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February 2018

  • Monday, February 26th A Conversation with BRICS Consulates - From Xiamen to Johannesburg: The Role of BRICS in Global Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 26, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMCombination Room
    Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue
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    Description

    BRICS is an association of the world’s five largest emerging economies – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa. It is also an increasingly important international summit institution. Since 2009, BRICS members have met annually at leader summits to promote the interests and role of developing states in global governance. The most recent BRICS Summit in 2017 was hosted in Xiamen, China.

    In an increasingly fractured world marked by rising protectionist sentiments, looming trade wars and global threats such as climate change, global health, security challenges, – what unique opportunities and potential does BRICS offer? More broadly, what role do rising powers have in addressing global challenges? What leadership potential does BRICS offer in global governance today? This panel aims to address these questions as BRICS group prepares for its tenth annual summit in July 2018, which will hosted and presided over by South Africa in Johannesburg.

    At this event hosted by the BRICS Research Group and Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union, we are honored to be joined by the Consul Generals of Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa to Toronto. Five (TBC) BRICS Consul Generals will be addressing the U of T community on their vision and contributions to BRICS. Please join us on February 26th, 4-6pm at the Combination Room of Trinity College for this panel event. Please kindly note that only guests who have registered via the Munk School event listing will be admitted to the event.

    Contact

    Angela Hou

    Co-Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    BRICS Research Group


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 28th The Director's Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) warmly invites you to the second event of our Research Seminar Series – “The Director’s Cut: A Historian Examines the Asia-Pacific Through the Lens of Cinema” with Professor Takashi Fujitani.

    This research seminar series is brought to you by CASSU, and aims to provide a forum for students who share similar interests in Asian social, cultural, and political affairs to engage in dialogue with faculty members. We hope to provide our peers with the opportunity to better understand the practice of academic inquiry through learning about faculty-level research. In this seminar, Professor Fujitani will speak about his experience researching the history of the Asia-Pacific region, with a particular focus on his interest in cinema and his inter-disciplinary approach to history and film in the context of Asian Studies. Please join us in Room 208N of the Munk School North House on February 28th, from 3-5pm. We hope to see you there!

    Speaker Biography

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). A graduate of UC Berkeley, Professor Takashi Fujitani came to the University of Toronto from the University of California, San Diego, where he was a professor of modern Japanese history for two decades. He has held numerous grants and fellowships, including from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, Stanford Humanities Center, and Social Science Research Council. He is also editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press). Much of his past and current research has centered on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, gender and cultural production in the Asia-Pacific, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 28th Unspoken Territories: An evening with filmmaker Marusya Bociurkiw

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 28, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMMedia Commons Theatre,
    3rd floor of Robarts Library
    130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Sometimes outrageous, often funny and always insightful, poet/pedagogue Marusya Bociurkiw’s films and books create an alternative diaspora archive, built on hybridity, intersectionality and the desire to speak to that which has been unspoken.Her body of work – 10 films and 6 books unique to the fields of Slavic Studies and Slavic literature – rewrite the Ukrainian settler narrative and create new queer and intersectional feminist imaginaries that cross ethnic, transnational, and identitarian boundaries. Bociurkiw will show clips from her films and will share footage from her current project, “Post-Revolution.”

    Marusya Bociurkiw is associate professor of media theory and co-director of The Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought , which promotes research-creation and graduate study in the areas of media studies, critical theory, Aboriginal, feminist, and queer studies, and media activism. She holds a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of British Columbia, an M.A.in Social and Political Thought from York University, and a B.F.A from NSCAD University. Dr. Bociurkiw’s academic research is broadly concerned with the intersections of affect, nation and technology, and their gendered, queered and racialized ramifications. She is also a media artist, writer, blogger and scholar whose media works and books about the sexuality, ethnicity , food, and culture have been screened and read all over the world. Her films and videos are in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, The National Archives, and various universities and libraries. A longtime media activist, she founded Emma Productions, a feminist media collective in the 1980’s and is currently engaged in documenting that history. She is the writer/director of nine films and videos, including “Unspoken Territory”, a history of racial profiling in Canada, and “What’s the Ukrainian Word For Sex: A Sexual Journey through Eastern Europe.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marusya Bociurkiw
    Speaker
    Filmmaker; Associate Professor of Media Theory, Ryerson University; Director of the Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought

    Marta Baziuk
    Moderator
    Director of the Holodomor Education and Research Consortium, CIUS, Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2018

  • Thursday, March 1st "We Shouldn't Make Any More Of Them": Intermediality, American Series Media, And Comet Productions (1946 - 1947)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 1, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 1946, Mary Pickford and her husband Charles “Buddy” Rogers released a film based on the popular newspaper comic strip Little Iodine through their B-film production company, Comet Productions. A failed attempt at establishing a popular film series, the production of Little Iodine will nonetheless serve as a useful case study in this talk examining the process of Hollywood serial filmmaking and the American cinema’s intersection with disparate media forms in the 1930s and 1940s.

    Contact

    Rakhi Dewan


    Speakers

    Justin Morris
    Ph.D. Candidate, Cinema Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 2nd Searching for Truth in the Transitional Justice Movement: Lessons from the Balkans and Colombia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 201812:00PM - 2:00PMCentre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    2nd Floor
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    Description

    Dr. Rowen will present key findings from her recently published book, Searching for Truth in the Transitional Justice Movement (Cambridge University Press, 2017), which examines the campaigns for a truth commission to redress human rights abuses committed in the course of the war during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, the decades-long armed conflict in Colombia, and US detention policies in the War on Terror. Drawing on twelve years of fieldwork, over 200 interviews, archival and survey research, Rowen’s book considers how transitional justice developed as an idea around which a loosely structured movement emerged and then became professionalized, eventually making truth commissions a standard response to mass violence. By exploring how this movement developed, as well as efforts to establish truth commissions in the Balkans, Colombia, and the US, this talk will address the different processes through which political actors translate new legal ideas such as transitional justice into political action. As will be argued, the malleability of legal ideas and policy interventions such as transitional justice and truth commissions, is both an asset and a liability for those striving to ensure accountability, improve survivor well-being, and prevent future violence.

    Contact

    Lori Wells


    Speakers

    Dr. Jamie Rowen
    University of Massachussetts - Amherst


    Sponsors

    Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

    Centre for European, Russian. and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 2nd Bordering Families: Kinship Migration and Immigration Bureaucracy in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT
    About 45% of foreign residents in South Korea are women, and the majority of them come to South Korea on kinship-related legal status. This talk investigates gendered bordering practices in “temporary ethno-kinship visa programs” which requires migrants to provide proof and justification to immigration authorities when extending their visas. Using extensive ethnographic data, this talk will demonstrate how migrants experience and contest such bordering practices in courts, immigration offices and other government agencies, as well as in their daily lives. Through an in-depth focus on marriage migrants from Vietnam and co-ethnic migrants from China, this talk will discuss how two groups of migrant women make contested kinship claims to the South Korean state:. Using Balibar’s notion of “being a border” and Zelizer’s ideas about the intimate economy, this talk conceptualises the border as a dynamic site where notions of membership, family and speculative capital are contested. Focusing on the technical aspect of defining and adjudicating family through immigration measures will allow us to see the performative account of “governmentality” and procedural contradictions in the grey areas of the law. It will also enable us to analyse state actions and migrant responses to them organically as each traverses justifications of family, immigration and economy.

    BIOGRAPHY
    Sohoon Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. Her postdoctoral research project explores the ‘informal’ politics between the migrant care workers and their employers in the liminal space of immigration, social protection and labour. Building upon her PhD thesis, she is currently working on a book manuscript on the temporality of ethno-kinship migration in South Korea through a combination of ethnography, in-depth personal and group interviews and analysis of laws and policies. Her research interests also include multicultural (damunhwa) policies in South Korea, return migrants and bottom-up development in Indonesia, and NGO-Trade Union relationship in migrant movement in South Korea. Prior to her PhD studies, she worked at Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) in areas of ASEAN human rights mechanisms, indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia, and documentation of human rights violation. She has also undertaken consultancies with UN Women, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES), and other NGOs to write on topics of migrant domestic workers, intersectionality and discrimination and labour rights protections in South Korea.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Cynthia Cranford
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Sohoon Lee
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 2nd De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the end of the Old Regime

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 2, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Glendon College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 5th Geopolitics and Security Shifts in East Asia - Perspective from Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 5, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    There have been a number of dynamics impacting the geopolitical landscape in East Asia over the past few years. The most acute – and recent – examples of this have been the intensifying provocations from North Korea, which continues to look at enhancing its nuclear and missile program. But, there are also a number of other critical changes in the region – from new leadership in South Korea to leadership consolidation in China. The region also continues to adapt to a new administration in the US and its changing views on trade and – perhaps – alliances. All of these factors have made Japan’s geo-strategic environment more complex. How is Japan adapting to this change and what are the tripwires to watch for?

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    Jonathan Berkshire Miller
    Speaker
    Senior Visiting Fellow, Japan Institute of International Affairs

    David Welch
    Chair
    Dean’s Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Endowed Chair Program in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs, University of Toronto; Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 5th Book Launch: Toward a Better World: Memoirs of a Life in International and Development Economics, by Gerry Helleiner

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 5, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Towards a Better World describes the life, times and perspectives of Gerry Helleiner, a Canadian activist and university-based economist, who worked for roughly 40 years with developing countries and international organizations. In his memoir, Towards a Better World, Helleiner recounts the profound early experiences in Africa that propelled him into a rewarding career devoted to research, advice and teaching in international economics, economic development and global poverty reduction.

    Join Gerry Helleiner, in dialogue with Antoinette Handley of the University of Toronto Department of Political Science, as he discusses the experiences and insights behind his new book. Introductory remarks by Stephen Lewis. Books for purchase and refreshments available.


    Speakers

    Gerry Helleiner
    Canadian Activist and University-based Economist

    Antoinette Handley
    University of Toronto Department of Political Science



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 6th Re-storying Indigenous Geographies: a story of urban Ainu migration in comparative context

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 6, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Questions of Indigeneity in the Asia-Pacific Seminar Series

    Description

    Abstract:

    In recent years, the task of “restorying” has been identified as an important strategy in making space for the counternarratives of the nation-state from the perspective of Indigenous histories. Here, I use four stories to start to tell a different history of Indigenous Ainu life in Japan. The stories recount Ainu experiences of migration to Tokyo and other cities since the early 1900s. Beyond their narrative content, I explain how these stories are part of a broader political project that urban Ainu leaders have used for over forty years to contest and resist the ‘regionalization’ of Indigenous Ainu affairs to Hokkaido. Using the Ainu situation as my reference point, I develop a comparative conversation about the transformation of Indigenous geographies across the Pacific and elaborate on the fraught politics but also moral value of thinking with urban mobilities. I end with reflections on an exchange between Tokyo Ainu and Montreal Inuit in Osaka in 2003 and its relevance for my current project.

    Biography:

    Mark Watson is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Concordia University. His main area of research concerns the comparative analysis of urban Indigenous collectivity, self-organization and mobility. This focus informs broader, on-going interest in practices and theories of action-oriented and collaborative research.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Mark Watson
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 8th 150 Years After the Meiji Restoration--Japanʼs Global Engagement Then and Now

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 8, 201811:30AM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (at Hoskin Avenue)
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    Description

    Japan is currently celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Meiji Restoration. Canada’s own sesquicentennial year just ended. And this year marks the 90th anniversary of the formal establishment of Canada-Japan diplomatic relations. The questions motivating this symposium reflect on those seminal moments. What can we learn from Japan’s early global engagement and its embrace of modernity? What are the implications for Japan’s current leadership and diplomacy in regional and global settings? What needs to be done to strengthen relationships between Canada and Japan and to deepen their cooperation in pursuit of shared interests? A distinguished group of speakers from Japan and Canada will address such questions and open an important, future-oriented conversation.

    Draft Program:

    11:30-12:00 Registration and light lunch

    12:00-13:15 Welcome
    Professor Randall Hansen, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Ms Takako Ito, Consul General of Japan, Toronto

    Professor David Welch, Dean’s Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Endowed Chair Program in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs, University of Toronto;
    Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo

    Opening Keynote

    Ms Koko Kato, Special Advisor to the Cabinet
    “Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution in Heavy Industry”

    13:15-15:00 Panel 1: Japan’s Entry into International Society

    Featured speaker: Professor Tomoko Okagaki, Dokkyo University

    Commentators: Professor Robert Vipond, Director, Department of Political Science;
    Ms Deanna Horton, Munk School of Global Affairs

    15:00-15:30 Break

    15:30-17:30 Panel 2: Japan’s Future Challenges: Lessons from the Meiji Era

    Featured speaker: Professor Yuichi Hosoya, International Politics, Keio University

    Commentator: Professor David Welch

    17:30-18:30 Closing Roundtable Discussion

    Dr. Sarah Taylor, Director-General for North Asia and Oceania, Global Affairs Canada
    Professor Yuichi Hosoya
    Professor Tomoko Okagaki
    Ms Koko Kato

    18:30-19:30 Reception

    Panel 1: Japan’s Entry into International Society with feature speaker ProfessorTomoko Okagaki

    What did the Meiji Restoration in 1868 entail for Japanese society, for its external relations, and for international society as a whole? The Meiji Restoration represented not only the official return to imperial rule from the Shogunate system, but also Japan’s modern nation-building and entry into international society. How did Japan embrace international constraints placed by the Euro-dominant international society of the late 19th century? How did Japan embark on reforms and restructuring of feudal society? What explains the rapidity and seeming facility of Japan in accepting international norms of the era? With particular focus on Japan’s conformity with international law, the talk will cover the nature of Japan’s encounter with the West and discuss universal themes involving nation-building and accession to international society by latecomer states. Meiji Japan’s experience may also share a common motif of foreign policy with Canada, which gradually achieved its diplomatic independence from Britain since Confederation, searching for its place in the changing distribution of power in the international system.

    Panel 2: Japan’s Future Challenges: Lessons from the Meiji Era with featured speaker Professor Yuichi Hosoya

    Abstract forthcoming

    Speaker Bios:

    Ms Koko Kato is Special Advisor to the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan; Project Coordinator, Sakubei Yamamoto Collection inscribed in Memory of the World; Managing Director, National Congress of Industrial Heritage Foundation; Coordinator, Cabinet Secretariat Industrial History Project Team; and Coordinator, The World Heritage Council for the Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution. Ms Kato graduated from Keio University, majoring in literature. She built up her career as a conference interpreter, and by working at CBS News, Tokyo branch. After completing the Master of Community and Regional Planning (MCRP) program at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, she started her own business in Tokyo. She has also devoted her energies to the research on domestic and international industrial heritages. She played the leading role in the inscription of the “Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution – Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining” on the World Heritage List in 2015. Publication: “Industrial Heritage” (Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Inc., 1998) as well as many articles in magazines such as “Gakutou” and “Chiri.” Ms Kato also scripted and total produced the Nomination file on the “Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution” to be inscribed on the World Heritage List.

    HOSOYA Yuichi is Professor of International Politics at Keio University, Tokyo. He is also Senior Researcher at the Institute for International Policy Studies (IIPS), Senior Fellow at The Tokyo Foundation (TKFD), and also Adjunct Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA). Professor Hosoya was a member of the Advisory Board at Japan’s National Security Council (NSC) (2014-2016). He was also a member of Prime Minister’s Advisory Panel on Reconstruction of the Legal Basis for Security (2013-14), and Prime Minister’s Advisory Panel on National Security and Defense Capabilities (2013), in which capacity he assisted to draft Japan’s first National Security Strategy. Professor Hosoya studied international politics at Rikkyo (BA), Birmingham (MIS), and Keio (Ph.D.). He was a visiting professor and Japan Chair (2009–2010) at Sciences-Po in Paris (Institut d’Études Politiques) and a visiting fellow (Fulbright Fellow, 2008–2009) at Princeton University. His research interests include the postwar international history, British diplomatic history, Japanese foreign and security policy, and contemporary East Asian international politics. His comments appeared at New York Times, Washington Post, Financial Times, USA Today, Die Welt and Le Monde, as well as at major Japanese media.

    Tomoko T. Okagaki (Ph.D., The University of Michigan, 2005) is Professor of Political Science at Dokkyo University in Japan and author of The Logic of Conformity: Japan’s Entry in International Society (The University of Toronto Press, 2013). She was a visiting student at the University of Toronto (Sankei Scholarship) in 1986-1987 and also studied Canadian foreign policy at the University of British Columbia as a recipient of Government of Canada Award 1988-89, obtaining her master’s degree there. Her long-standing research interests in international politics include, inter alia, state socialization, comparative regionalism, and theories of international relations. She held an Abe Fellowship from 2008-2010, spending a total of two years at Harvard University, as an academic associate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and as a visiting scholar at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies. In 2014 she taught Asian regionalism at le Département de Géographie, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne as a professeure invitée and at le Centre d’etudes japonaises, L’institut national des langues et civilisations orientales as a chercheuse invitée.

    Robert Vipond is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Centre for the Study of the United States at the University of Toronto.
    He has written broadly on the political development of Canada. This includes co-editorship of Roads to Confederation: The Making of Confederation, 1867 (U of T Press, 2017), a two-volume anthology of leading essays on the Confederation era.

    Chair:

    David A. WELCH (Ph.D., Harvard University, 1990), Dean’s Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Endowed Chair Program in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs, University of Toronto; CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs; Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo; and Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation. Dr. Welch is author of Painful Choices: A Theory of Foreign Policy Change (Princeton University Press, 2005), Justice and the Genesis of War (Cambridge University Press, 1993), and co-editor of Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World (University of Toronto Press, 2011). He has recently been researching and writing on Asia-Pacific Security, with a particular focus on confidence, trust, empathy, threat perception, misperception, North Korea, the East China Sea, and the South China Sea.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 8th Conceiving Hunger in the Soviet Union at War: Between Heroism and Humiliation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 8, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Hunger was a defining feature of the Second World War in the Soviet Union. While hunger was nothing new to many Soviet citizens, the war politicized hunger in new ways and generated distinct ways of conceiving of hunger’s effects. This talk will examine contemporaries’ reflections on the hungry body and the hungry mind in Leningrad and beyond, and will address the way hunger both underpinned and threatened to destabilize wartime myths of sacrifice and solidarity.

    Rebecca Manley is an Associate Professor of History at Queen’s University. She is the author of To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War (Cornell University Press, 2009). She is currently working on a SSHRC funded book length provisionally entitled Tsar Hunger: Conceiving Hunger in Modern Russia. The project offers a fresh perspective on the place of hunger in modern Russian history by examining the way writers and revolutionaries, political economists and physiologists, government officials and philanthropists conceptualized and attempted to come to grips with hunger.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Manley
    Queen's University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 9th Climate Change and Population Growth: Future Threats of Genocide and Solutions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 9, 20189:00AM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    As human rights appear to recede from the international agenda to be replaced by a new wave of nationalism and right-wing populism, it is important to remind the world that massive violations of human rights, including genocide, continue to threaten large numbers of people. As the nature of these threats changes from violence engineered by nation states to more dispersed forms of violence perpetrated by criminal groups and national/religious based organizations such as ISIS, confrontation with these altered forms of violence must be addressed. If we are to create an agenda to once again create consciousness of the great importance of these events and to reignite the willingness and create an initiative to confront and prevent these changing forms of genocidal violence, we must identify them and proceed to formulate policies to deal with them.

    To these ends, this symposium and discussion will bring together two of the latest analyses by two of the most prominent scholars in the field. After presenting their new insights this symposium will present commentaries and analysis, including raising critical questions to be addressed and open these up for a hopefully wide-ranging discussion.

    Contact

    Megan Reid


    Speakers

    Dr. Alex Alvarez
    Speaker
    Author of, “Unstable Ground: Climate Change, Conflict and Genocide

    Dr. James Tyner
    Speaker
    Author of "From Rice Fields to Killing Fields: Nature, Life, and Labor under the Khmer Rouge"

    Dr. Maureen Hiebert
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Calgary

    Dr. Herbert Hirsch
    Discussant
    Professor of Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University

    Dr. Roger Smith
    Discussant
    Professor Emeritus of Government, College of William and Mary

    Dr. Henry Theriault
    Discussant
    Professor and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Worcester State University


    Co-Sponsors

    Zoryan Institute of Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 9th Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 9, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Biography:

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Christian Lee Novetzke
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 10th Community Screening of Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼 & Conversations with the Director JO Se-young and Korean feminist activist-scholars

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 10, 20182:15PM - 5:30PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
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    Description

    *******TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION HERE: https://variety-survival-talkshow.eventbrite.ca/

    *Open to Public; Tickets are free of charge; Bilingual (English subtitle & Korean-English interpretation for the panel is provided) (감독과의 대화: 한국어/영어 통역)

    Title: Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼
    Director: JO Se-young
    Genre: Documentary
    Production: South Korea 2009
    Running time: 72 min (panel and open Q&A the director will follow screening)
    Doors Open: 2:15pm
    Screening Starts: 2:30pm
    Audio: Korean (English subtitles)

    Variety Survival Talkshow 버라이어티 생존토크쇼, an award-winning documentary, follows the narrative of South Korean women who have come together to break the silence about sexual violence. It is a story of survival and resilience, but also desires, intimacy, and collective solidarity for social change. On the International Women’s Day in 2018, in the #MeToo moment across national borders, we hope this documentary and the discussion with the Director Jo Se-young, together with feminist activist-scholars Youn Joung Kim and Hae Yeon Choo, will inspire us think through what women’s citizenship means, reminding us how the personal is ever more political.

    Director JO Se-young has directed numerous critically-acclaimed feature documentaries with a focus on gender and sexual politics in South Korea. She made her debut in film directing in 2005 with . She received the Jinbo Award at the Seoul Independent Documentary Film and Video Festival with (2009). She also won the White Goose Award at the DMZ Korean International Documentary Film Festival and other awards with , on women’s experiences with abortion.

    Youn Joung Kim is a feminist activist-scholar and Ph.D. student in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University. She appears in this documentary as a member of the feminist group against sexual violence in South Korea. Her research interests revolved around sex work and U.S. militarization in South Korea.

    Hae Yeon Choo is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Affiliated Faculty of the Asian Institute and the Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016) on labor and marriage migration and the question of migrant rights and citizenship in South Korea.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    JO Se-young
    Film director

    Youn Joung Kim
    Ph.D Student, Gender, Feminist, and Women's Studies, York University

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    Hope21: Korean Progressive Network in Canada

    Toronto Korean Film Festival (TKFF)

    Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto

    Cinema Studies Student Union (CINSSU) at the University of Toronto

    Centre for Feminist Research at York University

    Gender, Feminist, & Women's Studies at York University

    York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 12th German Ostpolitik and the 'Ukraine Crisis': Berlin's Changing Approach to Russia after the Annexation of Crimea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 12, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The spectacular events of 2014 – the annexation of Crimea, start of the war in the Donets Basin, shooting of Malysian airliner MH17 over Eastern Ukraine, etc. – have changed German perceptions of the current Russian leadership fundamentally, as expressed in far going shifts in public discourse and opinion. Gradually, this change of position has also been noted in Ukraine. While there was in summer 2014 still an inapt Ukrainian “Mrs Ribbentropp” against Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor is today perceived, by most Ukrainian political observers, as one of the most pro-Ukrainian Western leaders. Nevertheless, an array of continuing formal and informal ties between Russia and Germany (economic, cultural, political etc.) continues to exert a largely unhealthy influence on German society and politics, as they often are used by the Kremlin to manipulate German decision and opinion making. These attempts are eased by deep-seated pathologies in post-war German foreign political thought including escapist pacifism, anti-Americanism, and mis-perceptions of the East European past and present as well as Germany’s role therein. The continuing significant German trade with Russia, and only slowly improving public knowledge about Ukraine are preventing an already disillusioned political class in Berlin to take a more resolute stance within the current Russian-Western confrontation.

    ANDREAS UMLAND studied politics and Russian affairs in Leipzig, Berlin, Oxford, Stanford and Cambridge. He taught at the Urals State University, St. Antony’s College Oxford, Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Catholic University of Eichstaett and Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. Since 2014, he is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation in Kyiv. He is also general editor of the book series “Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society” and consulting editor for the “Journal of Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Andreas Umland
    Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation in Kyiv, Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    John Yaremko Chair in Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 12th Impunity as State Formation: A New History of Post-Absolutist Thailand

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 12, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Max Weber famously characterized the state as the entity holding the monopoly on legitimate violence in the polity. What if, instead, the state is formed through the exercise of impunity, or the persistent and repeated failure to be held to account for illegitimate violence? In this paper, I develop a framework of impunity as state formation grounded in a new history of post-absolutist Thailand. Three key moments since the end of the absolute monarchy in 1932 – a 1958 coup that claimed to respect the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, an investigation into state violence at the height of the Cold War that enhanced its cover-up, and the emergence of a dialectic of who can be killed with impunity and who cannot be impugned in the late reign of Rama IX – are key components of this history and invite new approaches to the study of law, human rights, and sovereignty.

    Biography:

    Tyrell Haberkorn is an Associate Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and writes about state violence and dissident cultural politics in Thailand. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law and Violence in Northern Thailand (University of Wisconsin Press, 2011) and In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand (University of Wisconsin Press, 2018). Her essays and translations have appeared in Dissent, Foreign Affairs, openDemocracy, and Prachatai.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 14th Child victims and female perpetrators: Dealing with the Nazi-murder of disabled children in the post-war Soviet Union

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 14, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In November 1943, shortly after the liberation of the occupied Soviet territories by the Red Army, three mass graves with the bodies of 144 children were discovered in a former colony for disabled children in Zaporizhia region. The disabled children had been shot in two mass murder actions by a German SS special unit in October 1941 and in March 1943. In the course of the NKVD investigations of the case, seven former Soviet employees of the colony, among them four women, were put on trial and convicted for complicity with the Germans in the crime. The trial documentation in many ways presents a fascinating historical resource: First, it deals with an understudied context of Nazi-crimes in the Soviet Union in WWII: the murder of disabled people. Second, it shows competing logics and possibilities of action of the Soviet defendants. Third, it is one of the few examples that show how Soviet postwar justice dealt with female collaborators. And fourth, it reveals to a certain extent problems of the Soviet treatment of disabled persons in prewar times.

    Tanja Penter is professor of Eastern European History at Heidelberg University, Germany. Her research interests include: comparison of dictatorships, Soviet war crimes trials, questions of transitional justice and compensation for Nazi crimes and memory policies in the Soviet Union and its successor states. Her books include: Kohle für Stalin und Hitler. Arbeiten und Leben im Donbass 1929 bis 1953 (Essen 2010). She is a member of the German-Russian and the German-Ukrainian Commission of Historians and of the scientific board of the German Historical Institute in Moscow.


    Speakers

    Tanja Penter
    Heidelberg University


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 15th China’s 19th Party Congress: Leadership, Decision-Making, and Political Succession

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 15, 201810:00AM - 11:30AM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    China’s 19th Party Congress of October 2017 is a landmark in Xi Jinping’s leadership. Predictably Xi was “re-elected” as general secretary and he began his second term in a new position of strength, although he is still subjected to a number of constraints. The important personnel changes at the Party Congress will be fleshed out at the National People’s Congress in early March 2018 when Premier Li Keqiang forms his cabinet. This will provide more clues to the continuities and changes in China’s leadership changeover, decision-making specifics, and the pattern of political succession. In addition to these issues, the paper will also attempt to address the opportunities and challenges confronting the Xi Jinping leadership. As such, the paper is a third in a series of talks about the 19th Party Congress sponsored by the Asian Institute.

    Biography:

    Dr. Alfred L. Chan is professor of political science at Huron University College, London, Ontario. An alumnus of the University of Toronto, he has maintained his affiliation with the university (and the Asian Institute) since graduation. Current research projects include one on power and policy during the Xi Jinping era and another one on the Hu Jintao era.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Alfred Chan
    Professor, Department of Political Science, Huron University College


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 15th Trade and Economic Growth in Asia and the Pacific: A Multilateral Development Bank Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 15, 20182:00PM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Stephen Groff, Vice President of Operations for Southeast/East Asia and the Pacific at the Asian Development Bank will discuss how regional cooperation and integration, technology, and value chains all help contribute to trade and economic growth in Asia and the Pacific.

    Stephen P. Groff is responsible for the full range of ADB’s operations in East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. His mandate includes establishing strategic and operational priorities in his areas of responsibility, producing investment and technical assistance operations amounting to approximately $5 billion annually, managing an existing portfolio of about $31 billion, and leading about 650 staff.

    In addition, Mr. Groff supports ADB’s President in managing ADB’s overall operations, represents ADB in high-level multilateral fora, and contributes to managing its relationships with its 67 member country shareholders, other multilateral financial institutions, and key government, private sector, and civil society partners.

    Prior to joining ADB, Mr. Groff was Deputy Director for Development Cooperation at the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) where he led OECD’s work on a wide range of development-related economic and political issues. He also served as OECD’s envoy to the G20 Working Group on Development and was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council. Prior to this he was the Deputy Vice-President for Operations at the Washington-based Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where he helped set up the agency and led MCC programs while advising the CEO on development issues, strategy, and policy. Prior to MCC, Mr. Groff held several staff positions at the ADB. Before this, Mr. Groff was the deputy director and chief economist on a large U.S. Agency for International Development project designed to encourage private sector development in the southern Philippines, a Program Director for the U.S. Refugee Program, and a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer.

    Mr. Groff has worked across Asia, Africa, and Latin America and writes regularly on development issues. He also serves on a number of advisory boards for development-related organizations.

    Mr. Groff holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Harvard University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Biology from Yale University.


    Speakers

    Stephen Groff
    Vice President of Operations for Southeast/East Asia and the Pacific at the Asian Development Bank


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 16th Media Politics in China: Improvising Power Under Authoritarianism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 16, 20182:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Who watches over the party-state? In this engaging analysis, Maria Repnikova reveals the webs of an uneasy partnership between critical journalists and the state in China. More than merely a passive mouthpiece or a dissident voice, the media in China also plays a critical oversight role, one more frequently associated with liberal democracies than with authoritarian systems. Chinese central officials cautiously endorse media supervision as a feedback mechanism, as journalists carve out space for critical reporting by positioning themselves as aiding the agenda of the central state. Drawing on rare access in the field, Media Politics in China examines the process of guarded improvisation that has defined this volatile partnership over the past decade on a routine basis and in the aftermath of major crisis events. Combined with a comparative analysis of media politics in the Soviet Union and contemporary Russia, the book highlights the distinctiveness of Chinese journalist-state relations, as well as the renewed pressures facing them in the Xi era.
    The book will be available for sale at the venue.

    Biography:

    Maria Repnikova is a scholar of political communication in illiberal contexts, with a focus on Chinese media politics. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Global Communication and a Director of the Center for Global Information Studies at Georgia State University. Maria’s work examines critical journalism, political propaganda, cyber nationalism, and global media branding in China, drawing some comparisons to Russia. Her work appeared in the China Quarterly, New Media & Society, Journal of Contemporary China, as well as in Foreign Affairs andForeign Policy, amongst other venues. Her book, Media Politics in China: Improvising Power Under Authoritarianism, is just out with Cambridge University Press. In the past, Maria was a post-doctoral fellow at the Annenberg School for Communication. Maria holds a PhD in Politics from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Maria Repnikova
    Assistant Professor, Global Communication, Georgia State University


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 16th Not Yet: Indigeneity, Antiblackness, and Anticolonial Liberation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    In the song “Immigrants (We Get the Job Done)” from Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton Mixtape, the settlement of the Americas is framed through liberal understandings of arrival and immigration that transform chattel slavery and forced labor into the exceptional narratives of pulling oneself up from hard labor to freedom. It reflects current political mobilizations against xenophobia and immigration bans that insist that we are all immigrants to the Americas. And it erases completely the ongoing colonization of Indigenous peoples and lands. At the same time, Indigenous studies has come under critique from a range of scholars who argue that assertions of sovereignty and land hinge on the afterlife of slavery, the endemic possessive logics of antiblackness constitutive of new world politics, and the xenophobia of territories and borders. Rather than approach these discussions as representative of a historical and ontological impasse, this talk will engage recent work in Indigenous critical studies and Black studies to think through how antiblackness and colonization produce dispossession. How might we imagine anticolonial liberation outside and beyond the structures of settler whiteness?

    Biography:

    Jodi A. Byrd is a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and associate professor of English and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she is also a faculty affiliate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. She is the author of Transit of Empire: Indigenous Critiques of Colonialism (Minnesota, 2011). Her articles have appeared in American Indian Quarterly, Cultural Studies Review, Interventions, J19, College Literatures, Settler Colonial Studies, and American Quarterly. Her teaching and research focuses on issues of indigeneity, gender, and sexuality at the intersections of political studies, postcolonial studies, queer studies, comparative ethnic studies, and technology studies. Her current manuscript in process, entitled Indigenomicon: American Indians, Videogames, and Structures of Genre, interrogates how the structures of digital code intersect with issues of sovereignty, militarism, and colonialism.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Jodi A. Byrd
    Associate professor, English and Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 20th The Rural Voice on Reality TV: The Politics of Timbre in the Ukrainian ‘Voice’

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 20, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper concerns the politics and aesthetics of what is known in post-Soviet Ukraine as the avtentyka singing voice (автентичний голос), which translates literally as the “authentic” voice. My focus is on the problem that this avtentyka vocal timbre creates when it appears in the context of a popular reality TV singing competition called Holos Krainy, or “Voice of the Nation,” part of the global “Voice” franchise that has aired in Ukraine since 2011. Beyond the clashes of style and genre that occur when avtentyka singers who use village timbres sing modern pop hits, I attend to a more general politics of vocal timbre to examine how the avtentyka voice, which sits within a historical trajectory of resistance to state power, challenges the conventional wisdom about how the folkloric necessarily points backwards, toward an essentialized national past. Rather, I consider avtentyka and its iconic vocal timbre as a form of late Soviet expressive culture that also has the somewhat paradoxical potential to operate in today’s Ukrainian mediasphere as a forward-looking expressive form. Rooted in ethnographic research among avtentyka practitioners, I examine how the politicized timbres of avtentyka reject logics of success according to the standards of reality TV “democratainment” and remake failure in the competition as an act of refusal—of the limited musical forms that dominate Ukrainian media and as an assertion of the ungovernable wildness of Ukrainian rural expressivity.

    Maria Sonevytsky is currently Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bard College. Her first book, Wild Music: Sound and Sovereignty in Ukraine, is forthcoming on Wesleyan University Press. In the fall of 2018, she will join the ethnomusicology faculty at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Maria Sonevytsky
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Bard College

    Joshua Pilzer
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology in the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    University of Toronto Ethnomusicology Roundtable

    Wilfried Laurier’s Anthropology Program at the Faculty of Arts, Office of the Vice President Academic & Provost, Anthropology Students' Association


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 23rd Putting the Postcolonial into the trente glorieuses: Bidonvilles, the Autoroute A8, and the Aéroport Nice-Côte d’Azur

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 23, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This paper is part of a larger effort, undertaken now by several historians of modern France, to write workers from North Africa back into French history during the period 1945-1975. Most of that work has understandably considered Paris and Marseille, which had the largest concentrations of maghrébin workers. Here the focus is on the French Riviera and the links between transnational mass tourism and the migration of North African workers who helped build hotels, vacation rentals, the new airport (soon the second busiest in France after those of Paris), and France’s first autoroute requiring tolls, A8. They did so while living in bidonvilles (shantytowns), ultimately razed for the autoroute and for the beautification of the airport. North Africans were thus critical in constructing the postwar Côte d’Azur, yet they have been hitherto written out of the historical narrative of this imagined tourist “paradise.”

    Stephen L. Harp is Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Akron. He is the author of Learning to Be Loyal: Primary Schooling and Nation Building in Alsace and Lorraine, 1850-1940 (1998), Marketing Michelin: Advertising and Cultural Identity in Twentieth-Century France (2001), Au Naturel: Naturism, Nudism, and Tourism in Twentieth-Century France (2014), and Rubber in World History: Empire, Industry and the Everyday (2016). His current research focuses on the environmental and social impacts of mass tourism on the French Riviera.


    Speakers

    Prof. Stephen Harp
    The University of Akron


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 26th Book Talk: The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 26, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The Killing Season examines one of the largest and swiftest instances of mass killing and incarceration in the twentieth century—the shocking anti-leftist purge that gripped Indonesia in 1965–66, leaving some five hundred thousand people dead and more than a million others in detention. Challenging conventional narratives that portray the violence as arising spontaneously from religious, cultural, and social conflicts, the book argues that it was instead the product of a deliberate campaign led by the Indonesian Army. It also details the critical role played by the United States, Britain, and other major powers in facilitating the mass murder and incarceration – and the more than 50 years of silence and inaction that followed. In contrast to prevailing approaches, The Killing Season seeks to locate Indonesia’s experience in a comparative historical framework. In doing so, it engages wider theoretical debates about the logic and legacies of mass killing and incarceration, as well as the histories of human rights, US foreign policy, and the Cold War.

    Speaker Biographies:

    Geoffrey Robinson is a Professor of History at UCLA where he teaches and writes about political violence, genocide, human rights, and mass incarceration. He received his PhD from Cornell University. His major works include: The Dark Side of Paradise: Political Violence in Bali (Cornell, 1995); East Timor 1999: Crimes against Humanity (Elsham & Hak, 2006); “If You Leave Us Here, We Will Die”: How Genocide Was Stopped in East Timor (Princeton, 2010); and most recently, The Killing Season: A History of the Indonesian Massacres, 1965-66 (Princeton University Press, 2018). Before coming to UCLA, Robinson worked for six years at Amnesty International’s Research Department in London, and in 1999 he served as a Political Affairs Officer with the United Nations in Dili, East Timor. He is currently co-editing a book of photographs and images related to the mass violence of 1965-66 in Indonesia.

    Margaret MacMillan is a Professor of History at the University of Toronto and the former Warden of St. Antony’s College.
    She is the author of the Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Geoffrey Robinson
    Keynote
    Professor, Department of History, UCLA

    Margaret MacMillan
    Opening Remarks
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2018

  • Tuesday, April 3rd Tian Xia and the Evolution of Chinese Leadership: former New York Times Asia Correspondent Howard French on his Book “Everything Under the Heavens"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 3, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    French describes the foundation of a resilient Pax Sinica as “a basic proposition that was reasonably consistent: accept our superiority and we will confer upon you political legitimacy...”, a tribute system that dates back as far as the Han dynasty. Through its nine-dash- line diplomacy and beyond, China is now “increasingly determined to brook no rivals in the region”, including the USA. Join Howard French in an insightful discussion of how, based on its history, China might exercise its growing national power in the decades ahead.

    Biography:

    Howard French reported from Africa for The Washington Post and at The New York Times was bureau chief in Central America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa; Japan; and China. He has also written for The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, and Rolling Stone, among other U.S. publications. His work has earned him two Overseas Press Club awards and two Pulitzer Prize nominations. He is the author of A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa and China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants Are Building a New Empire in Africa. Mr. French is on the faculty of the Columbia University School of Journalism and lives in New York City.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Howard French
    Speaker
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Professor of Journalism, Columbia Journalism School, Columbia University in the City of New York

    Lynette Ong
    Chair

    Diana Fu
    Discussant


    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 5th Map Men: Lives and Deaths of Geographers in Transnational East Central Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 5, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Conflicts over turf are geo-coded by grievance, particularly in Europe’s tumultuous borderland pasts of German-Polish, Polish-Ukrainian, Polish-Jewish, Ukrainian-Russian, Hungarian-Romanian, and Hungarian-Jewish relations. In tales of flawed “great men” and their selves, historians too conveniently reify categories of nationality, rationality, or modernity to psychologize group behavior by language and religion, instead of delving into the eccentric worlds of individuals and social contexts for generating maps. This lecture re-grounds maps as intersubjective human artefacts, colored in by relational patterns of everyday frustration and status-conscious anxiety, petty jealousy and human pride.

    Where explanations fail, maps offer forensic clues: the obsessive passion for maps in matters of life and death, friendship and war, across borders and oceans from the 1870s to the 1950s. Looking at the mobile worlds of five “transnational Germans” who were also multilingual, Anglophile, and national-scientific geographers—Albrecht Penck (1858-1945) of Germany, Eugeniusz Romer (1871-1954) of Poland, Stepan Rudnyts’kyi (1877-1937) of Ukraine, Isaiah Bowman (1878-1950) of North America, Count Pál Teleki (1879-1941) of Hungary, he recreates the relationships of a generation of aspiring bourgeois experts. By retelling their lives and deaths, he looks at the history of borderland conflict and digs into the personal lives of men whose prejudices helped to shape the emergence of geography and cartography as modern sciences out of pre-1914 Ostmitteleuropa.

    The lecture finally illustrates the ways in which today’s clickbait and functional grids depicted budding graphic projects on surreal and subjective terms. As maps are shipped around ever more dangerously as weapons, Seegel argues that they continue to define tensions of empire that are common to émigré trusteeships for mediating territorial conflict, as well as positions of privilege for a global technical intelligentsia’s multigenerational advancement.

    Steven Seegel is professor of Russian and European history at the University of Northern Colorado. He is the author of Mapping Europe’s Borderlands: Russian Cartography in the Age of Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2012), and Ukraine under Western Eyes: The Bohdan and Neonila Krawciw Ucrainica Map Collection (Harvard University Press, 2013). He has been a contributor to the fourth and fifth volumes of Chicago’s international history of cartography series, and has translated over 300 entries from Russian and Polish for the US Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos, 1933-1945, in multiple volumes, published jointly by Indiana University Press. He is also a former director at Harvard of the Ukrainian Research Institute’s summer exchange program. His most recent book, Map Men: Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe, is published by University of Chicago Press in April 2018.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Steven Seegel
    Speaker
    Professor of History, University of Northern Colorado

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 6th Pathways Magazine Volume 2, No. 2 Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 6, 20181:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 6th The History and Afterlives of a Medical Utopia: Exploring the Remains of Colonial Medicine in the Afro-Pacific World

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 6, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Guillaume Lachenal
    Université Paris Diderot


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 17th The 2018 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 17, 20185:30PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The 2018 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was founded in 1989 by Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber. The prize is a literary award for the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs that seeks to deepen public debate on significant international issues. Presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Foreign Policy magazine, the winning author receives $15,000.

    The
    2018 Short Listed Authors were announced on February 12, 2018. The winner will be announced on March 13 and invited to speak at a free public event at the Munk School of Global Affairs on April 17, 2018.

    Registration for the event ceremony will open in March 2018.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 19th 2018 Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Lecture: The Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 19, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMroom 100A, Jackman Humanities Institute
    170 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the course of the Wolodymyr Dylynsky Memorial Lecture, Professor Shore will present her new book, the Ukrainian Night: An Intimate History of Revolution.

    “This is a civilization that needs metaphysics,” Adam Michnik told Václav Havel in 2003. A decade later, on 21 November 2013, Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych unexpectedly reversed the course of his own stated foreign policy and declined to sign an association agreement with the European Union. Around 8 p.m. that day a thirty-two year-old Afghan-Ukrainian journalist, Mustafa Nayem, posted a note on his Facebook page: “Come on, let’s get serious. Who is ready to go out to the Maidan”—Kiev’s central square—“by midnight tonight? ‘Likes’ don’t count.” No one then knew that “likes don’t count”—a sentence that would have made no sense before Facebook—would bring about the return to metaphysics to Eastern Europe. While the world watched (or did not watch) the uprising on the Maidan as an episode in geopolitics, those in Kiev during the winter of 2013–14 lived the revolution as an existential transformation: the blurring of night and day, the loss of a sense of time, the sudden disappearance of fear, the imperative to make choices.

    The book will be available for purchase at the event.

    Marci Shore teaches European cultural and intellectual history. She received her M.A. from the University of Toronto in 1996 and her PhD from Stanford University in 2001. Before joining Yale’s history department, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University‘s Harriman Institute; an assistant professor of history and Jewish studies at Indiana University; and Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies at Yale. She is the author of The Taste of Ashes: The Afterlife of Totalitarianism in Eastern Europe (Crown, 2013), Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (Yale University Press, 2006) and the translator of Michal Glowinski‘s Holocaust memoir The Black Seasons (Northwestern University Press, 2005).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marci Shore
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History, Yale University

    Roman Senkus
    Chair
    Senior Editor, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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