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February 2019

  • Friday, February 22nd – Friday, April 5th Environmental Governance Lab Work in Progress Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 22, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, March 15, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, April 5, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab hosts regular EGL Work in Progress Talks. The talks are an informal, interdisciplinary forum where faculty and Ph.D. students can discuss ongoing research in the field of environmental politics, policy, and governance. At these events, two presenters offer a 10-minute overview of an ongoing project to serve as a fodder for discussion. If you are interested in hearing more about this and other Environmental Governance Lab events please email eg.lab@utoronto.ca for more information.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 22nd Pious Captains: Religion, Masculinity, and Combat in Sixteenth-Century France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 22, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The sixteenth century witnessed a proliferation of military texts written by French noblemen who were veterans of the Italian Wars and religious wars. In these texts, authors developed a new masculine standard through how they represented noblemen in combat. They abandoned the medieval trope of the knight and replaced it with that of the captain. Religious piety was an essential aspect of this change as the authors incorporated a renewed emphasis on crusade in their idealised representation of nobility. In the beginning of the period, authors’ religious ideals conflicted with political realities as they placed crusader imagery alongside gleeful descriptions of France waging war against Popes and allying with Protestants and Muslims against Catholics. These inherent contradictions did not resolve themselves until the latter half of the century when authors’ glorification of holy war dissipated as France plunged into its vicious cycle of religious conflict that shattered the social fabric of the nobility. The bloodshed between Frenchmen over religion meant that representations of noblemen as imagined crusaders ceased to be a favourable trope in military literature. Religious fanaticism was no longer glorified, and thus noblemen needed to present themselves as secular actors devoid of aggressive religious motivations. Authors continued to utilise the trope of the pious captain but without its original crusader rhetoric.

    Benjamin (Benji) Lukas is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation, “From Knights to Captains: The construction of nobility through masculinity and warfare in sixteenth-century France,” examines the changes in the representation of nobility in sixteen-century military literature. His research interests include the study of masculinity, warfare, religious conflict, and sexual violence.


    Speakers

    Benjamin Lukas
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 25th From Buenos Aires to Osaka: The view of the G20 from the IMF

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Patrick Cirillo, a founding member of the G7 Research Group, is Principal Assistant to the Secretary of the International Monetary Fund. Previously, he served as Deputy Chief of Operations in the IMF secretariat and Deputy Chief of Public Affairs in the IMF’s Communications Department. From 1997 to 2008, he was also the Secretary to the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-Four on International Monetary Affairs and Development (G24), which brings together the major emerging market and developing countries. Prior to joining the Fund, Patrick worked in financial markets in Europe and in academia in Canada and Europe. Patrick attended universities in Switzerland, France and Austria and is a graduate of International Relations Program at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Patrick Cirillo
    International Monetary Fund


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th The Environmental Governance Lab in Conversation with Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change, Patricia Fuller

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 201912:00PM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Join us for a conversation with Patricia Fuller, Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change. Appointed in 2018, Ambassador Fuller is working to advance Canada’s climate change plans on the international stage. The conversation will center on key themes surrounding global climate governance and the state of play in the UN climate negotiations following the recent UNFCCC COP24 meeting in Katowice, Poland and the IPCC report from October 2018. .

    The conversation will be moderated by Matthew Hoffmann, professor and co-director of the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. His research focuses primarily on global environmental governance and he is especially interested in the global response to climate change.


    Speakers

    Patricia Fuller
    Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change

    Matthew Hoffmann
    Professor and co-director of the Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th Authoritarianism and Populism in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    From the rise of Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines to Myanmar’s military dictatorship, Southeast Asia is home to several fascinating cases of authoritarianism and populism. Efforts to combat corruption and drug trafficking have become authoritarian mechanisms through which to crack down on dissent and tighten the state’s stronghold on civil societies. Do such observations point to a recent resurgence of historical trends, or are we witnessing new forms of populism and authoritarianism in the 21st century? What are the political and socio-economic factors that give rise to and sustain populism in Southeast Asia? How is authoritarianism in Southeast Asia different from, or similar to, centralized governance in other parts of the world?

    We are honoured and excited to welcome three distinguished panelists to our event:

    Professor Arne Kislenko (Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto) will discuss the regression in Thailand witnessed with the return of military government and a new king. He will also speak to the entrenchment of authoritarianism in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar/Burma. Our second panelist Petra Molnar (Research Associate. International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law) will be discussing her fact-finding trip to the Philippines in 2018, the impacts of the drug war, and more generally about human rights advocacy. Our third panelist, Irene Poetranto (PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab) will be commenting on the digital/cyber component of populism and authoritarianism, for example, Duterte’s use of social media.

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Arne Kislenko
    Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Petra Molnar
    Research Associate, International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Irene Poetranto
    PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th The Material World of Ukrainian Children during the Holodomor and What Saved Children's Lives

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Skubii’s research aims at broadening and rethinking our understanding of the Holodomor from a material perspective. She will discuss the importance of material items and commodities in saving children’s lives, both within their families and in orphanages. By focusing on children’s consumer goods, she will examine the mechanisms of distribution and allocation of consumer goods, as well as the spaces and practices of consumption by children in 1932-1933.

    Dr. Iryna Skubii is an Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture. Her research interests include economic and social history, gender studies, consumption and materiality, and history of childhood in early Soviet Ukraine. She holds a Ph.D. degree from Karazin National University (2013). In 2016, Professor Skubii was a fellow of the German-Ukrainian Commission of Historians and undertook research at Ludvig-Maximillians University in Munich. In 2016-2017, she won research grants from the Shevchenko Scientific Society in America and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. In 2017, Professor Skubii published her monograph “Trade in Kharkiv in the years of NEP (1921-1929): between the economy and everyday life.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Petro Jacyk Program's co-director, head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre

    Iryna Skubii
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Researcher, Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 27th Resettling the Borderland: State Relocation and Ethnic Conflict in the South Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 27, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central and Inner Asia Speaker Series

    Description

    Farid Shafiyev presents a study of Imperial Russian and Soviet Resettlement policies in the South Caucasus during the 19-20th centuries and their impact on the ethnic conflicts in the region, especially the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict. The book investigates the nexus between imperial practices, foreign policy, religion and ethnic conflicts. Taking a comparative approach Dr. Shafiyev explores the most active phases of resettlement, when the state imported and relocated waves of Germans, Russian sectarians and Armenian settlers into the South Caucasus and deported thousands of others. He also offers insights on the complexities of empire-building and managing space and people in the Muslim borderlands.

    Farid Shafiyev is a diplomat and scholar from Azerbaijan. He holds a PhD from Carleton University and an MPA from Harvard Kennedy School of Government as well as Bachelor of Law and Diploma in History from Baku State University. Farid Shafiyev served as ambassador of Azerbaijan to Canada and currently posted in the Czech Republic. He is author of numerous articles and op-eds.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Farid Shafiyev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 27th Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Sir Lawrence Freedman: The End of the Transatlantic Alliance? Trump, Brexit and the New World Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 27, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    This event will be webcast. Click here to watch live on February 27.

    Join us as Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King’s College, London UK discusses The End of the Transatlantic Alliance? Trump, Brexit and the New World Order.


    Speakers

    Sir Lawrence Freedman
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King's College, London UK Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20191:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 15. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th “The Chosen People Has No Choice”: Israel’s Politics of Fear, Freedom and Bad Faith

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Uriel Abulof is a Senior Lecturer (US Associate Professor) at Tel-Aviv University’s School of Political Science, Government and International Affairs, where he directs the graduate studies program. He is also a research fellow at Princeton University’s LISD / Woodrow Wilson School and at the Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace. Abulof studies the politics of fear and legitimation, social movements, existentialism, nationalism and ethnic conflicts. His recent books include The Mortality and Morality of Nations (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and Living on the Edge: The Existential Uncertainty of Zionism (Haifa University Press, 2015), which received Israel’s best academic book award (Bahat Prize). He is also the co-editor of Self-Determination: A Double-Edged Concept (Routledge, 2016) and Communication, Legitimation and Morality in Modern Politics (Routledge, 2017). Abulof is the recipient of the 2016 Young Scholar Award in Israel Studies. He is currently working on another book for Cambridge University Press on Political Existentialism and Humanity’s Midlife Crisis. His articles have appeared in journals such as International Studies Quarterly, International Political Sociology, Nations and Nationalism, British Journal of Sociology, European Journal of International Relations, Journal of International Relations and Development, Contemporary Politics, Perspectives on Politics, Society, Ethnic and Racial Studies and International Politics

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Uriel Abulof
    Tel Aviv University/Princeton University


    Sponsors

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Phonographic Visions of America: Harry Smith and Woody Guthrie

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    What is a phonographic recording? A copy, inseparable from an original sonic event? Or a representation, a ritual re-enactment, that requires the listener’s participation?

    With these questions in mind, this talk will examine two sets of recordings: Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music, compiled in the summer of 1952, and Woody Guthrie’s March 1940 recordings for the Library of Congress. Although these sets employ different representational strategies — with Guthrie using his own voice, Smith the voices and rhythms of various other people — both artists use the phonographic medium to construct a sonic “vision” of America. This talk will explore the nature of these representations and how they might lead us to re-consider phonography and its place within the cultural nexus of American modernism.

    Contact

    Don Newton


    Speakers

    Ryan Stafford
    PhD Candidate Department of English University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th THE REFUGEE AND MIGRATION COMPACTS: COOPERATION IN AN ERA OF NATIONALISM

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Please join the Global Migration Lab for another event in its speaker series examining contemporary issues and challenges in global migration governance.

    Anne Staver: “Of two minds: reasserting national control while negotiating global migration governance”

    James Milner: “Collective action in a time of populism: Everyday politics and the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees”

    Discussant: Jennifer Hyndman, Director of the Centre for Refugees Studies, York University

    Moderator: Randall Hansen, Interin Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Signed in December 2018, the Global Refugee and Global Migration Compacts are an admission that the challenges of migration are best approached through cooperation and collective action.

    The Compact on Refugees recognizes the unequal burden placed on Global South states, which host refugees, and rich Global North states, which pay to keep them in regions of origin. Recognizing that most refugees will not return home or be resettled, the Compact proposes new solidarity, development, and finance mechanisms to foster the inclusion and development of displaced people and host populations alike. While promising, displacement crises continue to proliferate, host states remain under-funded, and programming faces major delivery challenges.

    In terms of the Migration Compact, scholars have long argued that state interests are largely incompatible with attempts at global migration governance. Yet, in 2016 the International Organization for Migration became a UN agency, and the vast majority of states supported the Compact with a goal of facilitating safe, orderly, and legal migration. At the same time, right-wing parties in liberal democracies rallied against the Compact, arguing it would erode state sovereignty, and several prominent states “pulled out”.

    This panel will unpack the potential for global migration governance, responsibility-sharing, and addressing collective action problems in the face of burden-shifting, populism, and a growing desire to assert control.

    James Milner is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Carleton University. He is also currently Project Director of LERRN: The Local Engagement Refugee Research Network, a 7-year, SSHRC-funded partnership between researchers and civil society actors primarily in Canada, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon and Tanzania. He has been a researcher, practitioner and policy advisor on issues relating to the global refugee regime, global refugee policy and the politics of asylum in the global South. In recent years, he has undertaken field research in Burundi, Guinea, Kenya, India, Tanzania and Thailand, and has presented research findings to stakeholders in New York, Geneva, London, Ottawa, Bangkok, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam and elsewhere. He has worked as a Consultant for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in India, Cameroon, Guinea and its Geneva Headquarters. He is author of Refugees, the State and the Politics of Asylum in Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), co-author (with Alexander Betts and Gil Loescher) of UNHCR: The Politics and Practice of Refugee Protection (Routledge, 2012), and co-editor of Protracted Refugee Situations: Political, Human Rights and Security Implications (UN University Press, 2008).

    Anne Balke Staver is a senior researcher at the Oslo Metropolitan University, focusing on migration and integration policies. She holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Toronto and an MSc in Forced Migration from the University of Oxford. She is formerly a research fellow at the Institute for Social Research (Oslo), and has extensive experience from migration policymaking and implementation in the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration, Norwegian Police Immigration Service and the Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees (igc).

    This speaker series is supported in part by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Anne Balke Staver
    Panelist
    Senior Researcher, Oslo Metropolitan University

    James Milner
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Carleton University

    Jennifer Hyndman
    Discussant
    Director, Centre for Refugees Studies, York University


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Utopia’s Discontents: Russian Exiles and the Quest for Freedom, 1830-1930

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Over the course of the long nineteenth century, hundreds of thousands of tsarist subjects left the Russian empire and resettled in western and central Europe. There, they created new communities that they called “Russian colonies.” This talk reconstructs the utopian experiments that emerged in the “Russian colonies,” and examines how they influenced political imaginaries in Russia and in their European host societies. Providing a vivid portrait of a unique émigré milieu, the presentation also argues that the story of the colonies offers a novel perspective on one of the most classic themes in Russian history—the relationship between Russia and Europe.

    Faith Hillis is associate professor of history at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Children of Rus’: Right Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation (Cornell University Press, 2013). The recipient of research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, ACLS, Columbia, and Harvard, she is currently a fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library.


    Speakers

    Faith Hillis
    University of Chicago


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin - "Leadership: A Place for Women?"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20196:00PM - 7:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria University in the University of Toronto
    93 Charles Street West, Toronto
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    Series

    Women and Leadership

    Description

    Join us as The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, former Chief Justice of Canada, discusses “Leadership: A Place for Women?” This presentation is part of the Women and Leadership Series of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program.

    Biography
    The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin served as Chief Justice of Canada from 2000 to mid-December 2017.
    Ms. McLachlin works as an arbitrator and mediator in Canada and internationally. She brings to those forms of dispute resolution her broad and deep experience from over 35 years in deciding a wide range of business law and public law disputes, in both common law and civil law; her ability to work in both English and French; and her experience and skill in leading and consensus-building for many years as the head of a diverse nine-member court. Ms. McLachlin also sits as a Justice of Singapore’s International Commercial Court and the Hong Kong Final Court of Appeal.

    Her judicial career began in 1981 in the province of British Columbia, Canada. She was appointed to the Supreme Court of British Columbia (a court of first instance) later that year and was elevated to the British Columbia Court of Appeal in 1985. She was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia in 1988 and seven months later, she was sworn in as a Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.

    Ms. McLachlin is the first and only woman to be Chief Justice of Canada and she is Canada’s longest serving Chief Justice.
    The former Chief Justice chaired the Canadian Judicial Council, the Advisory Council of the Order of Canada and the Board of Governors of the National Judicial Institute. In June 2018 she was appointed to the Order of Canada as a recipient of its highest accolade, Companion of the Order of Canada. She has received over 35 honorary degrees from universities in Canada and abroad, and numerous other honours and awards.

    Ms. McLachlin is the author of numerous legal articles and publications, as well as a mystery novel, Full Disclosure, published in 2018.
    The 2,094 Supreme Court of Canada judgments in which she participated – of which she wrote 442 – and her legal writings and speaking, include a wide range of subjects in corporate, construction, financial services, taxation, contract, tort, other areas of business law, as well as arbitration and mediation. Her legal texts include, as lead co-author, the first and second editions (1987 and 1994) of The Canadian Law of Architecture and Engineering. It is generally recognized that the judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada during her tenure have affirmed Canada as a jurisdiction that is very supportive of arbitration.

    The former Chief Justice received a B.A. (Honours) in Philosophy in 1965 and both an M.A. in Philosophy and an LL.B in 1968 from University of Alberta. She was called to the Alberta Bar in 1969 and to the British Columbia Bar in 1971. She practised law in Alberta and British Columbia. Commencing in 1974, she taught for seven years in the Faculty of Law at the University of British Columbia as a tenured Associate Professor.


    Speakers

    The Rt. Hon. Beverley McLachlin
    Former Chief Justice of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    It is recognized that the military coups in Thailand in 2006 and 2014 were the orchestrated attempts of the anti-democratic alliance of the old powers against the rise of electoral politics. After the coups, they have tried to establish firm control through various measures, including the constitutions of 2007 and 2017 and strengthening the bureaucracy. However, little attention has been paid to the Thai military’s expansive civil affairs projects, including rural and urban development programs, mass organizations and mobilization campaigns, ideological and psychological programs. Puangthong argues that the Thai military has always paid great importance to its civil affairs projects as a political offensive to control popular politics since the counter-insurgency period. The conservatives craftily manipulated legal and moral legitimacy in order to protect and expand the army’s role beyond its combatant sphere. The entrenchment has been more apparent and aggressive since the 2006 coup. Old apparatuses were reactivated and new ones were created. Power of the army over other state agencies increased more than ever. On one hand, the military’s civil affairs projects allow the military and conservative elites to dictate the country’s long-term political direction. This potent tool, on other hand, effectively polarizes the populace deeper and thus makes democratization in the future difficult.

    Biography:
    Puangthong R. Pawakapan is Associate Professor of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Harvard University, 2018-2019. Her recent works include “The Central Role of Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command in the Post-Counter-insurgency Period,” Trends in Southeast Asia (ISEAS: Singapore 2017); “The Foreign Press’ Changing Perceptions of Thailand’s Monarchy.” Trends in Southeast Asia. (2015); State and Uncivil Society in Thailand at the Temple of Preah Vihear, (2013).


    Speakers

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Puangthong R. Pawakapan
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Book Launch for "Diasporic Media Beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Korea in a celebration of Dr. Sherry Yu’s book Diasporic Media beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles. Dr. Yu will be joined by Dr. Karim H. Karim who be the discussant for the event.

    Sherry S. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

    Karim H. Karim is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University and the director of the Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam. He is an Associate of Migration and Diaspora Studies and the Centre for European Studies at Carleton University, and cross-appointed to Carleton’s Journalism program and Institute of Comparative Studies in Literature, Art, and Culture.


    Speakers

    Karim H. Karim
    Discussant
    Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton Universty; Director, Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam

    Sherry Yu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Arts, Culture and Media, and the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE B. N. PANDEY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF INDIA

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Novetzke
    Speaker
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Democracy in Asia: Building Sustainable Institutions and Practices in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars whose work either frames contemporary global assessments of the state of democracy around the world or focuses attention directly on the political struggle now underway between democracy and authoritarianism across the Asian region. Its purpose is to bring current comparative research on the evolution of democratic institutions and practices of government into dialogue with cutting-edge conceptual work on democracy and democratization. The participants together address the challenge of maintaining domestic and international stability when countries are facing competing political imperatives generated both by globalizing capitalism and by the contemporary diffusion of systemic power.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
    2:10-2:15PM Welcoming Remarks
    RANDALL HANSEN
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    2:15-4:00PM Panel I
    LUCAN AHMAD WAY

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Are we actually in the Midst of a Democratic Recession?

    SEVA GUNITSKY
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Great Powers and the Future of Democracy

    LYNETTE ONG
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto
    Studying “China in the World” in 2019

    PHILLIP LIPSCY
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    Democracy, Financial Crises, and Economic Volatility

    MAIKO ICHIHARA
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    Understanding Japan’s International Democracy Assistance Policy

    4:00-4:15PM Break

    4:15-5:55PM Panel II

    YUSUKE TAKAGI
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan
    Democracy in Asia: The Case of the Philippines

    JOSEPH WONG
    Professor, Department of Political Science
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School
    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Japan: Asia’s First Unlikely Democracy

    DAN SLATER
    Professor of Political Science
    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies
    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan
    Indonesia: Asia’s Newest Unlikely Democracy

    SANG-YOUNG RHYU
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
    Upgrading Democracy in Korea: Resilient Consolidation and Complex Challenges

    DIANA FU
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Contention in an Illiberal Era: China under Xi Jinping

    5:55-6:00PM Closing Remarks
    TAKAKO ITO

    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    6:00-7:00PM Reception

    Event Announcement

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Discussant
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Takako Ito
    Closing Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Seva Gunitsky
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Maiko Ichihara
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

    Phillip Lipscy
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Sang-young Rhyu
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, South Korea

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor Political Science

    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies

    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan

    Yusuke Takagi
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Kyiv, Constantinople, Moscow: an Ecclesial Triangle

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20195:00PM - 6:30PM5 Elmsley Place (next to Brennan Hall on USMC Campus)
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    Description

    In the Summer and Fall of 2018, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, who possesses a primacy of honour among Orthodox worldwide, announced that he would grant autocephaly—i.e. full self-governance—to Orthodoxy in Ukraine. The Russian Orthodox Church protested, and eventually broke communion with Constantinople. Around New Year, The Orthodox Church of Ukraine, as the autocephalous body is
    officially known, was recognized by the Ecumenical Patriarch so that there are now two Orthodox Churches in the country, both claiming canonical status. The presentation will shed light on this complex theological, canonical, and political situation.

    Thomas Bremer is professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Münster, Germany.
    He is author or (co)editor of several books, among them, Eastern Orthodox Encounters of Identity and Otherness: Values, Self-
    Reflection, Dialogue (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014) and Cross and Kremlin (Eerdmans, 2013), a short history of the Russian
    Orthodox Church. His research focuses on ecumenical relations between Eastern and Western Churches, on Orthodoxy in
    Russia, Ukraine, and in the Balkans, and on churches and politics in Eastern Europe.

    For futher information on the event, please contact Dr. Brian Butcher: brian.butcher@utoronto.ca

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Thomas Bremer
    Professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Munster, Germany


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Orthodox School of Theology

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Which Alternative? Lessons from Germany's Past for a Europe in Tumult

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In the past decade, Europe has drifted in and out of crises. The Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis, and the resurgence of the far right have shaken the confidence of some of the most committed defenders of the European political project. Germany has found itself at the center of many of these issues, and its presence has often reinvigorated long-harbored global anxieties about German political power. Germany’s past, however, can teach us a great deal about both the potential and the limits of this current continental search for political alternatives. This talk will offer a set of theses on the recent influx of minorities, the faltering of the European Union, and the gradual transformation of Germany’s political landscape, including the rise of a New Right.

    Jennifer Allen is an assistant professor of modern German history at Yale University. She is working on a book titled Sustainable Utopias: Art, Political Culture, and Historical Practice in Late Twentieth-Century Germany, which charts Germany’s postwar efforts to revitalize the concept of utopia. She argues that, contrary to popular accounts, German interest in radical social alternatives had not diminished by the late twentieth century. Rather, Germans pursued the radical democratization of politics and culture through a series of modest grassroots projects. They not only envisioned a new German utopia but attempted to enact their vision, reclaiming utopian hope from the dustbin of historical ideas. In addition to the themes of utopia and anti-utopianism, Allen’s research explores the theories and practices of memory; counterculture and grassroots activism; and the politics of cultural preservation during and after the Cold War. Her work has been supported by the Volkswagen and Mellon Foundations; the American Academy in Berlin; the Institut für Zeitgeschichte; DAAD; the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego; and the Institutes for European Studies and International Studies at UC Berkeley. Allen received her Ph.D. in history from UC Berkeley in 2015. She is currently the Berthold Leibinger Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin and a visiting researcher at the Dahlem Humanities Center at the Free University in Berlin.

     


    Speakers

    Jennifer Allen
    Yale University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Natalia Roudakova is a cultural anthropologist (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007) working in the field of political communication and comparative media studies, with a broad interest in moral philosophy and political and cultural theory. She has worked as Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication, University of California in San Diego, and as Visiting Scholar in the Media and Communication Department at Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands) and in the Department of Communication at Södertörn University, Stockholm (Sweden). In 2013-2014, Roudakova was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California, where she completed her book, titled Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia which is now out with Cambridge University Press.

    Losing Pravda examines the spectacular professional unraveling of journalism in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union and its broader social and cultural effects. Roudakova argues that a crisis of journalism is unlike any other: it fundamentally erodes the value of truth-seeking and truth-telling in a society. In many ways, Roudakova tracks how a post-truth society comes into being. Russia’s case thus becomes far from unique, illuminating instead the historical and cultural emergence of phenomena such as “fake news,” misinformation (kompromat), and general distrust in politics and public life that have now begun to plague Western democracies as well. Roudakova’s account of one country’s loss of the culture of truth-seeking can serve as an important “wake-up call” for Western nations going forward.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Natalia Roudakova



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management
    University of Toronto
    105 St. George Street
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    The University of Toronto and the Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto are pleased to present a special symposium marking this year’s International Women’s Day on Friday, March 8. “Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day” will feature prominent women from various fields who will examine both advancements made by women in recent years as well as the challenges they continue to face. Among the speakers will be Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor of the University of Toronto, who will deliver the keynote speech on the careers of female academics. Other presenters will include the University of Toronto’s Vice-President, HR & Equity, Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, who will speak on the importance of women in terms of the university’s human resources, and Dr. Rachel Silvey, the Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, who will talk on women in Southeast Asia in a conversation moderated by Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin of the Department of Political Science. The Consul-General of Japan Takako Ito will focus on Japan’s various initiatives to raise the status of women such as the World Assembly of Women (WAW!) to be held in March in collaboration with Women 20 (W20). The assembled group of prominent women and their insights are certain to make this event both important and timely.

    *********************************************

    Event Program:

    3:00 – Welcoming Remarks by Dr. Louis Pauly, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    3:05 – Keynote Speech by Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor, University of Toronto; Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto

    3:20 – Panel Discussion

    Panelists:
    Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Dr. Rachel Silvey, Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Moderator: Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    3:50 – Audience Q&A

    4:00 – Adjournment

    4:00-4:30 – Networking Reception

    Speakers

    Louis W. Pauly
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    Panelist
    Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Rachel Silvey
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Takako Ito
    Panelist
    Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Sylvia Bashevkin
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Rose Patten
    Keynote
    Chancellor, University of Toronto

    Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Notes for a History of Prakrit Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE INDIA-CANADA ASSOCIATION LECTURE

    Prakrit was, along with Sanskrit and Tamil, one of the main languages of literature in premodern South Asia. It flourished in the first half of the first millennium BCE, although it continued to be cultivated for many centuries afterwards. This talk will begin by sketching the historical outlines of this tradition and then explain why it is important to corroborate, elaborate, and reflect upon its history. First, Prakrit textuality was closely connected to broader developments in the religious and expressive literatures of South Asia, and gives us a unique perspective onto those developments. Second, the many ways in which Prakrit texts defy being ‘historicized’—verses that slip in and out of anthologies, stories told again and again, works that survive only in fragments or abridgements—actually tell us something important about the historical being of literary texts.

    Andrew Ollett is a Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows. He works on the literary and intellectual traditions of premodern South Asia.


    Speakers

    Andrew Ollett
    Speaker
    Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th Zimbabwe 2019: Real Quest for Democracy or Smoke and Mirrors?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Room 108N
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    Description

    The forced departure of President Mugabe, the transition to a new ZANU-PF leadership and the aftermath of the controversial 2018 elections have altered the Zimbabwean political landscape. Initial hopes that Zimbabwe was at a possible inflection point for democracy and development have vanished with the deepening political and economic crisis, the labor strikes and the regime’s violent crackdown in January 2019. Democratic space and opportunities for inclusive development are deteriorating as a result. What can be done to protect and enhance democratic space notably for women and youth and non-violent transformations from below? To better understand the situation, Global Affairs Canada supported a CANADEM team in making an assessment in February. Two members of the team will present and discuss their key findings at the brown bag lunch.

    JULIET KIRANGWA KAYE AND JEAN-MARC MANGIN, EQUIPE UBUNTU

    Jean-Marc and Juliet are the co-partners of EquipeUbuntu, a small consulting firm providing needs assessment, strategic advice and capacity-building.

    From 2010 to 2016, Jean-Marc was the Executive Director of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, the largest national organization of Canadian researchers and scholars. After fifteen years as a public servant with the UN, international NGOs and the Canadian Government, Jean-Marc became in 2006 the executive director of CUSO, Canada’s oldest volunteer-sending NGO, and was the first executive director of the Global Call for Climate Action, a civil society initiative bringing together over 350 international organizations and networks in support of transformational change and rapid action to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Jean-Marc has lived for more than 10 years in the Global South, mostly in Africa. Jean-Marc holds a M.A. in Political Sciences from the University of Toronto.

    From 2004 to 2016, Juliet provided advice to over 400 entrepreneurs in the Greater Toronto Area in developing and executing their business plans. 83% were self-sustaining within 2 years; 8% earned over $1 million within 5 years. Prior to moving to Canada, Juliet worked with FAO and WFP in Ghana, Malawi and Zimbabwe in managing food security programs and in providing policy analysis. She has worked directly with farmers, extension services and agro-businesses as well as with policy units within the UN and local governments. Most recently, she supported private entities and consortiums achieving national food self-sufficiency goals in Guyana and Jamaica. Juliet holds a M.A. in Agricultural Economics from Makerere University in Uganda.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Juliet Kirangwa Kaye
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Jean-Marc Mangin
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Wilson Prichard
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Master of Global Affairs Associate Professor, Political Science Research Director, International Centre for Tax and Development


    Co-Sponsors

    Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th PCJ Society: CV/Resume Writing Workshop

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20192:30PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    208N
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    Description

    This CV/Resume writing workshop is open to anyone interested in touching up on their resume, or learning how to write one from scratch. A representative from U of T’s Career Centre will be coming in to give you tips and tricks to write an impressive and concise resume! Learning these techniques is especially helpful as this is a popular time to be applying for jobs and internships. You are highly encouraged to bring a copy of your resume with you to this workshop, but if you do not have one then this is a great opportunity for you to get started! Please email pcjsociety@utoronto.ca with any questions.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th Munk Graduate Student Conference “The New Economy: What’s New?”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 20199:30AM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The title of the 13th annual Munk Graduate Student Conference is “The New Economy: What’s New?” and discusses the state of the modern economy and how it will be affected by a variety of factors over the following decade. The event will feature four panels: (1) Investing in the New Economy- Latin America; (2) Migration and its effect on the New Economy; (3) Canada’s role in the New Economy; and finally, (4) Perspectives of Munk Graduate Students on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the New Economy, which will only feature graduate students. The knowledge and experience gained will be both applicable and relevant to students as they transition out of academia and begin to navigate the complexities of the current labour market.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    University of Toronto Graduate Student Union

    Master of Global Affairs Student Union

    CERES student Union

    Student Initiative Fund


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th 70 Years of Russian Musical Resistance: From Gulag Songs to Pussy Riot

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Artemi Troitsky is the leading Russian music journalist, radio host, producer, author and critic. He is the author of nine books on the history of Russian and Soviet music and youth culture, and he lectures widely around the world. Troitsky produces weekly shows for Radio Liberty and ARU.TV and regularly contributes to newspapers Novaya Gazeta, Postimees, and The Moscow Times. He is also a frequent contributor on Echo Moskvy, TV Dozhd, and BBC Russian Service.


    Speakers

    Artemi Troitsky
    music journalist and radio host


    Sponsors

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 16th A Body in Fukushima: Reflections on the Nuclear in Everyday Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 16, 20191:00PM - 5:00PMInnis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    NOTE: This event consists of three components: (1) Photo Exhibitions – March 4 to April 14; (2) A Body in a Library Performance by Eiko Otake – March 15; (3) Video Screening and Symposium – March 16. All three are free of charge. Registration is required ONLY for the the third part – Video Screening and Symposium.

    This is a multi-sited, multi-media, and multi-disciplinary event that demonstrates how art can contribute to critical reflection on the nuclearization of everyday life in our contemporary world. Since 2014 Eiko Otake and William Johnston have photographed the performer among the ruins and abandoned places that have been left in the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe of March 2011. Following a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Northeastern Japan, a massive tsunami inundated reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, resulting in meltdowns in three reactors. The Fukushima disaster is regarded as the second largest nuclear accident in history, and yet its full consequences remain temporally and spatially boundless and ultimately unknowable — a reality that Otake’s haunting bodily performances and Johnston’s striking photography make so compelling. Otake’s and Johnston’s collaborative work on Fukushima has been exhibited in major venues across the Americas and appears in Canada for the first time.

    Otake is a world-renowned, movement-based artist who performed as Eiko and Koma for more than forty years before beginning her solo performances for the project, A Body in Places. Her awards include a Guggenheim, MacArthur, Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award, and Dance Magazine Award for lifetime achievement. William Johnston is a photographer and historian whose critically acclaimed written work and photography have focused on issues of the body, sexuality, disease, the environment, and public health. The symposium accompanying the exhibitions and performance will feature presentations by leading scholars and artists working across disciplines.

    PHOTO EXHIBITIONS
    DATES: March 4 – April 14, 2019 (depending on the library hours)
    LOCATIONS:
    Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, ON
    1st floor exhibition area,and 8th floor, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library
    Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge St., Toronto, ON
    3rd and 5th floors

    CURATORS:
    Takashi Fujitani, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies
    Henry Heng Lu, Independent Curator and Founder, Call Again

    A BODY IN A LIBRARY PERFORMANCE BY EIKO OTAKE
    DATE: Friday, March 15, 5:15 – 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

    VIDEO SCREENING AND SYMPOSIUM
    * Registration is required *
    DATE: Saturday, March 16, 1:00 – 5:00 PM, followed by reception
    LOCATION: Innis Town Hall, Innis College, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON
    SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS:
    Eiko Otake, Independent movement-based performance artist
    William Johnston, Department of History, Wesleyan University

    Takashi Fujitani, Department of History and Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto
    Marilyn Ivy, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
    Tong Lam, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Katy McCormick, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University
    Lisa Yoneyama, Women and Gender Studies Institute and Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Toronto Reference Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department, University of Toronto

    School of Image Arts, Ryerson University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 19th Japan’s Role in the Global Governance of Non-Proliferation and Outer Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 19, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Summary:
    Japanʼs presence in the global rule-making process was timid, to say the least, during the Cold War. Although it presented itself as a victim of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan was also under the extended nuclear deterrence of the United States. However, recent initiatives such as the Arc of Freedom and Prosperity or Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision brought Japan into a stage of global governance. This lecture will discuss the cases of global governance on nuclear non-proliferation and outer space.

    Japan faces a non-proliferation challenge from North Korea and a space threat from China. Taking initiatives in these domains is essential to Japanʼs security as well as to maintaining global order for peaceful use of nuclear and space technologies. As a tech-advanced country, Japan plays a certain role in providing ideas and technical support for both domains. These cases are good examples to show how Japan sees itself as a player in the global governance structure.

    Speaker Biography:
    Kazuto Suzuki is Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics at the Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan. He graduated from the Department of International Relations, Ritsumeikan University, and received a Ph.D. from Sussex European Institute, University of Sussex, England. He has worked in the Fondation pour la recherche stratégique in Paris, France, as assistant researcher and as Associate Professor at the University of Tsukuba from 2000 to 2008. Suzuki also spent one year at Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University from 2012 to 2013 as a visiting researcher. He served on the Panel of Experts for Iranian Sanction Committee under the United Nations Security Council from 2013 to July 2015. He was formerly the President of the Japan Association of International Security and Trade.

    His research focuses on the conjunction of science/technology and international relations; subjects including space policy, non-proliferation, and export control and sanctions. His recent work includes Space and International Politics (2011, in Japanese, awarded the Suntory Prize for Social Sciences and Humanities), Policy Logics and Institutions of European Space Collaboration (2003) and many others.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Kazuto Suzuki
    Speaker
    Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics, Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan

    Louis W. Pauly
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Chair
    CIGI Chair, Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Professor, Political Science, University of Waterloo

    Founder, Japan Futures Initiative


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 20th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 20, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Join us as Professor Sánchez-Cuenca, discusses “Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises.” This presentation is part of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series.

    Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences at Carlos III University of Madrid. He has written extensively on political violence, terrorism, theory of democracy, and Spanish politics. His latest book is The Historical Roots of Political Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2019).


    Speakers

    Professor Ignacio Sanchez-Cuenca
    Associate Professor, Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences Carlos III University of Madrid



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Indigenous Intersections Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place,
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    INDIGENOUS INTERSECTIONS explores indigeneity as a category of identity with specific attention to the U.S. context. Through invited keynote lectures, panel presentations, and critical discussion inviting audience participation, this symposium interrogates the following questions: How does indigeneity intersect with race, gender, and sexuality? As significant numbers of indigenous peoples from Latin America migrate to the United States, how does indigeneity shift across the borders of settler states? How can Native Americans, Indigenous migrants, and communities of color (not mutually exclusive categories) support each other’s projects of sovereignty and decolonization?

    Invited Speakers:

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University, author of Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (2016) and The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (2003)

    Beginning with her seminal essay “Who’s the Indian in Aztlán? Rewriting Mestizaje, Indianism, and Chicanismo from the Lacandón,” Professor Saldaña-Portillo has been at the forefront of re-thinking Chicanx-Native American relations in the United States. Her most recent monograph, Indian Given, winner of the 2016 Best Book Award from the National Association of Chicano and Chicana Studies, examines the long and continued significance of British and Spanish colonial racialized notions of place.

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon, author of Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities (2011), co-editor (with Brenda Child) of Indian Subjects: Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education (2014), and author of the forthcoming Indian on Both Sides: Indigenous Identities, Race, and National Borders.

    Professor Klopotek’s pathbreaking 2011 interdisciplinary ethnography Recognition Odysseys explores the central role race plays in federal processes of tribal recognition. Turning his attention to the U.S.-Mexico border in his forthcoming monograph Indian on Both Sides, Professor Klopotek examines the continuing significance of race in determining who counts as Indigenous in the United States.

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, author of numerous volumes including Indian Blood: HIV and Colonial Trauma in San Francisco’s Two-Spirit Community (2016) and Louisiana Creoles: Cultural Recovery and Mixed Race Native American Identity (2007); editor of Obama and the Biracial Factor: The Battle for a New American Majority (2012).

    Located at the intersections of Indigenous studies, queer studies, mixed-race studies, and public health, Professor Jolivétte’s 2016 monograph Indian Blood, a Lamda Literary Award finalist, explores the long impact of colonial trauma on two-spirited, mixed-race Native people as well as possibilities for healing and decolonization. Professor Jolivétte’s varied, illustrious career has included serving as Executive Director of the American Indian Community Cultural Center for the Arts in San Francisco, the Indigenous Peoples’ Representative at the United Nations Forum on HIV and the Law in 2011, and Tribal Historian for the Atakapa-Ishak Nation from 2008-2011.


    Speakers

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor, Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor, American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Bissel-Heyd Fellowship in American Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st The Constitution of 1936 and Stalin's Turn to Mass Repressions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In her presentation, Prof. Velikanova discusses a new element in the historical picture explaining why politics shifted to mass repressions in 1937. Besides Stalin’s protracted conflict with regional party/state clans and the inflammatory role of new NKVD head Nikolai Yezhov, the dictator’s conceptualization of popular commentaries on the constitution and the results of the 1937 census could reverse his views on society and the hope that ordinary Soviets were sufficiently Sovietized. Together with international developments in the fall of 1936 that heightened Stalin’s fear of war, popular discussion of the constitution can provide the missing piece in the puzzle for why relative moderation ended and repressions expanded from former oppositionists to the officials and finally to the wider population.

    Olga Velikanova is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Texas and a former alumna of CERES. She obtained her PhD from Saint Petersburg State university. She specializes in Soviet popular opinion studies and works extensively with declassified Communist party and secret police archives. She is author of five books discussing Soviet social mobilization campaigns and popular perceptions of Soviet politics and of Lenin’s image involving historical, anthropological and political culture methods. Her last book, Mass Political Culture under Stalinism: Popular Discussion of the Soviet Constitution of 1936 (Palgrave 2018) is the first full-length study of Stalin’s Constitution, exploring the government’s goals and Soviet citizens’ views of constitutional democratic principles and their problematic relationship with the reality of Stalinism.


    Speakers

    Olga Velikanova
    University of North Texas


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd – Saturday, March 23rd Beauty, Brutality, and the Neocolonial City

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20199:30AM - 3:00PM108N, North House, University of Toronto
    Saturday, March 23, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMUniversity of Toronto
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    Description

    This two-day event brings together international scholars and critics to explore the complexity, dynamism, and significance of Manila within and beyond Asia. As a city that has experienced the multiple vestiges of empire, the disciplinary machinations of dictatorial rule, the effects an infamous “war on drugs”, and the continued realities of uneven resource distribution, Manila serves as a productive physical and ideological space to explore the dialogic nature of beauty and brutality—as these concepts intertwine in the urban repertoires of the global south. On March 22, speakers will reflect on how Manila influences their work as diaspora scholars. On March 23, renowned novelist Jessica Hagedorn will read from her most famous works, as well as converse with Lucy San Pablo Burns (UCLA), discussing her thoughts on Manila as a space for artistic and imaginative possibility. Hagedorn will also be signing books, which can be purchased through Another Story Bookshop at the venue.

    FRIDAY, MARCH 22
    108N – NORTH HOUSE, MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC POLICY,
    1 DEVONSHIRE PLACE
    Program:
    9:30 AM – 10:00 AM – Welcoming Remarks
    10:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Dialogue 1: Sensing the City
    SPEAKERS: Ferdinand Lopez (Toronto); Gary Devilles (Ateneo De Manila); Paul Nadal (Princeton); Genevieve Clutario (Harvard)
    12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – Lunch
    1:00 PM – 3:00 PM – Dialogue 2: Intimacies and the City
    SPEAKERS: Robert Diaz (Toronto); Denise Cruz (Columbia); Martin Manalansan (Minnesota); Christine Balance (Cornell); Allan Isaac (Rutgers)

    ***********************
    SATURDAY, MARCH 23
    NEXUS LOUNGE, 12TH FLOOR, OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), 252 BLOOR ST. W.
    A Reading with Noted Author Jessica Hagedorn, in Conversation with Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns (UCLA)
    Program:
    4:00 PM – 4:30 PM – Welcoming Remarks
    4:30 PM – 4:45 PM – Performance by Patrick Salvani
    4:45 PM – 6:00 PM – Reading with Jessica Hagedorn, and Conversation with Lucy Burns (UCLA)
    6:00 PM – 6:30 PM – Book Signing


    Speakers

    Christine Bacareza Balance
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies and Performance Studies, Cornell University

    Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department, University of California, Los Angeles

    Genevieve Clutario
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Harvard University

    Denise Cruz
    Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

    Robert Diaz
    Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Gary Devilles
    Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of the Filipinos Studies, Ateneo De Manila University

    Jessica Hagedorn
    Author of Toxicology, Dream Jungle, The Gangster of Love and Dogeaters; Winner of the American Book Award

    Allan Punzalan Isaac
    Associate Professor, English and American Studies, Rutgers University

    Ferdinand Lopez
    Associate Professor of English, University of Santo Tomas; an incoming PhD student in Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto

    Paul Nadal
    Post-Doctoral Research Associate of American Studies, Princeton University

    Martin Manalansan
    Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Minnesota


    Co-Sponsors

    School of Cities, University of Toronto

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th Sex and Power in Occupied Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Based on my book Sanitized Sex, the talk will discuss the various attempts to sanitize sexuality through the regulation of prostitution, venereal disease and intimacy in occupied Japan after World War II. It features sexuality as key element in issues of security, health and morale during the occupation period. In doing so it underscores how the sanitization of sex was a male-dominated struggle for control and authority in the clash of two competing patriarchal, imperial powers: Japan and the United States. That said, the talk is more than a study of the postwar sexual encounters. An analysis of sex, its regulation and negotiation between occupiers and occupied sheds new light on the everyday experiences and asymmetries of power in occupied Japan, the legacies of the Japanese Empire, and the particularities of postwar U.S. imperialism in the postcolonial formation of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Robert Kramm is a post-doctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and affiliated with the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong. He holds a doctoral degree in history from ETH Zurich and received his B.A. and M.A., also in history, from the University of Erfurt.


    Speakers

    Robert Kramm
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities, Department of History, University of Hong Kong

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th What US Officials Said about NATO Enlargement, What the Russians Heard, and the Problem of Value-Complexity

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20195:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The fierce scholarly and practitioner debate on the question “did the United States promise not to enlarge NATO” has taken our attention away from an important policy problem and one newly released U.S. and Russian historical materials highlight very well: how do leaders manage tradeoffs and uncertainty? Pursuing one set of interests can harm the achievement of other interests. And sometimes, policies take a while to form, adding to uncertainty in relations among countries. American University Professor James Goldgeier will explain why Bill Clinton and his top advisers convinced themselves that they could both enlarge NATO and keep Russia on a Western-oriented track, despite Boris Yeltsin’s warnings to the contrary, and he will discuss the implications of their approach for U.S.-Russia relations today.

    James Goldgeier is Visiting Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Professor of International Relations at the School of International Service at American University, where he served as Dean from 2011-17. He holds the 2018-19 Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-Russia Relations at the John W. Kluge Center. Previously, he was a professor at George Washington University, where from 2001-05 he directed the Elliott School’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. He also taught at Cornell University, and has held a number of public policy appointments, including Director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council Staff, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Henry A. Kissinger Chair at the Library of Congress. In addition, he has held appointments or fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Hoover Institution, the Brookings Institution, and the Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation. He is past president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, and he co-directs the Bridging the Gap project, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He has authored or co-authored four books.


    Speakers

    James Goldgeier
    American University and Council on Foreign Relations



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 26th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series
    Deputy Minister Stephen Lucas: Governing Minerals for Renewable Energy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 26, 20199:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Renewable energy is the best means of bringing global emissions within the required 1.5 degrees limit. While this is an imperative technical response to climate change, the full cost of renewables needs investigation. Specifically, the value chains of minerals used to produce renewable energy remains hidden.

    Join us for a keynote presentation from Dr. Stephen Lucas, Deputy Minister, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Government of Canada followed by a discussion with Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Office of the Auditor General of Canada on the governance of the mineral supply chain for renewable energy.

    Speakers:

    Dr. Stephen Lucas was appointed Deputy Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) on January 23, 2017. As Senior Associate Deputy Minister (Climate Change) from June 2016 to January 2017, Dr. Lucas led ECCC activities in support of the development and adoption of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Before joining ECCC, Dr. Lucas was Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet for Plans and Consultations and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Privy Council Office. From 2013 to 2014, he was Assistant Secretary, Economic and Regional Development Policy, at the Privy Council Office.

    As Assistant Deputy Minister, Science and Policy Integration at Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) from 2009 to 2013, he was responsible for strategic policy development related to energy, mineral and forest resources, climate change and clean energy and international and intergovernmental relations. Prior to that, from 2007 to 2009, he was Assistant Deputy Minister, Minerals and Metals Sector, at NRCan, where he provided leadership on innovation, green mining and corporate social responsibility.

    Dr. Lucas started his career as a research scientist at the Geological Survey of Canada in 1988. He has a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Geological Engineering from Queen’s University and a Ph.D. in structural geology and tectonics from Brown University.

    Ms. Julie Gelfand was appointed as Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development in March 2014. Before joining the Office of the Auditor General, Ms. Gelfand held the positions of Chief Advisor at Rio Tinto Canada and of Vice-President of Environment and Social Responsibility at the Rio Tinto Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOC).

    Prior to joining IOC, Ms. Gelfand was Vice-President, Sustainable Development at the Mining Association of Canada and co-chair of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Centre of Excellence, under the federal CSR Strategy for the Canadian International Extractive Sector.
    From 1992 to 2008, she served as President of Nature Canada. She also founded and chaired the Green Budget Coalition.


    Speakers

    Dr. Stephen Lucas
    Deputy Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada
    Government of Canada

    Ms. Julie Gelfand
    Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
    Office of the Auditor General, Government of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Embedding Research Excellence: Perspectives from Sub-Saharan Africa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Governments and regional bodies across Sub-Saharan Africa are increasingly eager to support science. Regional and national policy documents and programmes reflect this enthusiasm and ambition and commitments to more resource for science, research and innovation (SRI). This is matched by rising levels of financial support from funders outside the region looking for new ways to support research that conform to Sub-Saharan African aspirations and needs.

    Behind this consensus about the need to support SRI however lays some stark differences about the criteria that should be used to evaluate the contributions of science. In this talk I will reflect on recent research and focus on the complex array of expectations about what science can and should deliver. National, regional and international funders adopt a variety of sometimes ambiguous rationales about the pathways through which these contributions from science funding are delivered, with distinctions between ‘basic’ and ‘applied’ science failing to provide significant clarity. On the one hand there is a desire for excellent research as sanctioned by academics acting with high degrees of autonomy and, on the other, for science that is deeply embedded in local social and policy realities and whose success or failure requires input and evaluation by a much broader array of stakeholders.

    These aims are not impossible to resolve, but reconciliation is far from straightforward and significant policy and communication rifts make it difficult to achieve. The talk will identify a number of relatively straightforward ways in which the process of supporting science can be improved and enhanced so that science contributes to multiple agendas. However, it will also highlight more fundamental challenges which confront science funders across the globe related to the ways in which support for research is framed and provided.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Joanna Chataway
    Head of Department at UCL STEaPP (Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Defending the Liberal Revolution in France: The Legislative Assembly and the Demise of the Constitution of 1791

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    On 1 October 1791, the French Legislative Assembly convened in Paris, initiating the constitutional regime that revolutionaries in 1789 had committed themselves to establish. Within a year, however, the monarchy had been overthrown, and the Constitution of 1791 had collapsed. In explaining the French Revolution’s transition during this period from a moderate to a more radical phase, historians have emphasized factors such as the importance of the Flight to Varennes, the rise of the popular movement, and the dynamic of revolutionary discourse. Such explanations have tended to dismiss support for the constitutional regime on the eve of its demise as marginal, insincere, or irrelevant. Yet the advent of republican democracy in France should not completely eclipse the significance of the constitutional monarchy’s failure. This paper suggests that debate within the Legislative Assembly reveals not conflict between republicans and royalists, but a more nuanced struggle between differing conceptions of the revolution, the location of national sovereignty, and the importance of a written constitution. For example, the opposition of some deputies to the declaration of war against Austria on 20 April 1792 reflected determination to defend the constitution and the liberal principles it embodied. Beyond the Assembly, the paper also examines the departmental denunciations of the Paris crowd’s invasion of the Tuileries Palace on 20 June 1792. These addresses and petitions went beyond manifestations of loyalty to Louis XVI to express commitment to the ideal of constitutionalism. Thus this paper argues that there were many in France who still hoped to defend the liberal revolution of 1789, with its promise of individual liberty, property rights, and the rule of law, on the eve of a second revolution which would sweep away the Constitution of 1791.

    Bill Cormack received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario in 1992. In 1995, Cambridge University Press published his first book, Revolution and Political Conflict in the French Navy 1789-1794. Since 1998, he has been a member of the Department of History at the University of Guelph in Ontario, where he teaches modern European history. His new book, Patriots, Royalists, and Terrorists in the West Indies: The French Revolution in Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1789-1802, comes out with the University of Toronto Press in January 2019. His current research concerns the French Legislative Assembly and the demise of the Constitution of 1791.


    Speakers

    William Cormack
    University of Guelph


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Cosmogony and Literacy in the Bengali “Book of Light”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE ANNUAL BENGAL STUDIES LECTURE

    Once considered the “primordial source of all books” and a proxy for the Qurʾān itself, the Persian and Bengali versions of theNūrnāma (Book of Light) virtually disappeared from the religious landscape of contemporary Bangladesh and West Bengal. The Book of Light narrates the creation of the world by God through the body of the Muḥammad of light. This creation story played a key role in shaping the popular understanding of Islamic cosmology, language, and the significance of the written word in Bengali Islam. With this lecture, I will address the topic of vernacular literacy and multilingualism in Bengal between the 17th and 19th century through the study of the Nūrnāma tradition. A fresh look at the textual tradition that surrounded the transmission of this creation story reveals ways to conceive of vernacular Islam beyond categories of elite vs. popular, or orthodox vs. heterodox.

    Thibaut d’Hubert is associate professor in the department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations (SALC) at the University of Chicago. He published several articles in periodicals and collective volumes, and contributed entries on Bengal for Brill’s Encyclopedia of Islam, THREE. In his book titled In the Shade of the Golden Palace: Ālāol and Middle Bengali Poetics in Arakan(New York: Oxford University Press, 2018), d’Hubert studies the encounter of Persian, Sanskrit, and vernacular poetics in the courtly milieu of the frontier region between today’s Bangladesh and Myanmar. He is also the co-editor with Alexandre Papas of the volume Jāmī in Regional Contexts: The Reception of ʿAbd al-Raḥmān Jāmī’s Works in the Islamicate World, ca. 9th/15th-14th/20th (Handbook of Oriental Studies, Leiden: Brill, 2019).

    Reception to follow

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Thibaut d'Hubert
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department for the Study of Religion


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2019

  • Monday, April 1st EGL Work in Progress Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 1, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab hosts regular EGL Work in Progress Talks. The talks are an informal, interdisciplinary forum where faculty and Ph.D. students can discuss ongoing research in the field of environmental politics, policy, and governance. At these events, two presenters offer a 10-minute overview of an ongoing project to serve as a fodder for discussion. If you are interested in hearing more about this and other Environmental Governance Lab events please email eg.lab@utoronto.ca for more information.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 5th China, the War on Terror, and the Mass Internment of Turkic Minorities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Sean R. Roberts is an Associate Professor of the Practice of International Affairs and Director of the International Development Studies program at The George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Dr. Roberts is an anthropologist by training and wrote his dissertation at the University of Southern California on the Uyghurs of Kazakhstan and their interaction with China’s Uyghurs. In addition to his academic work, he has done substantial work in the field of international development, primarily in the former Soviet Union and especially in Central Asia. Dr. Roberts has published numerous articles in academic journals, edited volumes, and in policy-oriented publications, both about political development in Central Asia and about the Uyghurs. He also frequently provides commentary to major news outlets on these subjects, and he is currently writing a book on the self-fulfilling prophecy of Uyghur militancy. His most recent publication is in the Journal of Critical Asian Studies and is entitled “The biopolitics of China’s “war on terror” and the exclusion of the Uyghurs.”

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sean Roberts
    George Washington University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 12th In the Presence of the Divine: Identity and Meaning in Newar Buddhist Art

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 12, 20196:00PM - 8:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Event Series "The Newars and Their Neighbours"

    Description

    Vibrant colors and pulsating sounds of religious devotion punctuate the streets and gullies of Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley. Among the Valley’s Newar Buddhist community, art and ritual work in concert to make the divine present in the urban landscape of the city. For Newar Buddhists, art and ritual performance reinforce core philosophical principles and cultural ideals related to sacred space and ritual cosmology. This lecture examines the role of festivals and image processions in manifesting the divine in the city of Patan. The vibrant ritual festivities and artistic traditions build layers of sacred geography and Buddhist cosmology into the streets and courtyards of the city spaces. Thus, this lecture explores the creation of sacred space in the city of Patan through festivals and other celebrations to examine how the Newar Buddhist community navigates the diversity of religious experience in the Kathmandu Valley to ultimately reaffirm their own religious identity.

    Kerry Lucinda Brown, Professor of Art History at Savannah College of Art and Design, is a specialist in South Asian and Himalayan art. Her research explores the relationship between art and religious identity in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, situating Newar Buddhist art within the larger context of South Asian Buddhist heritage.


    Speakers

    Kerry Lucinda Brown
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Savannah College of Art and Design

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 26th The French Trials of Cléophas Kamitatu: Refugee Politics, Leftist Activism, and Françafrique in 1970s Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In the 1970s, the French lawyer Jean-Jacques de Félice served as defense counsel for Cléophas Kamitatu-Massamba of Congo-Zaïre, who was expelled from France in 1972 even though he had obtained political refugee status. At the request of Mobutu Sese Seko, the French Minister of the Interior had censored Kamitatu’s critical portrayal of the Mobutu regime, La Grande Mystification du Congo (published by François Maspero Press in 1970). The Kamitatu case illustrates how, even as France ratified the 1967 Protocol of the Geneva Convention on Refugees in 1971, immigration, censorship, and late Gaullist era Africa policies dominated political discussions. The attempts to censure Kamitatu’s book published by a French publisher and to deport him despite his status as political refugee show how various facets of French government engaged with international laws regulating refugees and deportation at the very time that Jacques Foccart, who had oriented France’s Africa policy since 1958, sought to integrate Congo-Zaïre into France’s sphere of influence in Africa. Kamitatu’s story thus exposes the network of Jacques Foccart as detrimental to French civil liberties, African opposition politics, and international refugee protocols alike. The chapter draws primarily on Kamitatu’s legal case files in the archives of his lawyer, Jean-Jacques de Félice. It places cause lawyering in historical perspective, promotes use of the lawyer’s archive as fertile historical method, and considers state and non-state actor networks in a common analytical framework.

    Meredith Terretta earned her PhD in African history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds the Gordon F. Henderson Research Chair in Human Rights and teaches history at the University of Ottawa. She specializes in themes of African liberation movements, legal activism, histories of refuge-seeking, and human rights. She has recently coedited African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights (Ohio University Press, 2015). Her most recent single-authored book is Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence: Nationalism, Grassfields Tradition, and State-Building in Cameroon (Ohio University Press, New African Histories Series, 2014). Her articles appear in numerous journals including The Journal of Contemporary History, The Canadian Journal of History, Matériaux pour l’histoire de notre temps, Politique africaine, The Journal of World History, Human Rights Quarterly, and The Journal of African History. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled Activism at the Fringes of Empire: Rogue Lawyers and Rights Activists In and Out of Twentieth Century Africa. She is President of the Canadian Association of African Studies.


    Speakers

    Meredith Terretta
    University of Ottawa



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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