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December 2017

  • Tuesday, December 19th Building a Better Budget Process in Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 19, 20174:00PM - 5:30PMCanadiana Gallery
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    Room CG-160
    Toronto, ON M5S 3K9
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    Description

    The City of Toronto’s 2018 municipal budget cycle is in full swing. Council’s Budget Committee has begun debating $12 billion worth of city spending based on a seemingly endless supply of financial reports compiled by staff. Making sense of the numbers is remarkably difficult, even for the closest City Hall watcher.

    To lift the veil, the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) and the U of T School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) are convening a panel that will shed light on how the annual process works and how it might be improved.
    How are budget decisions actually made? Who’s accountable? Is there meaningful opportunity for community input? What needs to change?

    Contact

    Jamila Allidina
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Shelley Carroll
    Speaker
    Toronto City Councillor for Ward 33 and former Budget Chair

    Benjamin Dachis
    Speaker
    Associate Director, Research, C.D. Howe Institute

    Joe Pennachetti
    Speaker
    IMFG Senior Fellow and former Toronto City Manager

    Riley Peterson
    Speaker
    Budget Lead, Toronto Youth Cabinet

    Gabriel Eidelman
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy & Governance, and co-founder of the University of Toronto City Hall Task Force



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Friday, January 12th Mobilizing without the Masses: Control and Contention in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 12, 20183:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    The launch of “Mobilizing without the Masses: Control and Contention in China” written by Diana Fu (University of Toronto) and published by Cambridge University Press (2017).

    Opening remarks given by Professor Randall Hansen, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs.

    “When advocacy organizations are forbidden from rallying people to take to the streets, what do they do? When activists are detained for coordinating protests, are their hands ultimately tied? Based on political ethnography inside both legal and blacklisted labor organizations in China, this book reveals how state repression is deployed on the ground and to what effect on mobilization. It presents a novel dynamic of civil society contention – mobilizing without the masses – that lowers the risk of activism under duress. Instead of facilitating collective action, activists coach the aggrieved to challenge authorities one by one. In doing so, they lower the risks of organizing while empowering the weak. This dynamic represents a third pathway of contention that challenges conventional understandings of mobilization in an illiberal state. It takes readers inside the world of underground labor organizing and opens the black box of repression inside the world’s most powerful authoritarian state.”

    To purchase the Kindle copy of the book: https://www.amazon.com/Mobilizing-without-Masses-Contention-Contentious/dp/1108430414/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1512577199&sr=8-1&keywords=diana+fu

    Author Bio:

    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of political science at The University of Toronto and an affiliate of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Fu’s research examines the relationship between popular contention, state power, and civil society in contemporary China. Her book “Mobilizing Without the Masses: Control and Contention in China,” is to be published in 2017 with Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics Series and Columbia University’s Studies of the Weatherhead East Asia Institute. It examines state control and civil society contention under authoritarian rule. Based on two years of ethnographic research that tracks the development of informal labor organizations, the book explores counterintuitive dynamics of organized contention in post-1989 China.

    Articles that are part of this broader project have appeared in Governance (2017), Comparative Political Studies (2017), The China Journal (2018), among others.

    Diana Fu graduated with distinction from Oxford University (M.Phil. in Development Studies and D.Phil in Politics), where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. Prior to joining the department, she was a Walter H. Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. She was also a Predoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Fu’s research has been supported by the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Chiang Ching Kuo Foundation, and the Rhodes Trust.

    Fu’s writing and research have appeared in The Economist, Foreign Affairs, The Washington Post, Boston Review, Nick Kristof’s On the Ground Blog (The New York Times), PostGlobal, and Global Brief.

    https://dianafu.org/

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Diana Fu
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; affiliate of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Michael Bernhard
    Inaugural Raymond and Miriam Ehrlich Eminent Scholar Chair in Political Science at the University of Florida

    Dan Slater
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

    Antoinette Handley
    Associate Professor , Chair, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 18th Uncovering China: Researching Contemporary Chinese Politics - CASSU Event with Speaker: Professor Victor Falkenheim

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 18, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) warmly invites you to the inaugural event of our Research Seminar Series – “Uncovering China: Researching Contemporary Chinese Politics” with Professor Victor Falkenheim.

    This research seminar series is brought to you by CASSU, and aims to provide a forum for students who share similar interests in Asian social, cultural, and political affairs to engage in dialogue with faculty members. We hope to provide our peers with the opportunity to better understand the practice of academic inquiry through learning about faculty-level research. In this seminar, Professor Falkenheim will speak about his experience researching contemporary Chinese politics, with a particular focus on his current research regarding migration and urbanization in China. Please join us in Room 208N of the Munk School North House on January 18th, from 4-6pm. We hope to see you there!

    Speaker Biography

    Victor Falkenheim is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science and East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto, where he has taught since 1972. Educated at Princeton (B.A) and Columbia (MA & Ph.D), Professor Falkenheim has previously served twice as Chair of the Department of East Asian Studies, as well as Director of the Joint Centre for Modern East Asia. His research interests and publications center on local politics and political reform in China. He has lectured widely in China and has worked on a number of CIDA and World Bank projects in China over the past two decades.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith


    Speakers

    Victor Falkenheim
    Professor Emeritus of Political Science and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 19th How Have the ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaped Japan-South Korea Relations?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 19, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    South Korean and Japanese citizens have become increasingly influential in shaping their bilateral relations. The society-level influence on government interactions is especially clear when a publicized bilateral issue linked to national security prompts emotional involvement of mainstream citizens. For better or worse, democratic political structures of Japan and South Korea enable the two domestic societies to perform a “watchdog” function of limiting policy options available to government officials involved in publicized bilateral interactions.

    This presentation will focus on the Japan-South Korea bilateral relations during the last decade in order to illustrate this point. In the midst of the fast-changing regional security environment during this period, the two societies started to re-evaluate and re-examine their respective national security identities of the Cold War period. Interestingly, these identity-shifts in both countries were first fueled by the changing domestic public attitude toward North Korea.

    The normative transformations initially sparked by the ‘North Korea factors’, however, also led to a ‘mutual security anxiety’ between Japanese and South Korean citizens, as they started to embrace a sense of uncertainty about the other side’s possible future trajectory as a potential threat to their own state. This societal-level mutual distrust from the last decade continues to provide a powerful ideational limit to the government-level bilateral interactions even up to today.

    Biography

    Seung Hyok Lee is currently a Lecturer at the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, and an Associate at the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs. Previously, he was a short-term Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Law, Hokkaido University, Japan, as well as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace and at the Louis Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He also worked as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Renison University College, University of Waterloo, and as a Visiting Scholar at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Dr. Lee received his doctoral degree in Political Science (International Relations) at the University of Toronto in 2011. His research interest is domestic society’s influence on publicized foreign policy issues, with specific focus on Japan and the Korean Peninsula. He is the author of Japanese Society and the Politics of the North Korean Threat (University of Toronto Press, 2016), “North Korea in South Korea-Japan Relations as a Source of Mutual Security Anxiety among Democratic Societies,” (The International Relations of the Asia-Pacific), and “Be Mature and Distinguish the ‘Forest’ from the ‘Trees’: Overcoming Korea-Japan Disputes Based on Incompatible National Historical Narratives.” (Asteion)

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Seung Hyok Lee
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto; Associate, Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th – Friday, January 26th R.F. Harney 11th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20189:00AM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, January 26, 20189:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference is now recognized as a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work. We attract a great number of proposals from various universities, not just in Canada but also the United States, South America, Europe, Asia and Africa.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    All sessions are open to the public.

    January 25th, 2018: Room 208N
    Session 1: 9:00-10:30
    Session 2: 10:40-12:10
    Session 3: 1:00-2:00

    January 26th, 2018: Room 108N
    Session 4: 9:00-10:15
    Session 5: 10:30-11:45
    Session 6: 1:00-2:15
    Session 7: 2:25-3:40

    Please note that the keynote lecture for this conference will be given by Professor Nancy Foner (CUNY) on January 25, 2018 (2:30-4:30pm).
    Please register on the Munk School events page.

    About the Speaker:
    Nancy Foner is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work has focused on the comparative study of immigration, comparing the immigrant experience in the United States and Europe as well as immigration today with earlier periods in the United States. She is the author or editor of 18 books, including In a New Land: A Comparative View of Immigration and most recently, with Richard Alba, Strangers No More: Immigration and the Challenges of Integration in North America and Western Europe.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Racialization in an Era of Mass Migration: Black Migrants in Europe and the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20182:30PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A comparative analysis of black migrants and their children in Western Europe and the United States points to the complex, and sometimes surprising, ways that the social, political, and demographic contexts and historical developments on the two sides of the Atlantic influence the nature and impact of racial boundaries and barriers that play such a significant role in their lives.

    About the Speaker:
    Nancy Foner is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work has focused on the comparative study of immigration, comparing the immigrant experience in the United States and Europe as well as immigration today with earlier periods in the United States. She is the author or editor of 18 books, including In a New Land: A Comparative View of Immigration and most recently, with Richard Alba, Strangers No More: Immigration and the Challenges of Integration in North America and Western Europe.

    This event also serves as the keynote lecture for our R.F. Harney 11th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (January 25-26, 2018).


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Silent Cities: Rachel Carson and the Imagination of U.S. Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caroline Holland
    PhD Candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Feeding France’s Outcasts: Rationing in Vichy’s Internment Camps, 1940-1944

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.


    Speakers

    Laurie Drake
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Who is Indigenous Here? The Rising Stakes of Recognition in Indonesia

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In Indonesia, as in other parts of Asia, the concept of indigeneity forged in white settler colonies is an awkward fit. Arguably, everyone is indigenous, or no one is indigenous. Nevertheless, discourses of indigeneity have taken hold. In India and the Philippines, contemporary concepts of indigeneity map onto colonial categories used to distinguish peasants from tribes. Whereas, in Indonesia, the Dutch colonial power did not divide the population in this same way, making recognition especially problematic. Yet the stakes of defining who qualifies as indigenous in Indonesia have risen in the past decade. The government has passed numerous regulations, which recognize the existence of distinct “customary communities” and enable these communities to hold land communally. Donors hope indigenous people with tenure security will conserve forests and mitigate climate change. This is a moment of opportunity and risk, as identity displaces visions of social justice based on principles of land-to-the-tiller and common citizenship.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tania Li
    Speaker
    Tania Murray Li teaches Anthropology at the University of Toronto, where she holds the Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy and Culture of Asia.

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2018

  • Friday, February 9th Sport and the French: An Erratic Trajectory from Du Guesclin to Coubertin

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 9, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.

    Pierre de Coubertin’s revival of the ancient Olympics was part of his larger program to reform the French educational system in imitation of the English model, i.e., to include physical education and sport as part of the curriculum. His initiative fell on deaf ears and for many decades thereafter French schools—and French people generally—continued to regard participation in sport as foreign to their mission and to their train de vie. This reluctance was, however, at odds with a tradition that had lasted for several centuries. In the Middle Ages and up to about 1650 the French both regarded themselves and were regarded by others as being among the best athletes in Europe. They were credited with having devised the knightly tournament; they were avid jousters; playing tennis was their obsession; they seem to have invented golf and perfected pall mall. The earliest biographies of the great French knights, from Guillaume le Maréchal to Bayard, all insert a section relating their subjects’ youthful sports achievements (Du Guesclin is taken here as emblematic of French feudal chivalry). From Charlemagne to Louis XIII most of the kings were keen athletes, but during the 16th and early 17th centuries sport on the personal level began to be removed from the French agenda.

    The focus of this talk will be to elucidate and understand the manifestations, disappearance, and reappearance of sport in France, from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, why it fell into disfavour in the 16th and 17th centuries, to be replaced by other forms, not simply of leisure activity but of purposeful pursuits. I will be drawing on a variety of sources: biographies, essays, rule books, polemical treatises, and purely “literary,” imaginative texts.

    Prof. John McClelland

    Professor Emeritus, Department of French, and Distinguished Senior Fellow, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

    1993-2003, Associated Professor, Faculty of Physical Education and Health (now Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education)

    Visiting Professor, Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance (Université de Tours, France; University of California at Santa Barbara; Université de Rennes II (France), chaire de littérature du XVIe siècle; Institut für Sportwissenschaften, Georg-August Universität, Göttingen (Germany).

    Co-General Editor for the 6-volume Bloomsbury Cultural History of Sport (forthcoming 2016), with special responsibility for vols. 1, 2, and 3 (Antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance).

    Author/co-editor of four books on French literature and sport, including Body and Mind: Sport in Europe from the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (2007) and Sport and Culture in Early Modern Europe/Le sport dans la civilisation de l’Europe pré-moderne (2009).

    Author of over 60 articles and book chapters on French literature, music, rhetoric, and sport, most recently (since 2014) ” Manuscrit et imprimé : survivances, interférences 1470-2007 : Les deux textes de Montaigne,” “Redefining the Limits: Sport in the Age of Galileo and the Scientific Revolution,” “Sport and Scientific Thinking in the Sixteenth Century: Ruling Out Playfulness,” “Early Modern Athletic Contests: Sport or not Sport,” and “Pantagruel et Gargantua, essais d’autofiction.”


    Speakers

    John McClelland
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Temple Heritage of a Chinese Migrant Community: Movement, Connectivity, and Identity in the Maritime World

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:

    This presentation examines the spread of Chinese temples associated with the veneration of Ruan and Liang buddhas from Sihui County in Guangdong Province, China, through Southeast Asia to the Chinatown in Kolkata, India. Ruan Ziyu and Liang Cineng were followers of the sixth Chan patriarch Huineng (638–713) and are believed to have attained enlightenment and become buddhas during the Song dynasty (960-1279). In the thirteenth century temples dedicated to these two Chinese buddhas were established in the Sihui County. With the migration of people from the region in the nineteenth century, the belief in the two buddhas and the temples associated with them spread to present-day Malaysia and India. These Ruan-Liang temples in foreign settings functioned as religious sites as well as community spaces and heritage markers. By tracing the spread (and evolution) of the Ruan-Liang belief and examining the communal function of the temples through the use of photographs, this paper analyzes the relationship between migration and the diffusion of Chinese religious traditions, the role of temples in the preservation of sub-dialect identity, the mixing of Chinese and local ideas and histories, and the intimate maritime connections between China, Southeast Asia, and India in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century.

    Biography:

    Tansen Sen is Professor of history and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He specializes in Asian history and religions and has special scholarly interests in India-China interactions, Indian Ocean connections, and Buddhism. He is the author of Buddhism, Diplomacy, and Trade: The Realignment of Sino-Indian Relations, 600-1400 (2003; 2016) and India, China, and the World: A Connected History (2017). He has co-authored (with Victor H. Mair) Traditional China in Asian and World History (2012) and edited Buddhism Across Asia: Networks of Material, Cultural and Intellectual Exchange (2014). He is currently working on a book about Zheng He’s maritime expeditions in the early fifteenth century and co-editing (with Engseng Ho) the Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, volume 1. He has done extensive research in India, China, Japan, and Singapore with grants from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the Japan Foundation, the American Philosophical Society, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (Singapore). He was the founding head of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center in Singapore and served on the Governing Board of the Nalanda University.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Tansen Sen
    Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Urban Regeneration in Detroit: Examining affordable housing issues and the openings for producing just spaces

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Julie Mah
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 28th The Director's Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) warmly invites you to the second event of our Research Seminar Series – “The Director’s Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema” with Professor Takashi Fujitani.

    This research seminar series is brought to you by CASSU, and aims to provide a forum for students who share similar interests in Asian social, cultural, and political affairs to engage in dialogue with faculty members. We hope to provide our peers with the opportunity to better understand the practice of academic inquiry through learning about faculty-level research. In this seminar, Professor Fujitani will speak about his experience researching the history of the Asia-Pacific region, with a particular focus on his interest in cinema and his inter-disciplinary approach to history and film in the context of Asian Studies. Please join us in Room 208N of the Munk School North House on February 28th, from 3-5pm. We hope to see you there!

    Speaker Biography

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). A graduate of UC Berkeley, Professor Takashi Fujitani came to the University of Toronto from the University of California, San Diego, where he was a professor of modern Japanese history for two decades. He has held numerous grants and fellowships, including from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Stanford Humanities Center, and Social Science Research Council. He is also editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press). Much of his past and current research has centered on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, gender and cultural production in the Asia-Pacific, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2018

April 2018

May 2018

  • Friday, May 25th Falkner lectures - hold

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 25, 20188:00AM - 8:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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