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April 2021

  • Tuesday, April 20th Canada's Quantum Internet: Prospects and Perils

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 20, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Quantum information science harnesses the strange properties of quantum physics to perform new kinds of communication and computation. A future internet that uses quantum networks and quantum computers has the potential to enable many new applications for governments and civil society. Canada has emerged as a leader in quantum information science, and academic and commercial labs are actively experimenting with quantum networks. Yet with any great technological promise there is also danger. Architects of the classical internet did not anticipate the crises of disinformation, cybersecurity, and surveillance that plague global networks. As we look toward a possible future quantum internet, what risks and challenges should we anticipate? How can Canada best position itself to take advantage of its own potential for innovation in quantum technology?

    This panel brings together experts to discuss the political, economic, and scientific implications of quantum communications, for Canada and the world.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Francesco Bova
    Associate Professor, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Anne Broadbent
    Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Ottawa

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Christoph Simon
    Professor and Associate Head, Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 21st Book Launch: Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 21, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    For the last few decades, the dominant growth model has been to focus on technological innovation. Yet, while a small number of cities and regions have benefited, many other communities have struggled. In his latest book, Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World, Dan Breznitz sets out to challenge this model and sets out how these communities might succeed. He argues that by understanding the changed structure of the global system of production and then using those insights to enable communities to recognize their own advantages, cities and regions can foster surprising forms of specialized innovation.

    On April 21, join us as Dan Breznitz sits down to discuss his new book with Ludwig Siegele, US Technology Editor at The Economist.

    Innovation in Real Places is currently available as an ebook and will be available at local bookstores, as well as from Indigo and Amazon, on April 17. You can find links to purchase at Oxford University Press.


    Speakers

    Dan Breznitz
    Speaker
    Professor and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies, and Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Ludwig Siegele
    Moderator
    US Technology Editor, The Economist



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 22nd – Friday, April 23rd Centre for South Asian Studies Graduate Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 22, 202110:00AM - 4:20PMOnline Event, Online Event
    Friday, April 23, 202110:00AM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The first ever graduate symposium in contemporary South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto was conceived of as a platform for students engaging in critical research connected to South Asia. As the pandemic disrupts our societies, it serves as a stark reminder of the importance of social relations and the need to transform the “normal.” Presenters in the conference draw our attention to a range of lenses to observe and imagine possibilities within history, religion, politics and technology. We invite students, faculty, professionals, and practitioners of South Asian Studies from across geographies to engage with and learn about emerging research in the field. We are immensely proud of the team at South Asian Studies that brought this event together and we wish all of our brilliant participants good luck with their presentations and academic journeys.

    Asmita Bhutani, PhD student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and Centre for South Asian Studies
    Sarah Alam, PhD student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and Centre for South Asian Studies
    (Co-Chairs of the CSAS Graduate Symposium 2021)

    ***Follow the link below to view the Symposium Program***

    PLEASE NOTE: The registration for the Keynote Address is conducted separately from the registration for the CSAS Graduate Symposium. Follow the link below to register for the Keynote Address via Zoom and register for the Symposium via Eventbrite OR copy/paste the URLs below in your web browser:

    * Register for the Keynote Address: https://bit.ly/3tdiMGH

    * Register for the Symposium: https://csasgradsymposium2021.eventbrite.ca

    * For further information: https://uoft.me/CSASGrad21

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 22nd Experiments in Skin: Race and Beauty in the Shadows of Vietnam

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 22, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Experiments in Skin: Race and Beauty in the Shadows of Vietnam (Duke University Press, 2021) examines the afterlife of the Vietnam War, and its continued impact on our understanding of race and beauty. Framing skin as the site around which these ideas have been formed, materially and metaphorically, the book considers the work of wartime scientists in the U.S. Military Dermatology Research Program, who attempted to alleviate the environmental and chemical risks to soldiers’ bodies, while helping to shore up the widespread use of these same chemicals, alongside the labors of women in contemporary Vietnam, who continue to struggle to remediate war’s biochemical effects. By foregrounding the histories of US militarism, biomedical investigations, chemical warfare, consumer culture and the bodies of U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers, prisoners, and civilians who have been the subjects of research and remediation, Experiments in Skin advances a transpacific theory of aesthetics and politics critical to our understanding of colonial modernity and the lives lived in its shadows.

    Speaker Bios:

    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU (presenter)
    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu is Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU. She is the author of Experiments in Skin and of The Beautiful Generation: Asian Americans and the Cultural Economy of Fashion (Duke UP, 2011), and co-editor of the anthologies Fashion and Beauty in the Time of Asia, Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America, and Technicolor: Race and Technology in Everyday Life. At NYU, she currently serves as the faculty coordinator for the Prison Education Program’s multi-year collaborative research project on “Debt and Incarceration” (https://wp.nyu.edu/nyu_debt_project/).

    Matthew Farish, Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T (panelist)
    Matthew Farish is Associate Professor of Geography and Associate Chair, Undergraduate at the University of Toronto. He teaches courses in cultural and historical geography, and studies the militarization of the planet by the United States during the middle decades of the twentieth century. He is finally nearing completion of a co-authored history of the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and is drawing together a collection of essays on US military climate laboratories, survival schools, and proving grounds.

    Edward Jones-Imhotep, Associate Professor and Director, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, U of T (panelist)
    Edward Jones-Imhotep is a historian of the social and cultural life of machines. He received his PhD in History of Science from Harvard University and is Director of the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IHPST). He is a co-founder of Toronto’s TechnoScience Salon, a public forum for humanities-based discussions about science and technology. His research deals with topics ranging from the history of music studios and artificial life to space technologies and the technological geographies of islands. But his work is particularly interested in histories of technological failure — breakdowns, malfunctions, accidents — and what they reveal about the place of machines and the stakes of machine failures in the culture, politics, and economics of modern societies. His book, The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press), won the Sidney Edelstein Prize. His current book project, Unreliable Humans/Fallible Machines, examines how people from the late-18th to the mid-20th centuries understood machine failures as a problem of the self — a problem of the kinds of people that failing machines created, or threatened, or presupposed.

    Elizabeth Wijaya, Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies, Graduate Faculty, Cinema Studies Institute and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, U of T (panelist)
    Elizabeth Wijaya is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and a Graduate Faculty at the Cinema Studies Institute and the Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. She was a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities). She is a co-founder of E&W Films and an Associate Producer of Taste (dir. Le Bao, Special Jury Prize, Berlinale 2021).

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu
    Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

    Matthew Farish
    Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T

    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Associate Professor and Director, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, U of T

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies, Graduate Faculty, Cinema Studies Institute and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, U of T



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 23rd Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #4: Student Life at Munk One

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 23, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Community is at the heart of the Munk One Program.

    The smallest of the One programs, learn how Munk One students benefit from small class sizes, a dynamic student life, mentorship opportunities, and a close connection to the Munk School community including graduate students, faculty and distinguished fellows who come from public service, private firms and the non-profit world.

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 26th A Conversation with Bob Rae

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 26, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Bill Graham Centre presents: A Conversation with Bob Rae

    Join Canada’s Ambassador to the UN to discuss events in Myanmar and other global hotspots.

    Appointed in 2020 as the Canadian Ambassador to the United Nations, Bob Rae has had an extensive career in politics. He served as Premier of Ontario in 1990, interim leader of the federal Liberal Party in 2011, and as Canada’s Special Envoy on Humanitarian and Refugee Issues (then called the Special Envoy to Myanmar) in 2017.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 27th Local Implications of a National Housing Strategy: The Case of Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 27, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Canada is facing a distinctly urban housing crisis. After decades of relative disengagement, federal and provincial governments are now working to manage the housing crisis. The 2017 National Housing Strategy (NHS) represents a potentially substantive shift not only in the degree of governmental engagement in housing development and affordability, but also in the role of municipalities and communities.

    This graduate fellow presentation will examine the implications for Toronto of recent national re-engagement in housing policy. It will analyze major elements of the National Housing Strategy, assess how it differs from previous housing policy efforts, and explore the new policy tools and approaches the federal government is using to engage local partners in the development and management of new housing stock. It will discuss the implications of this new approach for managing the country’s worsening urban housing crisis and for empowering municipalities and local communities in the process.

    Speaker

    James Ankers is the 2020-2021 Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Toronto and his research focuses on Canadian housing policy, particularly the relationship between housing, the welfare state, and social policy.

    Contact

    Piali Roy
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    James Ankers
    James Ankers is the 2020-2021 Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th Ageing and Later Life Caregiving Arrangements in Urban India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 20219:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Manipal Centre of Humanities meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    This lecture will be examining how ageing experiences, intergenerational relationships, and eldercare are shaped in a globalized India. Although, the law emphasizes on the role of the family to provide later life care, nonetheless, increasingly eldercare is becoming market (private companies providing a host of caregiving services to the older adults of urban India) oriented. Additionally, post the pandemic, virtual care has emerged as a strong option for later life care. Against this backdrop, this lecture will highlight how family care, virtual care and market-based care determines ageing experiences in urban India.

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay’s main research areas are Medical Sociology and Social Gerontology. Her work analyzes the intersections between health, cultural practices, laws, and policies among older adults. Additionally, her work deals with questions related to women and infant health in India.
    _______________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Naisargi Dave
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th The Secret Pleasures of a Migrant Dictionary

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 202110:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    This paper will look at a tiny portion of Benyamin’s Aadujeevitham (Goat Days, trans. Joseph Koyipally) commercially the most successful of Malayalam novels and a recipient of a number of literary awards. In the said portion, the migrant protagonist who finds himself faced with a foreign language compiles a dictionary of the words that he has learnt so far in his unforeseeably strange experience in the Arabian Gulf. The paper reads into the entries of this dictionary to speak about how migration produces a rent in the public sphere and invests it with zones of discrete communitarian pleasures.

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil is interested in the cultural dimensions of the migration to the Arabian Gulf from the south Indian state of Kerala. His papers on various aspects of the cultures of Gulf migration have appeared on various platforms including academic journals. Shafeeq received his PhD in Cultural Studies from the English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.
    ___________________________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Srilata Raman
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th The End of Travel: Time to Revisit Mass Tourism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Long before COVID-19 choked off flights, the planet was suffocating from the rise of mass tourism and the decline of travel. Post-pandemic, we need a new way to visit ancient relics and living cultures without crowding ourselves out. A look at the economics and sociology of mass tourism and alternative travel — scalability, sustainability and diminishing returns.

    About our Speaker

    Martin Regg Cohn is a political columnist for the Toronto Star. A foreign correspondent for 11 years, he ran the Star’s Middle East and Asia bureaus, reporting from more than 40 countries — from Afghanistan to Yemen. He was later Foreign Editor and a world affairs columnist. Nominated five times for the National Newspaper Award, he also received an Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada fellowship to research Islam in Indonesia, and won the Amnesty International Media Award for his coverage from Sudan.

    A Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, he is also a Visiting Practitioner in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University, and delivered lectures for New York Times Journeys on trips to Iran, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan.


    Speakers

    Martin Regg Cohn
    Speaker
    Political Columnist, Toronto Star Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science Associate Director, Global Engagement, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 29th The Waiting Dissolve: Abrar Alvi's Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (1962)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 29, 20219:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    Black and white Hindi cinema–from the time of independence (1947) to the emergence of colour (early 1960s)–can be studied for a distinct and fully-realized aesthetic of shadows, stark contrasts, grey tonalities and spatializations of the frame. Indeed, the camera displays an autonomy from the expressed or stifled desires of characters or plot points. Such a camera has true freedom moving respectfully and attentively into secret spaces that can be playful, intimate, inviting, lingering, transgressive and melancholic by turns and often within the same movement. It innovates in the private, unhurried ardency of light and shade, as this talk demonstrates with reference to Abrar Alvi’s Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (Master, Mistress and Servant, 1962).

    Gayathri Prabhu is Associate Professor at the Manipal Centre for Humanities and holds a doctoral degree in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is the author of four novels, a memoir and a novella in prose poetry. She is also the co-author (with Nikhil Govind) of Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). She works with mental health advocacy and is the Coordinator of the Student Support Centre, a psychotherapy service for students in Manipal.

    ___________________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Gayathri Prabhu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Rijuta Mehta
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 29th Panel Discussion: The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 29, 202110:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited to the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to this panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.

    * The series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities are posted above on our events website. Please look up the event titles below on our website and register for the ones you would like to attend.

    April 28, 9:00 – 10:00 am | Ageing and Later Life Caregiving Arrangements in Urban India (Speaker: Jagriti Gangopadhyay)
    April 28, 10:30 – 11:30 am | The Secret Pleasures of a Migrant Dictionary (Speaker: Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil)
    April 29, 9:00 – 10:00 am | The Waiting Dissolve: Abrar Alvi’s Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (1962) (Speaker: Gayathri Prabhu)

    ________________________

    Nikhil Govind joined the Manipal Centre for Humanities after completing his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include modern Indian literature and film. He is the author of Between Love and Freedom: The Revolutionary in the Hindi Novel (Routledge, 2014), Inlays of Subjectivity: Affect and Action in Modern Indian Literature (Oxford, 2019), and (with Gayathri Prabhu), Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). He has been Head of the Manipal Centre of Humanities since 2015.

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay’s main research areas are Medical Sociology and Social Gerontology. Her work analyzes the intersections between health, cultural practices, laws, and policies among older adults. Additionally, her work deals with questions related to women and infant health in India.

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil is interested in the cultural dimensions of the migration to the Arabian Gulf from the south Indian state of Kerala. His papers on various aspects of the cultures of Gulf migration have appeared on various platforms including academic journals. Shafeeq received his PhD in Cultural Studies from the English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.

    Gayathri Prabhu is Associate Professor at the Manipal Centre for Humanities and holds a doctoral degree in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is the author of four novels, a memoir and a novella in prose poetry. She is also the co-author (with Nikhil Govind) of Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). She works with mental health advocacy and is the Coordinator of the Student Support Centre, a psychotherapy service for students in Manipal.


    Speakers

    Nikhil Govind
    Panelist
    Associate Professor and Head, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Gayathri Prabhu
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 30th Seeing China and the Asia-Pacific from India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 30, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    With their shared and yet diverged colonial and postcolonial experiences, both China and India have embarked on their own modernizing and state-building projects after World War II. From a brief hope of solidarity in the 1955 Bandung Conference to repeated border conflicts, and from postwar developmentalism to neoliberal market reforms, the two self-assured Asian giants have entangled with one another in numerous ways. Today, as China and India seem to drift further apart from each other under the rhetoric of the “New Cold War,” what does it mean to talk about South-South relations in research, activism, and policy-making in the context of China and India? How do scholars and intellectuals from or working on India view China and the changing Asia-Pacific order? This panel brings together scholars and intellectuals from a variety of backgrounds to engage these urgent questions.
    ____________________________________

    Dr. Uday Balakrishnan, 70, is a former Indian civil servant, newspaper columnist and public intellectual. He retired from the Government of India as Member of the Postal Services Board & Chairman, Investment Board of the then 3 billion USD Postal Life Insurance Fund. Amongst his other assignments, Dr Balakrishnan has been in charge of the national child labour elimination programme as well as women labour and unorganized labour in the Government of India. He has worked in areas of logistics, financial inclusion and anti-corruption in the Government of India. He has also been the administrative head- Registrar- of the Indian Institute of Science – Bangalore.

    Dr. Balakrishnan’s academic interests include modern history (with special focus on India- China relations) and public policy. He has been Visiting Fellow at the National Insitute of Advanced Study – Bangalore, the Central European University – Budapest and Visiting Faculty at the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Insitute of Science Bangalore where he also has been teaching a public policy and contemporary history course titled ‘Introduction to Governance in India.’ Dr. Balakirshnan is a columnist and reviewer of books for some of India’s finest newspapers, The Hindu and its financial newspaper BusinessLine. He has co-authored a chapter on Indian Christianity (Eastern Christianity and Politics in the Twenty-First Century) edited by Lucian N Leustean – published by Routledge in 2014. A selection of his writings, ‘India On My Mind – Reflections on Politics, Democracy and History,’ was released by the Centre For Policy Studies-Vishakhapatnam – India on 14th April 2021.
    ________

    Mark W. Frazier is Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research and Co-Director of the India China Institute at The New School. His research interests focus on labor and social policy in China, and more recently on political conflict over urbanization, migration, and citizenship in China and India. He is the author of The Power of Place: Contentious Politics in Twentieth Century Shanghai and Bombay (Cambridge University Press, 2019). He has published articles on the Hong Kong protests for Asia-Pacific Journal, Public Seminar, and The Washington Post Monkey Cage blog. His earlier books are Socialist Insecurity: Pensions and the Politics of Uneven Development in China (Cornell University Press, 2010), The Making of the Chinese Industrial Workplace (Cambridge University Press, 2002), and (co-editor) The SAGE Handbook of Contemporary China (SAGE Publications, 2018).
    ________

    Arunabh Ghosh (BA Haverford; PhD Columbia) is a historian of twentieth century China with interests in social, economic, and environmental history, (transnational) histories of science and statecraft, and China-India history. He is currently an Associate Professor in the History Department at Harvard University. Ghosh’s first book, Making it Count: Statistics and Statecraft in the early People’s Republic of China (Princeton University Press, 2020), offers new perspectives on China’s transition to socialism in 1949 by investigating an elemental but hardly elementary question—how did the state build capacity to know the nation through numbers? He is currently working on two new projects: a history of (small) hydroelectric power in twentieth century China and a history of China-India scientific connections. Ghosh’s work has appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies, Osiris, BJHS Themes, EASTS, PRC History Review, and other venues.


    Speakers

    Uday Balakrishnan
    Panelist
    Former civil servant, newspaper columnist and public intellectual; Former Registrar and Visiting Faculty, Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Mark W. Frazier
    Panelist
    Professor of Politics and Co-Director of the India China Institute, The New School for Social Research

    Arunabh Ghosh
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of History, Harvard University

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of History; Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Political Science; Director, East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 30th Hungary’s Efforts to Leave the Axis Camp: Secret Diplomacy and Strategies for a ‘Low Price Defeat’ (1943–1944)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 30, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The lecture will provide an overview of Hungarian policies directed at leaving the Axis camp during the Second World War. After an introductory part on the general political and military situation of the country, the lecture will concentrate on the main goals of the Hungarian government in 1943 and the efficiency of various peace-feelers in the neutral capitals of Europe, primarily Bern Stockholm and Turkey, showing events from the perspective of the Hungarian side. The lecture will place Hungary into the general context of allies’ aims and war efforts, with a special focus on the geopolitical significance of Southeast Europe in the war. The lecture will draw the attention of the audience to the significance of secret peace-talks with the allied side while giving an insight into the related intelligence maneuvers and their impact on Hungary shortly before the German occupation.

    András Joó (VERITAS Institute, Budapest) obtained his doctoral degree at the University of Economics and Public Administration (now known as Corvinus University, Budapest) in 2001. His main area of research is the 20th century diplomatic history with a special focus on World War II. Dr. Joo is the author of a monograph on Hungarian foreign policy during World War II (Kállay Miklós külpolitikája: Magyarország és a háborús diplomácia 1942-1944. The Foreign Policy of Miklós Kállay: Hungary and Wartime Diplomacy 1942-1944. Napvilág Kiadó, Budapest, 2008). Dr. Joo joined the VERITAS Research Institute in 2015, where he has continued his research on the history of Hungary during World War II collecting and editing sources that have survived in the private hands yet not been discovered by the general public. He regularly publishes the results of his research in Hungarian.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    András Joó
    VERITAS Institute, Budapest


    Sponsors

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2021

  • Tuesday, May 4th Estranged Memory: Holocaust Remembrance and the Attitudes to Jews in Ukrainian Society after 1991

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 4, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This talk will address the complex issue of memory of the Holocaust in Ukrainian society after the fall of communism. After a brief overview on the main tendencies in the politics of remembrance, the talk will primarily focus on wider societal attitudes and beliefs. Anna Chebotarova will consider the place that Jews occupy in collective memory in Ukraine, which was home to one of the largest pre-war Jewish communities in Europe and became one of the major Holocaust killing fields during the WWII. She will analyze the dynamics of the attitudes of Ukrainians toward Jews and memory of the Shoah in the context of recent debates on antisemitism in Ukraine and in East-Central Europe. As many researchers have repeatedly stressed, the subject of contemporary antisemitism is often not real Jews, but the images of them, including those transmitted through collective memory frameworks. The presentation will explore the multilevel and multidirectional relations between (trans)national and local Holocaust memory and the social distance towards Jews in Ukraine today. Anna Chebotarova will apply mixed method research – the perspective that combines both data from previously conducted research, nationwide representative surveys as well qualitative data. She will explore how the (trans)formation of historical memory influences the perception of the Holocaust and, more broadly, the attitudes towards Jews in post-Soviet Ukraine and the main factors influencing these phenomena.

    Anna Chebotarova is a research fellow at the School for Humanities and Social Sciences, St. Gallen University (Switzerland), and the coordinator of “Ukrainian Regionalism: a Research Platform” initiative. She is affiliated with Polish Academy of Sciences, and with the Center for Urban History in East-Central Europe (Lviv, Ukraine). She obtained MA in Sociology and Social Anthropology from the Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) and MA in History and Sociology from Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Lviv, Ukraine). Her research interests include collective memory, Jewish heritage in East-Central Europe, Holocaust memory, heritage studies, qualitative methods of sociological research.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Anna Chebotarova
    Speaker
    a research fellow at the School for Humanities and Social Sciences, St. Gallen University (Switzerland)

    Anna Shternshis
    Chair
    Al and Malka Green Professor of Yiddish studies and the director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 4th Built For All: How Do We Build Back Better

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 4, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Built for All, a report by the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth and the Centre for Public Impact, examines the prospects and challenges for building an inclusive global economy. In this webinar, panelists will discuss the three key components of this framework: equitable access to resources and opportunities; collective stewardship of shared resources for future generations; and a level playing field for work and competition. By focusing on the actions that businesses, governments, academia and civic organizations need to play, panelists will explore the potential to build a more inclusive global future.


    Speakers

    Joseph Wong
    Opening Remarks
    Vice-President, International, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Professor, Department of Political Science

    Vibeka Mair
    Moderator
    Senior Reporter for Responsible Investor

    Marcela Escobari
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Center for Sustainable Development in the Global Economy and Development Program, Brookings

    Arturo Franco
    Speaker
    Vice President, Research, Data and Insight, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth

    Dan Vogel
    Speaker
    Director, North America, Centre for Public Impact


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 10th – Wednesday, May 12th Summer Institute: Advancing Anti-Corruption, Accountability and Transparency in the Global Pharmaceutical System

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 10, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, May 11, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, May 12, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Background

    There is growing evidence about how corruption in the pharmaceutical system creates inequitable barriers to access to medicines through wastage, diversion, and exclusion. The pharmaceutical system is particularly prone to corruption given that it is a complex system with multiple decision points and stakeholders, and it is characterized by many market and government failures. As the global community seeks to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including achieving SDG #3 – Good Health and Well-being, addressing corruption in the pharmaceutical system is essential. The COVID-19 pandemic has also shown how corruption threatens equity of access to health services and products.

    The Summer Institute: Advancing Anti-Corruption, Accountability and Transparency in the Global Pharmaceutical System provides a unique opportunity to learn from an array of multidisciplinary global experts in areas related to corruption risks in the pharmaceutical system. Attendees will also have the opportunity to apply their learning by working on case studies in small groups.

    Who Should Attend?

    Researchers, policy makers and any students interested in learning about how to identify and manage corruption risks related to the pharmaceutical system. No prior knowledge or experience on this topic is required.

    Time Commitment

    3 hours each day – May 10th, May 11th, and May 12th, 2021. Each session is from 9AM-12PM EST.

    Schedule **Coming Soon**

    We have an exciting list of instructors, topics, and activities lined up. Information is forthcoming.

    Please note that Zoom information will be directly emailed 24 hours before the first session (May 10th).

    Contact

    Gul Saeed


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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