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January 2020

  • Friday, January 10th The Czech Republic and Central-Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Velvet Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 10, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    MARK KRAMER is Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has taught as a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria, where he was the Panitza Distinguished Professor. Originally trained in mathematics at Stanford University, he was formerly an Academy Scholar in Harvard’s Academy of International and Area Studies and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He has written many books and articles on a wide range of topics, including Imposing Maintaining, and Tearing Open the Iron Curtain: East-Central Europe and the Cold War, 1945-1990, which was named by Foreign Policy as one of the ten best books published in the field of International Relations in 2014, and he has long served as editor of Harvard’s Cold War Studies Book Series and of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a prize-winning quarterly journal published by MIT Press. His latest book, on the Russian Chechen wars of 1994-1996 and 1999-2009, will be published in 2020.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Mark Kramer
    Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 15th Being a Canadian Diplomat in the End of the Cold War: Experience in Czechoslovakia 1988-1990

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 15, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Pierre Guimond is currently Diplomat in Residence and Senior Fellow at the Graduate School of International Studies of Laval University. Prior that he was Minister-Counsellor and Head of the Foreign Policy and Diplomacy Section of the Canadian Embassy in Paris.
    He started his career in 1979 at the Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs of the Government of Québec with assignments as desk officer in federal-provincial relations and then Head of the public affairs section of the Québec Government Office in Toronto. He joined the Canadian Foreign Service in 1987 and served in Prague, Bonn and Vienna before becoming Ambassador to Hungary, Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina from 2007 to 2010. At the headquarters of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, he served as desk officer for the Policy and Strategic Analysis Division, USSR and Central and Eastern Europe Division. He was also deputy director of the European Union Division and Senior Departmental Assistant to Minister of Foreign Affairs Bill Graham. He later became Director of the European Union Division, Eastern Europe and Balkans Division and Policy Planning Division. Mr. Guimond also had an assignment as foreign policy advisor in the Foreign Policy and Defense Secretariat of the Privy Council Office. A graduate of Laval University in Political science, he is also an Auditor of the French Institut des Hautes études de défense nationale. He is a member of the External Advisor Committee of the Canadian Foreign Service Institute, member of the board of Canadian associations on international affairs and is a frequent commentator on French Canadian media.

    Pierre Guimond’s first posting abroad as a junior diplomat was as Third Secretary and Vice Consul at the Canadian Embassy to the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic from the summer of 1988 to that of 1990, a time known in that country as the end of the period of “Normalisation”. While his basic tasks were, among others, to understand the local political scene and reporting back to Ottawa, doing that meant that Guimond had to maintain close contacts with many individuals known as ‘dissidents” by the Soviet-styled local authorities. Although “the” Canadian government expert on Czechoslovakia at the time, he, like so many other observers, failed to see coming the rapid transformation that was to occur in this Central European countries in the Fall of 1989 and which led to the lead dissident being elected President of the Republic. A key witness to both the political oppression and the uprising of the Czech and Slovak peoples, this diplomat ended up providing some support to members of the dissident movement, that included Vaclav Havel, in their communication with “the West”.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Pierre Guimond
    Diplomate en résidence, Université Laval



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 22nd Global Migration Lab presents Anna Triandyfillodou

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 22, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Speakers

    Anna Triandyfillodou
    Professor, Department of Sociology, Ryerson University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 23rd Making Caucasians Black: Street Trade and Racism on the Streets of Soviet Moscow

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 23, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Stalin and other early Soviet leaders saw the Caucasus as the USSR’s fruit and vegetable basket, reshaping agricultural practices and altering the natural landscape to favor “export” agriculture. Such beliefs only became realized much later, however, and hardly in the way these leaders envisioned. As the USSR became a consumer society, centered on major Russian cities, Caucasus—and, later, Central Asian—growers realized the money that could be made selling their products directly to northern customers. Municipal officials in Moscow and elsewhere realized the value of this trade to their citizens, who believed in the better quality of fresh fruits, vegetables and even flowers from the Soviet south. Existing in a “gray zone” between first and second economies, this long-distance movement of fresh food and flowers proliferated in the Soviet Union’s last two decades. Images of the time, which still dominate characterizations of the late USSR, showed mostly-empty grocery stores shelves and long queues for food. I argue however that these beliefs of the Soviet Union as a land of scarcity miss the dynamic, and quite capitalist, nature of food sales in the late USSR. This movement—of people and goods—had varied consequences on everything from natural environments in the Soviet south to family life among traders as well as the health of the Russian population. Racism was one significant outgrowth of this trade. Southern traders, denigrated as “blacks” were seen to befoul as well as benefit Moscow with their unofficial and ostensibly exploitative practices. The host Russian population’s racist stereotypes towards these traders began to apply more broadly to Soviet citizens of the Caucasus and Central Asia. In memories, nonetheless, these long-distance food traders believed that the USSR offered them a chance to overcome mundane lives in southern villages and succeed at its very center.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jeff Sahadeo
    University of Ottawa



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 29th Out of the Closet—Onto the Stage: Queer Theatre in Putin’s Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 29, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk comes to grips with LGBTQ discourse in Russia outside of the familiar political and social narratives of oppression and violence that have been prevalent since the 2013 “anti-gay-propaganda” legislation. It turns instead to the cultural sphere and challenges its widely held perception as an arena for exclusively heteronormative discourse by revealing queerness as an increasingly popular object of artistic exploration and a recurrent performative strategy within the Russian performing arts and dramatic writing of the 21st century. I zoom into the stories of drag queens, transgender persons, gays, lesbians, and multiple queer selves and others to unveil the unique combination of linguistic, performative, and visual means that shape queerness as a Russian cultural imaginary. Apart from discussing the portrayals of queerness that emerge on stage and in dramatic texts, I will also focus on the institutional context in which these images are produced, paying attention, among other things, to the geographical determinants of the possibilities of individual narratives.

    Tatiana Klepikova is a Faculty of Arts & Science Postdoctoral Fellow at the Women & Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, where she is working on her postdoctoral project about contemporary Russian queer theater and drama. She defended her Ph.D. in Slavic Literary Studies at the University of Passau, Germany, in 2019, after obtaining degrees in Teaching Foreign Languages (English and Spanish) in Yaroslavl (Russia), and Russian and East-Central European Studies in Passau. She is co-editor of several collections of interdisciplinary essays on privacy, including Outside the “Comfort Zone”: Private and Public Spheres in Late Socialist Europe (forthcoming in 2020 by De Gruyter). Her broader research interests include Soviet and contemporary Russian history and culture, political art, cultural privacy studies, queer studies, performance studies, and histories and cultures of LGBT communities in Eastern Europe.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Tatiana Klepikova
    Postdoctoral Researcher Women & Gender Studies Institute University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 31st Would Japanese Voters Support Non-Japanese Candidates? Voting Experiments in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 31, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Abstract:

    In the 2019 Canadian Federal election, more ethnic minority candidates ran for office than ever before. Like Canada, many other democratic states experience an increase in the number of ethnic minority candidates, as their population with the diverse ethnic backgrounds has grew over the past few decades. In contrast to this trend, few ethnic minority candidates have run for office in Japan so far. Considering that Japan have already accepted some, and may accept more immigrants in the future, Japanese people would see more ethnic non-Japanese candidates in the near future. If they ran for election at the national level, would Japanese voters support them? Who would be more or less likely to vote for such candidates, and why? Answering these counterfactual questions have important implications not just for understanding Japanese voters, but for the electoral democracy in many countries as well.

    To answer these questions, Professor Murakami will present the major result of three online voting experiments that he conducted in Japan between 2011 and 2019. In these experiments, he showed the participants several hypothetical candidate profiles, and asked them to vote for one. Among them, one of these candidates’ ethnicity was manipulated to be either Japanese, Korean or Chinese randomly. As the result, he found that a significant proportion of Japanese voters avoided supporting the non-ethnic minority candidate. But Professor Murakami also found that this effect depended largely on voters’ partisanship, ethnic group attitudes, and relevant policy preference. Several implications of these findings for the future Japanese elections will be discussed in the presentation.

    Biography:

    Go Murakami is an Associate Professor in the College of Law at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, Mississauga. He received PhD in Political Science from the University of British Columbia. Professor Murakami studies political psychology and behavior, with special interests in race, ethnicity and immigration. His recent publication includes “Effects of Candidates’ Ethnicity on Vote Choice in Japan: An Experimental Approach” (Ritsumeikan Law Review, 2019) and “Survey Experiment on Majority Building” In Yoichi Hizen, ed., Experimental Politics (with Kiichiro Arai and Masaru Kohno, 2016 [in Japanese]).

    Contact

    Seung Hyok Lee
    (647) 894-5126


    Speakers

    Go Murakami
    Associate Professor, College of Law, Ritsumeikan University, Japan


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Wednesday, February 12th Political correctness and language of the media – before 1989 and nowadays

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Address: Alumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400.

    Elena Krejčová is Associate Professor at the Department of Slavic studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia). She studied Czech Studies, Bulgarian Studies, English and American Studies at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski (Bulgaria), and completed her doctoral studies at Masaryk university in Brno (1999). Her main areas of research include political linguistics, sociolinguistics, contrastive linguistics of Slavic languages, theory of translation. Elena Krejčová is the author of monographs Slavonic Babylon (2016), Quo Vadis, Philologia? (2017), The Power of Public Speech (2017) and author of dictionaries Czech- Bulgarian Law Dictionary (2015) and Czech-Bulgarian Specialized Dictionary of Legal, Economic and Socio-political Terminology (2016).

    Political correctness as a way of forming the principles of communication and in particular the verbal behaviour is very strongly connected with the period of totalitarianism in the countries of the former socialist block (including Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.). The idea of “right” and “wrong”, i.e. unacceptable speaking, thinking, behavior that is treated as a crime, the battle of ideas and ideologies is well presented in media as a tool of propaganda before 1989, this close relation between communication and political systems was a part of the state policy. What happened after 1989 – did we finally gain freedom of speech? Media after the “Velvet revolution” changed a lot – from the feeling of freedom with no restrictions that ended up to vulgarization of language to the new requirements in society to treat people without prejudice and discrimination.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Elena Krejčová
    Associate professor, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Diana Kim
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th Citizen, Rebel, Immigrant: Exhibiting Twentieth-Century Youth in Twenty-First Century French and EU History Museums

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Susan Whitney
    Carleton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2020

  • Thursday, March 19th The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 19, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Prof. Cameron’s talk, which is based upon recent book, The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan (Cornell University Press, 2018), examines one of the most heinous crimes of the Stalinist regime, the Kazakh famine of 1930-33. More than 1.5 million people perished in this crisis, a quarter of Soviet Kazakhstan’s population, and the disaster transformed a territory the size of western Europe.
    Drawing upon a wide range of sources in Russian and in Kazakh, her talk brings this largely unknown story to light, revealing its devastating consequences for Kazakh society. It finds that through the most violent means the Kazakh famine created Soviet Kazakhstan and forged a new Kazakh national identity. But the nature of this transformation was uneven. Neither Kazakhstan nor Kazakhs themselves became integrated into the Soviet system in precisely the ways that Moscow had originally hoped. More broadly, she shows how the case of the Kazakh famine overturns several assumptions about violence, modernization, and nation-making under Stalin.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sarah Cameron
    University of Maryland



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the End of the Old Regime


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Collège Glendon


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Everyday functioning of the centrally planned economy in Czechoslovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Libor Žídek, Associate Professor, has lectured at the Faculty of Economics and Administration at Masaryk University, Czech Republic, since 1997. He specializes in economic transformation with a particular focus on the Czech economy. He also has a keen interest in planned economy, particularly in Czechoslovakia and generally in economic history. His doctoral thesis focused on the impact of globalization on economic policy and his habilitation thesis on the transformation process in the Czech Republic. He teaches courses on World Economic History, Economic Transformation and Macroeconomics. He has lectured on the topics of central planning and transformation in a number of countries, including the USA, Canada, Japan, Germany, the UK, Poland, Finland, Ukraine, and Jamaica. He has presented at conferences and published several books and a number of chapters and journal papers.

    The main goal of the talk is to give an idea about everyday economic reality in the socialist totalitarian system. It is partially based on results of our unique research – interviews with top-managers from the 1970s and 1980s. It generally breaks the common view that individual companies (at the bottom of the hierarchical pyramid) without hesitation followed the orders of the centre. The everyday reality was more complicated and foremost full of paradoxes, pretence and negotiations. The practice was far remote from textbook theory dealing with central planning.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Libor Zidek
    Masaryk University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2020

  • Thursday, April 9th Japan’s Changing Defense Posture under Abe: Radical Transformation or Evolutionary Shift?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 9, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    From North Korea’s nuclear/missile programs to China’s rapidly expanding military and a possible “gray-zone” crisis in the East China Sea, Japan faces a rapidly changing and increasingly threatening regional security environment. To address these challenges, since 2012 Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has accelerated efforts to “normalize” Japan’s defense planning and capabilities, reinterpret/revise Japan’s 1947 “Peace Constitution” to loosen constraints on its Self-defense Forces, and significantly strengthen the U.S.-Japan alliance. This talk will examine the drivers of recent changes to Japan’s national security policy and evaluate their significance for its defense posture, regional peace and stability, and the U.S.-Japan alliance.

    Contact

    Seung Hyok Lee
    (647) 894-5126


    Speakers

    Adam P. Liff
    Assistant Professor of East Asian International Relations, EALC Director, 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative (21JPSI) Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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