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September 2020

  • Wednesday, September 23rd Engendering History: Gender, Sexuality, and Love in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 23, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Ashley Thompson suggests an engendering of history that bears “the potential to make history, literally and figuratively, insofar as it threatens or promises to upset established notions of the field” (2008:106). This panel takes up Thompson’s call to engender history and interrogates dominant conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love in modern Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. From texts to textiles, classrooms to forests, and wedding photos to state records, the papers focus on particular spaces and materials that vibrated with social and political intensities through the long period of the Cold War in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. The panel shows how materiality and spatiality were key aspects that shaped the ideological extremes that manifested in violence and unrest in Southeast Asia, and the panel begins its inquiries in the 1950s.

    Alexandra Dalferro – “Weaving Queer Pasts and Futures in Thailand”

    Chairat Polmuk – “Of Eros and the Forest: The Topography of Love in Lao Revolutionary Literature”

    Catriona Miller – “Sewing Patterns and Visions of Democracy: Khmer Women Organizing during Decolonization (1948 – 1952)”

    ___________________

    ALEXANDRA DALFERRO is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University. She is currently writing her dissertation about the politics and practices of sericulture and silk weaving in Surin, Thailand, and she pays particular attention to the sensory and affective dimensions of these processes. Her fieldwork was supported by the Wenner Gren Foundation and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program, and for the 2019-2020 academic year, she was a Mellon Graduate Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell. Alexandra likes to weave and to sew and to think about how craft and art intersect with daily life.

    CHAIRAT POLMUK teaches Southeast Asian languages and literature, cultural theory, and media studies at the Department of Thai, Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He received a PhD in Asian Literature, Religion, and Culture from Cornell in 2018. His doctoral project titled, “Atmospheric Archives: Post-Cold War Affect and the Buddhist Temporal Imagination in Southeast Asian Literature and Visual Culture,” received the 2018 Lauriston Sharp Prize for best dissertation.

    CATRIONA MILLER is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Her dissertation, Gendering the Cambodian State (1900 – 1970) utilizes transnational feminist methods to recast the political history of Cambodia during the transition from a French Protectorate to a neutral Buddhist nation-state. She conducted this research with generous funding from the NSEP Boren Fellowship and Center for Khmer Studies Fellowship.

    ARNIKA FUHRMANN is an interdisciplinary scholar of Southeast Asia, working at the intersections of the region’s aesthetic, religious, and political modernities. She is an associate professor of Asian Studies at Cornell University and the author of Ghostly Desires: Queer Sexuality and Vernacular Buddhism in Contemporary Thai Cinema (Duke University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Alexandra Dalferro
    Panelist
    Phd Candidate, Cornell University

    Chairat Polmuk
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Chulalongkorn University

    Catriona Miller
    Panelist
    PhD Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cornell University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Book Launch of On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 202012:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *Please RSVP to Grayson Lee at grayson.lee@utoronto.ca to receive the Zoom link*

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis features a set of ethnographic works from the peripheries of urban, regional, and transnational development in South Korea, and discusses the ways in which places can be studied in an increasingly globalized world. Engaging with the ideas of “core location,” a term coined by Baik Young-seo, and “Asia as method,” a concept with a century-old intellectual lineage in East Asia, the book explores relational understandings of place as a constellation of local and global forces and processes that interact and contradict with each other in particular ways. Each chapter also explores multiple modes of urban marginality and discusses how understanding them shapes the methods of academic praxis to further social justice causes and decolonialized scholarship. This book is the outcome of several years of interdisciplinary collaborations and dialogues among scholars based in geography, architecture, anthropology, and urban politics.

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis is available for purchase from the University of Toronto Press. Please use the following promocode: UTPLAUNCH10

    For any inquiries, please email Professor Jesook Song at jesook.song@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Hyun Ok Park
    Opening Remarks
    Sociology, York University

    Hyun Gyung Kim
    Discussant
    Institute of Korean Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

    Albert Park
    Discussant
    History, Claremont McKenna College

    Hyun Bang Shin
    Discussant
    Geography and Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Alan Smart
    Discussant
    Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

    Jesook Song (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Laam Hae (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Politics, York University

    Sujin Eom (contributor)
    Speaker
    Geography, Dartmouth College

    Hyeseon Jeong (contributor)
    Speaker
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle and Migrant Workers Centre, Victorian Trades Hall Council, Australia

    You Jeong Oh (contributor)
    Speaker
    Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin

    Seo Young Park (contributor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, Scripps College

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea and Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Global and Diasporic Military Medicine in the Republic of China, 1946 - 1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This presentation argues that the global connections and medical culture forged by diasporic WWII medical personnel was central to the survival, growth, and centrality of military medicine in postwar China and Taiwan. Established in post-war Shanghai in 1946 from a military medical complex during World War II, the main military medical institution (National Defense Medical Center NDMC) faced existential threat when its primary source of financial and logistical support from the Chinese diaspora and American aid organizations shriveled up. As the only medical center to move from China to Taiwan in 1949, the NDMC faced an uncertain future on the island. In the mid-1950s, the NDMC’s personnel developed an elaborate Cold War vision of NDMC as a center for training anti-Communist Overseas Chinese students. This vision persuaded the U.S. government to financially support the NDMC in the mid-1950s, enabling the center to become one of the three leading medical colleges on the island today. The center’s philosophy of fusing medical therapy, training, and ideology played a unique role in shaping Taiwan’s exemplary universal health care system, and left an important legacy in its fight against SARS and COVID-19.
    ______________________

    WAYNE SOON (PhD Princeton) is an Assistant Professor of History at Vassar College. He researches on how international ideas and practices of medicine, institution-building, and diaspora have shaped Chinese East Asia’s interaction with its people and the world in the twentieth century. His forthcoming book, Global Medicine in China: a Diasporic History (Stanford University Press), tells the global health histories of Chinese East Asia through the lens of diasporic medical personnel. The book argues that the Overseas Chinese were central in introducing new practices of military medicine, blood banking, mobile medicine, and mass medical training to China and Taiwan. Universal care, practical medical education, and mobile medicine are all lasting legacies of this effort on both sides of the Taiwan Straits. Dr Soon’s published and forthcoming articles can be found in Twentieth Century China, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, American Journal of Chinese Studies, and East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal.

    SHELLY CHAN is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a historian of modern China and the Chinese diaspora and the author of Diaspora’s Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration. This recent book was published by Duke University Press in 2018 and shortlisted for the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) Humanities Book Prize. Chan’s new research focuses on the history of “homegoings” involving China, Taiwan, and the diaspora in the Cold War, as well as the historical geography of Nanyang (the South Seas) in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Chan received her Ph.D. from UC Santa Cruz and taught at the University of Victoria (2009-11) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2011-20) before returning this year to her Ph.D. alma mater as a faculty member.


    Speakers

    Wayne Soon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Vassar College

    Shelly Chan
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of History, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, The Factory and The Future of the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    As discussed in his new book The Myth of Chinese Capitalism, Dexter Roberts will describe how surging income inequality, an unfair social welfare system, and rising social tensions block China’s continued economic rise with implications for companies and countries around the world. He will discuss how China is struggling to leave behind its “Factory to the World” growth model, and include its hundreds of millions of left-behind migrant workers into a more innovative, consumption-driven economy and why that means China may not become the superpower the world expects. He will also discuss how COVID-19 has exacerbated the already huge social disparities in China further complicating its ongoing economic transition and putting it at risk of falling into the middle income trap. And he will discuss how global supply chain diversification is affecting China and whether a change in U.S. presidents is likely to do anything to reduce the growing tensions between Washington and Beijing.
    ________________

    Dexter Tiff Roberts is an award-winning writer and speaker on China now serving as a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative and an adjunct instructor in political science at the University of Montana as well as a Fellow at the university’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center. Previously he was China bureau chief and Asia News Editor at Bloomberg Businessweek, based in Beijing for more than two decades. He has reported from all of China’s provinces and regions including Tibet and Xinjiang, covering the rise of companies and entrepreneurs, manufacturing and migrants, demography and civil society. He has also reported from North Korea, Mongolia and Cambodia, on China’s growing economic and political influence. Roberts’ first book, The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, the Factory, and the Future of the World, was published by St. Martin’s Press in March 2020 and he created and now publishes a weekly newsletter called Trade War. He has a BA in Political Science from from Stanford University and Master of International Affairs from Columbia University and studied Mandarin Chinese at Taiwan Normal University.


    Speakers

    Dexter Tiff Roberts
    Speaker
    Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative; Adjunct Instructor in Political Science, University of Montana

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2020

  • Thursday, October 1st Book Launch "War: How Conflict Shaped Us" by Margaret MacMillan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    From the bestselling author of Paris 1919 comes a provocative view of war as an essential component of humanity and our history. Is peace an aberration?

    The instinct to fight may be innate in human nature, but war—organized violence—comes with organized society. War has shaped humanity’s history, its social and political institutions, its values and ideas. Our very language, our public spaces, our private memories, and some of our greatest cultural treasures reflect the glory and the misery of war. War is an uncomfortable and challenging subject not least because it brings out both the vilest and the noblest aspects of humanity.

    Margaret MacMillan looks at the ways in which war has influenced human society and how, in turn, changes in political organization, technology, or ideologies have affected how and why we fight. War: How Conflict Shaped Us explores such much-debated and controversial questions as: When did war first start? Does human nature doom us to fight one another? Why has war been described as the most organized of all human activities? Why are warriors almost always men? Is war ever within our control?

    Drawing on lessons from wars throughout the past, from classical history to the present day, MacMillan reveals the many faces of war—the way it has determined our past, our future, our views of the world, and our very conception of ourselves.

    Margaret MacMillan was educated at the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford. She was a member of Ryerson University’s History Department for 25 years, Provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto from 2002 to 2007 and Warden of St Antony’s College and Professor of International History, University of Oxford from 2007 to 2017. She is a Professor of History, University of Toronto, the Xerox Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 2nd 30 YEARS OF GERMAN UNITY AND CANADIAN PARTNERSHIP: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On October 3, 1990 the two Germanys were united again after having been divided for 28 years by barbed wires, landmines, fences and the Berlin Wall.
    As we reflect on 30 years of German unity, we are reminded of an era in which a peaceful revolution tore down the Berlin Wall and swept away the repressive East German regime. It was a time that sparked astonishingly rapid progress, as the member states of NATO and the Warsaw Pact engaged in negotiations on peace and security, disarmament, confidence building, and détente.
    German unity was made possible through the support of our allies; indeed, it could not have been achieved without those allies’ commitment to multilateralism and cooperation within a rules-based order. An often overlooked aspect of this transformation is the crucial role that Canada played in shoring up international support for a reunited Germany.

    Join us for an online event on Friday, 2 October, featuring former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney in conversation with Peter Mansbridge and a panel discussion with Senator Ratna Omidvar and political scientist Alexander Reisenbichler. Our distinguished speakers will look back on a time full of hope and promise – and look forward to how Canada and Germany jointly can make a difference in today’s more polarized world.

    Participants
    • The Right Honourable Brian Mulroney, PC CC QOC, former Prime Minister of Canada
    • Peter Mansbridge, OC, former Chief Correspondent, CBC News (Moderator)
    • The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, CM Oont, Independent Senator for Ontario
    • Alexander Reisenbichler, assistant professor of political science and research coordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES) at the Munk School, University of Toronto
    With remarks by
    • Michael Sabia, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    • Sabine Sparwasser, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Canada

    Peter Mansbridge is one of Canada’s most respected and recognizable figures. For five decades, including 30 years as anchor of CBC’s The National, Peter guided Canadians through the political, economic, and cultural events that have shaped the country.
    Known for his trademark voice and unflappable on-screen presence, Peter has received over a dozen national awards for broadcast excellence, including a lifetime achievement award from the Academy of Canadian Screen and Television, where his acceptance speech gave a passionate defence of good journalism and the principle it stands for: the truth.
    Away from the news desk, he has been recognized by leading universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, and, of course, Canada. He has received 13 honorary doctorates, has been a Fellow at Yale, has lectured at Oxford, and has just finished two terms as Chancellor of Mount Allison University. He is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal and is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Brian Mulroney became Canada’s eighteenth Prime Minister in 1984, after leading the Progressive Conservative party to the largest victory in Canadian history. Re-elected four years later, he became the first Canadian Prime Minister in 35 years to win successive majority governments.
    His tenure as Prime Minister was marked by the introduction of bold new initiatives such as the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Canada-US Acid Rain Treaty and the Canada-US Arctic Cooperation Agreement, a wave of privatizations, a low inflation policy, historic tax reform, extensive deregulation, and expenditure reduction policies that continue to be the basis of Canada’s impressive economic performance today.
    Prime Minister Mulroney served as Co-Chairman of the United Nations World Summit for Children, and his government played leading roles in the campaign against apartheid in South Africa, the creation of Le Sommet de la Francophonie, the Reunification of Germany, and the first Gulf War.
    He has been awarded the honor of Companion of the Order of Canada and has received the highest recognition from numerous governments for his leadership in vital matters affecting those nations. He has also been presented with honorary degrees and awards from universities and governments at home and abroad.
    Upon resigning, Mr. Mulroney rejoined the Montreal law firm of Norton Rose Fulbright as Senior Partner.

    Ratna Omidvar is an internationally recognized voice on migration, diversity and inclusion. In April 2016, Ms. Omidvar was appointed to the Senate of Canada as an independent Senator representing Ontario. As a member of the Senate’s Independent Senators Group, she holds a leadership position as Liaison.
    Senator Omidvar is a Councillor on the World Refugee Council, a Director at the Samara Centre for Democracy, and Chair Emerita for the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council.
    Senator Omidvar was appointed to the Order of Ontario in 2005 and became a Member of the Order of Canada in 2011, with both honours recognizing her advocacy work on behalf of immigrants and devotion to reducing inequality in Canada. In 2014, Senator Omidvar received the Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in recognition of her contribution to the advancement of German-Canadian relations.

    Alexander Reisenbichler is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto and research coordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. He will be a John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellow at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University in 2021–22. His work explores the politics of housing, financial, and labour markets in advanced economies, with regional specializations in Western Europe and the United States. His current research investigates the political economy of housing capitalism in the United States and Germany from a comparative, historical perspective. His work has appeared in Politics & Society, the Review of International Political Economy, West European Politics, and Foreign Affairs. Prof. Reisenbichler received his doctorate from The George Washington University and undergraduate degree from the University of Leipzig.

    Michael Sabia is the Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto. From March 2009 to January 2020, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ), where he oversaw the organization’s strategic direction and global growth.
    Before joining CDPQ, Mr. Sabia held numerous senior positions with BCE, including President and Chief Executive Officer, Executive Vice-President, and Chief Operating Officer as well as Chief Executive Officer of Bell Canada International. From 1993 to 1999, he occupied various roles with Canadian National Railway, including Chief Financial Officer. He spent the preceding decade working as a senior official in the Government of Canada, as the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet and in senior positions in the Department of Finance.
    Mr. Sabia earned a bachelor of arts in economics and politics from the University of Toronto and holds graduate degrees in economics and politics from Yale University.
    In April 2020, Mr. Sabia was appointed as Chair of the Board of the Canada Infrastructure Bank. He serves as a member of the Canadian government’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth. He is a trustee of the Foreign Policy Association of New York and a member of the Canada-Mexico Leadership Group and the Asia Business Leaders Advisory Council.
    Mr. Sabia was appointed to the board of the Mastercard Foundation in June 2020. He is committed to community involvement and recently co-chaired the capital campaigns of Université de Montréal, Polytechnique Montréal, and HEC Montréal. Mr. Sabia is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Sabine Sparwasser studied political science with a focus on foreign relations at the Institut d’études politiques in Paris following her studies of German, French, and English literature and linguistics at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. Before embarking on her diplomatic career, she worked as a freelance journalist for German television and was Research Assistant on European integration to Prof. Joseph Rovan in Paris.
    Sabine Sparwasser has been posted to the German EC Representation in Brussels as well as the German Embassies in London and San José. She also served as Consul General in Toronto. At the German Federal Foreign Office headquarters, she held various positions in the press, public relations, and political sections before assuming the role of Deputy Spokesperson. She later served as Director of the Middle East and Maghreb Division and as Head of the Foreign Service Academy. Before coming to Canada, she was Assistant Deputy Minister for Africa, Asia, Latin America, Near and Middle East as well as Germany’s Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    Sabine Sparwasser has been Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Canada since 2017. She is married to Gary Soroka, a former Canadian diplomat, and has two children.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 6th Book Launch: Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping The Future, by John Stackhouse

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 6, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for a virtual discussion with Munk School Director, Michael Sabia, in conversation with John Stackhouse, on the release of his new book ‘Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping The Future.’

    A leading thinker on Canada’s place in the world contends that our country’s greatest untapped resource may be the three million Canadians who don’t live here.

    Entrepreneurs, educators, humanitarians: an entire province’s worth of Canadian citizens live outside Canada. Some will return, others won’t. But what they all share is the ability, and often the desire, to export Canadian values to a world sorely in need of them. And to act as ambassadors for Canada in industries and societies where diplomatic efforts find little traction. Surely a country with people as diverse as Canada’s ought to plug itself into every corner of the globe. We don’t, and sometimes not even when our expats are eager to help.

    Failing to put this desire to work, contends bestselling author and longtime foreign correspondent John Stackhouse, is a grave error for a small country whose voice is getting lost behind developing nations of rapidly increasing influence. The soft power we once boasted is getting softer, but we have an unparalleled resource, if we choose to use it. To ensure Canada’s place in the world, Stackhouse argues in Planet Canada, we need this exceptional province of expats and their special claim on the twenty-first century.


    Speakers

    John Stackhouse
    Speaker
    Author, Senior Vice-President, Office of the CEO, Royal Bank of Canada and Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Michael Sabia
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 15th European Conflicted Heritage: New Reflections on the Treaty of Trianon 100 Years in Perspective (1920-2020)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 15, 202011:00AM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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