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October 2019

  • Thursday, October 17th Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMEast Asian Studies Lounge, 14th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Mari Yoshihara will speak about her new book, Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro, which interweaves the history of Leonard Bernstein’s transformation from an American icon to a world maestro with an intimate story of his relationships with two Japanese individuals: Amano Kazuko, a loyal fan who began writing letters to Bernstein in 1947, and Kunihiko Hashimoto, a young man who fell deeply in love with Bernstein in 1979 and later became his business representative. During the period in which these two relationships unfolded, Japan’s place in the world and its relationship vis-à-vis the United States changed dramatically, which in turn shaped Bernstein’s connection to the country. Yoshihara will trace the making of a global Bernstein amidst the shifting change of classical music that made this American celebrity turn increasingly to Europe and Japan.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).

    *Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro will be available for purchase at the venue.

    Location
    The lounge is located on the 14th floor of the Robarts Library. Take the P4 elevator from the 2nd floor of Robarts to the 14th floor. On exiting the elevator, head LEFT and follow signs to EAS.


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Speaker
    American Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th The Refugium in Eurasian History and its Spatiality

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room
    2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    The term refugium—yet to be properly defined—has been used by scholars to denote areas where safety from enemies owing to remoteness or difficulty of access provided long-term security that allowed for polity-formation (no connection to refugium as a medieval village fortification). Often a degree of sacredness is said to have been ascribed to refugia by their possessors. Examples of refugia on the Eurasian steppe: north of the Göbi Desert for the Asiatic Huns (Hiung-nu), Rouran (“Avars”), and Gök Türks; Yeti-su/Semirechye (Lake Balkash basin) for the West Türk Qaganate; Blue Forest on the Samara River (Ukraine) for Qipchaqs/Polovtsians; Burqan Qaldun Mountain for the Mongols of Chinggis Khan. Other possible refugia: the lower Dnieper River below its rapids (Zaporozhia) where the genesis of Ukrainian cossackdom occurred; Scandinavia (“Scandza Island”) for the Goths; Gerrhus for the Scythians. This seminar will survey the sources and spaces, query the reality of refugia as opposed to simple refuges, and explore aspects of spatiality.

     

    Sponsored by the Departments of History and of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations and by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Speakers

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto.


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20199:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th American Quarterly: Information Session with Mari Yoshihara

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 201911:00AM - 12:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Prof. Yoshihara, who is the Senior Editor of American Quarterly, the journal of the American Studies Association, will offer an informal session about the journal, including advice on submitting an article for publication.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Senior Editor, American Quarterly


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th 2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity "Discrimination and Aging among Visible Minority and Indigenous Older Adults in Canada"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract: Despite the demographic significance of the visible minority and Indigenous older adult populations in Canada, there is little information about their aging process. In particular, the role of discrimination in the aging trajectories of these populations remain understudied and undertheorized in the Canadian context. We aim to fill this gap by first providing a synthesis of the stress and aging, life course perspective, and settler colonialism theories to shed light on the shared and unique factors that contribute to the aging process for these non-white populations. Second, using the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), we examine the association between everyday discrimination and two markers of aging, pain and functional limitations. We discuss the implications of the theoretical frameworks and empirical findings for social service and healthcare delivery for visible minority and Indigenous older adults.

    Speaker bio: Zoua Vang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and an Associate Member of the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Psychiatry (Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry) at McGill University. She is also the founding Director of the Indigenous Maternal Infant Health & Well-being (IMIHW) Lab at McGill. Zoua received her BA in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and her MA and PhD in Sociology from Harvard University.
    She spent two years as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology and the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania where she obtained additional training in racial/ethnic health disparities and perinatal health.
    Zoua’s current research encompasses (i) migration and health, (ii) Indigenous maternal-infant health, and (iii) discrimination as a social determinant of health and well-being.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Zoua Vang
    Associate Professor (Sociology) and Associate Member (Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Psychiatry) at McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Through the interrogation rooms of the Korean War, this talk demonstrates how the individual human subject became both the terrain and the jus ad bellum for this critical U.S. war of ‘intervention’ in postcolonial Korea. In 1952, with the US introduction of voluntary POW repatriation proposal at Panmunjom, the interrogation room and the POW became a flashpoint for an international controversy ultimately about postcolonial sovereignty and political recognition.

    The ambitions of empire, revolution and non-alignment converged upon this intimate encounter of military warfare: the interrogator and the interrogated prisoner of war. Which state could supposedly reinvent the most intimate power relation between the colonizer and the colonized, to transform the relationship between the state and subject into one of liberation, democracy or freedom? Tracing two generations of people across the Pacific as they navigate multiple kinds of interrogation from the 1940s and 1950s, this talk lay outs a landscape of interrogation – a dense network of violence, bureaucracy, and migration – that breaks apart the usual temporal bounds of the Korean War as a discrete event.

    Monica Kim is Assistant Professor in U.S. and the World History in the Department of History at New York University. Her book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (Princeton University Press), is a trans-Pacific history of decolonization told through the experiences of two generations of people creating and navigating military interrogation rooms of the Korean War. She has published work in journals such as Critical Asian Studiesand positions: asia critiqueconcerning U.S. empire, war-making, and decolonization. She is also a member of the Editorial Collective for Radical History Review. Her research and writing have been supported by fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), the Penn Humanities Forum at University of Pennsylvania, and the Korea Foundation.

    *Copies of “The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History” will be available for sale during this event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th “We have borrowed also from the French, and they I think from the Spaniards": National Lessons from Navigation History

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Early modern Europeans were preoccupied with the problem of safely crossing
    the oceans. Such trips—for trade, war, and colonial expansion—could end in
    disaster if the navigator fell ill or relied on outdated maps and
    instruments on the treacherous seas. Each polity felt that their neighbours
    were more successful in creating new navigators. In this talk, Margaret
    Schotte will examine French, British, and Dutch records about training
    mariners, arguing that they shared a common set of strategies, which had
    originated in Iberia. And yet, in spite of this pan-European educational
    model, her analysis reveals unexpected variation in how mariners from
    different states approached particular tasks—from assessing the speed of
    their vessels to estimating their position. Where the Dutch chose
    logarithmic tables, the French turned to instruments. What effects did
    these choices have? At a time when maritime knowledge had significant
    geopolitical ramifications, we find that nautical science and practice, had
    distinct national characteristics.

    Margaret E. Schotte is an associate professor of history at York
    University. Her new monograph, Sailing School: Navigating Science and Skill, 1550-1800 (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019), is a comparative study of the development and
    dissemination of Dutch, English, and French sailors’ navigational
    practices—in the classroom, on board ship, and across international
    borders. Schotte traces the impact of print culture on navigational
    instruction, and reconsiders the rise of mathematics in European
    intellectual and artisanal cultures. She has worked on French travel
    narratives and hydrography lessons in New France. Her next project examines
    the unexpected mathematical lessons that took place aboard a Dutch East
    India Co. ship during the Seven Years’ War. www.margaretschotte.com or:
    http://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/profiles/mschotte/


    Speakers

    Margaret Schotte
    York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 20199:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 case studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to securing the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?

    Dr. Gwenn Pulliat is a researcher in geography at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). She has worked on Southeast Asia for a decade, with a focus on urban development issues. Her research deals with urban food security and the urban environment. In 2017, she has held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto, working on the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia partnership.


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 24th Internet Voting in Estonia, 2005-2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Internet voting in Estonia 2005-2019
    How Does It Work and Why Does 50% of the Population Vote Online?

    In 2005, Estonia was the first country in the world to offer universal remote internet voting in all national elections. Since then, the usage numbers have gradually grown in all e-enabled elections. A new milestone was reached in 2019 when close to 50% of all votes given were electronic. The lecture explores the uptake and usage patterns of internet voting, employing both survey and system log data on voter behavior. Specific attention is devoted to what drives usage growth given that every second vote in Estonia is now given online, but voter turnout has hardly changed over the course of 15 years of internet voting.

    Mihkel Solvak (PhD) is a senior research fellow in technology studies and head of institute at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies. His research interest include remote internet voting, electoral behavior, uptake and diffusion patterns of digital public services, data driven and machine learning enabled public services. He is affiliated with the Center of IT Impact Studies (CITIS), a research group that prototypes and builds digital public services for Estonian e-government.


    Speakers

    Mihkel Solvak, PhD
    Director, Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, University of Tartu, Estonia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th "Not in Our Town“ – a case study of civic/youth engagement against intolerance and radicalism in Slovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Ivan Chorvát is Associate Professor at the Department of Social Studies and Ethnology, Faculty of Arts, Matej Bel University in Banská Bystrica (Slovakia) and at the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, The University of Trnava (Slovakia). He studied Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Charles University in Prague, Society and Politics at the Central European University in Prague (Czech Republic), and completed his doctoral studies at The Institute for Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava (1998). His main areas of research include the sociology of family, tourism, leisure and consumption, and the study of sociological theory. I. Chorvát is the author of monographs Man – Father in the Contemporary Family (1999), Travel and Tourism in the Mirror of Time (2007), Leisure in Slovakia from a Sociological Perspective (2011), Consumption and the Consumer Society (2015) and co-editor of Family in Slovakia in Theory and Research (2015) and Leisure, Culture and Society: Czech Republic and Slovakia (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ivan Chorvat



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th – Saturday, October 26th Difference and Alterity: Critical Models in Modern Thought

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20192:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Saturday, October 26, 201910:00AM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Friday October 25

    2:00-2:15 Opening Remarks

    2:15-3:00
    Idit Dobbs-Weinstein, The Same Is the Different: Nature, Fortune, History in Machiavelli

    3:00-3:45
    Oleg Gelikman, The Quake of the Real: on the Ontology of Relation in Montaigne

    3:45-4:15 Coffee Break

    4:15-5:00
    Willi Goetschel, Writing Otherwise: Montaigne and La Boëtie

    5:00-5:45
    Warren Montag, “To Quit the Principles of Human Nature:” Locke’s Notion of the Inhuman

    Saturday October 26

    10:15-11:00
    Tracie Matysik, Substance as Contingency in the Young Karl Marx

    11:00-11:45
    Michael Rosenthal, On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Aesthetics to Make Sense of Immorality in Politics: Exempla, Thought-Images, and the Eichmann Trial

    12:00-1:30
    Lunch

    1:30-2:15 James McNaughton, Beckett’s Political Aesthetic

    2:15-3:00 David Suchoff, De-Colonizing Dialect: Beckett’s Palestinian and Irish Canines

    3:00-3:15
    Coffee Break

    3:15-4:00
    Omar Rivera, Resistance as Alterity in Decolonial Aesthetics

    4:00-4:45
    Amogh Sahu, Skepticism and the Philosophy of Difference

    5:00-5:30
    Open Discussion

    Sponsors

    Department of German Languages and Literatures

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th Sphere of Knowledge and Experience in Literature: A Case Study of Nepali Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This case study of Nepali literature shows how literature can reflect the expanding spheres of knowledge in societies like that of Nepal where multiple cultural modes prevail. I will present a study on the expanding sphere of Nepali literature in areas such as the choice of subject for writing, the growth of ‘print capitalism’ or printing and dissemination from the last decades of the 19th century, the role of literary journals in keeping up the creative and free spirit under the autocratic regimes, and the creation of the reading public. The presentation will show how in the first half of the twentieth century did Nepali poetry use romanticism as the important literary trend, and how the literary writers, critics and academics see and interpret modernism, and people understand it in common parlance. I will mention my own experience as a playwright in the selection of the motifs for the plays and how that reflects the sphere of creative writing, in terms of cultural diversity and plurality of subjects.

    Abhi Subedi (PhD) received his higher education in Nepal and Britain. He is an essayist, literary critic, linguist, playwright, and poet. He has over two-dozen books on different subjects to his credit. Professor Subedi has taught since 1970. He writes on issues of freedom, culture, literature, arts and social transformations.


    Speakers

    Dr. Abhi Subedi
    Professor Emeritus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Durability of Client Regimes: Foreign Sponsorship and Military Loyalty, 1946-2010

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Conventional wisdom suggests that great power patrons prop up client dictatorships. However, this is generally assumed rather than systematically analyzed. In this paper, I offer the first comprehensive analysis of the relationship between foreign sponsorship and authoritarian regime survival with the use of an original dataset of all autocratic client regimes in the postwar period. These results demonstrate that patronage from Western powers – the United States, France, and the United Kingdom – is not associated with client regime survival. Instead, only Soviet sponsorship reduces the risk of regime collapse. I explain this variation by considering the effects of foreign sponsorship on the likelihood of military coups d’etat. I argue that the Soviet Union directly aided its clients in imposing a series of highly effective coup prevention strategies. In contrast, the United States and its allies did not directly aid their clients in coup prevention which left regimes vulnerable to military overthrow.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Adam Casey
    Trudeau Centre Fellow Ph.D. Candidate & Course Instructor | Dept. of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Frederick Lee Story and the Hill 70 Memorial Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    During World War I (WWI), approximately 300 Chinese soldiers enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force despite rampant anti-Chinese discrimination. Anonymous until recently, Frederick “Freddy” Lee was one of those soldiers.

    Born into a Chinese Canadian Merchant family in Kamloops, BC, Freddy volunteered for the war, enlisting with the 172nd Battalion and served in a vital role as a machine gunner. Freddy fought in and survived the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1916, but was later killed in the Battle of Hill 70 in August 1917 at only 21 years of age. He fought and died as a Canadian. Freddy was among the 11,286 Canadians killed in France with no known graves.

    Freddy’s story is one that not only symbolizes the strength and determination of Chinese Canadians’ long struggle to gain acceptance as full Canadian citizens, but also embodies the Canadian spirit of “strength in diversity”, where Canadians of all ethnicities contributed to the history and development of their nation.

    While featuring Frederick Lee, the symposium will present a larger Chinese Canadian story. Based on historical research by experts on Chinese Canadian studies and WWI, along with invaluable insights from key figures involved in various Frederick Lee projects, the event will shine new light on Chinese Canadians’ contributions to Canadian history.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca, or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Opening Remarks
    Chancellor Emerita, University of Toronto, and retired Senator of Canada

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Dr. Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Robert C. Engen
    Panelist
    Department of Defence Studies, Canadian Forces College

    Mr. Mark Hutchings
    Panelist
    Chairman, The Hill 70 Memorial Project

    Mr. Jack Gin
    Panelist
    Finding Frederick Lee Project

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Welcoming Remarks
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 29th The Two Solitudes of Russia Abroad: The Exiled Intelligentsia and the Second World War in France

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk addresses the tensions which arose in the Russian emigre community in France during and after WWII. These tensions resulted from the divergent experiences and interpretations of the war by the Russian and Russian-Jewish cultural elites who had emigrated to France after the communist coup of 1917. Examining, on the basis of largely unpublished archival materials, attitudes toward Nazi Germany and the Vichy regime among exiled Russian-speaking writers and intellectuals, those who stayed in war-time France and those who took refuge in the United Stated, the talk will focus on Russian reactions to German and French anti-Semitic policies. The goal is to deepen our understanding of the precipitous decline of the Russian emigre cultural community, which thrived in interwar France, by exploring a taboo aspect of its final years, obfuscated in scholarly literature — namely, its fracturing along ethnic lines under the impact of the Holocaust. The talk will argue that traumatic war experience, including the manifest or perceived political attitudes of ethnic Russians in France, modified the cultural identity of the exiled Russian-Jewish intelligentsia, which had been the backbone of interwar Russian emigre cultural life, weakening its commitment to Russia Abroad and thereby accelerating the cultural community’s fragmentation and decline in France.

    Leonid Livak is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Centre for Jewish Studies, and an associated researcher at the Centre d’études des Mondes Russe, Caucasien & Centre-Européen (EHESS-Paris). He has published extensively on Russian-French and Russian-Jewish cultural history, and on Russian and transnational modernism. Among his books are: How It Was Done in Paris: Russian Emigre Literature and French Modernism (2003); Le Studio franco-russe (2005); Russian Emigres in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Interwar France (2010); The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination (2010); In Search of Russian Modernism (2018). As part of his current research project, “The Final Chapter of Russia Abroad,” he is writing the cultural history of the decline of the Russian emigre community in France.


    Speakers

    Leonid Livak
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th China's Rise and Neoliberalism's Demise?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20195:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The rise of China has coincided with, in the United States, a growing skepticism of “neoliberal” economic assumptions that were previously shared by policy elites across the U.S. political spectrum for decades. Are the two phenomena related? What might their relationship suggest about the future of U.S. domestic and foreign policy?

    Tarun Chhabra is a fellow with the International Order and Strategy program at the Brookings Institution as well as Georgetown University’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology. He has worked on the White House National Security Council staff, at the Pentagon, and at the United Nations. He also has been a visiting fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House and a Graduate Fellow at Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Chhabra holds a law degree from Harvard, where he was a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellow for New Americans, an M.Phil in international relations from Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford.


    Speakers

    Tarun Chhabra
    Speaker
    Fellow, The Project on International Order and Strategy, Brookings Institution

    Janice Stein
    Moderator
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMFather Madden Hall
    Carr Hall
    St. Michael’s College
    100 St. Joseph St.
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    Description

    “Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity”
    A conversation with Jacek Dukaj

    To RSVP, please email Prof. Aleksandra Swiecka at aleksandra.swiecka@utoronto.ca

    Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2019

  • Monday, November 4th The Ukrainian Bureau in London and Its Documents Related to the Holodomor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 4, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Wysocki will discuss the activity and archival heritage of the Ukrainian Bureau in London, which was established in 1931 with the aim of informing international opinion about the Ukrainians in Galicia, then part of Poland. Although the office was to exist for about two years, it continued to operate until the outbreak of World War Two. During its existence, the Ukrainian Bureau played a key role in the area of Ukrainian civic diplomacy and disseminating information on the situation in Ukraine, especially on the Holodomor.

    Historian Roman Wysocki is a lecturer at the Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on Polish-Ukrainian relations between the two world wars and on Ukrainians and Belarusians in Poland. His areas of interest include Ukrainian political thought, Polish-Ukrainian history in the twentieth century, Ukrainian emigrants in Poland, reactions to the Holodomor, and the Orthodox Church in Poland.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Roman Wysocki
    Speaker
    A lecturer at the Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland.

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Konstanty Reinert Chair of Polish Studies, Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 6th The Rise and Fall of “Good Governance” Promotion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    SEYMOUR MARTIN LIPSET LECTURE ON DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD

    Description

    Alina Mungiu-Pippidi is a policy scientist who chairs the European Research Center for Anticorruption and State-Building (ERCAS) at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, where she holds the chair in Democracy Studies. A Romanian by birth, she created and chaired for many years the Romanian Academic Society, the country’s leading think tank, and the Coalition for a Clean Romania, an anti-corruption alliance. She also served in 1996 as the first anticommunist news director of Romanian public broadcasting. Her books include “The Quest for Good Governance: How Societies Develop Control of Corruption” (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and “A Tale of Two Villages” (CEU Press, 2010). The latter was screened as a documentary by the BBC. She has published articles in Nature, Foreign Policy, the Journal of Democracy, and several public policy journals and has frequently been cited in The Economist and other prominent media. She consults for the World Bank and various European institutions, and also serves as a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Democracy and the research council of the International Forum for Democratic Studies.


    Speakers

    Alina Mungiu-Pippidi
    Professor of Democracy Studies, Hertie School of Governance



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 7th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Michael Ignatieff: Democracy versus Democracy: The Crisis of Liberal Constitutionalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 7, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    The populist challenge to liberal democracy is being waged in the name of democracy: the people versus the elites, the majority versus minorities, the electorate versus the courts. Instead of seeing the populism as a threat, we should think of it as a challenge that liberal democracy is fully capable of meeting. Liberal constitutionalism is built for crisis, and the populist crisis could end up strengthening our democracy, provided liberal institutions—and elites—respond.

    About our Speaker
    Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician.
    His major publications are The Needs of Strangers (1984), Scar Tissue (1992), Isaiah Berlin (1998), The Rights Revolution (2000), Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry (2001), The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror (2004), Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics (2013), and The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World (2017).
    Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Professor of the Practice of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.
    He is currently the Rector and President of Central European University in Budapest.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Michael Ignatieff
    President and Rector
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
    Distinguished Fellow
    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th The Battlegrounds of Ukraine: Ongoing Revolution(s) in Identity, Post-Industrialism, and Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Mykhaylo Wynnyckyj
    Associate Professor of the Department of Sociology and Kyiv-Mohyla Business School, Director of the Doctoral School, National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th Reel Asian Film Screening: The Dragon Painter

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that this event is FREE but the registration is required.

    Feature Presentation
    The Dragon Painter

    USA 1919
    53:00
    Silent with English intertitles
    G

    DIRECTOR
    William Worthington

    CAST
    Sessue Hayakawa
    Tsuru Aoki
    Edward Peil
    Toyo Fujita

    An early Hollywood silent film, The Dragon Painter is a fantasy romance about love and creative inspiration. Tatsu (Hayakawa) is a reclusive artist who lives in the mountains of Japan painting images of the dragon princess he loved in another life. He comes to believe the daughter of a wealthy art collector is his lost princess, but as Tatsu finds happiness in love, his art begins to suffer.

    In his prime, Hayakawa was as popular as Charlie Chaplin, as rich as Douglas Fairbanks, and to this day, the only Asian American to own his own Hollywood studio. Hayakawa founded Haworth Pictures Corporation after becoming fed up with the self-proclaimed Orientalist roles in which he was cast by the major studios, including his character in Cecil B. DeMille’s The Cheat. Hayakawa’s studio subsequently released 19 films between the years of 1918 to 1922.

    Although set in Japan, The Dragon Painter was shot on location in Yosemite National Park and stars a predominantly Japanese American cast, including Hayakawa’s wife, Tsuru Aoki. Produced by Hayakawa’s own studio, the film deliberately strived to provide an authentic perspective on Japanese culture that countered the dominant narrative of stereotypes, violence, and melodramatic conflict expected in so-called “Oriental” films of the period. For these reasons, it is considered it to be one of the first Asian American films in history. – Rob Buscher

    On the occasion of the film’s 100th Anniversary, The Dragon Painter will be presented with a live musical accompaniment and an original score by Los Angeles-based musician Goh Nakamura that was originally commissioned by the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival. A presentation on Hayakawa’s work and legacy will be given by Stephen Gong, film archivist and executive director of the Center for Asian American Media, who was responsible for locating and overseeing the restoration of the last existing print of The Dragon Painter.

    The screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th Reel Asian Roundtable with Chop Suey Nation and A Sweet & Sour Christmas

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Please note that this event is FREE but the registration is required.

    PULSE PRESENTATION
    CHOP SUEY NATION
    Canada 2019
    English

    AUTHOR
    Ann Hui
    (in attendance)

    A SWEET AND SOUR CHRISTMAS
    Canada 2019
    16:00
    English, Cantonese with English Subtitles
    G · Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Aram Collier
    (in attendance)

    PRODUCER
    Betty Xie
    (in attendance)

    How do food stories speak to a convoluted history of multiculturalism? What does it take to trace back the stories of diasporic community to its roots? If and when we do arrive, what next? This multimedia program explores this question through an excerpt reading of Chop Suey Nation and a screening of A Sweet and Sour Christmas.

    In 2016, Journalist Ann Hui drove across Canada seeking answers to two questions: Why is there a Chinese restaurant in every small town? Who are the families who run them? Meeting with owners and eating at their restaurants, Hui shares stories of diasporic Chinese communities in her book Chop Suey Nation, while unexpectedly, uncovering her own family history – revealing the importance of these restaurants to Canada’s history.

    In A Sweet and Sour Christmas, director Aram Siu Wai Collier and producer Betty Xie follow two types of holiday meals at the King Wok Restaurant: the deep-fried take-out Chinese Canadian food staples delivered to families across Kitchener and the traditional Cantonese meal for a family sharing a rare Christmas celebration. This film is a CBC Short Doc to be released on CBC Gem and the CBC Short Docs Channel in December 2019.
    – KL

    BIOs:

    Raised in a Chinese-Canadian family in Vancouver, Ann Hui grew up in a food-obsessed household to parents who always knew where the freshest Cantonese seafood or barbecued duck could be found. Since 2015, Hui has been The Globe’s national food reporter. Her work includes investigations into the role of lobbying in the development of Canada’s Food Guide, and a 2018 story that uncovered widespread sexual harassment in one of the country’s most prominent wineries. She has a Masters of Journalism from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia.

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a Toronto-based filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He edited the feature documentary Refugee and directed the short doc Who I Became, nationally broadcasted on PBS. His omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown (‘11-’14) toured Canada, Asia, and the USA. His Telefilm Canada-funded feature, Stand Up Man (‘17) premiered at multiple international film festivals. Collier is a mixed-race Asian Canadian/American who has a BFA and MFA in Film Production from the University of California at Santa Cruz and York University respectively.

    Betty Xie is a Chinese Canadian filmmaker and a festival curator. Her short documentary The Home Promised (‘14) won the Air Canada Best Short Film at the Reel Asian Film Festival and played at various international film festivals. She produced the Telefilm Canada funded-feature, Stand Up Man (‘17), which premiered at multiple international film festivals. Her short doc Chado: A Way of Tea was selected as a top 10 finalist of the 2018 TVO ShortDoc Contest. She was also a 2019 Doc Institute Canada Breakthrough Fellow.

    Join Hui, Collier and Xie in conversation moderated by multidisciplinary artist Shellie Zhang to discuss the Chinese-Canadian cuisine known as chop suey. These four artists dive by way of food stories into a deeper inquiry around constructs of citizenship, belonging, and tolerance.

    *Chop Suey Nation will be on sale prior to the event and Ann Hui will be available for book signings after the event.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th – Friday, November 15th PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20191:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
    Friday, November 15, 20199:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th The newest wave of Russian emigration and its implications for Russia and the West

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Sergei Erofeev is currently a lecturer at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He has been involved in the internationalization of universities in Russia since the early 1990s. Previously, Dr. Erofeev served as a vice rector for international affairs at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, the dean of international programs at the European University at Saint Petersburg, and the director of the Center for Sociology of Culture at Kazan Federal University in Russia. He has also been a Hubert H. Humphrey fellow at the University of Washington. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Erofeev was a concert pianist, and has worked in the area of the sociology of the arts.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sergei Erofeev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th Reel Asian Film Screening: What We Left Unfinished

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that this event is FREE but the registration is required.

    Feature Presentation
    WHAT WE LEFT UNFINISHED

    Afghanistan/USA 2019
    71:00
    Dari with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Mariam Ghani

    CAST
    Latif Ahmadi
    Hossain Fakhri
    Said Miran Farhad
    Juwansher Haidary
    Wali Latifi
    Faqir Nabi
    Yasamin Yarmal

    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    2019 Berlinale Forum
    2019 SFFILM
    2019 Sheffield Doc/Fest

    From 1978 to 1991, the Afghan Films Institute had been producing propaganda features to fit with the times. This documentary follows the incredible story of five of these unfinished works from Afghanistan’s Communist era, when the constantly shifting political regimes resulted in films remaining unfinished, unedited, and thought to be destroyed.

    In her debut feature, Mariam Ghani pieces fragments of this once-lost footage, from The April Revolution (1978), Downfall (1987), The Black Diamond (1989), Wrong Way (1990), and Agent (1991), unedited (and therefore, uncensored). Just as the original filmmakers did when they shot action scenes with real bullets, hired ex-agents to play spies, or restaged the Communist coup d’état with the army, air force, and an awful lot of tanks and missiles, What We Left Unfinished interweaves histories and fictions. Ultimately, we come to understand both the price paid by Afghan filmmakers for the benefits they gained under Communism and the reasons they persisted despite the risks they faced—and why they still believe that film could save Afghanistan from the divisions tearing it apart today.

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Mariam Ghani’s previous projects in Afghanistan have documented the spatial politics of the post-war constitutional assembly, real-estate speculations in reconstructed Kabul, afterlives of former secret prisons, diasporic translators in theatres of war, and forgotten histories of Afghan modernists, artists and intellectuals. What We Left Unfinished is her first feature.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Shahrzad Mojab, a scholar, teacher, and activist, internationally known for her work on the impact of war, displacement, dispossession, and violence on women’s learning and resistance. She is professor of Adult Education and Community Development and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto, and currently, the Director of Equity Studies at New College.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th Transnational Solidarity Networks in the Era of Gay Liberation: The Making of Gay Communities in North America (1970s-1980s)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    This talk discusses the relationship between the gay press and gay liberation movements in North America throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. The talk traces how international solidarity efforts and the need to “build community” in order to advance gay liberation politics fueled gay activists’ “desire to connect” in the post-Stonewall era. The discussion is centered around two (interconnected) networks that brought together people working with Toronto’s gay periodical The Body Politic (1971-1987), San Francisco’s Gay Sunshine (1971-1982), Boston’s Gay Community News (1973-1999), Mexico City’s Política Sexual and Nuestro Cuerpo (1979), as well as academics, activists, intellectuals, and other people based in the U.S. and Mexico throughout the period covered in the study.

    Juan Carlos Mezo González is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History working on a collaborative program in Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto. He holds an MA in History from the University of Toronto (2016) and an Honors BA in History from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (2014), where he was the recipient of the Gabino Barreda Medal as the top student in his cohort. His doctoral dissertation examines the transnational gay networks that people working with gay periodicals established across North America throughout the 1971-1994 period. His past and forthcoming publications focus on Indigenous and Colonial history and the history of gay liberation in North America. Juan Carlos is a recipient of the Mexican National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) Doctoral Scholarship and an Ontario Graduate scholar.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Juan Carlos Mezo González



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Dangerous Liaisons: The Forbidden Love Affairs of French Prisoners of War and German Women in the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Tens of thousands of French prisoners of war (POWs) and German women had to stand trial in Nazi Germany for having engaged in a love relation with each other. The prisoner and the woman both faced severe punishment, and the woman had to suffer public shaming. What do the trials reveal about Franco-German relations in World War II? How did French POWs and German women perceive each other? How did German village and factory communities react to these international love relations? Why did the relations never become part of memory in either country? The project examines Franco-German collaboration and international relations from a new perspective grounded in the everyday life experience in wartime Nazi Germany.

    Raffael Scheck is Katz Distinguished Teaching Professor of Modern European History at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. He has published five books and 40 articles on German right-wing politics and on French colonial prisoners of war. His book on the German army massacres of black French prisoners in 1940 was translated into French and German. He has completed a book manuscript on forbidden love relations between western prisoners of war and German women in World War II and is beginning to write a book on the German campaign in the West in 1940.


    Speakers

    Raffael Scheck
    Colby College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Tagore in China: The Case for Pan-Asian Poetics in the 1920s

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The Annual Bengal Studies Lecture

    Description

    Rabindranath Tagore’s 1924 tour in China has attracted numerous critical analyses throughout the years and continues to pique scholars’ curiosity. The literary luminary’s attempt to raise support for his vision of an Asia-wide investment in spirituality in a rapidly materializing world remains a particularly fraught topic. Scholarship on China’s response to the Eastern spirituality ideal has generally focused on Chinese Marxists’ scathing critiques of Tagore’s vision, epitomized in the cold reception his lectures received from their audience. Less attention has been paid to an array of enthusiastic responses that emerged from May 4th poets in the form of journal articles about Tagore and poetry which directly engaged with his ideas. This talk investigates the exchange with Tagore and his work as an event that deeply informed Chinese poetry. As such, I argue, Tagore’s visit enables a new understanding of the Eastern spirituality project not as a failure, but as a vehicle for the Chinese envisioning of Pan-Asian poetics.

    Gal Gvili is an Assistant Professor at the Department of East Asian Studies at McGill University. She studies and teaches modern, and contemporary Chinese literature, literary and cultural theory. Her first book investigates how interactions between Chinese writers and Indian religions and philosophy fashioned a conviction that literature is the ultimate means for transforming the national fate.

    The lecture will be followed by reception.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Department of English


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 22nd The Unmaking of the Multiculturalism Policies in a Country of Non-Immigration: How Japan Failed to Learn from North American Experiences

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 22, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Presentation Abstract:

    According to a comparative research of multiculturalism policies among democratic countries, Japan is known to be one of the least multiculturalist countries. Its national government does not affirm its ethnic diversity, has very few supports for immigrant groups, and still keeps its self-image of a “country of non-immigration.” However, Japan has also a (not so) long history of widening minority’s rights and creating its own version of multiculturalism. During the 1990s and the early 2000s, social scientists and bureaucrats researched the cases of countries in Europe and North America and coined a new term of “multicultural co-existence (tabunka kyosei)” as a response to increasing number of foreign residents. This presentation introduces the special characteristics of multiculturalism policies in Japan from comparative research findings. Then it examines how Japan learned from the experience of multiculturalism in the United States and Canada and how it failed to adopt the vision of “multicultural co-existence” as a platform of integration policy.

    Biography:

    Fuminori Minamikawa is a Professor at the College of International Relations at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan and a Visiting Professor at the R. F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. He received PhD in Sociology from the Graduate School of Social Sciences at Hitotsubashi University, Japan. His field of research is a sociology of ethnicity, race, and multiculturalism in historical and comparative perspectives. He is now engaging in a research projects on the historical making of American multiculturalism and a comparative study of multicultural policies in the United States, Canada and Japan. He published academic books and journal articles both in Japanese and English, including E Pluribus Unum: A Historical Sociology of Multicultural America (Kyoto: Horitsubunka-sha, 2016, in Japanese) and Trans-pacific Japanese American Studies: Conversations on Race and Racializations (Edited by Yasuko Takezawa and Gary Y. Okihiro, Honolulu: University of Hawai’I Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Fuminori Minamikawa
    Professor, College of International Relations, Ritsumeikan University, Japan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 25th Central Europe's Repeating Troubles with Great Powers: the Role of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    China is a new great power entering a geopolitically tense region of Central Europe, where Russia, Western Europe, and the U.S. have competed throughout the 20th century for influence. China benefitted from growing scepticism towards the West after the 2008 crisis and was looked upon by many in the region as an alternative. At the same time, with most of the economic expectations of China remaining unfulfilled, the frustration of China has grown as well, aided also by the different outlooks of Communism and the general suspicions of great powers in the region. The presentation will look into political, economic, and social aspects of China-Central Europe relations and its implications for Europe, in general, to show that even though China has presented new challenges, it is unlikely to compete on equal footing with the established great powers in the region.

    Richard Q. Turcsányi is a Key Researcher at Palacky University Olomouc, Assistant Professor at Mendel University in Brno, and Program Director at the Central European Institute of Asian Studies (www.ceias.eu). He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations and further degrees in economy and political science. In past, he conducted long-term study and research stays at the University of Toronto, Peking University, National Chengchi University in Taipei, and the European Institute for Asian Studies in Brussels. His research interests include Chinese foreign policy, relations between China and (Central and Eastern) Europe, and international relations of Asia-Pacific.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Richard Turcsanyi


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    European Studies Students' Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 28th Testbeds as innovation policy: A survey [IPL Speaker Series]

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 28, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series

    Description

    The need to test new technologies in complex real-world environments can be an important barrier to innovation. The solution often comes in the form of a particular type of innovation testbed, a bounded environment in which new technologies can be trialled and tested in real world conditions. Policy tools with these characteristics are sometimes called testbeds, demonstrators, or even sandboxes, and they have become increasingly important in innovation policy. Yet there has been little systematic analysis of this new innovation technology. This paper offers a framework for understanding real world innovation testbeds, a definition, and a typology of different types. Based on an evaluation of over 200 testbeds, it defines, conceptualises and categorises them. We identify four main types – testbed districts, testbeds environments, testbed facilities, and testbed programmes . We argue that real-world testbeds are likely to play an increasingly important role in innovation and industrial policy, but that there are important unresolved ethical and regulatory issues around their use.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Dr. Neil Lee
    Associate Professor of Economic Geography Department of Geography and Environment



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Empire’s Legacy: Roots of the Far Right in Contemporary France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk introduces Empire’s Legacy (Oxford University Press, forthcoming), which challenges the claim that globalization and its losers explain right-wing populism today. In France, a potential born of older relations between colonizers and colonized has revitalized the party of Jean-Marie and Marine Le Pen. Starting with the French conquest of Algeria in 1830, Empire’s Legacy analyzes shifting settler identities under colonialism; and their place, nature, and transmission in the postcolonial Fifth Republic. Drawing on archival research, subject interviews, and electoral surveys, Empire’s Legacy charts an interdisciplinary course between history, sociology, political science, and discourse analysis. It also combines analysis at the local, national, and international levels. This shows the importance of ethnic cleavages, social milieus, government probity, and political responses. As such, Empire’s Legacy has implications for other party families, social movements, and subaltern politics.

     

    John Veugelers is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. He has written widely on the far right, immigration politics, social movements, and voluntary associations in Canada, France, and Italy. His articles have appeared in a range of scholarly journals that includes: Ethnic and Racial Studies, International Sociology, British Journal of Sociology, Comparative European Politics, European Journal of Political Research, Sociological Quarterly, Current Sociology, Acta Sociologica, and West European Politics. A recipient of awards for outstanding teaching at the University of Toronto, he has been a visiting professor at universities in Europe, Asia, and Africa; and a visiting fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France.

     


    Speakers

    John Veugelers
    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2020

  • Friday, January 10th The Czech Republic and Central-Eastern Europe 30 Years after the Velvet Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 10, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    MARK KRAMER is Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. In addition to teaching international relations and comparative politics at Harvard, he has taught as a visiting professor at Yale University, Brown University, Aarhus University in Denmark, and American University in Bulgaria, where he was the Panitza Distinguished Professor. Originally trained in mathematics at Stanford University, he was formerly an Academy Scholar in Harvard’s Academy of International and Area Studies and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University. He has written many books and articles on a wide range of topics, including Imposing Maintaining, and Tearing Open the Iron Curtain: East-Central Europe and the Cold War, 1945-1990, which was named by Foreign Policy as one of the ten best books published in the field of International Relations in 2014, and he has long served as editor of Harvard’s Cold War Studies Book Series and of the Journal of Cold War Studies, a prize-winning quarterly journal published by MIT Press. His latest book, on the Russian Chechen wars of 1994-1996 and 1999-2009, will be published in 2020.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Mark Kramer
    Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2020

  • Wednesday, February 12th Political correctness and language of the media – before 1989 and nowadays

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Address: Alumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400.

    Elena Krejčová is Associate Professor at the Department of Slavic studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia). She studied Czech Studies, Bulgarian Studies, English and American Studies at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski (Bulgaria), and completed her doctoral studies at Masaryk university in Brno (1999). Her main areas of research include political linguistics, sociolinguistics, contrastive linguistics of Slavic languages, theory of translation. Elena Krejčová is the author of monographs Slavonic Babylon (2016), Quo Vadis, Philologia? (2017), The Power of Public Speech (2017) and author of dictionaries Czech- Bulgarian Law Dictionary (2015) and Czech-Bulgarian Specialized Dictionary of Legal, Economic and Socio-political Terminology (2016).

    Political correctness as a way of forming the principles of communication and in particular the verbal behaviour is very strongly connected with the period of totalitarianism in the countries of the former socialist block (including Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.). The idea of “right” and “wrong”, i.e. unacceptable speaking, thinking, behavior that is treated as a crime, the battle of ideas and ideologies is well presented in media as a tool of propaganda before 1989, this close relation between communication and political systems was a part of the state policy. What happened after 1989 – did we finally gain freedom of speech? Media after the “Velvet revolution” changed a lot – from the feeling of freedom with no restrictions that ended up to vulgarization of language to the new requirements in society to treat people without prejudice and discrimination.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Elena Krejčová
    Associate professor, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th CERES GSC hold

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20208:00AM - 3:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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