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January 2019

  • Thursday, January 10th Marching in Garuda's Nest: East Timor's Path to Independence through Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The independence struggle of East Timor from Indonesia rested on a three-pronged strategy. An aspect of it was to Indonesianize the war that Jakarta had unleashed on the half-island country. Under the overall guidance – and sometimes strict instructions – of their nationalist movement, East Timorese students and activists across Indonesia progressively broke the government’s stranglehold on information about East Timor. They informed the Indonesian public and forged formidable alliances with Indonesian human rights activist and political reformists. These Indonesians rallied against the day-to-day human right violations that the Indonesian military committed in East Timor and gradually came to recognize that the exercise of the right to self-determination in East Timor was a step in the direction of their much-delayed democratic transition. This talk will explore how it was that the East Timorese nationalists marched – and won – in Jakarta while fighting a losing battle in East Timor itself.

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael is a former refugee goatherd and currently a stateless person. He is an Associate Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of History at Queen’s University. He holds a Ph.D. in history and LL.M. in public international law. He studied the history and politics of Northeast Africa and Southeast Asia and wrote a dissertation on the East Timorese and Eritrean struggles for independence from Indonesia and Ethiopia, respectively. He is the author of Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and East Timor Compared (Cambridge, 2013), among others. He has since been researching Northeast African political economy of conflict and his book on the root causes, dynamics and consequences of maritime piracy in Somalia has just been published (Piracy in Somalia: Violence and Development in the Horn of Africa). He has previously held teaching and research positions at African, European and U.S. universities; and has worked for United Nations peacekeeping and The Carter Center election monitoring.


    Speakers

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael
    Speaker
    Department of History, Queen's University

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 10th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    Minister Scott Brison on "Digital Disruption: There Ought to be an App for That"

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    315 Bloor Street W.
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    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    We regret that the event with Minister Brison has been postponed to a later date due to an unforeseen matter. We will be in touch when the event is rescheduled.

    Join us as The Honourable Scott Brison, President of the Treasury Board of Canada and Minister of Digital Government discusses Digital Disruption: There Ought to be an App for That. This event is part of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program Series on Digital Leadership in Public Policy.

    About Our Speaker: The Honourable Scott Brison, was appointed to the federal cabinet as President of the Treasury Board in November 2015. In July 2018, he welcomed additional responsibilities after being appointed Minister of Digital Government. He has served as a member of the Cabinet Committee on Agenda, Results and Communications that tracks progress on the government’s priorities; the Cabinet Committee on Inclusive Growth, Opportunities and Innovation that considers strategies to promote inclusive economic growth, opportunity, employment, and social security; the Cabinet Committee on Open and Transparent Government; and the ad-hoc Cabinet Committee on Defence Procurement.
    During his years in opposition, he notably served as Vice-Chair of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance. On the international scene, he served as a member of the Trilateral Commission, and he was named by the World Economic Forum of Davos, Switzerland, as one of its “Young Global Leaders.” Minister Brison served as Minister of Public Works and Government Services, and Receiver General of Canada from 2004 to 2006 and, previously, as Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister with special emphasis on Canada-U.S. relations. He has had extensive private sector experience as an entrepreneur and investment banker. He has served as Vice-President of a Canadian investment bank and as Chairman of SeaFort Capital Inc., a Canadian private equity firm.

    He graduated Dalhousie University with a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Finance in 1989 and he has completed the Global Leadership and Public Policy for the 21st Century Executive Education Program at the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government.


    Speakers

    The Honourable Scott Brison
    President of the Treasury Board of Canada and Minister of Digital Government, Government of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, January 16th John Chen on "Data Security and Public Policy”

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, January 16, 201911:00AM - 12:00PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    105 St George Street, Toronto ON
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    Description

    Join us as John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO, BlackBerry Limited discusses Data Security and Public Policy in conversation with John Kelleher, Partner and in-house CEO/CXO, McKinsey & Company and Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

    About Our Speaker: As Executive Chairman and CEO of BlackBerry Limited, John Chen is responsible for defining the company’s vision and goals, setting its strategy, and ensuring the team’s execution matches corporate objectives. Appointed in November 2013, John has led BlackBerry through a successful pivot from hardware icon to software leader. Today the company is poised to leverage its brand strength and heritage in mobile security along with its enterprise cybersecurity and embedded software growth engines to accelerate into the Enterprise of Things, an emerging category with billions of connected devices and massive market potential. John came to BlackBerry a distinguished leader and proven turnaround executive with more than 30 years of engineering and management experience along with a reputation that extends well-beyond the technology industry. Prior to joining BlackBerry, John served as Chairman and CEO of Sybase Inc. where he re-invented the company and led it through 55 consecutive quarters of profitability, providing outstanding shareholder returns during his 15-year tenure. A global business leader with a strong interest in policy, John has testified before Congress on U.S.–China trade relations and was appointed by U.S. President George W. Bush to serve on the President’s Export Council. In 2006, he was appointed co-chair of the Secure Borders and Open Doors Advisory Committee. Additionally, John chaired the U.S.-China Policy Advisory Roundtable for the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), served on the Board of the National Committee on U.S. China Relations from 2012-2018, and has been a member of the Committee of 100 since 1997 and its Chairman from 2009-2011. John graduated magna cum laude from Brown University with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). John has an honorary professorship from Shanghai University, and honorary doctorates from San Jose State University, City University of Hong Kong, and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. John has received awards from the U.S.-Asia Institute, the U.S.-China Policy Foundation, the California-Asia Business Council, and the U.S.-Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation.

    Contact

    Daniel Ellul
    (416) 978-6119


    Speakers

    John Chen
    Speaker
    Executive Chairman and CEO, BlackBerry Limited; former Chairman and CEO, Sybase Inc.

    John Kelleher
    Speaker
    Partner and in-house CEO/CXO, McKinsey & Company; Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Peter Loewen
    Opening Remarks
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 17th A Seascape of Power: Turkish Energy Infrastructures in Africa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 17, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMNear and Middle Eastern Civilizations Conference Room (BF200B)
    4 Bancroft Avenue
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Many countries around the world are having difficulty in meeting rising power demands, and employ quick energy generation mechanisms to satisfy the needs of their populations. One such technology is powerships — repurposed ships that serve as mobile power generators. Currently, the only commercial producer of powerships is a Turkish company that converts second-hand ships into floating power plants in shipyards in Tuzla, Istanbul. Floating power plants attach themselves to national grids, and using fuel oil and natural gas, produce inexpensive electricity for countries such as Lebanon, Iraq, Ghana, Zambia, Mozambique, and Indonesia. For instance, the powership in Ghana currently provides 23% of the country’s electricity. Drawing on fieldwork in Turkey and various parts of Africa, this talk will analyze how powership company representatives set up thick relations with governments in Africa, explore the shipyards where ships are manufactured, and investigate the use of a floating power plant in Ghana.


    Speakers

    Gökçe Günel
    University of Arizona


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 18th Mauthausen: A Nazi Camp in Spanish Memory

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 18, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMGoldring Student Centre
    Regents Room - 206
    Victoria University
    150 Charles St W
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    Description

    Prof. Brenneis’s talk is based on her recent book, Spaniards in Mauthausen: Representations of a Nazi Concentration Camp, 1940-2015 (2018). It delves into a little-known subject of the cultural legacy of Spaniards deported to the Nazi concentration camp of Mauthausen during World War II.

    Sara Brenneis is an associate professor at Amherst College in Massachusetts who specializes in Spanish historical, literary and cultural studies. Her research examines representations of the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Franco dictatorship and the Spanish transition to democracy. In addition to Spaniards in Mauthausen (U of Toronto Press, 2018), she published Genre Fusion: A New Approach to History, Fiction, and Memory in Contemporary Spain (2014) and is the co-editor of Spain, World War II, and the Holocaust: History and Representation, (forthcoming, the U of Toronto Press).

     


    Speakers

    Prof. Sara Brenneis
    Amherst College


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of Spanish and Portugese

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Centre for Comparative Literature

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 22nd David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    The Honourable Christy Clark: (Not) One of the Boys

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 22, 20196:30PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto ON
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    Series

    Women in Leadership

    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy is pleased to welcome The Honourable Christy Clark, former Premier of British Columbia on January 22, 2019.

    This event is part of the Women in Leadership Series of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program.

    Christy Clark’s political career is full of firsts for Canadian women. Her hard-won record includes being the longest serving female Premier in Canadian history, the only female Premier ever to be re-elected in Canada, and the first Cabinet Minister in Canada to give birth while holding office. She was also the first Premier in the country to openly discuss personal experiences of sexual assault.
    Over her 6 ½ years as Premier, she defied the critics by proving herself as the best economic manager in the country. She balanced 5 consecutive balanced budgets, diversified BC’s economy with a visionary plan and ensured BC led the country in job creation. When she left office in 2017, the province had the strongest economy in Canada for more than one year running – the first time that’s happened since before she was born in 1965.
    Her success was founded on her ability to create and communicate a bold vision for growth, her gift for building and executing on a detailed plan, and a strong capacity to predict, mitigate and manage risks.
    When she retired, BC was on-track to eliminating its operating debt by 2020 – the first time since 1976. BC was also the only remaining Canadian province with a AAA credit rating.  
    Prior to becoming Premier, she was the host of the Christy Clark Show on CKNW 980 and a columnist for the Vancouver Sun and Province newspapers. She used all these platforms to establish a province-wide anti bullying campaign that continues to grow.
    Today she is a Senior Advisor at the internationally recognized law firm, Bennett Jones LLP. She also sits as a Board Director for Shaw Communications Inc., and for Recipe Unlimited Corporation. In addition, she serves as an Advisor for ThoughtWire Corp., an organization focused on advancing the Canadian tech sector. Recently she has also been appointed as an Associate Member for the InterAction Council. This is an international organization where former heads of state come together to find solutions to the political, economic and social problems of today’s world.
    In November, 2018 she was recognized as one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women by the Women’s Executive Network (WXN). She was also inducted into the WXN Hall of Fame.
    Clark is now also being credited for bringing the liquefied natural gas industry to British Columbia. LNG Canada just approved a $40B LNG project in Kitimat, British Columbia. This is the single largest private sector investment in Canadian history.


    Speakers

    The Honourable Christy Clark
    Former Premier of British Columbia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 25th Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Lost in Transition: What’s Next for the Left in Post-Soviet States
    Protests, political activism and the growth of social and political movements have been a defining feature of the Russian political landscape during the 1990s. With the arrival of Vladimir Putin in 2000, political activism declined, only to be brought back to life after the contested parliamentary election of 2011. Since then, the Russian political landscape has become diverse with groups ranging from pro-Western liberals to hard-line nationalists and left-wing Marxists. This presentation offers an overview of the transformation of the non-systemic left-wing political movements in post-Soviet Russia, paying particular attention to the formidable revival of these movements since the late 2000s and the structural impediments to their further participation in the political system. This case study is part of a bigger ongoing book project that provides insights into the factors undermining the development of the left-wing politics and the consolidation of the leftist forces in the post-soviet states.

    Elena Maltseva is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Windsor in Windsor, Canada. Elena holds a PhD degree in Political Science from the University of Toronto (2012). Her current research focuses on left-wing politics in post-Soviet states, social security reforms, labour issues and regime stability in post-communist countries.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 25th Indigenizing New France: Where Are We Now?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 25, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    From whatever subject position we “indigenize”, we are always indigenizing something–something deeply entangled with colonial processes. What has this meant in the case of New France? As early modern spatial or political phenomenon, it was elusive even to contemporaries. As historiographic artifact, it has been naturalized in startlingly different ways. Efforts to recreate the lived experience and vantage points of Indigenous polities have been ongoing for decades now; in recent years, they have been deeply enriched by deliberate, community-based cultural revitalization projects. But the politics of cross-cultural knowledge remain complex, and play out differently in France, the United States, Quebec, and elsewhere in Canada. Efforts to dismantle colonialist understandings of New France are correspondingly fractured. Still, they have been fruitful, and shed important light on the workings of the early modern empires.

    Trained as both a historian and an economist, Professor Desbarats is a founding member of the French Atlantic History Group.  Her research and writing concerns mainly the history of the early modern colonial state, particularly its financial aspects.  In both her teaching and writing, she has a deep interest in decolonizing French imperial history, beginning with narratives relating to New France.  She has published historiographic pieces on that topic in journals such as the William and Mary Quarterly, the Revue d’histoire de l’Amérique française and the Journal of Early American History.  Her attempts to understand “early modern” indigenous vantage points have led her to think differently about the financing of empires, and the history of economic thought itself.  Canada’s seventeenth-century playing-card currency appears less as a picturesque footnote known only to monetary specialists, and more of a window into technologies of imperial violence and expansion.  Such themes are explored in her SSHRC-financed book- in-progress, “Money and Empire in New France.” In the same spirit, she is also co-writing, with Allan Greer, New France: A Concise History, under contract with Oxford University Press.

    In cooperation with the Jesuit Archives in Montreal, and with graduate students Fannie Dionne and Sandra-Lynn Leclaire, she is also engaged in a pilot project to identify, transcribe and digitize early modern iroquoian/French language material written down by Jesuit missionaries

     


    Speakers

    Catherine Desbarats

    Associate Professor
    Department of History and Classical Studies
    McGill University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 31st R. F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies 12th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference Program: DAY ONE

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 31, 20199:00AM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference is now recognized as a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    9:00-9:10 Registration for Day One Conference Sessions

    9:10-9:15 Opening Remarks: Prof. Jeffrey G. Reitz, Harney Program
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    9:15-10:55 SESSION 1 Education and Integration

    11:00-12:40 SESSION 2 Pathways to Multiculturalism

    14:00-16:00 KEYNOTE LECTURE

    Speaker: Prof. Rima Wilkes, Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

    “Acknowledgment of Indigenous Lands, Treaties and Peoples: Too much? Or not enough?”

    **Please register separately for this event at https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/27005/


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 31st Harney Lecture in Ethnicity: “Acknowledgment of Indigenous Lands, Treaties and Peoples: Too much? Or not enough?”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 31, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    This special event will serve as the keynote lecture for the R.F. Harney 12th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference.

    Acknowledgement of Indigenous territory, treaties and peoples is now a widespread practice at institutions across Canada.
    For some individuals this practice is straightforward. For others the practice is baffling. In this lecture/workshop, we will begin with an
    overview of acknowledgments, including at 98 Canadian universities.
    We will then discuss some problems with land acknowledgments and turn to the question of how to move forward. The aim is not to provide a final definitive word on the subject. Rather the hope is that this discussion will contribute to a conversation about practice, challenges and possibilities.

    Rima Wilkes is Professor of Sociology at the University of British Columbia and the Past President of the Canadian Sociological Association (2017-2018). She was the Executive Editor of the Canadian Review of Sociology (2013-2016). Her most recent publications include: 2018 Wilkes, Rima and Cary Wu. “Ethnicity, Democracy, Trust: A Majority-Minority Approach.” Social Forces 97(1):465-494. Wilkes, Rima, Aaron Duong, Linc Kesler and Howard Ramos. 2017. “Canadian University Acknowledgment of Indigenous Lands, Treaties and Peoples.” Canadian Review of Sociology 54(1): 89-120., Wu, Cary and Rima Wilkes. 2017. “Local-National Political Trust Patterns: Why China is an Exception.” International Political Science Review 54(1): 89-120.; Wu, Cary and Rima Wilkes. 2017. “International Student Migration and the Search for Home” Geoforum 80: 123-132.; Panesar, Nilum, Pottie-Sherman, Yolande and Rima Wilkes. 2017. “The Komagata Through a Media Lens: Racial, Economic, and Political Threat in Newspaper Coverage of the 1914 Komagata Maru Affair” Canadian Ethnic Studies 49: 85-101.

    The lecture will be followed by a panel discussion, during which Prof. Cheryl Suzack (University of Toronto, Department of English and Centre for Indigenous Studies) and Prof. Douglas Sanderson (University of Toronto, Faculty of Law and Faculty Advisor, Aboriginal Law Students Association) will offer commentary on the presentation based on their experience in indigenous studies and the specific issue of land acknowledgments. The event will be moderated by Prof. Jeffrey Reitz, Director of the Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Prof. Rima Wilkes
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of British Columbia

    Prof. Cheryl Suzack
    Panelist
    University of Toronto, Department of English and Centre for Indigenous Studies

    Prof. Douglas Sanderson
    Panelist
    University of Toronto, Faculty of Law and Faculty Advisor, Aboriginal Law Students Association



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 31st Frank W. Woods Lecture - The Past and Future of Carbon Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 31, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Past and Future of Carbon Politics

    In every corner of the planet, fossil fuels have a powerful effect on repression, conflict, and the distribution of wealth. If the era of fossil fuels is ending – as the world moves toward cleaner energy – how will this affect global politics? This talk will provide a tour of fossil fuels and politics over the last century, and a glimpse of how the turn toward alternative energies could reshape global politics in unexpected ways.

    Michael L. Ross is a Professor of Political Science and the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He has published widely on energy politics, the political and economic problems of resource-rich countries, civil war, democracy, and gender rights. His most recent book, The Oil Curse: How Petroleum Wealth Shapes the Development of Nations was translated into Arabic, Russian, Portuguese and Japanese, and was named an “Outstanding Academic Title” by Choice magazine.

    Ross has served on advisory boards for the US government, the World Bank, major academic journals, and several non-profit organizations. He has also written articles for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Harper’s, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and his research has been featured in The Washington Post, Newsweek, Financial Times, and many other publications.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    (416) 946-0326


    Speakers

    Michael L. Ross
    University of California, Los Angeles



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2019

  • Friday, January 11th – Friday, February 22nd Environmental Governance Lab Work in Progress Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 11, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, February 1, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, February 22, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab hosts regular EGL Work in Progress Talks. The talks are an informal, interdisciplinary forum where faculty and Ph.D. students can discuss ongoing research in the field of environmental politics, policy, and governance. At these events, two presenters offer a 10-minute overview of an ongoing project to serve as a fodder for discussion. If you are interested in hearing more about this and other Environmental Governance Lab events please email eg.lab@utoronto.ca for more information.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 1st R. F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies 12th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference Program: DAY TWO

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 20199:00AM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Established in 2008 our Annual Graduate Research Conference is now recognized as a premier inter-university forum for graduate students in the field of ethnic studies to come and present their work.

    The main purpose of our conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present their work in a professional yet convivial atmosphere in preparation for more formal settings.

    9:00-9:05 Registration for Day Two Sessions

    9:05-10:20 SESSION 3 Gender

    10:20-11:50 SESSION 4 Identity

    12:30-14:00 SESSION 5 Policy and Integration

    14:30-16:30 Closing Lecture
    Speaker: Prof. Morton Weinfeld (McGill University, Department of Sociology)
    “Diasporas, Dual Loyalties, and Suspect Minorities: the (Canadian) Jewish Case”

    *Please register separately for this event at https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/27007/


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 1st Frank W. Woods Lunchtime Lecture - Gasoline Taxes and Subsidies over Time

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 201910:00AM - 3:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Join us for the annual Frank W. Woods Lunchtime Seminar, where Professor Michael L. Ross (UCLA) will present his latest research.

    Taxes and subsidies for fossil fuels have large economic and environmental consequences, yet surprisingly little is known about them – including why some countries subsidize fossil fuels while others tax them, and how and why these policies change over time. To address these and other questions, we use an original data set on monthly gasoline taxes and subsidies for 157 countries. We find that from 2003 to 2014, global taxes on gasoline fell by about 13 percent; that 96.5 percent of all subsidies originate in just 22 countries, all of them oil and gas exporters; and that changes in taxes and subsidies are weakly associated with proximity to elections, but neither this nor other factors have much explanatory power. These findings underscore how little progress has been made on taxing fossil fuels, and how difficult it is to predict reforms.

    Lunch will be provided.

    Michael L. Ross is a Professor of Political Science at the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA. He has published widely on energy politics, the political and economic problems of resource-rich countries, civil war, democracy, and gender rights. He has served on advisory boards for the US government, the World Bank, and his research has been featured in publications such as The Washington Post, Newsweek, Financial Times, etc.

    Contact

    Kevin Rowley
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Michael Ross
    University of California, Los Angeles



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 1st Extreme Protest Repertoire in 21st Century South Korea

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Alongside the celebrated candlelight protests, South Korea has witnessed the spread of unusual protest tactics in the context of diminishing political opportunities and movement decline in the age of neoliberalism. These tactics include prolonged protests atop high shipyard cranes, advertisement towers or power transmission towers (high-altitude protest), marching distances during which participants adopt the Buddhist practice of prostrating on the ground after every three steps as a form of protest (three-step-one-bow), occupation of public space where protesters set up protest camps and stage indefinite camp-ins that often last for years (protest camp), and persisting suicidal protests such as self-immolation. Why are South Korean protesters using these extreme means when alternatives are seemingly available? Who uses these tactics, and what do they accomplish? How do we make sense of the extreme protest repertoire? This talk explores why and how South Koreans resort to extreme protest forms on a regular basis, and what it tells us about the South Korean culture of protest in the 21st century.

    Sun-Chul Kim is Assistant Professor of Korean Studies in the Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures, Emory University. His book, Democratization and Social Movements in South Korea, 1984-2002: Defiant Institutionalization (Routledge, 2016), examines the evolution of social movements in the course of South Korea’s democratization. His recent research focuses on extreme forms of protest and what they mean in the rapidly changing context of 21st century South Korea.


    Speakers

    Sun-Chul Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Russian and East Asian languages and Cultures, Emory University

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 1st Harney Lecture in Ethnicity: “Diasporas, Dual Loyalties, and Suspect Minorities: the (Canadian) Jewish Case”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 20192:30PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Countries which are diverse and formed largely through waves of immigration — like Canada — must face issues of competing identities and perhaps loyalties within their populations. At times these loyalties reflect competing values and interests, as well as the effects of victimization. When minority rights and interests are defended vigorously these minorities can be perceived as suspect. The Jewish group in its long diasporic history, often as an iconic “other,” has encountered these dilemmas and accusations regularly.
    This is true even for the Canadian Jewish community, which is at the same time highly integrated even while many members perceive themselves in an ongoing marginal position. Transnational ties of diasporic groups may continue to pose challenges even for ostensibly liberal-democratic societies such as Canada.

    Morton Weinfeld is a Professor of Sociology at McGill University, where he holds the Chair in Canadian Ethnic Studies and directs the Minor Program in Canadian Ethnic and Racial Studies. In 2018-2019 he is a Visiting Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, as well as at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

    This event was rescheduled from November 1, 2018 and also serves as the closing lecture for the R.F. Harney 12th Annual Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Graduate Research Conference.

    Reception to follow.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Prof. Morton Weinfeld
    McGill University, Department of Sociology



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 1st THE WORK OF EMOTIONS: THE ROLE OF EMOTIONS IN THE ETHICS AND POLITICS OF CARE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMFrench Studies Building
    Odette Hall, Room 224
    50 St. Joseph Street
    University of Toronto
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    Description

    Please confirm your attendance in advance by e-mailing Majorie Rolando.

    Fabienne Brugère is Professor of Philosophy at the University Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis and Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur. She is President of the Academic Council of Paris Lumières University and a member of the editorial board of the Journal Esprit. She has published many articles and books on aesthetics, gender, feminism, and the philosophy of care: Le sexe de la sollicitude, Seuil, 2008; Philosophie de l’art, PUF, 2010; L’éthique du care, PUF, 2011; La politique de l’individu, Seuil, 2013. She has just published with Guillaume le Blanc, La fin de l’hospitalité, Flammarion, 2017.

    Fabienne Brugère will also take part in a debate, “Facing Zones of Detention” as part of the 2019 Night of Ideas, on Saturday, 2 February, at 9 p.m.

    For more details on this event : https://artmuseum.utoronto.ca/program/night-of-ideas-2019-schedule/


    Speakers

    Fabienne Brugère
    University Paris 8



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, February 2nd Sixth Annual China Law Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, February 2, 20198:30AM - 5:30PMJ140 (First floor) Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, 78 Queen's Park Crescent
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    Description

    The sixth annual China Law Conference will bring together scholars and practitioners across North America to address the intersection between Chinese Law and current events. The conference will feature panels on the South China Sea Dispute, Trade and “One Belt One Road” Initiative, and Human Rights and Ethnic Minorities of China. Speakers for the SCS panel are: Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon (University of Toronto), Ted McDorman (University of Victoria), Chris Chung (University of Toronto), and Nong Hong (Institute for China-America Studies). Speakers for the Trade panel are: Thomas S. Axworthy (Massey College), Gil Lan (Ryerson University), Julia Qin (Wayne State University), and Cyndee Todgham Cherniak (LexSage). Speakers for the Human Rights panel are: Alvin Y.H. Cheung (New York University), Masashi Crete-Nishihata (Citizen Lab), Mehmet Tohti (Canadian Uyghur Association), and Louisa Greve (Uyghur Human Rights Project).

    Please note that you can either register on the chinalawconference.ca website OR on Eventbrite.

    Contact

    Emily Tsui


    Speakers

    Elizabeth Riddell-Dixon
    Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre, University of Toronto

    Ted McDorman
    Professor, University of Victoria Faculty of Law

    Chris Chung
    PhD Candidate, University of Toronto Department of History

    Nong Hong
    Executive Director, Institute for China-America Studies

    Thomas S. Axworthy
    Chair of Public Policy, Massey College

    Gil Lan
    Professor, Ryerson University Ted Rogers School of Management

    Julia Qin
    Professor, Wayne State University Faculty of Law

    Cyndee Todgham Cherniak
    Founding Lawyer, LexSage

    Alvin Y.H. Cheung
    JSD Candidate, New York University Faculty of Law

    Masashi Crete-Nishihata
    Associate Director, Citizen Lab

    Mehmet Tohti
    Founder, Uyghur Canadian Association

    Louisa Greve
    Director of External Affairs, Uyghur Human Rights Project


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Bennett Jones LLP

    Jones & Co

    McMillan LLP

    Scotiabank Fund at the Faculty of Law

    Students' Law Society

    Sullivan and Cromwell LLP

    University of Toronto Students Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 5th Seminar on Leadership and team Genius with Dr. Joseph MacInnis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 5, 20193:30PM - 5:00PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How do we enhance leadership? How do we accelerate team genius? This 60-minute conversation focuses on pathways and principles of personal and professional leadership. We look at some of the leadership qualities of Pierre Elliot Trudeau when he was Prime Minsiter and explore the meaning of team genius, emotional intelligence, the art of mentoring and what we can learn from master leaders.

    We examine the importance of deep empathy, deep eloquence, and deep endurance and create a short list of actions to improve our personal and professional leadership skills.

    DR JOSEPH MACINNIS is a physician-scientist who examines leadership and team genius in life-threatening environments and how they can be enhanced in our personal and professional lives.

    Dr. MacInnis helped develop some of the systems and techniques that allow humans to function safely deep within the sea. He’s worked on undersea science and engineering projects with the US Navy, the Canadian government and the Russian Academy of Sciences. Supported by the Canadian government, he led ten research expeditions under the ice of the Arctic Ocean. The first person to explore the ocean beneath the North Pole, he was among the first to dive to the Titanic. He’s spent six thousand hours working inside the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Recently, he was the medical advisor and journalist on the James Cameron National-Geographic seven-mile science dive into the Mariana Trench.

    Dr. MacInnis currently examines and writes about leadership and team genius in lethal environments. He’s produced two leadership training videos for the Canadian military. His latest book, Deep Leadership: Essential Insights from High-Risk Environments, was published by Random House. He has written and hosted radio, television and giant-screen stories for CBC, CBS, Imax Corporation, National Geographic and the Discovery Channel.

    Dr. MacInnis gives leadership and team genius presentations in North America and Europe. His audiences have included Microsoft, IBM, National Geographic, Rolex, Visa and the U.S. Naval Academy. His work has earned him numerous distinctions including six honorary doctorates and the Order of Canada.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Dr. Joe MacInnis


    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Sponsors

    Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 6th Mediterranean Mobility Beyond Europe: The Role of Transit States and International Organizations

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 6, 20192:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    A live stream of this event will be available. Please note that the stream will not load until shortly before the event start time. 

    Please join the Global Migration Lab for another event in its speaker series examining contemporary issues and challenges in global migration governance.

    Kelsey P. Norman: “Strategic Indifference: Understanding Responses to Migrant and Refugee Settlement in Mediterranean Host Countries”

    Hiba Sha’ath: “At Cross Purposes: A Field-Based Perspective on IOM’s Framing(s) of Migration in Libya”

    Comments by Craig Damian Smith

    The Central Mediterranean has been the site of mass irregular migration for at least the past decade. Overloaded boats full of desperate people have come to dominate media and popular imagery. Growing attention to the often-dire conditions of migrants in Sahel and North African transit states provides an important check on European claims that “breaking” smuggling rings and criminalizing humanitarian NGOs can co-exist with the promise of development aid and protecting the rights of migrants. Indeed, it is now clear that Europe’s externalized migration controls have dire consequences for migrants, help support autocratic governments, and undermine international protection norms.

    However, the focus on Europe’s policy challenges and its ability to “externalize” controls ignores the interests, choices, and domestic politics in African transit and destination states. Likewise, International Organizations are characterized as passive vehicles of European policies, obscuring their significant interests and internal politics. This panel will unpack the policies and interests of Mediterranean transit and receiving states, explore how International Organizations mediate between their own and diverse state interests, and ask how these dynamics affect irregular migration in the region.

    Kelsey Norman is a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Political Science and the Institute for European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada and an instructor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She has conducted several years of field research throughout North Africa.

    Hiba Sha’ath is a second year PhD student in Human Geography at York University. Prior to joining York, she worked on data analysis, research coordination and reporting with IOM Libya’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) program from 2016 to 2017, and with IOM’s regional office for West and Central Africa in spring and summer of 2018.

    This speaker series is supported in part by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 7th “Hail Hubert!”: Holy Hubert Lindsey, Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement, and the Birth of Campus Preaching.

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 7, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 1964, students at the University of California, Berkeley staged a mass demonstration in an attempt to remove the university’s ban on political activities. Present among the free speech advocates, civil rights activists, and anti-Vietnam war protesters was Hubert Lindsey, a lone Southern Baptist preacher and self-identified missionary to the radical student population. Known as “Holy Hubert” among the students, Lindsey popularized a form of aggressive campus preaching that is still practiced today.

    This presentation will explore how Lindsey’s mission to Berkeley, as well as the campus preaching movement it inspired, helps us historicize and clarify the pressing cultural politics of free speech and hate speech on college campuses today.

    Contact

    Don Newton


    Speakers

    Kyle Byron
    PhD Candidate Department for the Study of Religion University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 7th Accepting Foreign Workers: Japan's New Policy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 7, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Abstract
    Known for its unique culture and society, Japan`s rapidly ageing society and chronic labour shortages have created long-term structural challenges. While Japanese policy-makers, pundits, and scholars have debated whether or not Japan could address these issues through outsourcing and automation, in recent years, the rising costs of social programs combined with a shrinking economy have threatened to turn Japan`s ageing population into a national crisis. In December of 2018, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe`s Liberal Democratic Party made history by introducing major reforms to Japan`s strict immigration policy that will dramatically increase that country`s immigrant population. Having spent his career working for the Japanese Immigration Bureau and a nationally recognized advocate of immigration reform, Mr. Hidenori Sakanaka discusses why it is necessary for Japan to become a major destination for immigrants and how it can effectively manage immigration in the 21st Century.

    Speaker Biography
    Graduating with a Master of Law Degree from Keio Gijuku University in 1970, Mr. Sakanaka joined the Japanese Ministry of Justice that same year, going on to become the Bureau Chief of the Immigration Bureau`s Tokyo Office. Since retiring his post at the Immigration Bureau, he has become head of the Japan Immigration Policy Institute. In recent years, he has proposed that Japan admit 10 million immigrants by 2050 in his lecture/article titled, “A Vision for Japan`s Model Immigration State,” and called for the peaceful co-existence of all peoples in his lecture/article, “A Plan for a Community of Different Peoples.” Mr. Sakanaka is the author of several books including: How the immigration control will be implemented (1989), An Immigration Officer`s Memoirs (2005), The Road to Japan`s Model Immigration State (2011), and The Population Decline and the Immigration Revolution (2012).

    Event Announcement

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Takako Ito
    Opening Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Director, Global Migration Lab

    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Nicholas Fraser
    Discussant
    PhD Student, Department of Political Science

    Hidenori Sakanaka
    Speaker
    Director, Japan Immigration Policy Research Institute

    Former Bureau Chief, Tokyo Immigration Bureau


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 7th Colonial Secularism, Buddhism and the Continuing Violence of Burmese Women's ‘Freedom’

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 7, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMRoom 2098, Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room, Sidney Smith Hall, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street
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    Description

    The idea that Burmese women enjoy greater freedom than either their Asian or European counterparts has been a persistent theme in both British colonial and Burmese nationalist discourse of the last two centuries. While Burmese feminists challenge the empirical reality of this myth of women’s freedom, in this talk I will explore the history and conceptual underpinnings of this discourse and its devastating consequences. At three moments in Burmese history (late 1920s, 1950s and 2015) the defense of Burmese Buddhist women’s freedom against perceived oppression of Islam, has mobilized anti-Muslim sentiment and violence. While many diagnose this Burmese Buddhist nationalism as illiberal excessive religion, I will argue instead that the discourse of Burmese women’s freedom and the ways it has been used to construct difference between Buddhists and Muslims finds its origins in colonial secularism and its ways of knowing and order in the world. Working from the frameworks laid out by Saba Mahmood and Talal Asad, this talk explores how colonial secularism enmeshed constructions of religion and gender in order to shed light on the current crisis in Burma.

    Alicia Turner is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Humanities at York University in Toronto. Her first book Saving Buddhism: Moral Community and the Impermanence of Colonial Religion explores concepts of sāsana, identity and religion through a study of Buddhist lay associations. She is currently working on a book, entitled Buddhism’s Plural Pasts: Religious Difference and Indifference in Colonial Burma, that offers a genealogy of religious division.


    Speakers

    Alicia Turner
    Speaker
    Department of Humanities and Religious Studies, York University

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 8th Innovating for Sustainable Development (13th Annual PCJ Student Conference)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 8, 201910:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Now in its thirteenth year, the theme of our 2019 conference is Innovating for Sustainable Development. It aims to provide diverse perspectives on the important role of innovation in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Achieving these goals by 2030 will require a massive and sustained investment, and it is unlikely that traditional international development institutions will be able to meet this on their own. However, new technologies and innovative program designs have dramatically lowered the cost of providing some basic health services, improved the speed and efficiency of humanitarian assistance, and increased accountability for citizens around the world. Our conference hopes to explore the unique roles that private sector, government, and NGOs play in this ever-changing landscape.

    Main Sponsor

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Political Science

    Department for East Asian Studies

    Department of Economics

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 8th Citizen solidarity, ethnic rivalry, or self-interest? Implicit and explicit biases during wartime

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 8, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What determines implicit associations and explicit attitudes towards belligerent states during wartime? Scholars have increasingly noted the important role played by both implicit (or affect-based) and explicit (or cognition-based) attitudes in explaining important elements of political behavior, but there has been little prior research on implicit attitudes during wartime. Further, there is theoretical and empirical disagreement as to whether one of several possible identity categories, such as citizenship or ethnicity, or the dynamics of the conflict should determine attitudes. We use an implicit association test (IAT) and a questionnaire in four Ukrainian cities to determine 600 respondents’ relative preferences for Ukraine or Russia, deploying nationally representative survey data to perform robustness checks on our IAT recruitment and measurement strategy. We find that ethnicity does not predict absolute preference for one state over the other, but rather that all ethnic groups across all cities express pro-Ukraine views on average in both explicit attitudes and implicit associations. The relatively high degree of congruence between explicit and implicit attitudes, the latter of which are very difficult to manipulate and are therefore immune from social desirability bias or other forms of preference falsification, suggests that respondents are generally comfortable expressing their pro-Ukraine views. These findings speak to international relations literature on diversionary conflict and rally-effects and comparative politics literature on ethnicity and conflict. They challenge theories that suggest ethnic minority diaspora populations (in this case, ethnic Russian citizens of Ukraine) may feel allegiance to an external homeland in times of conflict.

    Aaron Erlich is an Assistant Professor at McGill University. His current research interests include the impact of information in developing countries, measurement, democratization, and experimental design. Previous work has appeared in American Political Science Review and Comparative Political Studies, among other journals.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Aaron Erlich
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science at McGill University

    Matthew Light
    Chair
    Professor of Criminology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 8th Ambedkar, Buddha, and Marx...Again

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    My talk will engage with a set of late works by B. R. Ambedkar—Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Ancient India, The Buddha and His Gospel, The Buddha and His Dhamma, and Buddha or Karl Marx—where the analysis of Buddhism’s history in India intersects with Ambedkar’s understanding of “religion” and his philosophy of conversion. My talk returns to a question that haunts Ambedkar scholarship. This concerns the issue of how to understand Buddhist conversion within the complexly ramified temporalities of “return” and (Marxist) “revolution” that frames the project of human emancipation for B. R. Ambedkar.

    Anupama Rao is Senior Editor, Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East; and Acting Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society. Rao has written widely on the themes of colonialism and humanitarianism, and on non-Western histories of gender and sexuality. Her book, The Caste Question (University of California Press, 2009) theorized caste subalternity, with specific focus on the role of anti-caste thought (and its thinkers) in producing alternative genealogies of political subject-formation.

    She is currently working on a book on the political thought of B. R. Ambedkar; and a project titled Dalit Bombay, which explores the relationship between caste, political culture, and everyday life in colonial and postcolonial Bombay. Her most recent book, the edited volume Gender, Caste, and the Imagination of Equality was published in December 2017.

    Her work has been supported by grants from the ACLS; the American Institute for Indian Studies; the Mellon Foundation; the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the SSRC. She was a Fellow-in-Residence at the National Humanities Center from 2008-09, and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford during 2010-11. She was a Fellow at REWORK (Humboldt University, Berlin) in 2014-2015.


    Speakers

    Anupama Rao
    Speaker
    TOW Associate Professor, History and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    UofT/McMaster University Numata Buddhist Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 11th Understanding the Opioid Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 11, 20195:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Ford+Munk: A Public Policy Conference

    Description

    We are excited that our 10th anniversary panel for the Ford+Munk conference features an impressive lineup of researchers, policy practitioners, academics and leaders from the medical community.

    The panelists include:

    Helen Angus, Deputy Minister, Ontario Ministry of Health & Long Term Care

    Helen Angus was appointed Deputy Minister of Health and Long-Term Care in June 2018.
    Most recently, Helen served as the Deputy Minister of Treasury Board Secretariat and the Secretary of Treasury Board and Management Board of Cabinet. Previously, she was Deputy Minister of International Trade and Deputy Responsible for Women’s Issues, and Deputy Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade. Helen has also served as an associate deputy minister at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care with responsibility for Policy and Transformation.
    Prior to her return to the Ontario Public Service in 2012, Helen served as the Vice President responsible for the Ontario Renal Network at Cancer Care Ontario. She was also Cancer Care Ontario’s Vice President of Planning and Strategic Implementation and Vice President of Research and Analysis at the Canadian Institute for Health Information.
    Helen was educated at the University of Toronto and holds a Master of Science degree in planning.

    Dr. Vicky Stergiopoulos, Physician-in-Chief, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

    Dr. Vicky Stergiopoulos is a Clinician Scientist and the Physician-in-Chief at CAMH. She is also a Professor and Vice-Chair, Clinical and Innovation in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. Prior to joining CAMH, she served as the Psychiatrist-in-Chief at St. Michael’s Hospital, leading the development of a number of innovative health solutions for people experiencing homelessness and mental health and substance use challenges. Dr. Stergiopoulos has a keen interest in mental health policy, community development and the redesign of our system of mental health care for the purpose of system improvement. She champions equitable access to high quality health care, and the inclusion of service users in both service delivery and research.
    Dr. Stergiopoulos completed her medical training at Dalhousie University and training in psychiatry at the University of Toronto. She holds a MHSc in health administration from the University of Toronto’s Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation. Her program of research focuses on the design, implementation, evaluation and dissemination of interventions aiming to improve housing stability, service coordination and recovery of adults experiencing mental health and addiction challenges and social disadvantage.

    Gillian Kolla, PhD. Candidate, Dalla Lana School of Public Health: University of Toronto

    Gillian Kolla is a PhD candidate in Social and Behavioural Health Sciences at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. She uses community-based research, ethnographic and qualitative methods to examine how to make health and social services more accessible to people impacted by marginalization. Her PhD research explores the delivery of health and social services within the spaces where people gather to use illicit drugs, with a focus on how the criminalization of drug use impedes the ability of public health programs to respond effectively to drug use. She is currently also conducting research on the impacts of the overdose epidemic on the physical and emotional health of communities of people who use drugs.
    Gillian is a member of the coordinating committee of the Toronto Overdose Prevention Society, which set up unsanctioned Overdose Prevention Sites in Moss Park and Parkdale as a response to the devastating overdose crisis, and advocates for an evidence-based response to the overdose crisis. In recognition of this work, Gillian received the Emerging Public Health Leader award from the Public Health Alumni Association.

    Matt Johnson, Coordinator: Overdose Prevention Site, Parkdale Queen West Community Health Centre

    Matt Johnson is the Coordinator of the Overdose Prevention Site at Parkdale Queen West Community Health Centre. He is a long time Harm Reduction worker, advocate and was involved in setting up the unsanctioned Overdose Prevention Sites in Moss Park and Parkdale as an activist response to inaction around the overdose epidemic and the ongoing drug war. He has been asked to speak as an expert on substance use, Harm Reduction and Overdose response to Social Service agencies, Universities, a Coroner’s inquest and media. He continues to push for greater and meaningful involvement of people who use drugs in the development and implementation of services as well as policies affecting drug users. He works for an end to the drug war, and a humane system based in respect, human rights and greater health and stability for all.

    MODERATED BY:

    Georgina Black, Partner & National Leader: Management Consulting, KPMG Canada & Vice-Chair, KPMG Global Healthcare

    Georgina is a National Leader, Management Consulting. She has 20 years of experience advising organizations in the areas of executive governance and leadership, strategic planning, performance improvement and complex organizational change. Until recently, Georgina was the President of Blackstone Partners which was acquired by KPMG to deepen the firm’s commitment to the healthcare and broader public sectors in Canada. Georgina’s area of focus is working closely with boards, executive teams and diverse stakeholder groups to develop strategies to improve performance. She is an accomplished strategist and facilitator who has a reputation for getting results. Clients appreciate her attention to the realities of implementation, political acuity and the discipline she brings from 10 years focused on the private sector. Throughout her career, Georgina has led several transformational projects (mergers and acquisitions, restructuring, governance and program reviews, shared services and organizational design) in the public sector to improve effectiveness and efficiency within complex stakeholder environments. Through her work with provincial, local government, not for profits and healthcare organizations, Georgina brings a systems perspective to identifying and addressing cross function, organization and sector opportunities.


    Speakers

    Helen Angus
    Speaker
    Deputy Minister, Ontario Ministry of Health & Long Term Care

    Vicky Stergiopoulos
    Speaker
    Physician-in-Chief, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)

    Gillian Kolla
    Speaker
    PhD. Candidate, Dalla Lana School of Public Health: University of Toronto

    Matt Johnson
    Speaker
    Coordinator: Overdose Prevention Site, Parkdale Queen West Community Health Centre

    Georgina Black
    Moderator
    Partner & National Leader: Management Consulting, KPMG Canada & Vice-Chair, KPMG Global Healthcare


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 12th Enhancing Canada-Japan Security Cooperation: Building a More Comprehensive Partnership

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 12, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    *The University of Toronto St. George campus remains open, and this lecture will take place as planned. We look forward to hosting those of you who are able to safely arrive at 1 Devonshire Place.*

    Lecture Abstract
    Canada and Japan have long been key international partners, both bilaterally and multilaterally. The two countries are vibrant democracies that support open trade, investment and the rules-based international order. Their cooperation internationally spans a range of bodies including: the G7, G20, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, Asian Development Bank, International Monetary Fund, Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The two sides are also committed to enhancing trade relations with the now-ratified Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) trade deal.

    But while economic ties have long been the focal point of this relationship, it is a critical moment to reassess the need to elevate security and defense relations in order to make a more comprehensive and strategic partnership. Japan’s security environment continues to be laden with concerns—both short and long term—such as continued instability and uncertainty on the Korean peninsula along with meeting the long-term challenge of China. Meanwhile, Canada (also managing its own challenges in its relations with China) has increasingly voiced a desire to engage more deeply in the Asia-Pacific in security terms, and its relationship with Japan seems to be a natural cornerstone from which to base those evolving efforts. Where is this relationship going in security and defense terms? What are some of the main areas of opportunity? What are the challenges?

    Speaker Biography
    Jonathan Berkshire Miller is an international affairs professional with expertise on security, defense and intelligence issues in Northeast Asia. He has held a variety of positions in the private and public sector. Currently, he is a senior visiting fellow with the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA). He is also a Distinguished Fellow with the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada. Additionally, he is a Senior Fellow on East Asia with the EastWest Institute. Miller is also a Senior Fellow on East Asia for the Asian Forum Japan, based in Tokyo.

    Previously, he was an international affairs fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations, based in Tokyo. Jonathan also held a fellowship on Japan with the Pacific Forum CSIS from 2013-16. At the Pacific Forum CSIS, he chaired a ten-member group focused on Japan-Korea relations, in the context of the US “rebalance” to Asia. Miller has also held a number of other visiting fellowships on Asian security matters, including at JIIA and the National Institute of Defense Studies (Ministry of Defense – Japan).

    In addition, Miller previously spent nearly a decade working on economic and security issues related to Asia with the Canadian federal government and worked both with the foreign ministry and the security community. He regularly attends track 1.5 and track 2 dialogues in the region and lectures to universities, think-tanks, corporations and others across the Asia-Pacific region on security and defense issues. He also regularly provides advice and presents to multilateral organizations and foreign governments on regional geopolitics.

    Jonathan is a regular contributor to several journals, magazines and newspapers on Asia-Pacific security issues including The Economist Intelligence Unit, Foreign Affairs, Forbes and Newsweek Japan. He has also published widely in other outlets including Foreign Policy, the World Affairs Journal, the Nikkei Asian Review, the Japan Times, the Mainichi Shimbun, the ASAN Forum, Jane’s Intelligence Review and Global Asia. Miller has been interviewed and quoted on regional security issues across a wide range of media including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Reuters, CNN, CNBC, Bloomberg, Le Monde, Nikkei, The Japan Times, Asahi Shimbun, the Voice of America, The Globe and Mail and ABC news.

    Event Announcement

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Jonathan Berkshire Miller
    Speaker
    Senior Visiting Fellow, Japan Institute of International Affairs

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 13th The Arc of Protection: Toward a New International Refugee Regime

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 13, 20192:30PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    A live stream of this event will be available. Please note that the stream will not load until shortly before the event start time. 

    Alex Aleinikoff in conversation with Audrey Macklin and Randall Hansen

    Please join the Global Migration Lab for the first in a speaker series examining contemporary issues and challenges in global migration governance. The series is supported by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.

    The international refugee regime is broken. Too many people remain refugees for too long, as states in the Global North have cut resettlement programs and adopted policies to deter asylum-seekers while conflicts causing flight go unresolved. To repair and reform the current system, The Arc of Protection (co-authored by T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Leah Zamore) suggests a new focus on refugee rights, autonomy, and mobility and attention to the role that development actors can play in responding to refugee situations. Serious changes are needed at the level of structures and institutions, especially when it comes to global responsibility-sharing. These changes are unlikely to be made by states, who have watched over the decline of the refugee protection system. Reform will require new actors and ultimately political action.

    Alex Aleinikoff is University Professor, and has served as Director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility at the New School since January 2017. He received a J.D. from the Yale Law School and a B.A. from Swarthmore College.

    Alex has written widely in the areas of immigration and refugee law and policy, transnational law, citizenship, race, and constitutional law. In addition to The Arc of Protection, he is the author of Semblances of Sovereignty: The Constitution, the State, and American Citizenship, published by Harvard University Press in 2002. Alex is also a co-author of leading legal casebooks on immigration law and forced migration and host of the podcast, Tempest Tossed (on US immigration policy).

    This speaker series is supported in part by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.


    Speakers

    T. Alexander Aleinikoff
    Speaker
    The New School

    Audrey Macklin
    Commentator
    Professor & Chair in Human Rights Law, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Randall Hansen
    Commentator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Craig Damian Smith
    Moderator
    Associate Director, Global Migration Lab


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 13th Munk One Open House for Highschool Students & Parents

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 13, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
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    Description

    Planning your first year at U of T in September 2019, and want to find out more about Munk One? Join us on February 13 for an opportunity to meet Munk One professors, students, and staff who will tell you about this unique first year opportunity for students interested in global affairs.

    To make the most of your time with us, we ask that you arrive promptly at 6:00pm. During the first hour, Professor Teresa Kramarz, Director of Munk One will present a brief overview of the program, then students, and staff will talk about specific aspects of the program like its seminar class format, its labs, research opportunities, case competitions, international opportunities and much more. You will also have plenty of time to ask questions. Following that, starting at 7:00pm, Munk One students will take you on a short campus tour.

    Meet us in the boardroom and library at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, 315 Bloor Street West. We are looking forward to seeing you there!

    In the meantime, you can find out more about the program, by visiting our website:
    https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/one/

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    (416) 946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 13th Men in Charge?: Masculinities, Power and Politics in the #MeToo Era

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 13, 20197:00PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    From houses of parliament to corporate board rooms, politics is framed by powerful notions of manhood and organised in large part through men’s relations with other men. Elections and public policies often are contests over the performance of particular forms of masculinity. As recent events have shown, right-wing and fundamentalist movements and communities draw support and strength from appeals to masculine values. At the same time, there are growing efforts by feminist movements, civil society organizations, and governments to engage men in building gender equality, and an increasingly visible conversation about new, healthy forms of masculinity. This event will explore the interconnections of masculinities, power and politics around the world, and the public and institutional policies that can have a positive and transformative impact through engaging men as allies with women in the gender equality revolution.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Michael Flood
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Queensland University of Technology and author of "Engaging Men and Boys in Violence Prevention"

    Michael Kaufman
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Promundo and author of "The Time has Come. Why Men Must Join the Gender Equality Revolution"

    Megan Leslie
    Panelist
    President & CEO, WWF-Canada

    Shereen El Feki
    Chair
    Professor of Global Practice, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa, Promundo

    Humberto Carolo
    Opening Remarks
    Executive Director, White Ribbon Canada and Global Co-Chair, MenEngage Alliance



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 14th The Country Without a Post Office: Archiving a Photographic History of Kashmir

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 14, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Kashmir valley is a geographic region that straddles India’s northwestern border with Pakistan. Known for its idyllic meadows and mountainous landscapes, the Indian-administered territory is the site of one of the longest international political disputes in modern history, and is one of the most militarized regions in the world. Since the partition of the Indian subcontinent in 1947, the valley has been the site of multiple wars between India and Pakistan, and control of the region has become the subject of one the most divisive political and social debates in South Asia. In the late 1980s, Kashmiri militants began a rebellion against Indian administration of the region. The subsequent insurgency and counter-insurgency continue to this day and have resulted in thousands of deaths and human rights violations.


    Nathaniel Brunt is an interdisciplinary scholar, photographer and archival artist based in Toronto, Canada. His research and photographic practice focus on the history and photographic representation of modern war. Brunt is currently pursuing a PhD in the Communication and Culture joint program at Ryerson University and York University. His doctoral research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and The Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation.

    Brunt’s photographic work has been featured in the Globe and Mail, Sharp Magazine, and PDN, and has been exhibited in Canada and internationally. He has received academic and photographic honours from organizations including the Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival, the International Visual Sociology Association, and the Alexia Foundation for World Peace. Recently Brunt was a visiting scholar at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. He is co-director, with Alisha Sett, of the Kashmir Photo Collective, a digital resource of endangered photographs and related historical material that preserves, visualizes, and diversifies the histories of the Kashmir Valley.

    Nathaniel Brunt is an interdisciplinary scholar, photographer and archival artist based in Toronto, Canada. His research and photographic practice focus on the history and photographic representation of modern war. Brunt is currently pursuing a PhD in the Communication and Culture joint-program at Ryerson University and York University. His doctoral research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and The Pierre Elliot Trudeau Foundation.

    Brunt’s photographic work has been featured in The Globe and Mail, Sharp Magazine, PDN and been exhibited in Canada and internationally. He has received academic and photographic honours from organizations including Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival, The International Visual Sociology Association, and the Alexia Foundation for World Peace. Recently, Brunt was a visiting scholar at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Nathaniel Brunt
    Ryerson University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 14th Anwar Ibrahim: Confronting Authoritarianism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    15th Annual Seymour Lipset Memorial Lecture

    Description

    Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, the leader of Malaysia’s ruling Pakatan Harapan coalition and President of the People’s Justice Party, is expected to lead the country as its eighth Prime Minister. He served as Deputy Prime Minister in 1993-98 and Finance Minister in 1991-98. Since 1998, he has led the reform movement to strengthen democracy and the rule of law in the country. For his principled stance on issues of justice and the rule of law, he has spent over ten of the past 20 years in solitary confinement as a prisoner of conscience. He received a full pardon for all of the crimes alleged against him just days after his party won the 14th Malaysian General Election on 9 May 2018.
    Anwar is highly regarded for his stance against corruption and his skillful management of the Malaysian economy during the Asian financial crisis. He has called for bold reforms to Malaysia’s political economy in order for it to remain competitive in the 21st century. He believes an independent judiciary, free media, and respect for the rule of law are the foundations on which Malaysia’s economic strength can be expanded. He further believes that the government must not ignore the plight of the poor and marginalized and should take active steps to create a humane economy. The multiethnic People’s Justice Party that he leads has provided a template for how Malaysia’s diverse ethnic and religious groups can work together toward a common national objective.


    Speakers

    Anwar Ibrahim
    Speaker
    President, People's Justice Party of Malaysia

    Clifford Orwin
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, Classics, and Jewish Studies, University of Toronto

    Matthew Walton
    Opening Remarks
    Professor, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Donner Canadian Foundation

    National Endowment for Democracy in Washington

    The Embassy of Canada to the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 14th Parag Khanna on "The Future is Asian"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 14, 20195:00PM - 6:00PM Fleck Atrium (Ground Floor, North Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
    105 St George Street
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    Description

    Join us as Parag Khanna discusses his book “The Future is Asian.”

    Registraiton: 4:15pm
    Book Talk : 5:00pm – 6:00pm
    Book Sale 6:00-6:10pm

    BOOK SYNOPSIS: In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. The “Asian Century” is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning Saudi Arabia to Japan, Russia to Australia, Turkey to Indonesia—linking five billion people through trade, finance, infrastructure, and diplomatic networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. China has taken a lead in building the new Silk Roads across Asia, but it will not lead it alone. Rather, Asia is rapidly returning to the centuries-old patterns of commerce, conflict, and cultural exchange that thrived long before European colonialism and American dominance. Asians will determine their own future—and as they collectively assert their interests around the world, they will determine ours as well. There is no more important region of the world for us to better understand than Asia – and thus we cannot afford to keep getting Asia so wrong. Asia’s complexity has led to common misdiagnoses: Western thinking on Asia conflates the entire region with China, predicts imminent World War III around every corner, and regularly forecasts debt-driven collapse for the region’s major economies. But in reality, the region is experiencing a confident new wave of growth led by younger societies from India to the Philippines, nationalist leaders have put aside territorial disputes in favor of integration, and today’s infrastructure investments are the platform for the next generation of digital innovation. If the nineteenth century featured the Europeanization of the world, and the twentieth century its Americanization, then the twenty-first century is the time of Asianization. From investment portfolios and trade wars to Hollywood movies and university admissions, no aspect of life is immune from Asianization. With America’s tech sector dependent on Asian talent and politicians praising Asia’s glittering cities and efficient governments, Asia is permanently in our nation’s consciousness. We know this will be the Asian century. Now we finally have an accurate picture of what it will look like.

    ABOUT OUR SPEAKER: Parag Khanna is a leading global strategy advisor, world traveler, and best-selling author. He is Founder & Managing Partner of FutureMap, a data and scenario based strategic advisory firm. Parag’s newest book is The Future is Asian: Commerce, Conflict & Culture in the 21st Century (Feb. 5, 2019). He is author of a trilogy of books on the future of world order beginning with The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order (2008), followed by How to Run the World: Charting a Course to the Next Renaissance (2011), and concluding with Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization (2016). He is also author of Technocracy in America: Rise of the Info-State (2017) and co-author of Hybrid Reality: Thriving in the Emerging Human-Technology Civilization (2012). In 2008, Parag was named one of Esquire’s “75 Most Influential People of the 21st Century,” and featured in WIRED magazine’s “Smart List.” He holds a PhD from the London School of Economics, and Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has traveled to more than 100 countries and is a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.

    Contact

    Megan Murphy
    (416) 978-6122


    Speakers

    Parag Khanna
    Speaker
    Founder & Managing Partner, FutureMap Global Strategy Advisor

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 19th SAMPLE - Public Affairs & Engagement Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 19, 201910:00AM - 11:00AMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Gillian Mathurin



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 22nd Pious Captains: Religion, Masculinity, and Combat in Sixteenth-Century France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 22, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The sixteenth century witnessed a proliferation of military texts written by French noblemen who were veterans of the Italian Wars and religious wars. In these texts, authors developed a new masculine standard through how they represented noblemen in combat. They abandoned the medieval trope of the knight and replaced it with that of the captain. Religious piety was an essential aspect of this change as the authors incorporated a renewed emphasis on crusade in their idealised representation of nobility. In the beginning of the period, authors’ religious ideals conflicted with political realities as they placed crusader imagery alongside gleeful descriptions of France waging war against Popes and allying with Protestants and Muslims against Catholics. These inherent contradictions did not resolve themselves until the latter half of the century when authors’ glorification of holy war dissipated as France plunged into its vicious cycle of religious conflict that shattered the social fabric of the nobility. The bloodshed between Frenchmen over religion meant that representations of noblemen as imagined crusaders ceased to be a favourable trope in military literature. Religious fanaticism was no longer glorified, and thus noblemen needed to present themselves as secular actors devoid of aggressive religious motivations. Authors continued to utilise the trope of the pious captain but without its original crusader rhetoric.

    Benjamin (Benji) Lukas is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. His dissertation, “From Knights to Captains: The construction of nobility through masculinity and warfare in sixteenth-century France,” examines the changes in the representation of nobility in sixteen-century military literature. His research interests include the study of masculinity, warfare, religious conflict, and sexual violence.


    Speakers

    Benjamin Lukas
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Glendon College

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 25th From Buenos Aires to Osaka: The view of the G20 from the IMF

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Patrick Cirillo, a founding member of the G7 Research Group, is Principal Assistant to the Secretary of the International Monetary Fund. Previously, he served as Deputy Chief of Operations in the IMF secretariat and Deputy Chief of Public Affairs in the IMF’s Communications Department. From 1997 to 2008, he was also the Secretary to the Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-Four on International Monetary Affairs and Development (G24), which brings together the major emerging market and developing countries. Prior to joining the Fund, Patrick worked in financial markets in Europe and in academia in Canada and Europe. Patrick attended universities in Switzerland, France and Austria and is a graduate of International Relations Program at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Patrick Cirillo
    International Monetary Fund


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th The Environmental Governance Lab in Conversation with Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change, Patricia Fuller

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 201912:00PM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us for a conversation with Patricia Fuller, Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change. Appointed in 2018, Ambassador Fuller is working to advance Canada’s climate change plans on the international stage. The conversation will center on key themes surrounding global climate governance and the state of play in the UN climate negotiations following the recent UNFCCC COP24 meeting in Katowice, Poland and the IPCC report from October 2018. .

    The conversation will be moderated by Matthew Hoffmann, professor and co-director of the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. His research focuses primarily on global environmental governance and he is especially interested in the global response to climate change.


    Speakers

    Patricia Fuller
    Canada’s UN Ambassador for Climate Change

    Matthew Hoffmann
    Professor and co-director of the Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th Authoritarianism and Populism in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    From the rise of Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines to Myanmar’s military dictatorship, Southeast Asia is home to several fascinating cases of authoritarianism and populism. Efforts to combat corruption and drug trafficking have become authoritarian mechanisms through which to crack down on dissent and tighten the state’s stronghold on civil societies. Do such observations point to a recent resurgence of historical trends, or are we witnessing new forms of populism and authoritarianism in the 21st century? What are the political and socio-economic factors that give rise to and sustain populism in Southeast Asia? How is authoritarianism in Southeast Asia different from, or similar to, centralized governance in other parts of the world?

    We are honoured and excited to welcome three distinguished panelists to our event:

    Professor Arne Kislenko (Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto) will discuss the regression in Thailand witnessed with the return of military government and a new king. He will also speak to the entrenchment of authoritarianism in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar/Burma. Our second panelist Petra Molnar (Research Associate. International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law) will be discussing her fact-finding trip to the Philippines in 2018, the impacts of the drug war, and more generally about human rights advocacy. Our third panelist, Irene Poetranto (PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab) will be commenting on the digital/cyber component of populism and authoritarianism, for example, Duterte’s use of social media.

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Arne Kislenko
    Associate Professor of History, Ryerson University; Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Petra Molnar
    Research Associate, International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Irene Poetranto
    PhD candidate, Department of Political Science & Research at the Citizen Lab


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 26th The Material World of Ukrainian Children during the Holodomor and What Saved Children's Lives

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 26, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Skubii’s research aims at broadening and rethinking our understanding of the Holodomor from a material perspective. She will discuss the importance of material items and commodities in saving children’s lives, both within their families and in orphanages. By focusing on children’s consumer goods, she will examine the mechanisms of distribution and allocation of consumer goods, as well as the spaces and practices of consumption by children in 1932-1933.

    Dr. Iryna Skubii is an Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture. Her research interests include economic and social history, gender studies, consumption and materiality, and history of childhood in early Soviet Ukraine. She holds a Ph.D. degree from Karazin National University (2013). In 2016, Professor Skubii was a fellow of the German-Ukrainian Commission of Historians and undertook research at Ludvig-Maximillians University in Munich. In 2016-2017, she won research grants from the Shevchenko Scientific Society in America and the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. In 2017, Professor Skubii published her monograph “Trade in Kharkiv in the years of NEP (1921-1929): between the economy and everyday life.”

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Petro Jacyk Program's co-director, head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre

    Iryna Skubii
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Researcher, Associate Professor at Department for UNESCO “Philosophy of Human Communication” and Socio-humanitarian Disciplines at the Petro Vasylenko Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 27th Resettling the Borderland: State Relocation and Ethnic Conflict in the South Caucasus

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 27, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    Farid Shafiyev presents a study of Imperial Russian and Soviet Resettlement policies in the South Caucasus during the 19-20th centuries and their impact on the ethnic conflicts in the region, especially the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict. The book investigates the nexus between imperial practices, foreign policy, religion and ethnic conflicts. Taking a comparative approach Dr. Shafiyev explores the most active phases of resettlement, when the state imported and relocated waves of Germans, Russian sectarians and Armenian settlers into the South Caucasus and deported thousands of others. He also offers insights on the complexities of empire-building and managing space and people in the Muslim borderlands.

    Farid Shafiyev is a diplomat and scholar from Azerbaijan. He holds a PhD from Carleton University and an MPA from Harvard Kennedy School of Government as well as Bachelor of Law and Diploma in History from Baku State University. Farid Shafiyev served as ambassador of Azerbaijan to Canada and currently posted in the Czech Republic. He is author of numerous articles and op-eds.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Farid Shafiyev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 27th Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Sir Lawrence Freedman: The End of the Transatlantic Alliance? Trump, Brexit and the New World Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 27, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    This event will take place as scheduled on Wednesday, February 27.
    Click here to watch the webcast.

    Join us as Sir Lawrence Freedman, Emeritus Professor of War Studies at King’s College, London, UK discusses The End of the Transatlantic Alliance? Trump, Brexit and the New World Order.


    Speakers

    Sir Lawrence Freedman
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of War Studies, King's College, London UK Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20191:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 15. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science, School of Graduate Studies, and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th “The Chosen People Has No Choice”: Israel’s Politics of Fear, Freedom and Bad Faith

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Uriel Abulof is a Senior Lecturer (US Associate Professor) at Tel-Aviv University’s School of Political Science, Government and International Affairs, where he directs the graduate studies program. He is also a research fellow at Princeton University’s LISD / Woodrow Wilson School and at the Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace. Abulof studies the politics of fear and legitimation, social movements, existentialism, nationalism and ethnic conflicts. His recent books include The Mortality and Morality of Nations (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and Living on the Edge: The Existential Uncertainty of Zionism (Haifa University Press, 2015), which received Israel’s best academic book award (Bahat Prize). He is also the co-editor of Self-Determination: A Double-Edged Concept (Routledge, 2016) and Communication, Legitimation and Morality in Modern Politics (Routledge, 2017). Abulof is the recipient of the 2016 Young Scholar Award in Israel Studies. He is currently working on another book for Cambridge University Press on Political Existentialism and Humanity’s Midlife Crisis. His articles have appeared in journals such as International Studies Quarterly, International Political Sociology, Nations and Nationalism, British Journal of Sociology, European Journal of International Relations, Journal of International Relations and Development, Contemporary Politics, Perspectives on Politics, Society, Ethnic and Racial Studies and International Politics

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Uriel Abulof
    Tel Aviv University/Princeton University


    Sponsors

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Phonographic Visions of America: Harry Smith and Woody Guthrie

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    What is a phonographic recording? A copy, inseparable from an original sonic event? Or a representation, a ritual re-enactment, that requires the listener’s participation?

    With these questions in mind, this talk will examine two sets of recordings: Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music, compiled in the summer of 1952, and Woody Guthrie’s March 1940 recordings for the Library of Congress. Although these sets employ different representational strategies — with Guthrie using his own voice, Smith the voices and rhythms of various other people — both artists use the phonographic medium to construct a sonic “vision” of America. This talk will explore the nature of these representations and how they might lead us to re-consider phonography and its place within the cultural nexus of American modernism.

    Contact

    Don Newton


    Speakers

    Ryan Stafford
    PhD Candidate Department of English University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th THE REFUGEE AND MIGRATION COMPACTS: COOPERATION IN AN ERA OF NATIONALISM

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Please join the Global Migration Lab for another event in its speaker series examining contemporary issues and challenges in global migration governance.

    A live stream of this event will be available shortly before the panel begins. 

    Anne Staver: “Of two minds: reasserting national control while negotiating global migration governance”

    James Milner: “Collective action in a time of populism: Everyday politics and the implementation of the Global Compact on Refugees”

    Discussant: Jennifer Hyndman, Director of the Centre for Refugees Studies, York University

    Moderator: Randall Hansen, Interin Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Signed in December 2018, the Global Refugee and Global Migration Compacts are an admission that the challenges of migration are best approached through cooperation and collective action.

    The Compact on Refugees recognizes the unequal burden placed on Global South states, which host refugees, and rich Global North states, which pay to keep them in regions of origin. Recognizing that most refugees will not return home or be resettled, the Compact proposes new solidarity, development, and finance mechanisms to foster the inclusion and development of displaced people and host populations alike. While promising, displacement crises continue to proliferate, host states remain under-funded, and programming faces major delivery challenges.

    In terms of the Migration Compact, scholars have long argued that state interests are largely incompatible with attempts at global migration governance. Yet, in 2016 the International Organization for Migration became a UN agency, and the vast majority of states supported the Compact with a goal of facilitating safe, orderly, and legal migration. At the same time, right-wing parties in liberal democracies rallied against the Compact, arguing it would erode state sovereignty, and several prominent states “pulled out”.

    This panel will unpack the potential for global migration governance, responsibility-sharing, and addressing collective action problems in the face of burden-shifting, populism, and a growing desire to assert control.

    James Milner is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Carleton University. He is also currently Project Director of LERRN: The Local Engagement Refugee Research Network, a 7-year, SSHRC-funded partnership between researchers and civil society actors primarily in Canada, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon and Tanzania. He has been a researcher, practitioner and policy advisor on issues relating to the global refugee regime, global refugee policy and the politics of asylum in the global South. In recent years, he has undertaken field research in Burundi, Guinea, Kenya, India, Tanzania and Thailand, and has presented research findings to stakeholders in New York, Geneva, London, Ottawa, Bangkok, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam and elsewhere. He has worked as a Consultant for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in India, Cameroon, Guinea and its Geneva Headquarters. He is author of Refugees, the State and the Politics of Asylum in Africa (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), co-author (with Alexander Betts and Gil Loescher) of UNHCR: The Politics and Practice of Refugee Protection (Routledge, 2012), and co-editor of Protracted Refugee Situations: Political, Human Rights and Security Implications (UN University Press, 2008).

    Anne Balke Staver is a senior researcher at the Oslo Metropolitan University, focusing on migration and integration policies. She holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Toronto and an MSc in Forced Migration from the University of Oxford. She is formerly a research fellow at the Institute for Social Research (Oslo), and has extensive experience from migration policymaking and implementation in the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration, Norwegian Police Immigration Service and the Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees (igc).

    This speaker series is supported in part by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in the lead up to the 2019 International Metropolis Conference.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Anne Balke Staver
    Panelist
    Senior Researcher, Oslo Metropolitan University

    James Milner
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Carleton University

    Jennifer Hyndman
    Discussant
    Director, Centre for Refugees Studies, York University


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th Utopia’s Discontents: Russian Exiles and the Quest for Freedom, 1830-1930

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Over the course of the long nineteenth century, hundreds of thousands of tsarist subjects left the Russian empire and resettled in western and central Europe. There, they created new communities that they called “Russian colonies.” This talk reconstructs the utopian experiments that emerged in the “Russian colonies,” and examines how they influenced political imaginaries in Russia and in their European host societies. Providing a vivid portrait of a unique émigré milieu, the presentation also argues that the story of the colonies offers a novel perspective on one of the most classic themes in Russian history—the relationship between Russia and Europe.

    Faith Hillis is associate professor of history at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Children of Rus’: Right Bank Ukraine and the Invention of a Russian Nation (Cornell University Press, 2013). The recipient of research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, ACLS, Columbia, and Harvard, she is currently a fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library.


    Speakers

    Faith Hillis
    University of Chicago


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 28th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin - "Leadership: A Place for Women?"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 28, 20196:00PM - 7:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria University in the University of Toronto
    93 Charles Street West, Toronto
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    Series

    Women and Leadership

    Description

    Join us as The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, former Chief Justice of Canada, discusses “Leadership: A Place for Women?” This presentation is part of the Women and Leadership Series of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program.

    Biography
    The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin served as Chief Justice of Canada from 2000 to mid-December 2017.
    Ms. McLachlin works as an arbitrator and mediator in Canada and internationally. She brings to those forms of dispute resolution her broad and deep experience from over 35 years in deciding a wide range of business law and public law disputes, in both common law and civil law; her ability to work in both English and French; and her experience and skill in leading and consensus-building for many years as the head of a diverse nine-member court. Ms. McLachlin also sits as a Justice of Singapore’s International Commercial Court and the Hong Kong Final Court of Appeal.

    Her judicial career began in 1981 in the province of British Columbia, Canada. She was appointed to the Supreme Court of British Columbia (a court of first instance) later that year and was elevated to the British Columbia Court of Appeal in 1985. She was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of British Columbia in 1988 and seven months later, she was sworn in as a Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada.

    Ms. McLachlin is the first and only woman to be Chief Justice of Canada and she is Canada’s longest serving Chief Justice.
    The former Chief Justice chaired the Canadian Judicial Council, the Advisory Council of the Order of Canada and the Board of Governors of the National Judicial Institute. In June 2018 she was appointed to the Order of Canada as a recipient of its highest accolade, Companion of the Order of Canada. She has received over 35 honorary degrees from universities in Canada and abroad, and numerous other honours and awards.

    Ms. McLachlin is the author of numerous legal articles and publications, as well as a mystery novel, Full Disclosure, published in 2018.
    The 2,094 Supreme Court of Canada judgments in which she participated – of which she wrote 442 – and her legal writings and speaking, include a wide range of subjects in corporate, construction, financial services, taxation, contract, tort, other areas of business law, as well as arbitration and mediation. Her legal texts include, as lead co-author, the first and second editions (1987 and 1994) of The Canadian Law of Architecture and Engineering. It is generally recognized that the judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada during her tenure have affirmed Canada as a jurisdiction that is very supportive of arbitration.

    The former Chief Justice received a B.A. (Honours) in Philosophy in 1965 and both an M.A. in Philosophy and an LL.B in 1968 from University of Alberta. She was called to the Alberta Bar in 1969 and to the British Columbia Bar in 1971. She practised law in Alberta and British Columbia. Commencing in 1974, she taught for seven years in the Faculty of Law at the University of British Columbia as a tenured Associate Professor.


    Speakers

    The Rt. Hon. Beverley McLachlin
    Former Chief Justice of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    It is recognized that the military coups in Thailand in 2006 and 2014 were the orchestrated attempts of the anti-democratic alliance of the old powers against the rise of electoral politics. After the coups, they have tried to establish firm control through various measures, including the constitutions of 2007 and 2017 and strengthening the bureaucracy. However, little attention has been paid to the Thai military’s expansive civil affairs projects, including rural and urban development programs, mass organizations and mobilization campaigns, ideological and psychological programs. Puangthong argues that the Thai military has always paid great importance to its civil affairs projects as a political offensive to control popular politics since the counter-insurgency period. The conservatives craftily manipulated legal and moral legitimacy in order to protect and expand the army’s role beyond its combatant sphere. The entrenchment has been more apparent and aggressive since the 2006 coup. Old apparatuses were reactivated and new ones were created. Power of the army over other state agencies increased more than ever. On one hand, the military’s civil affairs projects allow the military and conservative elites to dictate the country’s long-term political direction. This potent tool, on other hand, effectively polarizes the populace deeper and thus makes democratization in the future difficult.

    Biography:
    Puangthong R. Pawakapan is Associate Professor of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Harvard University, 2018-2019. Her recent works include “The Central Role of Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command in the Post-Counter-insurgency Period,” Trends in Southeast Asia (ISEAS: Singapore 2017); “The Foreign Press’ Changing Perceptions of Thailand’s Monarchy.” Trends in Southeast Asia. (2015); State and Uncivil Society in Thailand at the Temple of Preah Vihear, (2013).


    Speakers

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Puangthong R. Pawakapan
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Book Launch for "Diasporic Media Beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Korea in a celebration of Dr. Sherry Yu’s book “Diasporic Media beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles.” Dr. Yu will be joined by Dr. Karim Karim who will be the discussant for the event.

    Sherry S. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

    Karim H. Karim is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication and the Director of the Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam at Carleton University. He is also an Associate of Migration and Diaspora Studies and the Centre for European Studies at Carleton University.

    Coffee and refreshments available at event.


    Speakers

    Karim H. Karim
    Discussant
    Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton Universty; Director, Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam

    Sherry Yu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Arts, Culture and Media, and the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    THE B. N. PANDEY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF INDIA

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Novetzke
    Speaker
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 4th Challenges for the G7 and G20 since 2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 4, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    To celebrate the publication of his revised The G20: Evolution, Interrelationships, Documentation, Peter Hajnal will talk about many changes that the G7 and G20 have undergone in the five years since the first edition in 2014.

    One major change was the suspension of Russia’s membership in the G8 in 2014, turning it once again into the G7. Another challenge comes from the rise of populism internationally and US attitudes and actions under the Trump administration – on climate, trade, security and other issues. But on a positive note, both Gs, despite the challenges, are surviving as key institutions of global governance.

    Peter has been a member of the G7/G8/G20 Research Groups since 1988 and attended 14 G7/G8/G20 summits as a member of the field team. He is also a member of the Academic Council on the United Nations System, the Union of International Associations, the Association of Former International Civil Servants and the American Library Association. Before his retirement he was Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto for 11 years. He also served as librarian for 25 years at the University of Toronto and 10 years at the United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library in New York. He was consultant at the United Nations, in post-Yugoslavia Macedonia, at the Civil G8 project in 2006 in Russia, and the Graham Library, Trinity College, University of Toronto, and assessor of the 2005 G8 Stakeholder Consultation for Chatham House. He is also a participant in Canada Declassified, a project of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, Trinity College, University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Peter Hajnal
    Fellow of Senior College and Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 5th Seminar on Deep Empathy & Emotional Intelligence with Dr. Joeseph MacInnis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 5, 20193:30PM - 5:30PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Come out to learn about team genius with Dr. Joe MacInnis!

    Deep Empathy is having a visceral, action-inspired feeling for the team, the task, the technology and the terrain. Central to this is the emotional intelligence to understand your own feelings and the feelings of your team partners.

    We will examine the importance of deep empathy and emotional intelligence. We’ll create action steps to improve our deep empathy skills.


    DR JOSEPH MACINNIS is a physician-scientist who examines leadership and team genius in life-threatening environments and how they can be enhanced in our personal and professional lives.

    Dr. MacInnis helped develop some of the systems and techniques that allow humans to function safely deep within the sea. He’s worked on undersea science and engineering projects with the US Navy, the Canadian government and the Russian Academy of Sciences. Supported by the Canadian government, he led ten research expeditions under the ice of the Arctic Ocean. The first person to explore the ocean beneath the North Pole, he was among the first to dive to the Titanic. He’s spent six thousand hours working inside the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Recently, he was the medical advisor and journalist on the James Cameron National-Geographic seven-mile science dive into the Mariana Trench.

    Dr. MacInnis currently examines and writes about leadership and team genius in lethal environments. He’s produced two leadership training videos for the Canadian military. His latest book, Deep Leadership: Essential Insights from High-Risk Environments, was published by Random House. He has written and hosted radio, television and giant-screen stories for CBC, CBS, Imax Corporation, National Geographic and the Discovery Channel.

    Dr. MacInnis gives leadership and team genius presentations in North America and Europe. His audiences have included Microsoft, IBM, National Geographic, Rolex, Visa and the U.S. Naval Academy. His work has earned him numerous distinctions including six honorary doctorates and the Order of Canada.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Dr.Joseph MacInnis
    Speaker

    Jona Malile
    Admin



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 6th A Religion / Migration Nexus? Faith groups, immigration policy, and public opinion in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 6, 201912:30PM - 2:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A webinar of this event will be available shortly before the panel begins. 

    Immigration to Canada has progressively changed the religious composition of the country, and stimulated a number of heated policy debates around questions of citizenship and belonging. Religious groups have also long been some of the most vocal advocates for family migration and refugee resettlement. At the same time, narratives of displacement, welcome, and belonging have largely ignored the experience and opinions of Indigenous populations.

    This discussion will examine how religion and shaped migration and vice versa: How have faith groups influenced immigration patterns and policy? How is immigration changing religion in a secular Canadian society? And what do Indigenous experiences of displacement tell us about popular narratives of welcome?

    Shachi Kurl:

    “Migration’s Impact on Secularism in Canada” 

    Geoffrey Cameron:

    “Religion and the course of private refugee sponsorship in Canada”

    Sadia Rafiquddan:

    “Words Matter: Reframing the narrative of refugees, Indigenous peoples and Muslims in Canada” 

    Discussant: Michael Donnelly, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Shachi Kurl is Executive Director of the Angus Reid Institute. She is a frequent guest on CBC’s “At Issue,” Canada’s most-watched political panel, and her analysis has been published in The Globe and Mail, the National Post, and other influential forums.

    Geoffrey Cameron (MPhil, PhD) is Director of Public Affairs for the Baha’i Community of Canada, a Research Associate with the Global Migration Lab, and he teaches at McMaster University. He is co-editing a forthcoming volume, “Private Refugee Sponsorship: Concepts, Cases, and Consequences”.

    Born in Sargodha, Pakistan, Sadia Rafiquddin draws inspiration from her parents’ move to Canada as refugees in 1990. She is a freelance writer, broadcaster and photographer focusing on human rights stories for CBC, Ferst Digital Inc., Philanthropic Foundations Canada, Hacking Health and Apathy is Boring among others. Her radio documentary Engaged at 14:“I was worried about science class. And now I am getting married?” for CBC’s The Doc Project, was awarded two silver prizes at the New York Festival’s World’s Best Radio Programs in 2018.


    Speakers

    Shachi Kurl
    Panelist
    Angus Reid Institute

    Geoffrey Cameron
    Panelist
    Baha’i Community of Canada, Global Migration Lab

    Sadia Rafiquddin
    Panelist
    Writer and broadcaster

    Michael Donnelly
    Speaker
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Baha'i Community of Canada

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 6th Lux Interview

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 6, 20194:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - Classroom, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Will Kosiancic
    (613) 867-9345


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Democracy in Asia: Building Sustainable Institutions and Practices in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars whose work either frames contemporary global assessments of the state of democracy around the world or focuses attention directly on the political struggle now underway between democracy and authoritarianism across the Asian region. Its purpose is to bring current comparative research on the evolution of democratic institutions and practices of government into dialogue with cutting-edge conceptual work on democracy and democratization. The participants together address the challenge of maintaining domestic and international stability when countries are facing competing political imperatives generated both by globalizing capitalism and by the contemporary diffusion of systemic power.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
    2:10-2:15PM Welcoming Remarks
    RANDALL HANSEN
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    2:15-4:00PM Panel I
    LUCAN AHMAD WAY

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Are we actually in the Midst of a Democratic Recession?

    SEVA GUNITSKY
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Great Powers and the Future of Democracy

    LYNETTE ONG
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto
    Studying “China in the World” in 2019

    PHILLIP LIPSCY
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    Democracy, Financial Crises, and Economic Volatility

    MAIKO ICHIHARA
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    Understanding Japan’s International Democracy Assistance Policy

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    4:00-4:15PM Break

    4:15-5:55PM Panel II

    YUSUKE TAKAGI
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan
    Democracy in Asia: The Case of the Philippines

    JOSEPH WONG
    Professor, Department of Political Science
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School
    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Japan: Asia’s First Unlikely Democracy

    DAN SLATER
    Professor of Political Science
    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies
    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan
    Indonesia: Asia’s Newest Unlikely Democracy

    SANG-YOUNG RHYU
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
    Upgrading Democracy in Korea: Resilient Consolidation and Complex Challenges

    DIANA FU
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    State Control in China under Xi Jinping

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    5:55-6:00PM Closing Remarks
    TAKAKO ITO

    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    6:00-7:00PM Reception

    Event Program and Announcement

    Democracy in Asia Symposium Program

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Discussant
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Takako Ito
    Closing Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Seva Gunitsky
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Maiko Ichihara
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

    Phillip Lipscy
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Sang-young Rhyu
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, South Korea

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor Political Science

    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies

    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan

    Yusuke Takagi
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Kyiv, Constantinople, Moscow: an Ecclesial Triangle

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20195:00PM - 6:30PM5 Elmsley Place (next to Brennan Hall on USMC Campus)
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    Description

    In the Summer and Fall of 2018, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, who possesses a primacy of honour among Orthodox worldwide, announced that he would grant autocephaly—i.e. full self-governance—to Orthodoxy in Ukraine. The Russian Orthodox Church protested, and eventually broke communion with Constantinople. Around New Year, The Orthodox Church of Ukraine, as the autocephalous body is
    officially known, was recognized by the Ecumenical Patriarch so that there are now two Orthodox Churches in the country, both claiming canonical status. The presentation will shed light on this complex theological, canonical, and political situation.

    Thomas Bremer is professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Münster, Germany.
    He is author or (co)editor of several books, among them, Eastern Orthodox Encounters of Identity and Otherness: Values, Self-
    Reflection, Dialogue (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014) and Cross and Kremlin (Eerdmans, 2013), a short history of the Russian
    Orthodox Church. His research focuses on ecumenical relations between Eastern and Western Churches, on Orthodoxy in
    Russia, Ukraine, and in the Balkans, and on churches and politics in Eastern Europe.

    For futher information on the event, please contact Dr. Brian Butcher: brian.butcher@utoronto.ca

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Thomas Bremer
    Professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Munster, Germany


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Orthodox School of Theology

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Which Alternative? Lessons from Germany's Past for a Europe in Tumult

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In the past decade, Europe has drifted in and out of crises. The Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis, and the resurgence of the far right have shaken the confidence of some of the most committed defenders of the European political project. Germany has found itself at the center of many of these issues, and its presence has often reinvigorated long-harbored global anxieties about German political power. Germany’s past, however, can teach us a great deal about both the potential and the limits of this current continental search for political alternatives. This talk will offer a set of theses on the recent influx of minorities, the faltering of the European Union, and the gradual transformation of Germany’s political landscape, including the rise of a New Right.

    Jennifer Allen is an assistant professor of modern German history at Yale University. She is working on a book titled Sustainable Utopias: Art, Political Culture, and Historical Practice in Late Twentieth-Century Germany, which charts Germany’s postwar efforts to revitalize the concept of utopia. She argues that, contrary to popular accounts, German interest in radical social alternatives had not diminished by the late twentieth century. Rather, Germans pursued the radical democratization of politics and culture through a series of modest grassroots projects. They not only envisioned a new German utopia but attempted to enact their vision, reclaiming utopian hope from the dustbin of historical ideas. In addition to the themes of utopia and anti-utopianism, Allen’s research explores the theories and practices of memory; counterculture and grassroots activism; and the politics of cultural preservation during and after the Cold War. Her work has been supported by the Volkswagen and Mellon Foundations; the American Academy in Berlin; the Institut für Zeitgeschichte; DAAD; the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego; and the Institutes for European Studies and International Studies at UC Berkeley. Allen received her Ph.D. in history from UC Berkeley in 2015. She is currently the Berthold Leibinger Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin and a visiting researcher at the Dahlem Humanities Center at the Free University in Berlin.

     


    Speakers

    Jennifer Allen
    Yale University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Natalia Roudakova is a cultural anthropologist (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007) working in the field of political communication and comparative media studies, with a broad interest in moral philosophy and political and cultural theory. She has worked as Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication, University of California in San Diego, and as Visiting Scholar in the Media and Communication Department at Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands) and in the Department of Communication at Södertörn University, Stockholm (Sweden). In 2013-2014, Roudakova was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California, where she completed her book, titled Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia which is now out with Cambridge University Press.

    Losing Pravda examines the spectacular professional unraveling of journalism in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union and its broader social and cultural effects. Roudakova argues that a crisis of journalism is unlike any other: it fundamentally erodes the value of truth-seeking and truth-telling in a society. In many ways, Roudakova tracks how a post-truth society comes into being. Russia’s case thus becomes far from unique, illuminating instead the historical and cultural emergence of phenomena such as “fake news,” misinformation (kompromat), and general distrust in politics and public life that have now begun to plague Western democracies as well. Roudakova’s account of one country’s loss of the culture of truth-seeking can serve as an important “wake-up call” for Western nations going forward.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Natalia Roudakova



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management
    University of Toronto
    105 St. George Street
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    *Please register for this event here*

    The University of Toronto and the Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto are pleased to present a special symposium marking this year’s International Women’s Day on Friday, March 8. “Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day” will feature prominent women from various fields who will examine both advancements made by women in recent years as well as the challenges they continue to face. Among the speakers will be Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor of the University of Toronto, who will deliver the keynote speech on the careers of female academics. Other presenters will include the University of Toronto’s Vice-President, HR & Equity, Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, who will speak on the importance of women in terms of the university’s human resources, and Dr. Rachel Silvey, the Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, who will talk on women in Southeast Asia in a conversation moderated by Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin of the Department of Political Science. The Consul-General of Japan Takako Ito will focus on Japan’s various initiatives to raise the status of women such as the World Assembly of Women (WAW!) to be held in March in collaboration with Women 20 (W20). The assembled group of prominent women and their insights are certain to make this event both important and timely.

    *********************************************

    Event Program:

    3:00 – Welcoming Remarks by Dr. Louis Pauly, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    3:05 – Keynote Speech by Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor, University of Toronto; Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto

    3:20 – Panel Discussion

    Panelists:
    Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Dr. Rachel Silvey, Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Moderator: Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    3:50 – Audience Q&A

    4:00 – Adjournment

    4:00-4:30 – Networking Reception

    Speakers

    Louis W. Pauly
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    Panelist
    Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Rachel Silvey
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Takako Ito
    Panelist
    Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Sylvia Bashevkin
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Rose Patten
    Keynote
    Chancellor, University of Toronto

    Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Notes for a History of Prakrit Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE INDIA-CANADA ASSOCIATION LECTURE

    Prakrit was, along with Sanskrit and Tamil, one of the main languages of literature in premodern South Asia. It flourished in the first half of the first millennium BCE, although it continued to be cultivated for many centuries afterwards. This talk will begin by sketching the historical outlines of this tradition and then explain why it is important to corroborate, elaborate, and reflect upon its history. First, Prakrit textuality was closely connected to broader developments in the religious and expressive literatures of South Asia, and gives us a unique perspective onto those developments. Second, the many ways in which Prakrit texts defy being ‘historicized’—verses that slip in and out of anthologies, stories told again and again, works that survive only in fragments or abridgements—actually tell us something important about the historical being of literary texts.

    Andrew Ollett is a Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows. He works on the literary and intellectual traditions of premodern South Asia.


    Speakers

    Andrew Ollett
    Speaker
    Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th G7 Research Group Presents: Road to Biarritz 2019 - Priorities of the French G7 Presidency

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 201912:00PM - 2:00PMCombination Room, Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue
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    Description

    As France has assumed the presidency of the G7 for 2019, Marc Trouyet, France’s Consul General in Toronto, will share insights about his government’s preparation and its priorities for the summit it will host in Biarritz on August 24-26. He will also discuss continuities and cooperation with Canada’s 2018 presidency and themes at the Charlevoix Summit last June. The event will be moderated by Professor David Wright, Kenneth and Patricia Taylor Distinguished Professor of Foreign Affairs at Victoria College and Canada’s former and longest serving Ambassador to NATO.

    Biography:

    Marc Trouyet, the Consul General of France in Toronto since 2015, serves in the territorial jurisdiction of Ontario and Manitoba. Mr. Trouyet has been a diplomat for almost 15 years. His previous post as head of the department of French Overseas Development Assistance in Paris.

    For four years, he served as Deputy Head of Mission of the French Embassy in Australia. When Mr. Trouyet was Deputy Permanent Representative to the French United Nations mission in Rome, he worked extensively with the World Food Program, the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Food and Agricultural Organization. He previously was the officer in charge of sustainable development issue in the UN division of the French Foreign Affairs department.

    Prior to joining the foreign service, Mr. Trouyet held positions in the governing council of the Paris City Council. A Graduate of l’Ecole nationale d’administration (ENA), Mr. Trouyet received his bachelor in Political Science and a Masters in Town Planning.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Marc Trouyet
    Speaker
    Consul General of France to Toronto

    David Wright
    Moderator
    Kenneth and Patricia Taylor Distinguished Professor of Foreign Affairs at Victoria College


    Sponsors

    G7 Research Group

    Co-Sponsors

    International Relations Society

    European Studies Students Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th Life Force Atrocities during the Korean War and their Aftermath: Repression, Resistance and the Construction of Solidarities of Bereavement

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Korean civil war, thousands of real and imagined “leftists” were massacred by the emerging South Korean state. In the wake of South Korea’s long process of post-authoritarian transitional justice, the nature of many of these atrocities has to come to light, in turn leading to increased interest from South Korean and international scholars. This talk builds upon this research by focusing on the role that the family structure played in determining the targets and methods of the perpetrators. Drawing on Elisa Von Joeden-Forgey’s concept of “life force atrocities,” I discuss the ways in which counter-insurgency forces incorporated the decimation the family unit as part of the broader process of anti-leftist liquidation. This pattern was continued into the post-war years, as survivors and families of accused “leftists” were denied the right to properly mourn and placed under the “guilt by association system”. I argue that this process of systematic persecution gave rise to novel forms of communal identities, anchored around the notion of the collective bereaved family. This, in turn, led to unique forms of political resistance in the 1960-1961 period.

    Dr Wright is currently the Korea Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto. He completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2016. He is currently working on completing his manuscript “Civil War, Politicide, and the Politics of Memory in South Korea, 1948-1961”. His work has been published in Cross Currents, The Asia Pacific Journal, and by Routledge.


    Speakers

    Brendan Wright
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; Director, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th Zimbabwe 2019: Real Quest for Democracy or Smoke and Mirrors?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Room 108N
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    Description

    The forced departure of President Mugabe, the transition to a new ZANU-PF leadership and the aftermath of the controversial 2018 elections have altered the Zimbabwean political landscape. Initial hopes that Zimbabwe was at a possible inflection point for democracy and development have vanished with the deepening political and economic crisis, the labor strikes and the regime’s violent crackdown in January 2019. Democratic space and opportunities for inclusive development are deteriorating as a result. What can be done to protect and enhance democratic space notably for women and youth and non-violent transformations from below? To better understand the situation, Global Affairs Canada supported a CANADEM team in making an assessment in February. Two members of the team will present and discuss their key findings at the brown bag lunch.

    JULIET KIRANGWA KAYE AND JEAN-MARC MANGIN, EQUIPE UBUNTU

    Jean-Marc and Juliet are the co-partners of EquipeUbuntu, a small consulting firm providing needs assessment, strategic advice and capacity-building.

    From 2010 to 2016, Jean-Marc was the Executive Director of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, the largest national organization of Canadian researchers and scholars. After fifteen years as a public servant with the UN, international NGOs and the Canadian Government, Jean-Marc became in 2006 the executive director of CUSO, Canada’s oldest volunteer-sending NGO, and was the first executive director of the Global Call for Climate Action, a civil society initiative bringing together over 350 international organizations and networks in support of transformational change and rapid action to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Jean-Marc has lived for more than 10 years in the Global South, mostly in Africa. Jean-Marc holds a M.A. in Political Sciences from the University of Toronto.

    From 2004 to 2016, Juliet provided advice to over 400 entrepreneurs in the Greater Toronto Area in developing and executing their business plans. 83% were self-sustaining within 2 years; 8% earned over $1 million within 5 years. Prior to moving to Canada, Juliet worked with FAO and WFP in Ghana, Malawi and Zimbabwe in managing food security programs and in providing policy analysis. She has worked directly with farmers, extension services and agro-businesses as well as with policy units within the UN and local governments. Most recently, she supported private entities and consortiums achieving national food self-sufficiency goals in Guyana and Jamaica. Juliet holds a M.A. in Agricultural Economics from Makerere University in Uganda.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Juliet Kirangwa Kaye
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Jean-Marc Mangin
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Wilson Prichard
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Master of Global Affairs Associate Professor, Political Science Research Director, International Centre for Tax and Development


    Co-Sponsors

    Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th PCJ Society: CV/Resume Writing Workshop

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20192:30PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    208N
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    Description

    This CV/Resume writing workshop is open to anyone interested in touching up on their resume, or learning how to write one from scratch. A representative from U of T’s Career Centre will be coming in to give you tips and tricks to write an impressive and concise resume! Learning these techniques is especially helpful as this is a popular time to be applying for jobs and internships. You are highly encouraged to bring a copy of your resume with you to this workshop, but if you do not have one then this is a great opportunity for you to get started! Please email pcjsociety@utoronto.ca with any questions.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th Forced Migration in Central America: The Causes of "Caravans" and Canada's Response to a Regional Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    States in the North of Central America (NCA)– El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala – are characterized by endemic poverty, corruption, gang violence, criminality, sexual-identity and gender-based violence, and weak or repressive states. The situation has given rise to a major displacement crisis.

    The region saw a tenfold increase in refugees and asylum-seekers from 2011 to 2016. Over 350,000 people claimed asylum globally from 2011 and 2017, with 130,500 in 2017 alone. Most made claims in Mexico and the US, but an increasing number sought refuge in Belize, Costa Rica, and Panama. In the first two months of 2019 alone, almost 8000 refugee claims were made in Mexico; the majority from Honduras and El Salvador. Women, families, and unaccompanied minors are over-represented in displaced populations.

    Internal displacement is likewise significant. The region has the world’s most urbanized displaced population, with roughly 95% living in urban areas, making traditional, camp-based humanitarian assistance challenging.

    Regional displacement has international implications. Between 400,000 and 500,000 NCA nationals cross irregularly into Mexico annually, most attempting to reach the US. Mexico has become a country of destination, and the new Mexican government has quickly put in place reception measures and enhanced access to the labour market for refugees.

    To manage large displacements, states need to apply a comprehensive regional approach. UNHCR is supporting a state-led process known as the MIRPS – the Comprehensive Regional Protection and Solutions Framework – which seeks to promote mechanisms of responsibility-sharing for the prevention, protection and solutions of displaced populations.

    This timely panel will offer an in-depth analysis of the current situation, examine the policies of the new government in Mexico, and ask what Canada can do to assist host states and displaced people.


    Speakers

    Jean-Nicolas Beuze
    Speaker
    UNHCR Representative in Canada

    Carol Girón
    Speaker
    Regional Coordinator of Policy & Programming, Scalabrini International Migration Network, Guatemala City, Guatemala

    Arnau Baulenas Bardia
    Speaker
    Human rights lawyer, Instituto de Direchos Humanos, Universidad Centroamericano, San Salvador, El Salvador

    Patricia Landolt
    Moderator
    Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th From Syria To Hope: Social and Political Representation of Refugees in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20197:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    The event will screen From Syria To Hope, an official Films with a Cause documentary made in collaboration with York Region Muslims to explore the lives of three Syrian families who came to Canada as refugees. After the short screening there will be a Q&A period with the Director, Yazmeen Kanji, an undergraduate student at the University of Toronto. For the remainder of the event there will be a panel discussion about how refugees are socially and politically represented in Canada, specifically in the context of the Syrian refugee crisis.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 14th Nikhil Pal Singh - Race Realism and the US Rise to Globalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMUniversity College, Room 140
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    As Donald Trump conjures visions of battering “Chinese walls” to US commerce and erecting border walls to stem drugs, crime and surplus people from “s**thole countries” of the Western hemisphere at the center of his foreign policy project, we might want to reconsider the place of racial imaginaries within US foreign relations. In dominant scholarly accounts of post-WWII US foreign policy-making, civilizational, race-thinking retreated in the face of both IR realist and liberal internationalist concerns with the management of decolonization under aegis of global capitalism. In this talk, Dr. Nikhil Pal Singh considers how a tradition of what we might term, “race realism” has endured, shadowing and supplementing post-WWII globalism. In this, as in many aspects of the contemporary moment, Trumpism marks a return of what has been repressed.

    Contact

    Don Newton
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Dr. Nikhil Pal Singh
    Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History Faculty Director, NYU Prison Education Program New York University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 14th First Contact: Indigenous Film Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 14, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The PCJ Society has partnered with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) and Canadian Studies Student Union to present a film screening event on Aboriginal peoples, First Contact.

    Most Canadians have never taken the time to get to know Indigenous People or visit their communities. First Contact takes six average Canadians, all with strong opinions about Indigenous People, on a unique 28-day journey into Indigenous Canada. Leaving their everyday lives behind, the six travel deep into Winnipeg, Nunavut, Alberta, Northern Ontario, and the coast of British Columbia to visit Indigenous communities. First Contact is a journey that will turn the six participants’ lives upside down, challenging their perceptions and confronting their opinions about a world they never imagined they would see. It is an experience that will change their lives, forever.

    The movie will run for roughly 50 minutes, before which we will open up a panel discussion with Professors from the Indigenous Studies Department at U of T, as well as members of audience (speaker information to follow).

    This event is free and open to all University of Toronto students. Tickets are limited. Please register on Eventbite.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Brenda Wastecoot
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto

    Muriam Fancy
    Moderator
    Peace, Conflict and Justice Student

    John Andras
    Discussant
    Founding Director of Honouring Indigenous Peoples Director, Portfolio Manager Andras Group, Mackie Research Capital



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th Munk School Graduate Student Conference “The New Economy: What’s New?”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 20199:30AM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Tickets: $5 General Admission/ Free for University Students (with student ID) & Munk Alumni

    The title of the 13th annual Munk Graduate Student Conference is “The New Economy: What’s New?” and discusses the state of the modern economy and how it will be affected by a variety of factors over the following decade. The event will feature four panels: (1) Investing in the New Economy- Latin America; (2) Migration and its effect on the New Economy; (3) Canada’s role in the New Economy; and finally, (4) Perspectives of Munk Graduate Students on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the New Economy, which will only feature graduate students. The knowledge and experience gained will be both applicable and relevant to students as they transition out of academia and begin to navigate the complexities of the current labour market.

    PANEL 1: Investing in the New Economy: Latin America
    Panelists: Jonathan Hausman, Jesus Bravo, Daniel Bernhard, Moderator: Dr. Darius Ornston
    PANEL 2: Migration and its Effect on the New Economy
    Panelists: Dr. Sharry Aiken, Alexia Campbell, Dr. John Isbister
    PANEL 3: Canada’s Role in the New Economy
    Panelists: Dr. Trevin Stratton, Professor Paul Acchione, Adam Jagelewski, Dr. Danny Harvey, Moderator: Dr. Enid Slack
    PANEL 4: Munk Graduate Students Panel: AI in the New Economy
    Moderator: Dr. Robert Austin

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    University of Toronto Graduate Student Union

    Master of Global Affairs Student Union

    CERES student Union

    Student Initiative Fund


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th University of Graz Exchange Opportunity Info Session

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201911:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Doris Knasar from the Office of International Relations at the University of Graz will give an overview of the study and research options for exchange students as well as student life on campus and in the city of Graz. The University of Graz is a comprehensive public research institution offering a range of English-taught courses for bachelor and master students across the disciplines (from liberal arts to naturals sciences, business, education and law). Research options are possible on all levels.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Doris Knavar
    Graz University, Austria


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    The European Studies Students’ Association at the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th 70 Years of Russian Musical Resistance: From Gulag Songs to Pussy Riot

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Artemi Troitsky is the leading Russian music journalist, radio host, producer, author and critic. He is the author of nine books on the history of Russian and Soviet music and youth culture, and he lectures widely around the world. Troitsky produces weekly shows for Radio Liberty and ARU.TV and regularly contributes to newspapers Novaya Gazeta, Postimees, and The Moscow Times. He is also a frequent contributor on Echo Moskvy, TV Dozhd, and BBC Russian Service.


    Speakers

    Artemi Troitsky
    music journalist and radio host


    Sponsors

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    Taylor Owen: What’s Behind the Techlash? (and what to do about it)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    2018 was the year of the techlash. It was the year that long-simmering concerns about the potential negative effects of technology on our economy, on our personal lives and even on our democracy broke into public debate. But what is behind this reaction? How did Silicon Valley go from a catalyst of innovation that was broadly seen as aligned with economic growth and democratic participation to the source of serious questions about the integrity of our society and democracy? And what should we as citizens and our governments do to respond?

    Taylor Owen is the Beaverbrook Chair in Media, Ethics and Communications and Associate Professor in the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University. He was previously Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Global Affairs at the University of British Columbia, and the Research Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. His Doctorate is from the University of Oxford and he has been a Trudeau and Banting scholar, an Action Canada and Public Policy Forum Fellow, the 2016 Public Policy Forum Emerging Leader, and sits on the Board of Directors of the Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and on the Governing Council of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Taylor Owen
    Beaverbrook Chair in Media, Ethics and Communications and Associate Professor, Max Bell School of Public Policy, McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 16th A Body in Fukushima: Reflections on the Nuclear in Everyday Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 16, 20191:00PM - 5:00PMInnis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    NOTE: This event consists of three components: (1) Photo Exhibitions – March 4 to April 14; (2) A Body in a Library Performance by Eiko Otake – March 15; (3) Video Screening and Symposium – March 16. All three are free of charge. Registration is required ONLY for the the third part – Video Screening and Symposium.

    This is a multi-sited, multi-media, and multi-disciplinary event that demonstrates how art can contribute to critical reflection on the nuclearization of everyday life in our contemporary world. Since 2014 Eiko Otake and William Johnston have photographed the performer among the ruins and abandoned places that have been left in the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe of March 2011. Following a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Northeastern Japan, a massive tsunami inundated reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, resulting in meltdowns in three reactors. The Fukushima disaster is regarded as the second largest nuclear accident in history, and yet its full consequences remain temporally and spatially boundless and ultimately unknowable — a reality that Otake’s haunting bodily performances and Johnston’s striking photography make so compelling. Otake’s and Johnston’s collaborative work on Fukushima has been exhibited in major venues across the Americas and appears in Canada for the first time.

    Otake is a world-renowned, movement-based artist who performed as Eiko and Koma for more than forty years before beginning her solo performances for the project, A Body in Places. Her awards include a Guggenheim, MacArthur, Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award, and Dance Magazine Award for lifetime achievement. William Johnston is a photographer and historian whose critically acclaimed written work and photography have focused on issues of the body, sexuality, disease, the environment, and public health. The symposium accompanying the exhibitions and performance will feature presentations by leading scholars and artists working across disciplines.

    PHOTO EXHIBITIONS
    DATES: March 4 – April 14, 2019 (depending on the library hours)
    LOCATIONS:
    Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, ON
    1st floor exhibition area,and 8th floor, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library
    Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge St., Toronto, ON
    3rd and 5th floors

    CURATORS:
    Takashi Fujitani, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies
    Henry Heng Lu, Independent Curator and Founder, Call Again

    A BODY IN A LIBRARY PERFORMANCE BY EIKO OTAKE
    DATE: Friday, March 15, 5:15 – 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

    VIDEO SCREENING AND SYMPOSIUM
    * Registration is required *
    DATE: Saturday, March 16, 1:00 – 5:00 PM, followed by reception
    LOCATION: Innis Town Hall, Innis College, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON
    SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS:
    Eiko Otake, Independent movement-based performance artist
    William Johnston, Department of History, Wesleyan University

    CHAIR
    Takashi Fujitani, Department of History and Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto
    PANELISTS
    Marilyn Ivy, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
    Photography and 3.11, with a meditation on William Johnston’s photographs of Eiko Otake in Fukushima
    Katy McCormick, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University
    Searching for A Body, Finding Trees
    Lisa Yoneyama, Women and Gender Studies Institute and Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    Post-Fukushima Epistemology
    Tong Lam, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Fallout, promise! Some reflections on pink landscapes

    For more information from the Toronto Public Library, please click here.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reference Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department, University of Toronto

    School of Image Arts, Ryerson University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 18th Leading Up to Osaka 2019: Japan’s Role in Global Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 18, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    With less than four months until the 2019 G20 summit is hosted in Osaka, Japan, this panel event will bring together experts to discuss Japan’s role in global governance and plurilateral summitry, specifically in the context of the G7 and G20. Organized by the G20 Research Group, the G7 Research Group, the International Relations Society (IRSOC), the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU), and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, this discussion will focus on the history of Japan’s involvement in global governance, its contribution to the management of global affairs and the challenges it faces as the current G20 host and on the international stage writ large. This event will host J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy and Interim Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Professor Louis Pauly, G7 and G20 expert Dr. Peter Hajnal, and Japan International Cooperation Agency civil servant Mrs. Kazuko Funakoshi.

    Speaker Biographies:

    Alessandra Cicci is co-chair of the executive of summit studies for the G20 Research Group for the 2019 summit in Osaka, Japan and a Senior Researcher for the G7 Research Group. She holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, Italian and European Union Studies and graduated from St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto in 2018. She currently works in Government Relations at a public affairs firm and will begin a dual-degree program at Sciences Po and the Munk School in September for a Master of Public Policy and Master of Global Affairs.

    Kazuko Funakoshi has extensive career experience in development finance, and is currently studying at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Prior to the Munk School, she was leading the Official Development Assistance (ODA) loan projects team in Nepal at the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)—the government agency in charge of Japan’s ODA. At JICA, Kazuko formulated and implemented large-scale infrastructure projects across Asia in various sectors such as energy, environment, transport and housing—some of which were co-financed with the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. She also has experience with emergency response operations (Specifically, the 2015 Nepal Earthquake). She holds a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics from Kyoto University in Japan.

    Ji Yoon Han is co-chair, with Alessandra Cicci, of the executive of summit studies for the G20 Research Group for the 2019 Summit in Osaka. She graduated with a Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Bioethics from the University of Toronto. Ji Yoon has previously served as compliance analyst, lead analyst and compliance director for both the G20 and G7 Research Groups. Her research interests are in green financing and renewable energy, developed through her work on clean energy, tax administration and international financial institution reform. Ji Yoon has attended G7 and G20 summits in Hamburg, Charlevoix and Buenos Aires.

    Peter Hajnal is a Fellow of Senior College and Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto. He has been a member of the G7/G8/G20 Research Groups since 1988 and attended fourteen G7/G8/G20 summits. Before his retirement he was Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto for 11 years; served as librarian for 25 years at the University of Toronto and 10 years at the United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library in New York; and conducted a number of consultancies. In addition to a number of articles, book chapters and conference presentations, he is the author or editor of eleven books, including The G8 System and the G20: Evolution, Role and Documentation (Ashgate, 2007; also published in Russian and Chinese editions). His latest book is the second, revised edition of The G20: Evolution, Interrelationships, Documentation (Routledge, 2019).

    Louis W. Pauly is the J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is cross-appointed to the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, where he also serves as Interim Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan. A graduate of Cornell University, the London School of Economics, New York University, and Fordham University, he was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2011. With Emanuel Adler, he edited the journal International Organization from 2007 to 2012. In 2015, he received the Distinguished Scholar Award in International Political Economy from the International Studies Association. His major publications include Power in a Complex Global System; Hong Kong’s International Financial Centre; Global Ordering: Institutions and Autonomy in a Changing World; Global Liberalism and Political Order; Complex Sovereignty; Governing the World’s Money; Democracy beyond the State?; The Myth of the Global Corporation; Who Elected the Bankers? Surveillance and Control in the World Economy; and Opening Financial Markets: Banking Politics on the Pacific Rim.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Peter Hajnal
    Panelist
    Fellow, Senior College

    Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Kazuko Funakoshi
    Panelist
    Master of Global Affairs (MGA) Candidate Former Civil Servant, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

    Alessandra Cicci
    Speaker
    Co-Chair, G20 Research Group

    Ji Yoon Han
    Speaker
    Co-Chair, G20 Research Group

    Louis W. Pauly
    Discussant
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    G20 Research Group

    G7 Research Group

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    International Relations Society

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 19th Japan’s Role in the Global Governance of Non-Proliferation and Outer Space

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 19, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Summary:
    Japanʼs presence in the global rule-making process was timid, to say the least, during the Cold War. Although it presented itself as a victim of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan was also under the extended nuclear deterrence of the United States. However, recent initiatives such as the Arc of Freedom and Prosperity or Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision brought Japan into the global governance stage. This lecture will discuss cases of global governance on nuclear non-proliferation and outer space.

    Japan faces a non-proliferation challenge from North Korea and a space threat from China. Taking initiatives in these domains is essential to Japanʼs security as well as to maintaining global order for peaceful use of nuclear and space technologies. As a tech-advanced country, Japan plays a certain role in providing ideas and technical support for both domains. These cases show how Japan sees itself as a player in the global governance structure.

    Speaker Biography:
    Kazuto Suzuki is Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics at the Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan. He worked as an assistant researcher in the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique in Paris, France, and as Associate Professor at the University of Tsukuba (2000 to 2008). Suzuki was a visiting researcher at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University (2012 to 2013), and he served on the Panel of Experts for the Iranian Sanction Committee under the United Nations Security Council (2013 to July 2015). He is a former President of the Japan Association of International Security and Trade.

    Suzuki’s research focuses on the conjunction of science/technology and international relations, including space policy, non-proliferation, and export control and sanctions. His recent work includes Space and International Politics (2011, in Japanese, awarded the Suntory Prize for Social Sciences and Humanities), Policy Logics and Institutions of European Space Collaboration (2003) and many others.

    Event Announcement

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Kazuto Suzuki
    Speaker
    Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics, Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan

    Louis W. Pauly
    Welcoming and Closing Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Takako Ito
    Opening Address
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    David A. Welch
    Chair
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 20th A Conquest that Changed an Empire: The Ottoman Military in Syria

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 20, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room (SS2098)
    Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    When Selim I conquered Syria in 1516, he changed the Ottoman Empire in more ways than simply adding territory. This lecture discusses the effect of the conquest of Syria on two fundamental Ottoman military institutions—the timar cavalry system and the Janissary infantry corps—and demonstrates the use of government documents to critique the representation of these changes in the political literature of the time as illegitimate. These shifts are usually attributed to the military and price revolutions of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. However well before these developments, circumstances resulting from the Ottoman presence in the Arab lands caused both military forces to intensify the recruitment of outsiders. The resulting alterations in both military systems were not confined to Syria, but spread throughout the empire and made the Ottoman Empire another kind of state, not just larger but institutionally and ideologically different.


    Speakers

    Linda Darling
    Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg, Universität Bonn, and University of Arizona


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 20th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 20, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Join us as Professor Sánchez-Cuenca, discusses “Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises.” This presentation is part of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series.

    Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences at Carlos III University of Madrid. He has written extensively on political violence, terrorism, theory of democracy, and Spanish politics. His latest book is The Historical Roots of Political Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2019).


    Speakers

    Professor Ignacio Sanchez-Cuenca
    Associate Professor, Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences Carlos III University of Madrid



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Indigenous Intersections Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place,
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    INDIGENOUS INTERSECTIONS explores indigeneity as a category of identity with specific attention to the U.S. context. Through invited keynote lectures, panel presentations, and critical discussion inviting audience participation, this symposium interrogates the following questions: How does indigeneity intersect with race, gender, and sexuality? As significant numbers of indigenous peoples from Latin America migrate to the United States, how does indigeneity shift across the borders of settler states? How can Native Americans, Indigenous migrants, and communities of color (not mutually exclusive categories) support each other’s projects of sovereignty and decolonization?

    Invited Speakers:

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University, author of Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (2016) and The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (2003)

    Beginning with her seminal essay “Who’s the Indian in Aztlán? Rewriting Mestizaje, Indianism, and Chicanismo from the Lacandón,” Professor Saldaña-Portillo has been at the forefront of re-thinking Chicanx-Native American relations in the United States. Her most recent monograph, Indian Given, winner of the 2016 Best Book Award from the National Association of Chicano and Chicana Studies, examines the long and continued significance of British and Spanish colonial racialized notions of place.

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon, author of Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities (2011), co-editor (with Brenda Child) of Indian Subjects: Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education (2014), and author of the forthcoming Indian on Both Sides: Indigenous Identities, Race, and National Borders.

    Professor Klopotek’s pathbreaking 2011 interdisciplinary ethnography Recognition Odysseys explores the central role race plays in federal processes of tribal recognition. Turning his attention to the U.S.-Mexico border in his forthcoming monograph Indian on Both Sides, Professor Klopotek examines the continuing significance of race in determining who counts as Indigenous in the United States.

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, author of numerous volumes including Indian Blood: HIV and Colonial Trauma in San Francisco’s Two-Spirit Community (2016) and Louisiana Creoles: Cultural Recovery and Mixed Race Native American Identity (2007); editor of Obama and the Biracial Factor: The Battle for a New American Majority (2012).

    Located at the intersections of Indigenous studies, queer studies, mixed-race studies, and public health, Professor Jolivétte’s 2016 monograph Indian Blood, a Lamda Literary Award finalist, explores the long impact of colonial trauma on two-spirited, mixed-race Native people as well as possibilities for healing and decolonization. Professor Jolivétte’s varied, illustrious career has included serving as Executive Director of the American Indian Community Cultural Center for the Arts in San Francisco, the Indigenous Peoples’ Representative at the United Nations Forum on HIV and the Law in 2011, and Tribal Historian for the Atakapa-Ishak Nation from 2008-2011.

    Indigenous Intersections Symposium Schedule

    9:00-9:30am – Coffee Reception
    9:30-10:00am – Introduction: Intersections of Indigeneity, Race, Gender, and Identity in the Americas – Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto
    10:00-11:00am – Andrew Jolivétte, San Francisco State University
    11:00-11:30am – Question and Answer with moderator Rinaldo Walcott, University of Toronto
    11:30am-1:00pm – Lunch Break
    1:00-1:45pm – Brian Klopotek, University of Oregon
    1:45-2:15pm – Question and Answer with moderator Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto
    2:15-3:00pm – María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo, New York University
    3:00-3:30pm – Question and Answer with moderator Nicholas Sammond, University of Toronto
    3:30-4:00pm – Coffee Break
    4:00-5:00pm – Roundtable Discussion with Professors Saldaña-Portillo, Klopotek, and Jolivétte – Moderated by Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto


    Speakers

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor, Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor, American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Bissel-Heyd Fellowship in American Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st The Constitution of 1936 and Stalin's Turn to Mass Repressions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In her presentation, Prof. Velikanova discusses a new element in the historical picture explaining why politics shifted to mass repressions in 1937. Besides Stalin’s protracted conflict with regional party/state clans and the inflammatory role of new NKVD head Nikolai Yezhov, the dictator’s conceptualization of popular commentaries on the constitution and the results of the 1937 census could reverse his views on society and the hope that ordinary Soviets were sufficiently Sovietized. Together with international developments in the fall of 1936 that heightened Stalin’s fear of war, popular discussion of the constitution can provide the missing piece in the puzzle for why relative moderation ended and repressions expanded from former oppositionists to the officials and finally to the wider population.

    Olga Velikanova is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Texas and a former alumna of CERES. She obtained her PhD from Saint Petersburg State university. She specializes in Soviet popular opinion studies and works extensively with declassified Communist party and secret police archives. She is author of five books discussing Soviet social mobilization campaigns and popular perceptions of Soviet politics and of Lenin’s image involving historical, anthropological and political culture methods. Her last book, Mass Political Culture under Stalinism: Popular Discussion of the Soviet Constitution of 1936 (Palgrave 2018) is the first full-length study of Stalin’s Constitution, exploring the government’s goals and Soviet citizens’ views of constitutional democratic principles and their problematic relationship with the reality of Stalinism.


    Speakers

    Olga Velikanova
    University of North Texas


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Identification Technologies and Biometric Power: A Transition from Occupied China to Post-World War II Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The invention of identification technologies is deeply connected with the surveillance of colonial populations. Fingerprinting, the forerunner of biometrics, was created by the British police in colonial India in 1897, and was also employed in Manchuria and Northeast China under Japanese occupation from the 1920’s to 1945. Why did fingerprint identification attract the Japanese imperialist power, and how effectively was it practiced? We examine narratives surrounding the Japanese identification systems in Manchuria, especially regarding Chinese workers who were placed under severe surveillance, and discuss how a similar scheme survived the lost war and was actually legitimated in post-World War Ⅱ Japan. The expansion and transformation of biometric power can be seen in the Japanese government’s repeated attempts to establish “perfect” identification systems. Surveillance has spread from ex-colonial populations to foreign workers and to citizens, culminating in recent legislative changes concerning enhanced technologies.

    ASAKO TAKANO is an Associate Professor at Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan. She received her Ph.D. in Social Sciences from Hitotsubashi University, and published her book in Japan in 2016, Fingerprints and Modernity.

    MIDORI OGASAWARA is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University, and a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. She conducted field research in China to investigate the Chinese experiences of Japanese colonial identification systems and obtained her Ph.D. in Sociology from Queen’s in 2018.


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Asako Takano
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan

    Midori Ogasawara
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University; Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Ottawa


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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