« September 2017 - November 2017 December 2017 - Present

December 2017

  • Friday, December 1st "From Ojŏk to Nakkomsu: Media and Satire in South Korean Democratization"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 1, 20172:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT
    In 1970, the Park Chung Hee regime imprisoned Kim Chi-ha for publishing Ojŏk (Five Bandits), a lengthy satirical poem that dared to call the government a band of thieves. The poet on trial then turned the court into a stage for further dramatizing his resistance. Nearly half a century later, the “candlelight revolution” that brought down Park Chung Hee’s daughter from power turned the streets and social media into a fluid offline-online stage for a phenomenonal drama of resistance. But the candlelight revolution was preceded by what might be called a “podcast revolution,” launched in 2011 by the wildly parodic Nakkomsu (I am a petty cheat). Examining the role of political satire through Ojŏk and Nakkomsu, the talk will address the transformation and media-specific potency of “laughtivism” in South Korean democratization.

    BIOGRAPHY
    Professor Youngju Ryu is Associate Professor of Korean Literature and Director of the Korean Language Program in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan. Professor Ryu specializes in modern Korean literature and her areas of research expertise include aesthetics of dissidence, cultures of authoritarianism, and philosophies of reconciliation in twentieth-century Korea. She is the author of Writers of the Winter Republic: Literature and Resistance in Park Chung Hee’s Korea (Columbia University Press, 2016).

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Youngju Ryu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Korean Literature, University of Michigan

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 1st Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 1, 20173:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street, Room 2125
    University of Toronto
    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT.
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    A. Naomi Paik will address themes raised in her new book, Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps Since World War II, which grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Specifically, this talk will focus on both the bodily practices of and discourses surrounding prisoner practices of self-harm and the U.S. state’s efforts to preserve life—in particular, its force-feeding of hunger strikers at the current Guantánamo camp. By interpreting the testimonies of hunger strikers, Paik examines the prisoner body as a site of power and struggle waged between the U.S. state and the prisoners, who attempt to seize their own form of habeas corpus, taking their bodies back from the camp regime, by inflicting self-harm.

    A. Naomi Paik is assistant professor of Asian American studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American and comparative ethnic studies; U.S. imperialism; social and cultural approaches to legal studies; transnational and women of color feminisms; carceral spaces; and labor, race, and migration. Her manuscript, “Rightlessness: Testimonies from the Camp,” (UNC Press, 2016), reads testimonial narratives of subjects rendered rightless by the U.S. state through their imprisonment in camps. She has published articles on the indefinite detention of HIV-positive Haitian refugees at Guantánamo in Social Text and Radical History Review. She has also published on post-September 11th attacks on academic freedom, particularly on postcolonial studies, in Cultural Dynamics. She earned her doctorate in American studies from Yale University, and held the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow of Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the Early Career Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Humanities Center of the University of Pittsburgh.

    REGISTRATION IS NOT REQUIRED FOR THIS EVENT.

    Contact

    Stella Kyriakakis
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    A. Naomi Paik
    Assistant Professor, Asian American Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, December 4th What’s Going On with Spain?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 4, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    On October 1st, the government of the Spanish region of Catalonia held a referendum on independence in open defiance of a constitutional court ban. The ensuing police crackdown transformed the long simmering political stand-off from an internal affair to a news item worthy of international headlines. This talk is for anyone interested in the background to the issue, current developments, and future prospects and implications.

    Karlo Basta is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Memorial University of Newfoundland. As part of a broader research project on identity conflict in multinational states, he has followed the rise of Catalan secessionist movement since 2009.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Karlo Basta
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    Francisco Beltran
    Chair
    Lecturer, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 6th A Tale of Sub-human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 6, 20174:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    A Tale of Sub-human: The Rohingyas in Myanmar and Bangladesh

    The first discussion in the event series, Rohingya in Peril: Buddhist/Muslim tensions in Myanmar and beyond.

    The Rohingyas, considered by the United Nations as the world’s most persecuted people, have recently experienced unprecedented violence and brutality committed by Myanmar security forces and vigilantes. Following alleged attacks on Myanmar police posts and a military base by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) on August 25, 2017, Myanmar security forces indiscriminately fired on Rohingya civilians, burnt their houses down, raped girls and women, and killed thousands mercilessly in what the United Nations termed as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” This state-sponsored violence spurred 600,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh in the past two months. The Rohingyas have experienced intense, ongoing violence because they are non-citizens in Myanmar. In fact, citizenship is a legal status conferred by the state that makes non-citizens a new ‘other,’ a vulnerable category viewed as less than human that Uddin refers to as being treated as “sub-human.” This talk will focus on the state of the Rohingyas in Bangladesh and Myanmar illuminating an intricate relation of statelessness, human rights and the paradox of the “sub-human.”

    Biography

    Nasir Uddin is a cultural anthropologist based in Bangladesh and a professor of anthropology at the University of Chittagong. His research interests include statelessness and refugee studies; human rights and non-citizens; indigeneity and identity politics; the state in everyday life; the politics of marginality and vulnerability; and borderlands and border people, particularly those of Bangladesh and Myanmar, the Chittagong Hill Tracts, and South Asia. His publications include To Host or To Hurt: Counter-narratives on the Rohingya (Refugees) in Bangladesh (2012); Life in Peace and Conflict: Indigeneity and State in the Chittagong Hill Tracts (2017) and Indigeneity on the Move: Varying Manifestation of a Contested Concept (2017). Currently he is working on a new monograph, the Rohingyas: A Tale of Sub-Human (2018).

    Contact

    Sherry McGratten
    416-946-8901


    Speakers

    Nasir Uddin
    Speaker
    Professor, Anthropology, University of Chittagong

    Yasmin Khan
    Discussant
    PhD Student, Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies

    Department of Anthropology


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 6th A New Beginning: The Egyptological Department of the German Institute of Archaeology in Cairo after WW II

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 6, 20175:30PM - 7:30PMAnthropology Boardroom
    19 Russell Street
    2nd Floor, Room 246
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    Description

    The Second World War was a significant turning point in the history of institutionalized German archaeology in Egypt. Against the backdrop of the complete loss of all of its property in Egypt and of the ongoing political tensions between the young Federal Republic of Germany and Egypt’s Nasser regime, the German Archaeological Institute had to rebuild its department in Cairo. Germany’s new western-orientated foreign policy and the reparations agreement with Israel complicated their relationship with Egypt. The talk traces the developments from the first steps towards a reopening of the Cairo Department to the institute’s consolidation in the 1950s and early 1960s.


    Speakers

    Dr. Susanne Voss-Kern
    German Archaeological Institute, Cairo


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    The Archaeology Centre, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 7th European Leadership Within the G7 and the G20

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 7, 201710:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The G20 Research Group invites you to “European Leadership Within the G7 and the G20” featuring Marc Trouyet, French Consul General, Kevin McGurgan, UK Consul General, and Giuseppe Pastorelli, Italian Consul General.

    This panel discussion will highlight the perspectives of European G7 and G20 member states, understand their views on global governance, discuss priorities and commitments in international fora, and explore each nation’s relationship with Canada as we near the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix, Quebec.

    The panel will take place on December 7 from 10AM to 12PM in the library of the Munk School Observatory (315 Bloor Street W.) and will be followed by a coffee and tea reception.

    Contact

    Helene Emorine
    (416) 451-4104


    Speakers

    Marc Trouyet
    French Consul General

    Kevin McGurgan
    UK Consul General

    Giuseppe Pastorelli
    Italian Consul General


    Main Sponsor

    University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    G7 and G20 Research Groups

    Bill Graham Centerfor Contemporary International History

    Diplomats on Campus

    European Studies Students' Association

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 7th Countering Disinformation in the Post-Fact Era

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 7, 20172:00PM - 3:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Colonel Jay Janzen, Director of Military Strategic Communications for the Canadian Armed Forces, will highlight the hybrid disinformation tactics used by the Kremlin and ISIS in an effort to divide alliances, spread fear, and recruit extremists. His view is that the greatest threat to NATO allies is not a biological virus or a nuclear missile, but rather the large-scale ‘weaponization’ of information. Using real-world examples, he will demonstrate potential adversaries are targeting Canada’s government and Canadian military operations. Colonel Janzen will describe best-practices for countering disinformation and fake news, and will provide recommendations for military forces, the media, and citizens to protect themselves from trolls, bots, and echo-chambers.


    Speakers

    Colonel J. Janzen, CD
    Speaker
    Director, Military Strategic Communications, Canadian Armed Forces

    Carmen Cheung
    Moderator
    Professor, Global Practice Executive Director, Global Justice Lab Director, Research Partnerships Associate Director, Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice, Munk School of Global Affairs



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 7th That Is How I Lost My Mother: Jewish Narratives of the Ukrainian Famine 1932-33

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 7, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Based on hundreds of oral histories of Ukrainian Jews, the lecture discusses how Soviet Jews survived Famine, and how they made sense of their experiences.

    Anna Shternshis holds the position of Al and Malka Green Associate Professor of Yiddish studies and the director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. She received her doctoral degree (D.Phil) in Modern Languages and Literatures from Oxford University in 2001. Shternshis is the author of Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1923 – 1939 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006) and When Sonia Met Boris: An Oral History of Jewish Life under Stalin (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). She is the author of over 20 articles on the Soviet Jews during World War II, Russian Jewish culture and post-Soviet Jewish diaspora. Together with David Shneer, Shternshis co-edits East European Jewish Affairs, the leading journal in the field of East European Jewish Studies.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Anna Shternshis
    Speaker
    Al and Malka Green Associate Professor of Yiddish Studies, University of Toronto

    Frank Sysyn
    Chair
    Director, Toronto CIUS Office, University of Alberta


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th CSK Brown Bag Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 201712:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th Outcasts of Empire: Japan's Rule on Taiwan's "Savage Border," 1874-1945

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20173:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In his new book Outcasts of Empire, Paul D. Barclay probes the limits of modern nation-state sovereignty by positioning colonial Taiwan at the intersection of the declining Qing and ascending Japanese empires. Outcasts chronicles the lives and times of interpreters, chiefs, and trading-post operators along the far edges of the expanding international system, an area known as Taiwan’s “savage border.” In addition, Barclay boldly asserts the interpenetration of industrial capitalism and modern ethnic identities.

    By the 1930s, three decades into Japanese imperial rule, mechanized warfare and bulk commodity production rendered superfluous a whole class of mediators—among them, Kondo “the Barbarian” Katsusaburo, Pan Bunkiet, and Iwan Robao. Even with these unreliable allies safely cast aside, the Japanese empire lacked the resources to integrate indigenous Taiwan into the rest of the colony. The empire, therefore, created the Indigenous Territory, which exists to this day as a legacy of Japanese imperialism, local initiatives, and the global commoditization of culture.

    Paul D. Barclay teaches East Asian history at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. He is the general editor of the digital repository East Asia Image Collection and author of Outcasts of Empire: Japan’s Rule on Taiwan’s “Savage Border,” 1874-1945(University of California, 2017). Barclay’s research has received support from the National Endowment from the Humanities, the Social Science Research Council, the Japanese Council for the Promotion of Science, and the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Paul D. Barclay
    Speaker
    Chair, Asian Studies Professor, Department of History, Lafayette College

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th JIM DOAK LECTURE SERIES WITH MARK LILLA

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMAlliance française de Toronto
    Spadina Theatre
    24 Spadina Road
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    Description

    **Lecture in English followed by discussion in French and English.

    The May 7 French election has been portrayed in the North American Press as an overwhelming victory against the rise of populism. But a victory of what, exactly? That is an important question at this juncture in the history of the Fifth Republic. Emmanuel Macron’s rise was made possible by the collapse of all the major parties and the failure of social movements and unions to change much of anything in French economic and political life. Yet, despite Emmanuel Macron’s election populism will not disappear if France cannot stop Islamic terrorism. What are the chances of new parties and new movements forming? Is it finally time for a Sixth Republic- and if so, what might it look like?

    Marc Lilla, political scientist, historian of ideas, Journalist, is Professor of Humanities at Columbia University. He has written widely on French Politics and continental philosophy, notably in the New York Review of Books, The New York Times, Le Monde and Le Débat. His numerous publications include The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics (2017); The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016); The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals and Politics (2001); and French Thought: Political Philosophy (1994).

    Sponsors

    Alliance Française de Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre d'Études de la France et du Monde Francophone


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 8th From Lepsius to WW II – The History of German Egyptology in the 19th and early 20th Centuries

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 8, 20177:00PM - 9:00PMEarth Sciences Building,, Room B142
    5 Bancroft Avenue
    University of Toronto
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    Description

    German Egyptology boasts a long and varied history. Political upheavals and academic conflicts within the subject were the catalysts for a number of different developments. The lecture traces the history of the discipline in Germany, its successes and set-backs, from the mid-19th century beginnings under Karl Richard Lepsius to the outbreak of the Second World War.


    Speakers

    Dr. Susanne Voss-Kern
    German Archaeological Institute/DAI


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    SSEA Toronto

    German Academic Exchange Service


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 12th Democracy from the Bottom up: Unlocking the Potential of Community Councils

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 12, 20174:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Room 108N
    Toronto, ON M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In a number of cities around the world, community councils give local residents the power to get directly involved in local matters facing municipal government. In Toronto, City Council will soon consider the boundaries, mandates, and powers of its four community councils, which were created in 1998 to address the perceived lack of direct access to City Hall as a result of amalgamation.

    This panel will discuss the benefits and challenges of using bodies such as community councils to govern local decisions. In learning from the experiences in Toronto, Vancouver, and New York, this panel will explore whether community council-like bodies have the potential to create more accessible and participatory local governments.

    Contact

    Selena Zhang
    (416) 978-5117


    Speakers

    John Elvidge
    Speaker
    Deputy City Clerk, City of Toronto

    Jessica Silver
    Speaker
    Assistant Comptroller for Public Affairs & Chief of Strategic Operations, New York City Comptroller’s Office

    Edana Beauvais
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, McGill University

    Zachary Spicer
    Moderator
    Visiting Researcher, Institute on Municipal Finance & Governance



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 19th Building a Better Budget Process in Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 19, 20174:00PM - 5:30PMCanadiana Gallery
    14 Queen’s Park Crescent West
    Room CG-160
    Toronto, ON M5S 3K9
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    Description

    The City of Toronto’s 2018 municipal budget cycle is in full swing. Council’s Budget Committee has begun debating $12 billion worth of city spending based on a seemingly endless supply of financial reports compiled by staff. Making sense of the numbers is remarkably difficult, even for the closest City Hall watcher.

    To lift the veil, the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) and the U of T School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) are convening a panel that will shed light on how the annual process works and how it might be improved.
    How are budget decisions actually made? Who’s accountable? Is there meaningful opportunity for community input? What needs to change?

    Contact

    Jamila Allidina
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Shelley Carroll
    Speaker
    Toronto City Councillor for Ward 33 and former Budget Chair

    Benjamin Dachis
    Speaker
    Associate Director, Research, C.D. Howe Institute

    Joe Pennachetti
    Speaker
    IMFG Senior Fellow and former Toronto City Manager

    Riley Peterson
    Speaker
    Budget Lead, Toronto Youth Cabinet

    Gabriel Eidelman
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy & Governance, and co-founder of the University of Toronto City Hall Task Force



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2018

  • Wednesday, January 10th Meet and Greet the Consul-General of Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 10, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam


    Speakers

    Ms Takako Ito
    Consul-General of Japan in Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 12th China’s Financial System Is Threatened By Instability

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 12, 201810:00AM - 11:30AM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    China’s financial system is threatened by instability from high debt levels and financial risks. The nation is caught between promoting lending for growth purposes and dampening lending to reduce financial instability. Financial reforms that the government put in place this year are not being enforced, as banks hesitate to end lucrative funding channels. Will this end in crisis or stagnation? In this talk, Dr. Sara Hsu explores China’s unique circumstances and the possibility of crisis, discussing the origins of the debt debacle and assessing the perils posed to the financial system.

    Speaker Biography:
    Sara Hsu is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the State University of New York at New Paltz, and has published over six books and fifteen journal articles on the Chinese economy and financial sector. Hsu has published one of the only English language books on the topic of Chinese informal finance, entitled “Informal Finance in China: American and Chinese Perspectives”, as well as one of the only Chinese-language books on Chinese shadow banking. Her writings about current events in the Chinese economy have appeared in The Diplomat, the Nikkei Asian Review, East Asia Forum, China Brief, and China World. She is also a columnist with Forbes Magazine.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Sara Hsu
    Assistant Professor of Economics, State University of New York at New Paltz


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 12th Hong Kong Public Affairs and Social Service Society (UTHKPASS): Exploring the HKSAR, China and Taiwan - What Has Changed in the Past 20 Years and a Look Ahead to the Future

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 12, 201812:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    “Exploring the HKSAR, China and Taiwan – What Has Changed in the Past 20 Years and a Look Ahead to the Future” is an academic conference hosted by the University of Toronto Hong Kong Public Affairs and Social Service Society (UTHKPASS).

    As the first student-led academic conference at U of T focussing on Hong Kong issues, this conference serves to analyze the ever-changing social, economic and poltical dynamics in Hong Kong. The event will also consider Hong Kong’s relationship to China and the world in the post-handover era by examining the major issues of the past two decades and how these parallel issues in Taiwan and China.

    Discussion Questions:

    First Question/Topic: What implications does the political development of Hong Kong have on the Taiwanese Political climate?

    Second Question/Topic: What role can Hong Kong play in China’s future? What are the implications for Hong Kong with a foreseeable stronger China on the world stage?

    Please find the Eventbrite link here

    Speakers’ Bios

    Lynette Ong – Associate Professor of Political Science jointly apppinted by the Department of Political Science and the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Professor Lynette Ong is an expert in the politics and the political economy of China. With expertise in authoritarian politics and the political economy of development, she currently focuses on contentious politics in China and is undertaking a project on protest and land politics. Her book Prosper and Perish: Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China published by Cornell University Press has attracted lots of attention towards the non-sustainability of the “China Model”. Her publications have appeared or are forthcoming in Perspectives on Politics, Comparative Politics, International Political Science Review, China Quarterly and China Journal, etc.

    Tong Lam – Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies; Director, Global Taiwan Studies Program, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Professor Tong Lam focuses his research on the modern and contemporary history of China, amongst other interests. Lam cofounded the Critical China Studies Working Group and organized an international conference on Architectural Spectacle and Urbanism in (Post)socialist China. His current research lies in the relation between politics and aesthetics and entails the use of history, ethnography and visual arts, a cutting edge approach adopted by few others. Lam published a photo essay book and exhibited his work internationally, and continues to examine urban infrastructures, ruins and ruination, and development in post-socialist China.

    Victor C. Falkenheim – Professor Emeritus, East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    With experience working on CIDA and World Bank projects in China, Professor Victor Falkenheim focuses on contemporary Chinese politics and issues concerning urbanization and migration. Serving as a Professor Emeritus of Political Science of East Asian Studies, he has been instructing a course on the dynamics of democratic transformation over the past 4 decades in East Asian states. He has often been called upon to advise the government on Sino-Canadian issues, and has spoken about the One Belt One Road policy. Falkenheim co-authored Hong Kong and China in Transition and has published in the Asian Journal of Public Administration and more.

    Kui-Wai Li – Associate Professor, Department of Economics and Finance, City University of Hong Kong
    As a visiting professor at the Asian Institute of the Munk School of Global Affairs, Professor Kui-Wai Li is a keen advocate of the Economism paradigm. He specializes in political economy, financial and economic development, and industry and trade, and has been acting as consultants to international institutions, foreign governments and businesses. With focuses in the Chinese and other Asian economies, he has published several books, including Economic Freedom: Lessons of Hong Kong and his articles have appeared in journals published in USA, UK, Italy, etc. Li has edited Financing China Trade and Investment and been regularly interviewed on Hong Kong, China and foreign issues. Li has also published a book entitled Redefining Capitalism in Global Economic Development in June 2017.

    Jeffrey Ngo – Visiting Scholar at the University of Toronto/Chief Researcher of Demosisto in Hong Kong
    Jeffrey Ngo is a Visiting Scholar jointly affiliated with the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library and the Munk School of Global Affairs who studies the history of Hong Kong’s sovereignty. He’s also chief researcher for Demosisto, the Hong Kong youth pro-democracy political party. His writings have appeared in, among others, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and the Washington Post. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in history from New York University.

    Sida Liu – Assistant Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto
    With interests in sociolegal studies, Professor Sida Liu conducts empirical work on Chinese law and the legal profession and research on political sociology, criminal justice, and more. Having served and researched at different institutions, he has published extensively with articles appearing in Journal of Legal Education, Law and Social Inquiry, Law and Society Review, and others. He has been developing a theory of social space for analyzing law, professions, and other social entities following the Simmelian tradition of social geometry and the Chicago School of sociology. Liu currently teaches courses in the Criminology, Law and Society program.

    William Watson – Lecturer/Undergraduate Coordinator, Centre for Criminological & Sociological Studies, University of Toronto
    Professor William Watson is a lecturer and the Undergraduate Coordinator of the Centre for Criminology & Sociological Studies. His academic interests include the practice of forensic psychiatry, psychopathy, and the place of critical social science in public policy making. His articles also appeared in Sociology, The International Journal of Comparative Sociology, The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, and others. Born and raised in the United Kingdom and having his doctorate completed at the University of Cambridge, Professor Watson witnessed the negotiation between the United Kingdom and China over the retrocession of Hong Kong in the 1980s.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 12th Mobilizing without the Masses: Control and Contention in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 12, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    The launch of Mobilizing without the Masses: Control and Contention in China written by Diana Fu (University of Toronto) and published by Cambridge University Press (2017).

    “When advocacy organizations are forbidden from rallying people to take to the streets, what do they do? When activists are detained for coordinating protests, are their hands ultimately tied? Based on political ethnography inside both legal and blacklisted labor organizations in China, this book reveals how state repression is deployed on the ground and to what effect on mobilization. It presents a novel dynamic of civil society contention – mobilizing without the masses – that lowers the risk of activism under duress. Instead of facilitating collective action, activists coach the aggrieved to challenge authorities one by one. In doing so, they lower the risks of organizing while empowering the weak. This dynamic represents a third pathway of contention that challenges conventional understandings of mobilization in an illiberal state. It takes readers inside the world of underground labor organizing and opens the black box of repression inside the world’s most powerful authoritarian state.”

    Author Bio:

    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of political science at The University of Toronto and an affiliate of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Fu’s research examines the relationship between popular contention, state power, and civil society in contemporary China. Her book Mobilizing Without the Masses: Control and Contention in China, is to be published in 2017 with Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics Series and Columbia University’s Studies of the Weatherhead East Asia Institute. It examines state control and civil society contention under authoritarian rule. Based on two years of ethnographic research that tracks the development of informal labor organizations, the book explores counterintuitive dynamics of organized contention in post-1989 China.

    Articles that are part of this broader project have appeared in Governance (2017), Comparative Political Studies (2017), The China Journal (2018), among others.

    Diana Fu graduated with distinction from Oxford University (M.Phil. in Development Studies and D.Phil in Politics), where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar. Prior to joining the department, she was a Walter H. Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University. She was also a Predoctoral Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Fu’s research has been supported by the Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation, the Chiang Ching Kuo Foundation, and the Rhodes Trust.

    Fu’s writing and research have appeared in The Economist, Foreign Affairs, The Washington Post, Boston Review, Nick Kristof’s On the Ground Blog (The New York Times), PostGlobal, and Global Brief.

    To purchase the Kindle copy of the book follow this link

    Visit Diana Fu’s website by clicking here

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Diana Fu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; affiliate of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Michael Bernhard
    Panelist
    Inaugural Raymond and Miriam Ehrlich Eminent Scholar Chair in Political Science at the University of Florida

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Antoinette Handley
    Closing Remarks
    Associate Professor, Chair, Department of Political Science

    Joseph Wong
    Moderator
    Vice-Provost & Associate Vice-President, University of Toronto Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 18th The 14th Annual Seymour Lipset Memorial Lecture: The Populist Challenge to Liberal Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 18, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    William A. Galston is the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in Governance Studies and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington. A leading commentator on American politics as well as a leading voice in liberal policy circles. From 1993 to 1995, he served as Deputy Assistant to President Clinton for Domestic Policy, and he has been an advisor to six U.S. presidential campaigns, including that of Al Gore which he served as issues director. He is also College Park Professor at the University of Maryland, where formerly he served as Saul Stern Professor and Acting Dean at the School of Public Policy, as well as director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy. During the late 1990s, he was the executive director of the National Commission on Civic Renewal, and later he was the founding director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE).


    Speakers

    Dr. William A. Galston
    Brookings Institution, Washington, DC


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 18th Uncovering China: Researching Contemporary Chinese Politics - CASSU Event with Speaker: Professor Victor Falkenheim

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 18, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) warmly invites you to the inaugural event of our Research Seminar Series – “Uncovering China: Researching Contemporary Chinese Politics” with Professor Victor Falkenheim.

    This research seminar series is brought to you by CASSU, and aims to provide a forum for students who share similar interests in Asian social, cultural, and political affairs to engage in dialogue with faculty members. We hope to provide our peers with the opportunity to better understand the practice of academic inquiry through learning about faculty-level research. In this seminar, Professor Falkenheim will speak about his experience researching contemporary Chinese politics, with a particular focus on his current research regarding migration and urbanization in China. Please join us in Room 208N of the Munk School North House on January 18th, from 4-6pm. We hope to see you there!

    Speaker Biography

    Victor Falkenheim is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science and East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto, where he has taught since 1972. Educated at Princeton (B.A) and Columbia (MA & Ph.D), Professor Falkenheim has previously served twice as Chair of the Department of East Asian Studies, as well as Director of the Joint Centre for Modern East Asia. His research interests and publications center on local politics and political reform in China. He has lectured widely in China and has worked on a number of CIDA and World Bank projects in China over the past two decades.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith


    Speakers

    Victor Falkenheim
    Professor Emeritus of Political Science and East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 18th Book Launch: The Authority Trap - Strategic Choices of International NGOs

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 18, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Boardroom
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    Description

    Join us for a discussion of the new book, The Authority Trap: Strategic Choices of International NGOs (Cornell, 2017). Sarah S. Stroup and Wendy H. Wong show that not all international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) are created equal. Most INGOs are ignored in global politics, but a few have emerged as “leading INGOs” that command deference from various powerful audiences, and are well-positioned to influence the practices of states, corporations, and other INGOs. Leading INGOs might have authority, but they are not free to do what they want. Instead, they must balance the concerns of the various audiences that grant them authority in order to preserve their status. Caught in the authority trap, leading INGOs tend to be muzzled and make more conservative demands.

    Book sale, signing and reception to follow the discussion.

    This panel discussion will be chaired by Todd Foglesong, Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Sandra Ka Hon Chu, Director of Research and Advocacy, Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network and Steven Bernstein, Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, will serve as discussants.


    Speakers

    Sarah S. Stroup
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Middlebury College

    Wendy H. Wong
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Todd Foglesong
    Chair
    Professor of Global Practice at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Sandra Ka Hon Chu
    Discussant
    Director of Research and Advocacy, Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network

    Steven Bernstein
    Discussant
    Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 18th EU Talks - Global Security Tested: The EU's Role and Ambitions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 18, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMCanadian Forces Staff College
    215 Yonge Blvd
    North York, ON M5M 3H9
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    Description

    Speakers
    HE Ambassador Peteris Ustubs (EU) – European Union Ambassador to Canada – focus: EU Security and Defence Agenda

    Márton Ugrósdy (HU) – Deputy Director, Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade – focus: European security challenges, as seen from the Visegrad Four

    Dr. Annegret Bendiek (DE) – German Institute for International and Security Affairs – focus: European Security and the role of the U.S.

    Dr. Reinhard Krumm (DE), Friedrich Ebert Stiftung – focus: European Security and Russia

    Canadian Speaker TBA

    Moderator

    Stefanie Dreyer, TV presenter – journalist – economist

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Germany in Toronto

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation

    Canadian Forces College


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 19th How Have the ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaped Japan-South Korea Relations?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 19, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    South Korean and Japanese citizens have become increasingly influential in shaping their bilateral relations. The society-level influence on government interactions is especially clear when a publicized bilateral issue linked to national security prompts emotional involvement of mainstream citizens. For better or worse, democratic political structures of Japan and South Korea enable the two domestic societies to perform a “watchdog” function of limiting policy options available to government officials involved in publicized bilateral interactions.

    This presentation will focus on the Japan-South Korea bilateral relations during the last decade in order to illustrate this point. In the midst of the fast-changing regional security environment during this period, the two societies started to re-evaluate and re-examine their respective national security identities of the Cold War period. Interestingly, these identity-shifts in both countries were first fueled by the changing domestic public attitude toward North Korea.

    The normative transformations initially sparked by the ‘North Korea factors’, however, also led to a ‘mutual security anxiety’ between Japanese and South Korean citizens, as they started to embrace a sense of uncertainty about the other side’s possible future trajectory as a potential threat to their own state. This societal-level mutual distrust from the last decade continues to provide a powerful ideational limit to the government-level bilateral interactions even up to today.

    Biography

    Seung Hyok Lee is currently a Lecturer at the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto, and an Associate at the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs. Previously, he was a short-term Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Law, Hokkaido University, Japan, as well as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace and at the Louis Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel. He also worked as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Renison University College, University of Waterloo, and as a Visiting Scholar at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. Dr. Lee received his doctoral degree in Political Science (International Relations) at the University of Toronto in 2011. His research interest is domestic society’s influence on publicized foreign policy issues, with specific focus on Japan and the Korean Peninsula. He is the author of Japanese Society and the Politics of the North Korean Threat (University of Toronto Press, 2016), “North Korea in South Korea-Japan Relations as a Source of Mutual Security Anxiety among Democratic Societies,” (The International Relations of the Asia-Pacific), and “Be Mature and Distinguish the ‘Forest’ from the ‘Trees’: Overcoming Korea-Japan Disputes Based on Incompatible National Historical Narratives.” (Asteion)

    Contact

    Eileen Lam
    416-946-8918


    Speakers

    Seung Hyok Lee
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto; Associate, Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Asian Institute

    Department of Political Science


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, January 20th Community Screening of The Remants (공동정범) & Panel with Documentary Filmmaker Min Sook Lee and Anthropologist Jesook Song

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 20, 20182:30PM - 5:30PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    TO REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT please go to the separate eventbrite page HERE

    On January 20, 2009, a commercial building in Yongsan, a central district of Seoul, South Korea, erupted into flames. It was during a police crackdown of the building’s tenants-turned-evictees who were staging a protest against the redevelopment of the neighbourhood by occupying the building. During the fire, five protesters and one police officer died. In the aftermath of the tragedy, a heated debate ensued over who was accountable for the deaths – a debate that unfolded in courtrooms, in parliament, and on the streets. The Remnants 공동정범 follows the life of the evictees, who were incarcerated on a charge of the death of the policeman, raising questions about state violence, urban space, and democratic citizenship. Today, 9 years since the Yongsan tragedy, we hope this showing of the documentary the Remnants and the discussion with Min Sook Lee (documentary filmmaker and academic) and Jesook Song (urban anthropologist of Korea) will help us think through these important questions.

    Min Sook Lee has directed numerous critically-acclaimed feature documentaries, including: Donald Brittain Gemini winner Tiger Spirit, Hot Docs Best Canadian Feature winner Hogtown, Gemini nominated El Contrato and Canadian Screen Award winner, The Real Inglorious Bastards and most recently, Canadian Hillman Prize winner Migrant Dreams. Lee is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Cesar E. Chavez Black Eagle Award, and the Alanis Obomsawin Award for Commitment to Community and Resistance. Lee is an Assistant Professor at OCAD University, her area of research and practice focuses on the critical intersections of art+social change in labour, border politics, migration and social justice movements.

    Jesook Song is Professor of Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. She is an urban anthropologist with interests in housing, finance, welfare, labor, gender, and sexuality. Her first book, South Koreans in the Debt Crisis (Duke University Press, 2009) deals with homelessness and youth unemployment during the Asian financial crisis in the late 1990s to early millennium. Her second book Living On Their Own (SUNY Press, 2014) is about single household and informal financial markets through single women’s struggle in South Korea.


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Min Sook Lee
    Filmmaker; Assistant Professor, Faculty of Art, OCAD University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 24th Artificial Intelligence in International Law and Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 24, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In the age of drone warfare and the weaponization of codes, it is timely to consider the implications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for international law and relations. Join Jean-Gabriel Castel, Distinguished Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Osgoode Hall Law School, for a lecture and discussion. Light refreshments provided.

    About the speaker:

    Jean-Gabriel Castel, O.C., O.Ont., Q.C., L.S.M., Officier de la Légion d’Honneur, B.Sc., Lic. Droit (Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne), J.D. (Mich.), S.J.D. (Harv.), Docteur hon. causa (Aix-Marseille), fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Academy of Social Sciences, associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, member of the Académie du Var (France), former editor of the Canadian Bar Review and a Distinguished Research Professor emeritus at Osgoode Hall Law School of York University.

    He has focused his career on emerging topics in both public and private international law and international business law. He is also a world-renowned international arbitrator having participated to many important business disputes spanning multiple jurisdictions, legal systems and cultures. He has lectured in many universities around the world and published several books and articles dealing with topical subjects pertaining to law, international business and artificial intelligence.


    Speakers

    Jean-Gabriel Castel



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th – Friday, January 26th R.F. Harney 11th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20189:00AM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, January 26, 20189:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference is now recognized as a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work. We attract a great number of proposals from various universities, not just in Canada but also the United States, South America, Europe, Asia and Africa.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    All sessions are open to the public.

    January 25th, 2018: Room 208N
    Session 1: 9:00-10:30
    Session 2: 10:40-12:10
    Session 3: 1:00-2:00

    January 26th, 2018: Room 108N
    Session 4: 9:00-10:15
    Session 5: 10:30-11:45
    Session 6: 1:00-2:15
    Session 7: 2:25-3:40

    Please note that the keynote lecture for this conference will be given by Professor Nancy Foner (CUNY) on January 25, 2018 (2:30-4:30pm).
    Please register on the Munk School events page.

    About the Speaker:
    Nancy Foner is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work has focused on the comparative study of immigration, comparing the immigrant experience in the United States and Europe as well as immigration today with earlier periods in the United States. She is the author or editor of 18 books, including In a New Land: A Comparative View of Immigration and most recently, with Richard Alba, Strangers No More: Immigration and the Challenges of Integration in North America and Western Europe.


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Religion in the Time of the Anthropocene: Perspectives from Greater China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    How do religious movements promote or hinder transitions to ecologically sustainable societies in Asia? This talk considers the interaction of religion and ecology in the greater China region, focussing on Daoists in mainland China, Buddhists in Taiwan, and Mazu as the goddess of the marine bioregion connecting Taiwan, Fujian, Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macau. From these three cases, the talk engages arguments from Duara and Latour concerning the intersection of culture, nature and modernity, and argues for a specifically East Asian approach to the theorization of religion in the anthropocene.

    Speaker Bio:
    James Miller’s research focuses on the intersection of religion, culture and ecology in China, with a focus on Daoism, China’s indigenous organized religion. He is professor of humanities at Duke Kunshan University, and has published six books including, most recently, China’s Green Relgion: Daoism and the Quest for a Sustaianable Future (Columbia 2017).

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    James Miller
    Professor of Humanities, Duke Kunshan University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Racialization in an Era of Mass Migration: Black Migrants in Europe and the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20182:30PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A comparative analysis of black migrants and their children in Western Europe and the United States points to the complex, and sometimes surprising, ways that the social, political, and demographic contexts and historical developments on the two sides of the Atlantic influence the nature and impact of racial boundaries and barriers that play such a significant role in their lives.

    About the Speaker:
    Nancy Foner is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work has focused on the comparative study of immigration, comparing the immigrant experience in the United States and Europe as well as immigration today with earlier periods in the United States. She is the author or editor of 18 books, including In a New Land: A Comparative View of Immigration and most recently, with Richard Alba, Strangers No More: Immigration and the Challenges of Integration in North America and Western Europe.

    This event also serves as the keynote lecture for our R.F. Harney 11th Annual Graduate Research Conference in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (January 25-26, 2018).


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 25th Silent Cities: Rachel Carson and the Imagination of U.S. Suburban Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 25, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Drawing on archival sources and published writings, including the controversial bestseller Silent Spring (1962), this talk will address the impact of Rachel Carson’s concept of “life” on the suburban imaginary of the United States. Tensions within Carson’s “fabric of life” signal a revolution in environmental thought. What counts as “life”?

    Contact

    Sofi Papamarko
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Caroline Holland
    PhD Candidate, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Global Careers Through Asia Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20189:00AM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Are you interested in working in Asia? Wondering how to best prepare for a global career after your undergraduate degree? With the support of the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) is proud to present its annual Global Careers Through Asia conference.

    We will be hosting an exciting list of speakers, including professionals and academics. Our speakers span numerous sectors and fields, including government, business, film, journalism, and more.

    Program:

    9:00AM-9:30AM Registration and Coffee
    9:30AM-9:40AM Opening Remarks
    9:40AM-12:00PM Industry Panel Speaker Sessions

    9:40AM-10:20AM
    1. Media: Journalism and Film
    • Panelist #1: Betty Xie – Development Manager & International Programmer, Reel Asian Film Festival; Asian Institute Alumna
    • Panelist #2: Aaron Wytze Wilson – Journalist; Masters of Global Affairs Candidate, University of Toronto
    • Audience Q&A

    10:20AM-11:00AM
    2. Government and International Trade
    • Panelist #1: Don Campbell – Former Deputy Minister and Ambassador to Japan and Korea
    • Panelist #2: Julie Nguyen – Director, Canada-Vietnam Trade Council
    • Panelist #3: Victor Hong Min Liu, Director, Taipei Economic & Cultural Office, Toronto
    • Audience Q&A

    11:00AM-11:10AM Health Break

    11:10AM-12:00PM
    3. Not-for-Profit and Public Awareness
    • Panelist #1: Jordan Dupuis – Project Manager, Toronto Office Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada
    • Panelist #2: Marcia Iwasaki – Culture & Ed. Coordinator, Consulate General of Japan, Toronto
    • Audience Q&A

    12:00PM–1:30PM Networking Lunch

    1:30PM-3:00PM Workshop on Academia and Applied Research
    • Speaker #1: James Poborsa, PhD Candidate, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    • Speaker #2: Joseph McQuade, SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs
    • Speaker #3: Scott McKnight, PhD candidate in Political Science (international relations and comparative politics)
    • Speaker #4: Aaron Wytze Wilson – Journalist; Masters of Global Affairs Candidate, University of Toronto
    • Speaker #5: Professor Yiching Wu, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of East Asian Studies (TBC)


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th CSK Brown Bag

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Martina Mimica
    416-946-8996


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Feeding France’s Outcasts: Rationing in Vichy’s Internment Camps, 1940-1944

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.

    During the Second World War, France established a rationing system that attempted to provide a minimum amount of food to each of its citizens. It is generally accepted that rationing failed French civilians and worsened the food crisis. If free consumers could not always find enough food, what then of those that Vichy interned in its camps? This talk examines the ways in which Vichy’s rationing laws limited the ways in which camps could procure food and feed the individuals that they interned. It also looks at how food, once purchased made its way to internees and evaluates how much internees likely received. Faced with constant food shortages and hunger, internees, international aid organizations, and occasionally camp administrators tried as best they could to find additional food.

    Laurie Drake is a PhD candidate in the Department of History and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation examines the hunger crisis in Vichy’s internment camps and the ways in which the government, camp administrators, internees, and international aid organizations tried to find solutions.


    Speakers

    Laurie Drake
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 26th Who is Indigenous Here? The Rising Stakes of Recognition in Indonesia

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 26, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - Classroom, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In Indonesia, as in other parts of Asia, the concept of indigeneity forged in white settler colonies is an awkward fit. Arguably, everyone is indigenous, or no one is indigenous. Nevertheless, discourses of indigeneity have taken hold. In India and the Philippines, contemporary concepts of indigeneity map onto colonial categories used to distinguish peasants from tribes. Whereas, in Indonesia, the Dutch colonial power did not divide the population in this same way, making recognition especially problematic. Yet the stakes of defining who qualifies as indigenous in Indonesia have risen in the past decade. The government has passed numerous regulations, which recognize the existence of distinct “customary communities” and enable these communities to hold land communally. Donors hope indigenous people with tenure security will conserve forests and mitigate climate change. This is a moment of opportunity and risk, as identity displaces visions of social justice based on principles of land-to-the-tiller and common citizenship.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies

    Tania Li
    Speaker
    Tania Murray Li teaches Anthropology at the University of Toronto, where she holds the Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy and Culture of Asia.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 30th Multinational enterprises, service outsourcing and regional structural change

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, Room 208N, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series - Frontiers of Research in Global Innovation

    Description

    The presentation will start by providing a broad-brushed picture of the geography of foreign direct investment (FDI) to and from the European regions by function (i.e. Headquarters, Innovative activities, Sales, Production activities, Logistic & Distribution), looking at trends for the period 2003-2014. This simple exercise will allows us to shed some initial light on Multinational Enterprises’ (MNE) location choices of their different kinds of operations across subnational space, identifying regional trajectories both in the core and in the periphery of Europe (Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017; Comotti, Crescenzi and Iammarino, 2017, in progress).

    The presentation will then examine the structural transformation of regional industrial bases within the UK by focusing on the role played by inward manufacturing FDI in facilitating shifts towards service activities (Ascani and Iammarino, 2017, in progress). From a conceptual perspective, this research brings together different strands of literature, including studies on the impact of FDI on recipient regions, research on structural change, as well as contributions on the identification of local multipliers. From an empirical standpoint, the paper considers a specific demand-side channel for structural change: namely, the forward linkages established by foreign MNEs operating in manufacturing industries with local service providers. The paper uses data at plant level in the UK as reported in the Annual Census of Production Respondents Database (ARD), a business-level database collected by the UK Office of National Statistics. We estimate the multiplicative effects that FDI in manufacturing has on the creation of new service jobs in a region. In order to produce reliable estimates of such a regional multiplier, our methodology relies on the adoption of an instrumental variable approach. Our findings confirm that foreign MNEs do establish prominent demand linkages with service providers, and that FDI in manufacturing is accompanied by notable multiplicative effects in service employment within UK travel-to-work-areas. This effect is strongly concentrated in tertiary activities that produce intermediate services, rather than final demand services. Furthermore, while the composition of this effect tends to be homogeneous in terms of the knowledge content of service activities, it becomes highly heterogeneous once the degree of concentration of tertiary activities across space is considered.

    Some implications for policy and directions for future research will conclude the presentation.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    (416) 946-8912


    Speakers

    Simona Iammarino
    London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Geography and Environment



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 30th Legend Lin Dance Theatre Documentary Screening: The Walkers (行者)

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 30, 20185:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    2 Sussex Ave, University of Toronto
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1J5
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    Description

    “The Walkers” (行者) is a documentary film whose director took over 10 years to make. It presents the story of renowned Taiwanese choreographer Lin Lee-chen and her Legend Lin Dance Theatre. Extracting the essential details of Lin’s daily life, the film explores the origins of her dance, contemplates the poetic and ritualistic movements she creates, and delineates her lifetime pursuit of aesthetic concerns.

    For more information about the film please click here.

    Country: Taiwan
    Year: 2015
    Genre: Documentary
    Runtime: 141 min
    Director: Singing CHEN
    Producers: Singing CHEN, LIN Leh-Chyun

    January 30, 2018 Screening – Schedule of Events:

    5:00PM REGISTRATION OPENS – Reception with Taiwan inspired cuisine
    5:30PM WEBSITE LAUNCH – The Taiwan Gazette (Global Taiwan Studies Program, Asian Institute)
    6:00PM FILM SCREENING
    8:30PM POST-SCREENING DISCUSSION

    MODERATOR:
    PROF. ANTJE BUDDE, Centre for Drama, Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Toronto

    DISCUSSANTS:
    LIN LEE-CHEN (林麗珍), Artistic Director, Legend Lin Dance Theatre

    Legend Lin Dance Theatre will perform at the following Canadian venues in January and February 2018:
    “Canadian Dance Festival”, January 20 at the National Arts Center in Ottawa
    “Danse Danse”, January 24 to 27 at the Theatre Maisonneuve in Montreal
    “PuSH International Performing Arts Festival”, February 3 at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Prof. Antje Budde
    Moderator
    Centre for Drama, Theatre & Performance Studies, University of Toronto

    LIN Lee-Chen (林麗珍)
    Discussant
    Artistic Director, Legend Lin Dance Theatre



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2018

  • Thursday, February 1st The new moral science of social finance: Governing American poverty with "ethical" capitalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 1, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk presents a critical analysis of the social finance industry, a marketplace for profitable investments that are also branded as ways of using finance “ethically” to solve social problems. As social finance gains influence in American public policy and with high net worth financial investors, the talk uses case studies in Michigan and California to illustrate how it is shifting the governance of welfare and poverty in poor neighbourhoods and communities.

    Contact

    Sofi Papamarko
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Emily Rosenman



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 1st Book Launch: When the World Seemed New: George H.W. Bush and the End of the Cold War, by Jeffrey A. Engel

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 1, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The end of the Cold War was the greatest shock to international affairs since World War II. In that perilous moment, Saddam Hussein chose to invade Kuwait, China cracked down on its own pro-democracy protesters, and regimes throughout Eastern Europe teetered between democratic change and new authoritarians. Not since FDR in 1945 had a U.S. president faced such opportunities and challenges.

    As presidential historian Jeffrey Engel reveals in this page-turning history, behind closed doors from the Oval Office to the Kremlin, George H. W. Bush rose to the occasion brilliantly. Distrusted by key allies and dismissed as too cautious by the press, Bush employed personal diplomacy to rally a coalition to push Iraq out of Kuwait, to help unify Germany and save NATO, and ultimately to safely navigate the tumultuous end of the Soviet empire. Based on unprecedented access to previously classified documents and interviews with all of the principals, When the World Seemed New is a riveting, fly-on-the-wall account of a president with his hand on the tiller, guiding the United States through a pivotal time and setting the stage for the twenty-first century. Books available for purchase. Refreshments to follow.

    About the speaker:
    Jeffrey A. Engel is the Founding Director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. Author or editor of ten books on American foreign policy and the American presidency, his latest is When the World Seemed New: George H.W. Bush and the End of the Cold War.


    Speakers

    Jeffrey A. Engel
    Founding Director, Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 2nd IPL Speaker Series | Capitalism Without Capital

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 2, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    Capitalism Without Capital: The Rise of the Intangible Economy
    Early in the twenty-first century, the major developed economies began to invest more in intangible assets, like design, branding, R&D, and software, than in tangible assets, like machinery, buildings, and computers. For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. But this is not just a familiar story of the so-called new economy. Drawing from his new book (with Jonathan Haskel), Capitalism without Capital, Stian Westlake will show how the growing importance of intangible assets has also played a role in some of the big economic changes of the last decade. The rise of intangible investment is an underappreciated cause of phenomena from economic inequality to stagnating productivity. Stian Westlake will present three possible scenarios for what the future of an intangible world might be like, and outline how managers, investors, and policymakers can exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow their businesses, portfolios, and economies.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Jonathan Haskel
    Jonathan Haskel is Professor of Economics at Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London and Director of the Doctoral Programme at the School. He was previously Professor and Head of Department at the Department of Economics, Queen Mary, University of London. He has taught at the University of Bristol and London Business School and been a visiting professor at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College, USA; Stern School of Business, New York University, USA; and the Australian National University. Between 2013 and 2016, Professor Haskel was an elected member of the Council of the Royal Economic Society and between November 2012 and December 2015, a member of the "Research, Innovation, and Science Policy Experts" (RISE) high level group advising the European Commissioner for Research, Innovation, and Science on policy.

    Stian Westlake
    Stian Westlake is currently Advisor to the Science, Innovation and Universities Minister (UK) and Senior Fellow at Nesta, the UK’s national foundation for innovation. Previously, he was Executive Director of Policy and Research at Nesta leading a team developing new insights into innovation policy and practice. Prior to that, he worked in social venture capital at the Young Foundation and spent five years at McKinsey & Company in Silicon Valley and London, where he provided strategic advice to a range of private and public sector clients, focusing on health care, technology and corporate and infrastructure finance.



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 2nd Trump Plus One

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 2, 20182:00PM - 3:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    One year and almost 3,000 presidential tweets later, it’s time for the Centre for the Study of the United States to assess the State of the Union. Join us for a wide-ranging discussion about the state of voting rights, the electorate, foreign policy, and culture.

    Panellists include:

    Randy Boyagoda (Principal, St. Michael’s College; Dep’t of English) Yasmin Dawood (Faculty of Law), Ron Pruessen (Dep’t of History) Andrew Stark (UTSC/Rotman).

    Contact

    Sofi Papamarko
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Randy Boyagoda
    Speaker
    Professor, English Department Basilian Chair in Christianity, Arts and Letter

    Ron Pruessen
    Speaker
    History Professor, University of Toronto

    Yasmin Dawood
    Speaker
    Law Professor, University of Toronto

    Andrew Stark
    Speaker
    Professor of Strategic Management @ Rotman

    Robert Vipond
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 8th IPL Speaker Series | Advanced Manufacturing: The New American Innovation Policies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 8, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Innovation Policy Lab Seminar Series

    Description

    The United States lost almost one-third of its manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2010. As higher-paying manufacturing jobs are replaced by lower-paying service jobs, income inequality has increased. Between 1990 and 2013, the median income of men without high school diplomas fell by an astonishing 20%, and that of men with high school diplomas or some college by 13%. Innovation has been left largely to software and IT startups, and increasingly U.S. firms operate on a system of “innovate here/produce there,” leaving the manufacturing sector behind. In this talk, Dr. Bonvillian will share insights from his new book (co-authored with Peter Singer) about how to rethink innovation and revitalize America’s declining manufacturing sector. He will discuss how advanced manufacturing—particularly, new production paradigms that can increase efficiency and reduce costs, the new process and business models that must accompany them, and alternative funding models for start-up manufacturers—will be key to revitalization. And he will highlight the importance of new models for training workers and the role of manufacturing in addressing secular stagnation in innovation, growth, productivity and middle class prosperity. As recent political turmoil shows, the stakes could not be higher.

    About the Speaker

    William B. Bonvillian is Lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Science Technology and Society and Political Science Departments, and advises on research projects at MIT’s Industrial Performance Center. From 2006-17, he was Director of MIT’s Washington, D.C. Office, supporting MIT’s strong and historic relations with federal R&D agencies, and its role on national science policy. He has assisted with major MIT technology policy initiatives, on energy technology, the “convergence” of life, engineering and physical sciences, advanced manufacturing, online higher education and its “innovation orchard” project on startup scale-up. Prior to that, he served for seventeen years as a senior policy advisor in the U.S. Senate. His legislative efforts included science and technology policy and innovation issues. He worked extensively on legislation creating the Department of Homeland Security, on Intelligence Reform, on climate change, on defense and life science R&D, and on national competitiveness and innovation legislation leading to the America Competes Act in 2007.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    William Boone Bonvillian
    Lecturer Science, Technology and Society Program Department of Political Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 8th Rohingya in Peril: Buddhist/Muslim tensions in Myanmar and Beyond

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 8, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMWilliam Doo Auditorium
    Wilson Hall, 40 Willcocks St,
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    Join the Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies for an in depth discussion of the current situation in Burma/Myanmar, featuring three panelists and a discussion. This is the second event in the series, Rohingya in Peril, co-sponsored by the Asian Institute. This workshop features three 20-minute presentations by our panelists, followed by a discussion among the panelists, followed by a Q&A period with the audience. Register for this workshop on Eventbrite by clicking here

    John Holt will discuss what contemporary Rohingya political leaders in Yangon and Sittwe are saying about the current crisis, and what progressive monks in Mandalay see to be a way forward. He may also consider a comparative perspective on Buddhist/Muslim tensions in Sri Lanka and/or Thailand.

    Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière will consider the re-definition of monastic roles in the transitional Burma/Myanmar. She will focus on a new claim by a range of monks for responsibility in preserving Buddhist national identity in this context, and the rise of an extreme nationalist Buddhism.

    Juliane Schober will contextualize the anti-Rohingya violence historically in terms of an extended anti-Muslim sentiment in Myanmar, and show how anti-Muslim sentiments have informed the project of the state for the past century. Specifically, her presentation will look at various registers (ethnicity, gender and law) through which prejudice have been established. She will also discuss why, in their current configuration, these social developments threaten an emerging vision of belonging to a new future for Myanmar that is multi-ethnic and multi-religious.

    Panelists’ Biographies
    Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière a researcher with the National Center of Scientific Research and is the current Director of the Center of Southeast Asia Studies in Paris.

    John Holt has taught at Bowdoin College in Maine since 1978. He teaches courses about Asian religious traditions, especially Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as courses on theoretical approaches to the study of religion. He has received numerous research awards, including four fellowships from the National Endowment of the Humanities, two senior fellowships from the Fulbright Program, as well as other national research awards from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and the Asian Cultural Council. He has been an editor of Religious Studies Review and was elected as a fellow to the American Society for the Study of Religion in 1995. He is the author of many influential works, including Theravada Traditions: Buddhist Ritual Cultures in Contemporary Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press (2017); Buddhist Extremists and Muslim Minorities: Religious Conflict in Contemporary Sri Lanka (NY: Oxford U. Press, 2016); Spirits of the Place: Buddhism and Lao Religious Culture (HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2009).

    Juliane Schober is Director of the Center for Asian Research and Professor of Religious Studies at Arizona State University where she also directed the graduate program in Religious Studies (2009–2012) and developed a doctoral track in the Anthropology of Religion. She is an anthropologist of religion who works on Theravada Buddhist practice in Southeast Asia, especially Burma/Myanmar. In 2013, Juliane participated in the first IAPP delegation of U.S. universities to Myanmar, organized by the International Institute of Education. She has held leadership positions in the Association for Asian Studies, the American Academy of Religion, the American Anthropological Association, and serves on various editorial boards. Also in 2013, Juliane founded the Theravada Studies Group, an academic organization affiliated with the Association for Asian Studies. The group promotes comparative and scholarly exchanges among social scientists and humanists who work on aspects of Theravada Buddhism in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Southwest China and globally though pilgrimage and diaspora networks. Her most recent book, Modern Buddhist Conjunctures in Myanmar: Cultural Narratives, Colonial Legacies and Civil Society, was published in 2011 (University of Hawai’i Press).

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière
    Researcher with the National Center of Scientific Research; Current Director of the Center of Southeast Asia Studies in Paris

    John Holt
    William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of the Humanities in Religion and Asian Studies, Bowdoin College

    Juliane Schober
    Director of the Center for Asian Research and Professor of Religious Studies at Arizona State University


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 8th The Migrant Crisis, Immigration Attitudes, and Euroscepticism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 8, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CERES Graduate Student Conference Keynote Lecture

    Description

    Between 2014 and 2016, the EU has been confronted with one of the greatest crises in its history, the European refugee crisis. Not only did the crisis challenge pillars of the European project such as the doctrine of free movement, it might have also influenced individuals’ assessments of immigration and European Integration, as well as the relationship between anti-immigrant sentiment and Euroscepticism. Using data from three waves of the European Social Survey (ESS) – the wave before the crisis in 2012, the wave at the beginning of the crisis in 2014 and the wave at the (perceived) height of the crisis in 2016 – I test the degree to which these conjectures hold. For one, my results indicate that there is a consistent and solid relationship between more critical attitudes toward immigration and increased Euroscepticism. Even more importantly and more relevant for my research question, however, I find that the crisis neither increased anti-immigration sentiments nor critical attitudes toward the EU nor did it reinforce the link between rejection of immigrants and rejection of the EU.

    Daniel Stockemer is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include electoral politics, social movements, political representation, and European Politics. Daniel has published two books, one edited volume, and more than eighty articles in peer-reviewed journals, in among others Electoral Studies, Party Politics and European Union Politics. He is editor of the ECPR Journal European Political Science (EPS).


    Speakers

    Prof. Daniel Stockemer
    University of Ottawa


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Robert F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 9th Security Cooperation in East Asia, Japan, South Korea, and the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 9, 20182:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Symposium

    Description

    As the ongoing crisis over North Korea’s nuclear weapons program starkly illustrates, coordinating effective international responses to serious regional challenges can be extremely difficult. Part of the difficulty rests with the fact that in every major geopolitical flashpoint in the region, important countries either stand on opposite sides of the issue or have at best partially overlapping interests.

    The United States, of course, has been a key player in every major security issue in East Asia since 1945. It has relied heavily both on its network of bilateral alliances and on its forward presence, primarily in Japan. Its two most important allies in the region are Japan and South Korea, which are not formal allies, but which share a broad range of values and interests. Arguably, there is considerable scope for enhancing security cooperation both bilaterally and trilaterally.

    The purpose of the symposium is to explore the possibilities and limits of enhanced security cooperation in East Asia, primarily between these three countries, and in the first instance specifically with respect to North Korea, but also more broadly.

    “The American Approach to Security in Asia” by Professor Peter D. Feaver

    Since the end of the Cold War, a bipartisan consensus, more or less, has guided U.S. grand strategy globally, and specifically in the Asian region. As a candidate, Donald Trump campaigned on themes that indicated he would take U.S. foreign policy in dramatically different directions. He has made some significant departures in policy, in particular dropping the TPP and withdrawing from the Paris Accords. And he has made many more departures in rhetoric, in particular in the way he talks about the value of traditional alliances, the goals of international trade, and the way he wishes to confront the North Korean nuclear threat. Yet overall, have Trump’s policies been more discontinuous or continuous? I will discuss the bidding, how we got here and where American foreign policy appears to be heading, paying special attention to the faultlines within the Trump Administration.

    Peter D. FEAVER (Ph.D., Harvard University, 1990), Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. Dr. Feaver is Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) and also Director of the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy (AGS). Feaver is author of “Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations” (Harvard Press, 2003) and “Guarding the Guardians: Civilian Control of Nuclear Weapons in the United States” (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is co-author: with Christopher Gelpi and Jason Reifler, of “Paying the Human Costs of War” (Princeton Press, 2009); with Susan Wasiolek and Anne Crossman, of “Getting the Best Out of College” (Ten Speed Press, 2008, 2nd edition 2012); and with Christopher Gelpi, of “Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force” (Princeton Press, 2004). He has also authored a variety of monographs, scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy pieces on American foreign policy, public opinion, nuclear proliferation, civil-military relations, information warfare, and U.S. national security. He is a member of the Aspen Strategy Group and co-curator of the Elephants in the Room blog on ForeignPolicy.com. From June 2005 to July 2007, he served as Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy, regional strategy reviews, and other political-military issues. In 1993-94, he served as Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy review, counterproliferation policy, regional nuclear arms control, and other defense policy issues.

    “History or Security? Politics and Diplomacy over the Issue of Comfort Women among Japan, South Korea, and the United States” by Professor Naoko Kumagai

    This presentation demonstrates how matters of geopolitical security have been able to override the historical issue of comfort women in the Japan-South Korea relationship. The presentation explores the vicious circle wherein Korean and international criticism of Japan, partly fueled by Korean and international activists, stirred the “revisionist” backlash from Japan and worsened the overall Japan-South Korean diplomatic relationship. The presentation highlights two distinctive problems in the vicious circle: the balance between reconciliation and factual accuracy and the neglect of moral or legal responsibilities. Japan’s hardliner conservatives have denied the importance of moral responsibility, while anti-Japanese critics have overemphasized Japan’s legal responsibility. The presentation then examines how and to what extent America’s encouragement of reconciliation between Japan and South Korea, out of security concerns in the face of the North Korean nuclear and missile crisis and the rise of China, has served to ameliorate the problems and facilitate reconciliation.

    Naoko KUMAGAI (Ph.D., Graduate Center of the City University of New York, 2009), Associate Professor and Director of the International Relations Program, International University of Japan, Minamiuonuma, Niigata Prefecture. Dr. Kumagai is the author of Jūgun Ianfu Mondai (Chikuma Shinsho, 2014), which was translated into English, “The Comfort Women: Historical, Political, Legal, and Moral Perspectives (English version of Jūgun Ianfu Mondai. Translated by David Noble)” (I-House Press, July 2016), selected for the 2014 LTCB (Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan) International Library for English translation. She published various papers and articles on Japan-Korea relations, forgiveness and reconciliation, international security, humanitarian law, and Japan-India relations. Among her articles are “The Absence of Consensus in Japan over the Issue of Comfort Women–With the Case of the Asian Women’s Fund from the Approach of Ontological Security” (Social Science Japan Journal, July 2015) and “Asian Women’s Fund Revisited” (Asia-Pacific Review, Vol.2, Issue 2, 2014). She is a recipient of the Nakasone Yasuhiro Award Incentive Award in July 2016. Her current research interests include disarmament and international security, weapons research and development, humanitarianism, the protection of civilians in armed conflict, and state sovereignty and transnational civil society.

    “Incompatible National Historical Narratives as an Obstacle to Security Cooperation” by Dr. Seung Hyok Lee

    In the current South Korea-Japan relations, incompatible ‘national historical narratives’ concerning certain past events at the citizen level are an influential factor binding governmental interactions in publicized bilateral issues. However, while the two societies increasingly disagree on the ‘contents’ of their respective narratives, the underlying patterns of how they permeate in each society are similar. The first pattern is a belief in ‘national exceptionalism’, and the second is a belief that their unique historical accomplishments are now being subjected to their neighbour’s distortion. Most citizens in each country, at present, are unaware that the two same ideational patterns are equally at work on the other side. By promoting Japanese and South Korean public to recognize this fact, rather than focusing on the incompatible contents of the diverging national historical narratives, the two countries could attain a genuine ‘maturation’ in the bilateral relations. This presentation will argue that in the long run, this mutual recognition at the citizen level is what will sustain a stable and lasting bilateral cooperation, including in the regional security issues.

    Seung Hyok LEE (Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2011), Lecturer in Political Science, University of Toronto-Scarborough, and Associate at the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs. Dr. Lee has served as Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Law, Hokkaido University, as well as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace and at the Louis Frieberg Center for East Asian Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has also been Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Renison University College, University of Waterloo, and Visiting Scholar at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs. His main research interest is domestic society’s influence on publicized foreign policy issues, with a specific focus on Japan and the Korean Peninsula. He is the author of Japanese Society and the Politics of the North Korean Threat (University of Toronto Press, 2016), “North Korea in South Korea-Japan Relations as a Source of Mutual Security Anxiety among Democratic Societies,” (The International Relations of the Asia-Pacific), and “Be Mature and Distinguish the ‘Forest’ from the ‘Trees’: Overcoming Korea-Japan Disputes Based on Incompatible National Historical Narratives” (Asteion).

    Chair:

    David A. WELCH (Ph.D., Harvard University, 1990), Dean’s Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Endowed Chair Program in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs, University of Toronto; CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs; Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo; and Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation. Dr. Welch is author of Painful Choices: A Theory of Foreign Policy Change (Princeton University Press, 2005), Justice and the Genesis of War (Cambridge University Press, 1993), and co-editor of Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World (University of Toronto Press, 2011). He has recently been researching and writing on Asia-Pacific Security, with a particular focus on confidence, trust, empathy, threat perception, misperception, North Korea, the East China Sea, and the South China Sea.

    Contact

    Eileen Lam

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Department of Political Science

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Asian Institute


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 9th Knowledge and Power in the Pacific: Native Hawaiian Exploration in an Age of Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 9, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How can we understand the Pacific, Asia, and the broader world from indigenous perspectives–from the perspective of the people that Westerners claimed to “discover”? This paper turns the tables on stories of exploration by tracing the travels of two Native Hawaiians who traveled the Pacific in the late eighteenth century. Ka Wahine (a commoner and lady’s maid) and Kaʻiana (a male high chief who took an English captain as his lover) traveled to Macao, the Philippines, Pelau, the Aleutians, and Vancouver Island. Their motives, their experiences, and the ways they put their knowledge to use shed light on how knowledge and power were at play in the age of exploration. Placing indigenous exploration at the center of study opens up a much more sophisticated understanding of the forces at play in shaping the modern world and colonial spaces—especially if we use sources in indigenous languages by indigenous people.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    David Chang
    Professor, Department of History, University of Minnesota



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 9th Sport and the French: An Erratic Trajectory from Du Guesclin to Coubertin

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 9, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    All Joint French History Seminar events are held in English unless otherwise noted.

    Pierre de Coubertin’s revival of the ancient Olympics was part of his larger program to reform the French educational system in imitation of the English model, i.e., to include physical education and sport as part of the curriculum. His initiative fell on deaf ears and for many decades thereafter French schools—and French people generally—continued to regard participation in sport as foreign to their mission and to their train de vie. This reluctance was, however, at odds with a tradition that had lasted for several centuries. In the Middle Ages and up to about 1650 the French both regarded themselves and were regarded by others as being among the best athletes in Europe. They were credited with having devised the knightly tournament; they were avid jousters; playing tennis was their obsession; they seem to have invented golf and perfected pall mall. The earliest biographies of the great French knights, from Guillaume le Maréchal to Bayard, all insert a section relating their subjects’ youthful sports achievements (Du Guesclin is taken here as emblematic of French feudal chivalry). From Charlemagne to Louis XIII most of the kings were keen athletes, but during the 16th and early 17th centuries sport on the personal level began to be removed from the French agenda.

    The focus of this talk will be to elucidate and understand the manifestations, disappearance, and reappearance of sport in France, from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, why it fell into disfavour in the 16th and 17th centuries, to be replaced by other forms, not simply of leisure activity but of purposeful pursuits. I will be drawing on a variety of sources: biographies, essays, rule books, polemical treatises, and purely “literary,” imaginative texts.

    Prof. John McClelland

    Professor Emeritus, Department of French, and Distinguished Senior Fellow, Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies

    1993-2003, Associated Professor, Faculty of Physical Education and Health (now Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education)

    Visiting Professor, Centre d’Études Supérieures de la Renaissance (Université de Tours, France; University of California at Santa Barbara; Université de Rennes II (France), chaire de littérature du XVIe siècle; Institut für Sportwissenschaften, Georg-August Universität, Göttingen (Germany).

    Co-General Editor for the 6-volume Bloomsbury Cultural History of Sport (forthcoming 2016), with special responsibility for vols. 1, 2, and 3 (Antiquity, Middle Ages, Renaissance).

    Author/co-editor of four books on French literature and sport, including Body and Mind: Sport in Europe from the Roman Empire to the Renaissance (2007) and Sport and Culture in Early Modern Europe/Le sport dans la civilisation de l’Europe pré-moderne (2009).

    Author of over 60 articles and book chapters on French literature, music, rhetoric, and sport, most recently (since 2014) ” Manuscrit et imprimé : survivances, interférences 1470-2007 : Les deux textes de Montaigne,” “Redefining the Limits: Sport in the Age of Galileo and the Scientific Revolution,” “Sport and Scientific Thinking in the Sixteenth Century: Ruling Out Playfulness,” “Early Modern Athletic Contests: Sport or not Sport,” and “Pantagruel et Gargantua, essais d’autofiction.”


    Speakers

    John McClelland
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 13th Punishing Remains: Performing Witch Archives, Decriminalizing Witchcraft

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 13, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Toronto Renaissance and Reformation Colloquium

    Description

    The 1618 trial of Leonora Galigaï, along with her husband’s memory, was accompanied by fantastical political defamation. This talk on damnatio memoriae and the blurred borders of the witch trials investigates performing arts archives alongside literary defamation and the destruction of monuments. Combining allegations of witchcraft, Judaism, and defamations of female political leadership, this talk offers analyses of a hybrid trial in baroque Paris disclosing performative uses of print deployed in the destruction of political legacies and influence.

    VK Preston is an Assistant Professor at the Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies and University College at the University of Toronto. She works at intersections of performance theory and history with a focus on seventeenth-century French and trans-Atlantic baroques. As an early-career research fellow with the History of the Emotions Project in Melbourne, Australia, VK’s work on intersections of performativity and witch studies grapples with historiography, authority, and judicial abuse as well as histories of dance, theatre, and defamation. She is a research affiliate of Early Modern Conversions Project and participant in a number of international research communities, including, most recently, as a fellow at the John Carter Brown Library in Providence.


    Speakers

    VK Preston
    University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at Victoria University

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 14th Margaret MacMillan - War and the International Order in the 20th Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 14, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Munk Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    Live streaming of this event will begin at 6pm EST, February 14, 2018.

    We tend to see war as a breakdown of the international order but one that raises interesting issues. Can a particular international order—the balance of power for example—tend towards war? And how much does the experience of war produce new and perhaps stronger international norms and institutions? This lecture examines the two great wars of the 20th century and asks what caused them and what their consequences were.

    Margaret MacMillan was educated at the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford. She was a member of Ryerson University’s History Department for 25 years, Provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto from 2002 to 2007 and Warden of St Antony’s College and Professor of International History, University of Oxford from 2007 to 2017. She is a Professor of History, University of Toronto, the Xerox Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS and a Distinguished Fellow of the Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Her research specializes in British imperial history and international history of the 19th and 20th centuries. Her publications include Paris, 1919: Six Months that Changed the World, Nixon in China: the Week that Changed the World, The War that Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 and History’s People: Personalities and the Past. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and a Companion of the Order of Canada.

    Live streaming of this event will begin at 6pm EST, February 14, 2018.

    Contact

    Munk School Events
    (416) 946-8900


    Speakers

    Margaret MacMillan
    University of Toronto



    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Tansen Sen's India, China, and the World: A Connected History. Book launch and discussion with Tansen Sen, Stewart Beck, and Anup Grewal

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This pathbreaking study provides the first comprehensive examination of India-China interactions in the broader contexts of Asian and world history. By focusing on material exchanges, transmissions of knowledge and technologies, networks of exchange during the colonial period, and little-known facets of interactions between the Republic of India and the People’s Republic of China, Tansen Sen argues convincingly that the analysis of India-China connections must extend beyond the traditional frameworks of nation-states or bilateralism. Instead, he demonstrates that a wide canvas of space, people, objects, and timeframe is needed to fully comprehend the interactions between India and China in the past and during the contemporary period. [...] The author’s formidable array of sources, pulled from archives and libraries around the world, range from Chinese travel accounts to Indian intelligence reports. Examining the connected histories of the two regions, Sen fills a striking gap in the study of India and China in a global setting” (quoted from the blurb). Stewart Beck, former Canadian High Commissioner to India and President and CEO of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, and Professor Anup Grewal, Assistant Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, UofT, will join the author Tansen Sen in a discussion of his book. The book will be available for sale at the venue.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Tansen Sen
    Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai

    Stewart Beck
    President and CEO of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and former Canadian High Commissioner to India

    Anup Grewal
    Assistant Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Temple Heritage of a Chinese Migrant Community: Movement, Connectivity, and Identity in the Maritime World

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Description:

    This presentation examines the spread of Chinese temples associated with the veneration of Ruan and Liang buddhas from Sihui County in Guangdong Province, China, through Southeast Asia to the Chinatown in Kolkata, India. Ruan Ziyu and Liang Cineng were followers of the sixth Chan patriarch Huineng (638–713) and are believed to have attained enlightenment and become buddhas during the Song dynasty (960-1279). In the thirteenth century temples dedicated to these two Chinese buddhas were established in the Sihui County. With the migration of people from the region in the nineteenth century, the belief in the two buddhas and the temples associated with them spread to present-day Malaysia and India. These Ruan-Liang temples in foreign settings functioned as religious sites as well as community spaces and heritage markers. By tracing the spread (and evolution) of the Ruan-Liang belief and examining the communal function of the temples through the use of photographs, this paper analyzes the relationship between migration and the diffusion of Chinese religious traditions, the role of temples in the preservation of sub-dialect identity, the mixing of Chinese and local ideas and histories, and the intimate maritime connections between China, Southeast Asia, and India in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century.

    Biography:

    Tansen Sen is Professor of history and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He specializes in Asian history and religions and has special scholarly interests in India-China interactions, Indian Ocean connections, and Buddhism. He is the author of Buddhism, Diplomacy, and Trade: The Realignment of Sino-Indian Relations, 600-1400 (2003; 2016) and India, China, and the World: A Connected History (2017). He has co-authored (with Victor H. Mair) Traditional China in Asian and World History (2012) and edited Buddhism Across Asia: Networks of Material, Cultural and Intellectual Exchange (2014). He is currently working on a book about Zheng He’s maritime expeditions in the early fifteenth century and co-editing (with Engseng Ho) the Cambridge History of the Indian Ocean, volume 1. He has done extensive research in India, China, Japan, and Singapore with grants from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the Japan Foundation, the American Philosophical Society, the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (Singapore). He was the founding head of the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Center in Singapore and served on the Governing Board of the Nalanda University.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Tansen Sen
    Professor of History and the Director of the Center for Global Asia at NYU Shanghai


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Gentrification and Displacement in Detroit: Perspectives from Below

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Urban regeneration initiatives can help cities improve derelict built environments and increase their tax revenues. However, these efforts can also produce negative outcomes (e.g. displacement). This talk explores how gentrification occurs in a shrinking cities context and examines how gentrification and disinvestment affect the housing opportunities of low-income residents in Detroit.

    Contact

    Rakhi Dewan


    Speakers

    Julie Mah
    Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Sponsors

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop, University of Toronto


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 15th Ottoman Timariot Cavalry in its Seventeenth-Century Twilight: A Resilient or “Zombie” Institution?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 15, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    Natalie Zemon Davis Room
    100 St. George Street
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    It has long been received wisdom that the Ottoman institution of the timar (“fief/benefice/prebend”)—which gave a virtual caste of cavalry and other servants of the state the right to tax peasant agriculture in exchange for military or other service—was a linchpin of that state’s organization. Moreover, the timar is widely considered as crucial for the successful workings of the empire during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as, for example, the kapıkulı (“slave of the Porte”) military-administrative institution. The argument continues that the timar institution essentially became defunct by the seventeenth century, thanks to the adoption of viable gunpowder weaponry, inflationary pressures in Ottoman currency, and corruption. This seminar will offer a fresh look at these commonplaces in light of the problem of the survival of mountains of documents and defters—today mostly unseen or ignored—that suggest an institution that did not lose its vigour in the post-classical age and will consider the question, “Who are the ‘zombies,’ Ottoman timariots or Ottomanist historians?”


    Speakers

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for Euopean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Disclaimer:

    Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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