaker’s Biography:
    Garrett Felber is an assistant professor of History at the University of Mississippi. His research and teaching focus on twentieth-century African American social movements, Black radicalism, and the carceral state. Felber was the lead organizer of the Making and Unmaking Mass Incarceration conference and is the Project Director of the Parchman Oral History Project (POHP), a collaborative oral history, archival, and documentary storytelling project on incarceration in Mississippi. In 2016, Felber co-founded Liberation Literacy, an abolitionist collective inside and outside Oregon prisons. He also spearheaded the Prison Abolition Syllabus, a collaborative reading list published by Black Perspectives which highlighted and contextualized prison strikes in 2016 and 2018. Felber is also the coeditor of the Portable Malcolm X Reader with the late Manning Marable and is currently working on a biography of former political prisoner Martin Sostre.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Garrett Felber
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Mississippi



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Everyday functioning of the centrally planned economy in Czechoslovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Libor Žídek, Associate Professor, has lectured at the Faculty of Economics and Administration at Masaryk University, Czech Republic, since 1997. He specializes in economic transformation with a particular focus on the Czech economy. He also has a keen interest in planned economy, particularly in Czechoslovakia and generally in economic history. His doctoral thesis focused on the impact of globalization on economic policy and his habilitation thesis on the transformation process in the Czech Republic. He teaches courses on World Economic History, Economic Transformation and Macroeconomics. He has lectured on the topics of central planning and transformation in a number of countries, including the USA, Canada, Japan, Germany, the UK, Poland, Finland, Ukraine, and Jamaica. He has presented at conferences and published several books and a number of chapters and journal papers.

    The main goal of the talk is to give an idea about everyday economic reality in the socialist totalitarian system. It is partially based on results of our unique research – interviews with top-managers from the 1970s and 1980s. It generally breaks the common view that individual companies (at the bottom of the hierarchical pyramid) without hesitation followed the orders of the centre. The everyday reality was more complicated and foremost full of paradoxes, pretence and negotiations. The practice was far remote from textbook theory dealing with central planning.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Libor Zidek
    Masaryk University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th "Like a Mountain Singing Fine Words": Aracakecari and Other (Almost) Forgotten Jaffna Poets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    CHRISTOPHER ONDAATJE LECTURE ON SOUTH ASIAN ART, HISTORY AND CULTURE

    In the mid-eighteenth century, Jaffna and Batticaloa were centres of intense Tamil literary and musical creativity. Masterpieces such as Aracakecari’s immense Irakuvammicam, Ciṉṉatampippulavar’s Kalvaḷaiyantāti, and Varatarāca Kavirācar’s Civarāttirippurāṇam, to name but three, were composed by erudite poets in the royal courts and in temples in a distinctive Sri Lankan Tamil style. These works, once treasured in the Tamil areas of South India no less than in Sri Lanka, have largely disappeared from the cultural repertoire in our own traumatized generation. The lecture will try to define their special beauty and to suggest how we might recover the traditional ways of reading or singing them, thereby also reconnecting to the unique intellectual and artistic richness of that period.

    David Shulman is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A student of John Ralston Marr, thus in the line of teaching going back to U. V. Swaminath Iyer, he has specialized in the languages, literatures, poetic-linguistic grammars, and intellectual history of Southern India, with an emphasis on the early modern period (sixteenth to eighteenth centuries).


    Speakers

    David Shulman
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature

    Tamil Worlds Initiative

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 30th Acorns for Oaks or Plankton for Whales: Social Movements and Political Parties Interaction in Independent Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 30, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Ivan Gomza is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Kyiv School of Economics. Trained as a political scientist, he received his Ph.D. in 2012 after studying at the Joint Franco-Ukrainian Ph.D. Program at the University of Paris X-Nanterre, France, and the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine. Later, Dr. Gomza was a German fellow of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) at Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena (2013) and the Fulbright Faculty Development Program at College of William & Mary, Virginia (2016-2017). Professionally, he used to teach intensively at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, but in 2019 he joined the Kyiv School of Economics.
    Dr. Gomza’s scholarly interests comprise contentious politics, democratization, authoritarian regimes, and the bumpy road toward good governance. Dr. Gomza is the author of academic articles and two books. His Social Movements: a Handbook (2018), is the first title in Ukrainian comprehensively covering the topic. His second book, The Decadent Republic: Ideology of French Integral Nationalism under the Third Republic(upcoming in 2020) was subsidized by the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and Fulbright Program. The study explores instrumentalization and weaponization of fears of national decline by nationalist political entrepreneurs who aimed to overthrow one of the most durable democratic regimes of the interwar period. In addition to intensive teaching, Dr. Gomza frequently gives public lectures for various NGOs, think-tanks, and governmental agencies.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ivan Gomza
    Associate Professor of Public Policy and Governance at Kyiv School of Economics



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 31st Reinventing the Trading Nation: Japan, the United States, and the Future of Trade

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 31, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Reinventing the Trading Nation: Japan, the United States, and the Future of Trade

    While the future of the WTO hangs in the balance, Japan and the United States have sharply reoriented their paths as trading nations. The United States stepped out of the emerging regional trade architecture -crystallized in the TPP project- and has since resorted to tariffs to gain leverage in bilateral trade negotiations. Japan has chosen instead to resurrect the trade architecture and to advocate for multilateral solutions to the most pressing trade problems. The redefinition of the roles that the United States and Japan play in the international trading system will have profound consequences as can be seen in the NAFTA renegotiation, a stage one U.S.-China deal, and Japan’s mega trade agreements with Europe and the Asia-Pacific.

    Speaker Biography:
    Mireya Solís is Director of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies (CEAP), Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies, and senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings. Prior to her arrival at Brookings, Dr. Solís was a tenured associate professor at American University’s School of International Service.

    Dr. Solís is an expert on Japanese foreign economic policy, U.S.-Japan relations, international trade policy, and Asia-Pacific economic integration. She is the author of “Banking on Multinationals: Public Credit and the Export of Japanese Sunset Industries” (Stanford University Press, 2004) and co-editor of “Cross-Regional Trade Agreements: Understanding Permeated Regionalism in East Asia” (Springer, 2008) and “Competitive Regionalism: FTA Diffusion in the Pacific Rim” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). Her most recent book, “Dilemmas of a Trading Nation Japan and the United States in the Evolving Asia-Pacific Order” (Brookings Press, 2017) offers a novel analysis of the complex tradeoffs Japan and the United States face in drafting trade policy that reconciles the goals of economic competitiveness, social legitimacy, and political viability. Dilemmas of a Trading Nation received the 2018 Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Award and the Japanese edition 貿易国家のジレンマ:日本・アメリカとアジア太平洋秩序の構築 was published by Nikkei Press in October 2019.

    Solís has offered expert commentary to The New York Times, Financial Times, Washington Post, LA Times, Politico, The New Yorker, Nikkei, Kyodo News, Asahi Shimbun, Jiji Press, Japan Times, NHK World, Bloomberg, CNN, and BBC, among others.

    Solís earned a doctorate in government and a master’s in East Asian studies from Harvard University, and a bachelor’s in international relations from El Colegio de México.

    She is trustee of the Japan-America Society of Washington DC and steering committee member of the Leadership Council for Women in National Security.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Mireya Solis
    Director, Center for East Asia Policy Studies

    Knight Chair in Japanese Studies

    Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Program

    The Brookings Institution



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2020

  • Monday, April 6th New Persperctives on Hungarian Studies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 6, 20209:00AM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 9th Japan’s Changing Defense Posture under Abe: Radical Transformation or Evolutionary Shift?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    From North Korea’s nuclear/missile programs to China’s rapidly expanding military and a possible “gray-zone” crisis in the East China Sea, Japan faces a rapidly changing and increasingly threatening regional security environment. To address these challenges, since 2012 Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has accelerated efforts to “normalize” Japan’s defense planning and capabilities, reinterpret/revise Japan’s 1947 “Peace Constitution” to loosen constraints on its Self-defense Forces, and significantly strengthen the U.S.-Japan alliance. This talk will examine the drivers of recent changes to Japan’s national security policy and evaluate their significance for its defense posture, regional peace and stability, and the U.S.-Japan alliance.

    Contact

    Seung Hyok Lee
    (647) 894-5126


    Speakers

    Adam P. Liff
    Assistant Professor of East Asian International Relations, EALC Director, 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative (21JPSI) Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 16th Towards an Integrated Place-Based Innovation Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 16, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Innovation policy debates increasingly recognise societal challenges as drivers for innovation policy. This has motivated a ‘normative turn’ that advocates greater challenge orientation in innovation policy and targeted policies to articulate societal needs in order to deliver better innovations—not just more of them. In parallel, regional policy agendas, such as smart specialisation, focus on selectively building on unique, place-specific characteristics and assets, but it is somewhat agnostic about the direction of innovation. While mission-oriented and transformative, innovation policy agendas have been criticised for their lack of attention to context and the ‘messy realities’ of policy implementation, smart specialisation has been seen as too incremental, narrowing down the options and approaches for less developed regions and neglecting more transformative means of value capture. This talk will aim to bring together these top-down and bottom-up agendas, consider their key challenges and shortcomings, and discuss the need for an integrated place-based innovation and industrial policy.


    Speakers

    Dr. Elvira Uyarra
    Reader in Innovation Policy and Strategy at Alliance Manchester Business School (University of Manchester) Director of the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research Programme Director of the MSc in Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship Adjunct Professor at the Mohn Center of Innovation and Regional Development at the University of Western Norway Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Innovation Management Research (CIMR) of Birkbeck, University of London Fellow of the Regional Studies Association (RSA) and Chair of the North West if England branch of the RSA



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 17th Personalities, Institutions, and Illusions in Canadian History

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 17, 20208:30AM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    2020 marks the fiftieth year of Bob Bothwell’s teaching at the University of Toronto. In the half-century since he joined the faculty, he has established himself as one of Canada’s most prominent historians, an enthralling teacher, and a beloved mentor, colleague, and friend. To celebrate his extraordinary career, the International Relations Program, The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, Trinity College, and the Department of History are hosting a day-long conference at the University of Toronto on Friday, April 17, 2020.

    The conference will feature both academic papers and personal reflections from Bob’s colleagues, students, and friends. The roster of speakers includes John English, Norman Hillmer, and Margaret MacMillan, among others.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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