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November 2018

  • Thursday, November 1st "Diasporas, Dual Loyalties, and Suspect Minorities: the (Canadian) Jewish Case"

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Countries which are diverse and formed largely through waves of immigration — like Canada — must face issues of competing identities and perhaps loyalties within their populations. At times these loyalties reflect competing values and interests, as well as the effects of victimization. When minority rights and interests are defended vigorously these minorities can be perceived as suspect. The Jewish group in its long diasporic history, often as an iconic “other,” has encountered these dilemmas and accusations regularly.
    This is true even for the Canadian Jewish community, which is at the same time highly integrated even while many members perceive themselves in an ongoing marginal position. Transnational ties of diasporic groups may continue to pose challenges even for ostensibly liberal-democratic societies such as Canada.

    Speaker bio: Morton Weinfeld is a Professor of Sociology at McGill University, where he holds the Chair in Canadian Ethnic Studies and directs the Minor Program in Canadian Ethnic and Racial Studies. In 2018-2019 he is a Visiting Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, as well as at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Morton Weinfeld
    Sociology, McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 2nd “Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This research project examines the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry in South Korea to demonstrate how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested, negotiated, and reconstructed by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors, gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries. This study envisions reproductive ethics as part of a transnational feminist agenda by examining the ethical issues raised by the complicated relationships between intended parents and gamete donors/gestational surrogates. Drawing on three years of multi-sited ethnographic research conducted in South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine, this project disputes the unilateral understanding of ART, which is typically conceptualized as having a unidirectional flow from the “West” to Asia, by focusing on the complex relations between Korean intended parents and non-Korean gamete providers and gestational surrogates.

    Dr. Sunhye Kim is currently the Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow in Korean Studies at the Korea Institute, Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland in 2018. She received her B.A. and B.A in Sociology at Yonsei University, Seoul, and worked at the Korean Women’s Development Institute as a researcher. Sunhye’s research and teaching interests are related to the politics of human (re)production in transnational Asia; in particular, her research centers on the study of the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry as a site of interdisciplinary inquiry.


    Speakers

    Sunhye Kim
    Korea Institute, Harvard University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 2nd The Environmental Governance Lab in Conversation with David Miller: The future of the environment post Toronto elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20184:30PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Join us for a conversation with David Miller, former mayor of Toronto, current C40 Regional Director for North America, and C40 Ambassador for Inclusive Climate Action to make sense of the City of Toronto election results and what they mean for Toronto’s role in responding to the global climate and sustainability crises.

    The conversation will be moderated by Sara Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and a member of the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Her research focuses on what cities can do to mitigate climate change and environmental degradation. Watch her TEDX here.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    David Miller
    Speaker
    C40 Regional Director for North America & C40 Ambassador for Inclusive Climate Action

    Sara Hughes
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 3rd Munk School Grad Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 3, 201810:00AM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Come learn more about the graduate programs offered at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

    Representatives from the following programs will be on hand:

    Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies
    Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies
    Master of Arts in European and Russian Affairs
    Master of Global Affairs
    Master of Public Policy

    A separate information session will be held for the Master of Global Affairs program 12:00-1:00pm.

    For more information please contact: mga@utoronto.ca

    To register please visit: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/munk-school-of-global-affairs-and-public-policy-graduate-programs-open-house-tickets-51304850188


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 5th Reconceptualizing Nineteenth-Century Ukraine: Two Monographs on Intellectual, Political, and Social History

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 5, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event will celebrate two recently published books on the 19th century Ukraine: “Brothers or Enemies: The Ukrainian National Movement and Russia from the 1840s to the 1870s” by Johannes Remy (2016) and “Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905” by Serhiy Bilenky (2017).

    Contrary to the prevailing opinion, the idea of Ukrainian independence did not emerge at the end of the nineteenth-century. In Brothers and Enemies, Johannes Remy reveals that the roots of Ukrainian independence were planted fifty years earlier. Remy contextualizes the Ukrainian national movement against the backdrop of the Russian Empire and its policy of oppression in the mid-nineteenth-century. Remy utilizes a wide range of unpublished archival sources to shed light on topics that are absent from current discourse including: Ilarion Vasilchikov’s alliance with Ukrainian activists in 1861, the forged revolutionary proclamation used to deport Pavlo Chubynsky (who is known today as the author of the Ukrainian national anthem), and the 1864 negotiations between Kyiv activists and the Polish National Government. Brothers and Enemies is the first systematic study of imperial censorship policies during the period and will be of interest to those who seek a better understanding of the current Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

    In the nineteenth and early twentieth century Kyiv was an important city in the European part of the Russian empire, rivaling Warsaw in economic and strategic significance. It also held the unrivaled spiritual and ideological position as Russia’s own Jerusalem. In Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands, Serhiy Bilenky examines issues of space, urban planning, socio-spatial form, and the perceptions of change in imperial Kyiv. Combining cultural and social history with urban studies, Bilenky unearths a wide range of unpublished archival materials and argues that the changes experienced by the city prior to the revolution of 1917 were no less dramatic and traumatic than those of the Communist and post-Communist era. In fact, much of Kyiv’s contemporary urban form, architecture, and natural setting were shaped by imperial modernizers during the long nineteenth century. The author also explores a general culture of imperial urbanism in Eastern Europe. Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Johannes Remy
    Speaker
    Adjunct Professor at the Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki

    Serhiy Bilenky
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, University of Alberta

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History; Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 5th An Evening with The Honourable Gordon Campbell

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 5, 20186:30PM - 8:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 2C8
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy invites you to an evening with the Hon. Gordon Campbell. As premier of British Columbia from 2001 to 2011, Gordon Campbell oversaw a period of major policy reforms in the province. Under his leadership, the Government of British Columbia introduced major reforms in a wide range of policy issues, and in 2008, introduced the first broad-based carbon tax in North America aimed at reducing provincial GHG emissions. The Hon. Gordon Campbell will speak about his experiences leading the province, the challenges to policy innovation at the provincial level, and his own experiences pushing against the status quo.

    The Hon. Gordon Campbell was recently named an officer of the Order of Canada for his service as the High Commissioner of Canada in the United Kingdom, from 2011-2016, and most recently advised the Government of Ontario as the Chair of the Independent Financial Commission of Inquiry.

    Registration is required (seating is limited and available on a first come first serve basis).


    Speakers

    Hon. Gordon Campbell
    Former High Commissioner of Canada to the United Kingdom Former Premier of British Columbia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 6th Public Lecture by Taiwan’s Digital Minister Audrey Tang: Social Innovation and the Renovation of Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 6, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMRoom 100A, 1st floor, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Open, collective, experimental and sustainable. Taiwan’s first Digital Minister Audrey Tang’s talk will show what happens when people who grew up on the internet get their hands on the building blocks of government. As a self-described “conservative anarchist” and a so-called “white-hat hacker,” Audrey Tang will show how she works with her team to channel greater combinations of intelligence into policy-making decisions and public services delivery. She will also discuss “tech for good” and how Taiwan is “SDG indexing everything.” For more information, please view two recent articles on Apolitical (links below) which help elucidate Audrey and her philosophy.

    “Reprogramming power: Audrey Tang is bringing hacker culture to the state”

    “Meet the network tearing down walls between departments in Taiwan”

    Speaker’s Biography:

    Audrey Tang (唐鳳)
    Digital Minister, Taiwan

    Audrey is known for revitalizing the computer languages Perl and Haskell, as well as building the online spreadsheet system EtherCalc in collaboration with Dan Bricklin.

    In the public sector, Audrey serves on Taiwan National Development Council’s open data committee and K-12 curriculum committee; and led the country’s first e-Rulemaking project. Audrey joined the cabinet as Digital Minister on Oct 1st, 2016.

    In the private sector, Audrey works as a consultant with Apple on computational linguistics, with Oxford University Press on crowd lexicography, and with Socialtext on social interaction design.

    In the third sector, Audrey actively contributes to Taiwan’s g0v (“gov-zero”), a vibrant community focusing on creating tools for the civil society, with the call to “fork the government”.


    Speakers

    Audrey Tang
    Digital Minister of Taiwan


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Uncovering New Narratives of the Holocaust in European and Canadian Archives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20181:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A featured event for Holocaust Education Week presented by the cultural service of the French Embassy, the Goethe Institut Toronto, the Austrian Embassy, the Alliance Française, in collaboration with the CEFMF (Centre d’études de la France et du Monde Francophone) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, with the support of the EUNIC Cluster Fund.

    Entrance free

    This event will be held in English. Please follow the registration link above for a full program.

    With millions of pages of historical documents, photographs and film recorded by perpetrators, victims and rescuers, along with thousands of hours of recorded testimony from survivors as well as perpetrators, the Holocaust is the most documented case of genocide in the world. Yet much remains unknown, awaiting discovery.

    This year’s program sheds light on untold stories, new research, and marginalized histories of the Holocaust. Holocaust Education Week 2018 creates a platform for them to be heard and understood, expanding the familiar picture and leading us to a more robust and complex understanding of the multidimensional nature of the Holocaust.

    The postwar trials, the opening of the Red Cross archives through the International Tracing Service, and the fall of communism in Eastern Europe which enabled scholars to access Soviet-era holdings, all contributed to new insights into the complexity and context of how the Holocaust unfolded. Yet even with access to these extensive collections, much remains unknown, awaiting discovery.

    In partnership with the Neuberger Center and Holocaust Education Week, the Toronto EUNIC cluster (Goethe Institute, Alliance Française, Austrian Forum, Istituto Italiano) and the Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy are working to cast light on lesser-known narratives of the Holocaust, gathered through original and innovative archival work.

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Embassy of the French Republic

    EUNIC Cluster Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Slovakia: big dreams and fears of a small country

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Event description:

    As part of the events related to the 100th Anniversary of Czechoslovakia’s Independence in 1918, CERES is hosting a talk on events in contemporary Slovakia with one of the region’s leading experts.

    Speaker: Milan Nič, Senior Fellow, German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), Berlin
    Milan Nič is a senior fellow at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin and outgoing head of Europe program at the GLOBSEC Policy Institute in Bratislava, Slovakia. He is also non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington.
    His expertise includes the EU, Central Europe and the Visegrad Group (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia), European security, the Western Balkans, EU and NATO enlargement, and transatlantic relations.
    Nič began his professional carrier as a broadcaster at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty covering the transition period in Central and Eastern Europe. He was later program director at the Pontis Foundation, adviser to the High Representative/EU Special Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina Miroslav Lajčák, and senior adviser to the Deputy Foreign Minister of Slovakia in the government of Iveta Radičová (2010-2012). In 2010, he co-authored a book of essays on the EU and Slovak foreign policy with Tomas Valasek, Balazs Jarabik, Jana Kobzova, and others.
    Nič earned his MPhil from the Charles University in Prague, his MA at the Central European University in Budapest, and also studied at the Bologna Center of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

    CERES

    Chair: Robert C Austin

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Cvachovec Foundation

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Cold War, more than 36,000 individuals entering Canada claimed Czechoslovakia as their country of citizenship. A defining characteristic of this migration of predominantly political refugees was the prevalence of anti-communist and democratic values. Diplomats, industrialists, politicians, professionals, workers, and students fled to the West in search of freedom, security, and economic opportunity.

    Jan Raska’s Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada explores how these newcomers joined or formed ethnocultural organizations to help in their attempts to affect developments in Czechoslovakia and Canadian foreign policy towards their homeland. Canadian authorities further legitimized the Czech refugees’ anti-communist agenda and increased their influence in Czechoslovak institutions. In turn, these organizations supported Canada’s Cold War agenda of securing the state from communist infiltration. Ultimately, an adherence to anti-communism, the promotion of Canadian citizenship, and the cultivation of a Czechoslovak ethnocultural heritage accelerated Czech refugees’ socioeconomic and political integration in Cold War Canada.

    By analyzing oral histories, government files, ethnic newspapers, and community archival records, Raska reveals how Czech refugees secured admission as desirable immigrants and navigated existing social, cultural, and political norms in Cold War Canada.

    Jan Raska, PhD is a historian with the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th – Friday, November 9th Making and Re-Making Europe: The Czech and Slovak Contribution

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20185:30PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, November 8, 20189:00AM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 9, 20189:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Making and Re-Making Europe: The Czech and Slovak Contribution Draft Agenda

    Conference Patron: The Cvachovec Foundation

    7 – 9 November 2018

    In honour of the celebration in 2018 of the founding of Czechoslovakia, remembering fifty years since the Warsaw Pact invasion in 1968, and the events of 1989 and after, the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy will hold a two-day conference to mark these important anniversaries and give visibility to the contribution of Czechs and Slovaks in Europe and North America. The conference combines academic panels, films and a graduate student conference.

    November 7

    Pre-conference events:

    2:00-4:00 pm – Slovakia: Big Dreams and Fears of a Small Country – Milan Nič

    4:00-5:15 pm – Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada – Jan Raska

    Conference opening:

    5:30 PM Evening Cultural Event
    Havel and Underground Culture.
    Michael Kilburn, Endicott College, Beverly, Massachusetts. Paul Wilson, Writer and Translator.
    Michael Žantovský, Václav Havel Library, Prague, Czech Republic.

    Dramatic Readings from Tom Stoppard’s “Rock and Roll” and Václav Havel’s “Protest”

    Two Photo exhibits are open to the public in Cloister of the Munk School for viewing throughout the conference.

    In cooperation with the Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes in Prague and the Consulate General of the Czech Republic in Toronto, we are pleased to present a photographic exhibit depicting protests against the occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1968 within the struggle for freedom in the Communist states of Europe.

    Introductory remarks by Ivan Počuch, Consul General of the Czech Republic in Toronto.

    The Story of an Image: Bare-Chested Man in Front of a Tank
    Photographs of August 1968 by Ladislav Bielik, Bratislava

    This exhibit is sponsored by the Embassy of the Slovak Republic in Ottawa, Canada

    November 8

    9:00-9:15 Opening Remarks

    Professor Randall Hansen, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, H.E. Pavel Hrnčíř, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Canada, H.E. Vit Koziak, Ambassador of the Slovak Republic to Canada.

    9:15 – 11:00 Panel One: The Founding of Czechoslovakia: Was this a Harbinger of the Shaping of Twenty First Century Europe?

    Hugh Agnew, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
    ‘Odrakouštět se’? Czechoslovakia, 1918-1938, and the Habsburg Legacy

    Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    In Search of Modern Czech History: on Real Statehood and Imagined Identity

    Daniel Pratt, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
    Masaryk’s Philosophy and Its Legacy

    Chaired by Robert C Austin, University of Toronto

    11:00 – 12:30 – Panel Two: The Interwar Years: Moving Away From Multiculturalism?

    Nadya Nedelsky, Macalester College, St Paul, Minnesota.
    Czechoslovakism and its Discontents

    Melissa Feinberg, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    Is it democracy if the husband makes decisions autocratically? The problem of gender equality in interwar Czechoslovakia

    James Felak, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
    Slovaks, Czechoslovaks, and Non-Slavs: National Identity in Interwar Slovakia

    Chaired by Alex Toshkov, University of Toronto

    Lunch 12:30 – 1:30

    1:30-3:15 Panel Three: The Legacy of Communism: Is it too Early to Assess?

    Muriel Blaive, EURIAS Senior Fellow, Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, Vienna, Austria.
    What Have We Found in the Archives? Ten Years of Access to Secret Police Files

    James Krapfl, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
    Collective Effervescence in Postwar Czech and Slovak History: 1948, 1968, 1989, and Beyond

    Barbara J. Falk, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario.
    A Legacy of Communism’s Demise: Velvet Revolution(s) in Czechoslovakia and Beyond

    Libor Žídek, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    The Czechoslovak economic reforms of the 1960s and their long-term impact

    Chaired by Lucan Way, University of Toronto

    3:15 – 3:30 Coffee Break

    3:30 – 17:15 Panel Four: Czechs and Slovaks as a Diaspora – Their Impact on the Evolution of Czechoslovakia and/or the Countries Which They Adopted

    Jan Raska, Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
    Citizen Allies: Czech and Slovak Refugees in Cold War Canada

    Veronika Ambros, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
    Migration, Exile and Diaspora in Czech Literature

    Xavier Galmiche, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.
    The « Dictionnary of Central-european Thinkers 1945 to our days » : the case of the Czechoslovak emigration

    Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
    Vaclav Havel’s Aphorisms: a Mirror of the World?

    Chaired by Georgina Steinsky, University of Toronto

    17:30 – 19:00 Reception

    19:00 – Film Screening. The Nagano Tapes.

    November 9 – Student Conference and Roundtable on the Post-Communist Experience

    9:15 – Welcoming Remarks, Georgina Steinsky, CERES Executive-in-Residence, University of Toronto

    9:30 – 11:00 Panel One: Consolidation of States and Ideology
    Panelists are asked to explore the factors that led to the emergence of Austro-Hungarian successor states, and the issues of transition faced by these newly formed states, as well as to the movements that promoted independence during World War I. Additionally, panelists will discuss how the success or failure of these states related to the larger European political scene in the inter-war period, particularly regarding the merits and failings of democracy in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as the emergence and impact of fascist and communist ideologies.

    Jovana Papović – Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France
    The Sokol Movement – Patriotic Gymnastics from the Czech Lands to Yugoslavia

    Tess Megginson – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Mapping Czechoslovakia: The Czechs and Slovaks at Versailles

    Daniela Bouvier-Valenta – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Establishing a Unique Presence: An Analysis of Czechoslovakia’s Self-Identification in Interwar Europe

    Chaired by Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University, United Kingdom

    11:00 – 11:15 Coffee Break

    11:15 – 12:45 Panel Two: The Evolution of the Nation-State in “Wilsonian” Central Europe
    Panelists will discuss the impact of World War II and Nazi occupation and hegemony in Central Europe, and how the war altered Central European nationalism domestically and internationally into the post-war period.

    Anna Herran – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Not Carved in Stone: Building and Rebuilding Statues of T.G. Masaryk after 1938

    Duncan Eaton – Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
    Transitive Democracy: Edvard Beneš In and After Exile, 1938-1945

    Mira Markham – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States
    Rural Partisans and Communists: Resistance and Revolution in Moravian Wallachia, 1945-1950

    Chaired by Piotr Wrobel, University of Toronto.

    12:45 – 13:45 Lunch

    13:45 – 15:45 Panel Three: Understanding Socialism and its Legacies
    In regard to the failed revolts against socialist regimes in Hungary in 1956, Czechoslovakia in
    1968, and Poland in 1956, 1968, and 1970, Milan Kundera wrote that each of these regimes “could not have defended itself for more than three hours if it had not been backed by Russia.” (Milan Kundera, “The Tragedy of Central Europe,” The New York Review of Books vol. 31 no. 7 (April 1984).) Panelists are asked to debate whether socialism truly could have been reformed
    in Central Europe had the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union not intervened? How does this recent socialist past affect contemporary Central European politics?

    Katja Perat – Washington University in St. Louis, United States
    The Straw man of Communism

    Petra Skarupsky – University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
    Exhibition Poland – Czechoslovakia: Centuries of neighbourhood and friendship (1978)

    Réka Krizmanics – CEU, Budapest, Hungary
    Where is the Left? The Revolution of 1956 in Hungarian Memory Politics 1960–2018

    Alexandra Yao – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    The Development of Populism in the Czech Republic

    Chaired by James Krapfl, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

    15:45 – 16:00 Coffee Break

    16:00-17:00 Panel 4: Central European Communities Abroad
    Panelists will outline how Central and Eastern Central European immigrants and diasporas have influenced North America and North American culture, and how the new environment and reasons for emigrating, in turn, influenced their cultures.

    Alex Langstaff – New York University, New York, United States
    Émigré Networks and The Politics of Exile

    Zsolt Máté- University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary
    The reception of the 1956 Hungarian refugees in the United States and Canada

    Chaired by Barbara J. Falk, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th Taiwan's Transpacific Medical Modernity: Race and Disability in Wu Nien-Jen's Buddha Bless America (1996)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    EAS Speaker Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Recent scholarship from the US and Asia critiques how US historiographies of post-war development in Asia, shaped by Cold War liberalism, painted imperialism in Asia as largely benevolent, supporting the universal interests of humanism, democracy, and freedom. In this talk, I will look into Wu Nien-Jen’s film Buddha Bless America (1996) to offer critical reflections on the connection between militarism and the postcolonial development of nation building in its “authoritarian” forms, especially measured against the Western liberal language of rights, democracy and sovereignty. I examine how this cultural text renders imperialist violence visible in what is otherwise portrayed as unqualified medical humanitarianism and development, even as it reifies a liberal language of medical and scientific progress for national rehabilitation in the mutual co-constitution of US and Taiwan modernities from the 1960s onwards. Perceiving Buddha Bless America as a putatively post-Cold War cultural production that is integral to the historical reconstruction of Taiwanese liberal nationalism, my reading suggests that a post-authoritarian democratization – one that would be achieved by demanding rights and liberty via Western modernity – paradoxically obscures the process of re-militarization in a racialized biopolitical regime of organizing and managing life, labor, security, health, and dis/ability.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Professor Chien-Ting Lin teaches in the English Department of the National Central University of Chungli, Taiwan. He received his Ph.D. in literature and cultural studies from University of California, San Diego. He has published his research in Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Review of International American Studies, and Taiwan: A Radical Quarterly in Social Studies. His current book project tentatively entitled, Fugitive Subjects of “Secret Doctors”: Politics of Life and Labor in Taiwan’s Medical Modernity, investigates transpacific colonial and neocolonial formations of knowledge production and hierarchies of reproductive labor and life politics within different periods of Taiwan’s medical modernization.


    Speakers

    Chien-Ting Lin
    Associate Professor, Department of English, National Central University


    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th Social (In)security: Pensions and the Postwar Soviet Economy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Pension reform is all over the news in contemporary Russia. This talk will look at another period in which pension reform was a ‘hot topic’: the postwar years. During the Second World War, the Soviet government’s spending on pensions and other social welfare benefits tripled, yet, most pensions were far from enough to meet the cost of living and pensioners remained some of the poorest members of Soviet society. This talk will place pension reform within the Soviet state’s larger economic project of improving living standards by increasing the real value of money in ordinary citizens’ hands, a project that began in the late Stalin years but came to fruition under Khrushchev in 1956.

    Kristy Ironside is an Assistant Professor of Russian History at McGill University. She is currently writing a book on the role of money in the pursuit of prosperity in the postwar Soviet Union. She has published articles on the Soviet welfare state, lotteries, taxation, and fundraising in Kritika, Slavic Review, the Soviet and Post-Soviet Review, Europe-Asia Studies, and the Journal of Social History. She recently penned an op-ed in the Washington Post on pension reform in contemporary Russia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Kristy Ironside
    McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th How Democratic Should Vietnam Be?: Anticommunist Nationalists and the Debate on the Constitutional Transition in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN), May-December 1955

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the eyes of many foreign observers, one of the most puzzling aspects of the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam) was the continual in-fighting among anticommunists. Most accounts depict these internal conflicts as simply a struggle for power, but I contend that they also constituted a battle of ideas. Specifically, the presentation examines the debate between Ngô Đình Diệm and rival anticommunist nationalists in the summer and fall of 1955. Virtually all anticommunists agreed that the regime should become a constitutional republic, and they unanimously called for a democracy. Yet the seeming consensus belied starkly different definitions of democratic government. Diệm’s faction and the political parties associated with the southern sects called for a hybrid regime, that is, a regime that combined elements of authoritarianism and democracy. The sect parties demanded greater pluralism than Diệm, though the difference was of degree rather than of kind. The debate took a decidedly more liberal direction under the influence of the émigré politician Phan Quang Đán. Đán advocated for a militant democracy, that is, a full-fledged democracy that minimally limited liberty only to protect itself from extremist forces seeking to subvert democracy. In the end, Diệm prevailed over his rivals because he and his followers controlled the government. By seriously examining the diversity of political ideas in the RVN, the presentation suggests that the regime’s seeming intractable factionalism arose from substantive disagreements rather than factional squabbling.


    Speakers

    Nu-Anh Tran
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 9th Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang: The Epistemological Stakes of Two Realisms in New Taiwan Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    If, as Umberto Eco has argued, a work of art can be read as an “epistemological metaphor,” then the fictional world created by a film can also be read as an analogical comment on the knowability of the “real” world. This paper explores two models of cinematic realism, one totalizing and one apophatic, the former represented by Edward Yang’s Yi Yi and the latter by the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien. The former raises the ideal of cinema as a means of revealing even the hidden aspects of reality and thereby providing increased epistemological certainty. In contrast, through techniques including editing ellipses and the mobilization of off-screen space, Hou’s realism paradoxically represents a reality that defies or exceeds representation and therefore can only be represented in a negative or subtractive manner. It will further be argued that the two modes of realism reflect opposing impulses in a central dialectic of modernity.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Jason McGrath is Associate Professor in Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota, with affiliations in Moving Image Studies and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. His current book project is entitled Inscribing the Real: Realism and Convention in Chinese Cinema from the Silent Era to the Digital Age.


    Speakers

    Jason McGrath
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 12th Ukraine's Euromaidan: Five Years Later

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 12, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Five years ago Ukraine erupted in massive protests that came to be known as the Euromaidan. What’s changed and what hasn’t in the time that has passed? A panel of international and Canadian experts look at the key issues from a variety of perspectives.

    Marta Dyczok is Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University, and Adjunct Professor at the National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. She has published five books, including Ukraine’s Euromaidan. Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016) Ukraine Twenty Years After Independence: Assessments, Perspectives, Challenges (co-edited with Giovanna Brogi, 2015), Media, Democracy and Freedom. The Post-Communist Experience (co-edited with Oxana Gaman-Golutvina, 2009), articles in various journals including The Russian Journal of Communication (2014), Demokratizatsiya (2014), and regularly provides media commentary. Her doctorate is from Oxford University and she researches mass media, memory, migration, and history.

    Olexiy Haran is Professor of Comparative Politics at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy (UKMA). In 1991 93, he was Dean and organizer of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the re-born Kyiv Mohyla Academy. Since 2002, he has served as Founding Director of the UKMA School for Policy Analysis, and since 2015 as Research Director at the Democratic Initiatives Foundation, a leading Ukrainian analytical and sociological think tank. He is the co-editor of Constructing a Political Nation: Changes in the Attitudes of Ukrainians during the War in the Donbas (2017), Ukraine in Europe: Questions and Answers (2009), Russia and Ukraine: Ten Years of Transformation (Moscow 2003) and several other books. Also, he is a frequent commentator in Ukrainian and international media.In winter 2013-2014, Prof. Haran was a member of the Council of ‘Maidan’ movement. As a political scientist he spent several weeks at the frontline nearby Mariupol, Luhansk, Avdiivka, and Donetsk airport. He is a member of Public Council under Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine and a member of Washington-based Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS-Eurasia).

    Dr. Olga Onuch (DPhil Oxford 2010) is a Senior Lecturer [Associate Professor] in Politics. She joined the University of Manchester in 2014, after holding research posts at the University of Toronto (2010-2011), University of Oxford (2011-2014) and Harvard University (2013-2014). She is an Associate of Nuffield College (Oxford) and of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Onuch was also a Research Fellow at the Davis Center (Harvard) in 2017. Onuch’s comparative study of protest (as well as elections, migration & identity) in Eastern Europe and Latin America has made her a leading expert in Ukrainian and Argentine politics specifically, but also in inter-regional comparative analysis. Her book “Mapping Mass Mobilizations” (2014, reviewed in Europe-Asia Studies), explores the processes leading up to mass protest engagement in Ukraine (2004) and Argentina (2001). She is the author of several scholarly articles (in Journal of Democracy, Europe-Asia Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, Post-Soviet Affairs, GeoPolitics among other journals), book chapters, and policy briefs.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Olexiy Haran
    Speaker
    Professor of Comparative Politics, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy

    Marta Dyczok
    Speaker
    Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University

    Olga Onuch
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, University of Manchester

    Lucan Way
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Andriy Shevchenko
    Speaker
    Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 13th China “Going Global”: New Configurations of Chinese Overseas Investment

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 13, 201812:30PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The nature of Chinese investment abroad is changing. As China reaffirms its commitment to its “going global” strategy and the One Belt One Road initiative, China’s continued investment in regions such as Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia has caught the world’s attention. What are the implications of China’s shifting investment strategy for the global economy and the international system? To what extent are security and geopolitical concerns about Chinese investment abroad (both by the state and by the private sector) justified? How does China’s investment strategy reflect its shifting state and foreign policy challenges? How have these challenges changed the relationship between the Chinese government and the private sector, or transformed the Chinese approach to foreign investment? Please join us for this important dialogue with Professor Lynette Ong and Professor Howard Lin on November 13th, from 12:30pm-2pm. This event will take place in Room 108N, 1 Devonshire Place (North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy).

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Professor Lynette Ong
    Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Professor Howard Lin
    Global Management Studies, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 13th Book Launch: How to Write Literary History in the 21st Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 13, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMFather Madden Hall
    St. Michael's College (Carr Hall)
    100 St. Joseph St.
    Toronto ON M5S 2C4
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    Description

    How to Write Literary History in the 21st Century?
    A Book Launch and Reception for
    Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literture and Culture after 1918

    About the event

    Please join us in celebrating the publication of Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture after 1918 on November 13 (Tuesday) at 6pm in Carr Hall. This volume is a monumental intellectual and pedagogical project undertaken by Prof. Tamara Trojanowska and her colleagues, Prof. Joanna Niżyńska (IU) and Prof. Przemysław Czapliński (UAM), involving over 60 scholarly contributions from all over the world! The book launch will feature a discussion panel with the editors and contributors on the topic of How to write literary and cultural histories in the 21st century? A reception will follow. This event is free and open for public. Please register via the link provided above.

    About the book

    Being Poland offers a unique analysis of the cultural developments that took place in Poland after World War I, a period marked by Poland’s return to independence. Conceived to address the lack of critical scholarship on Poland’s cultural restoration,Being Poland illuminates the continuities, paradoxes, and contradictions of Poland’s modern and contemporary cultural practices, and challenges the narrative typically prescribed to Polish literature and culture.

    Reflecting the radical changes, rifts, and restorations that swept through Poland in this period, Polish literature and film reveal a multitude of perspectives. Addressing romantic perceptions of the Polish immigrant, the politics of post-war cinema, poetry, and mass media, Being Poland is a comprehensive reference work written with the intention of exposing an international audience to the explosion of Polish literature and film that emerged in the twentieth century.

    Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th Reforms in Uzbekistan: A Conversation with Ambassador Javlon Vakhabov

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 201812:30PM - 2:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In his presentation, Uzbekistan’s Ambassador to the United States and Canada, Javlon Vakhabov, will discuss significant economic, political, and social reforms in Uzbekistan, as well as prospects for close partnerships in Canada.


    Speakers

    Javlon Vakhabov
    Speaker
    Ambassador of Uzbekistan to the United States and Canada

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th The Indo-Pacific: Security Governance for Peace

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMSchulich Executive Conference Center- Event Room, Ground Floor, Seymour Schulich Building, York University, 4700 Keele Street
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    Series

    Annual Forum Series on Ocean Frontiers

    Description

    Keynote (5-6pm)
    Security, Governance and Peace in the Indo-Pacific: A New Look at Sustainable Common Security
    Former Canadian Ambassador to the UN and President of the Rideau Institute, Hon. Mdm. Peggy Mason

    Panel Discussion (6-7pm)
    The Indo-Pacific: An Evolving Security Order?
    Eminent panelists include Embassy and Consulate Leads

    This forum brings together scholars and officials to discuss a range of trans-frontier security issues emerging from the Indo-Pacific region. Of critical importance is clarity on what the “Indo-Pacific” construct means and implies, both as an epistemic category of geostrategic vision and as a geophysical domain in the larger context of perilous maritime-space-nuclear nexus. This forum also aims to promote insights into international security governance norms, Canada’s role in Indo-Pacific security governance, and Canadian engagement in trans-pacific peace processes through ASEAN, NATO, and the U.N. The larger purpose is to foster critical thinking on geostrategic issues management, and promote discussions on peaceful ways of establishing global security governance mechanisms.

    Location: http://www.acc-schulichexecutiveconferencecentre.com/map–directions.html


    Speakers

    Hon. Mdm. Peggy Mason
    President, Rideau Institute and former Canadian Ambassador to the UN


    Sponsors

    Science for Peace, Canada

    Conference of Defence Associations Institute (CDAI)

    York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 14th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: This Shaking Keeps Me Steady

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 14, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The registration for this event is now CLOSED. Rush tickets will be available but entries are not guaranteed.

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave (entrance off of St. George Street)

    Pakistan 2017
    61:00
    Urdu with English subtitles
    14A • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Shehrezad Maher

    Official Selection
    2018 Montreal International Documentary Film Festival
    2017 Visions du Reel

    This visually reflective documentary by Shehrezad Maher attempts to reconstruct trauma — both of first responders in Karachi, confronted with death every day, and of the victims and survivors whose experiences are shown via televised re-enactments replayed for mass entertainment.

    Originating from a prompt to two ambulance drivers in Karachi to retell their recurring dreams, this film explores the permeable boundaries between memory and fiction, and between lived trauma, its recollection, and its re-enactment. First responders reflect on the aftermath of violent events, while television re-enactment actors audition for, and perform the gendered roles of victim, perpetrator, and witness in scenarios ranging from the banal to the tragic. Unfolding through rituals, preparations, dreams, and performance, we never see the tragic events themselves, but instead catch traces of the extent to which they have been internalized by a society. -KE

    Shehrezad Maher was born and grew up in Karachi, Pakistan (1988) and is currently based in Brooklyn, New York. She studied visual arts at Bennington College and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale University (2014). Her work has screened at institutions and festivals such as Visions du Réel (Nyon, Switzerland), RIDM (Montréal, Canada), the LA Film Forum (Los Angeles, CA), Anthology Film Archives (New York, NY), and Experiments in Cinema (Albuquerque, NM).

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Michelle Buckley, an urban and economic geographer whose research lies at the intersections of urbanization, work and employment, and labour migration.

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th War Machines: Imagining Bodies, Technology, and Space Beyond the Battlefield

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20183:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Abstract:

    Over the course of the 20thCentury, the United States’ military thinking has increasingly focused on the interaction between soldiers and technology, from ideas like Cybernetics through to a present focus on technologies like electrical brain stimulation, exoskeletons and augmented reality visors. This project addresses these present technological fascinations and how they exemplify a particular and novel approach to the relationship between soldier and technology. In examining this relationship, I trace the political economy, material implications, and ideologies surrounding and producing these emerging technologies, many of which have not (and may never) see the battlefield. This project follows three sites of military technological development and circulation: The Academy, The Start-Up City, and The Arms Fair in order to understand how war and its fighters are imagined and made, before and beyond the battlefield


    Speakers

    Andrew Merrill
    PhD Candidate Department of Geography and Planning University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th Dan Livermore Book Launch "Detained"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    In Detained Daniel Livermore analyzes the emergence of Islamic fundamentalist extremism and its Canadian implications, including the erroneous investigations that targeted Canadians and led to their detentions in Syria, Egypt, Pakistan, Libya, Tunisia, and Sudan. Scrutinizing the most prominent cases, he details the role of Canadian agencies in the imprisonments and relates how subsequent court cases brought the situations to light, resulting in settlements and apologies to Ahmad Abou-El-Maati, Abdullah Almalki, and Maher Arar, among others. Drawing on his experience in Canada’s foreign ministry, Livermore explains how an essentially misguided War on Terror emerged and how Canadian-American cooperation went wrong.

    Daniel Livermore, former director general of security and intelligence at the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, is senior fellow at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa and senior visiting fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College and the Munk School, University of Toronto.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th Dr. Jesús Seade - The Future of North American Trade

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20185:30PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    The Munk School is proud to host Dr. Jesús Seade, lead Mexican negotiator on NAFTA, for a keynote address on November 15, 2018.
    Dr. Seade will discuss the future of North American trade and will then engage in a Q&A from the audience.
    The event is open to the public.

    Dr. Jesús Seade

    Dr. Jesús Seade, holds D.Phil. and B.Phil. degrees (Economics) from Oxford University and BSc in Chemical Engineering from Mexico’s UNAM. He has led a very global career straddling academia (in UK, France, Mexico, Hong Kong and China) and high-level public service nationally and internationally (Mexico’s multilateral ambassador in the creation of WTO; and top or senior officer in the three leading global economic bodies: WTO in Geneva, and World Bank and IMF in Washington DC). As Ambassador to GATT, he led Mexico’s playing a very influential and constructive role in the creation of WTO. As WTO Deputy Director-General he led economic work and relations with governments, legislatures, press and business sectors in member countries around the world. As IMF Senior Advisor he held final responsibility, under the IMF Board, for IMF policies (inc. each disbursement) towards three major countries in financial crisis in 1998-2001: Brazil, Argentina and Turkey, and later presided over all IMF transparency work (fiscal, banking and data). As an academic, he has influential publications listed in doctoral programs in the US and Europe for over 30 years, in public finance, market structure and international trade. In Hong Kong and China he has been Vice-President of two leading universities and, in HK, he was a member of the Advisory Boards of the ministers of trade and of financial services. He has been appointed Chief NAFTA Negotiator of the Government of the virtual President Elect of Mexico Mr. Andrés Manuel López Obrador.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 15th Reel Asian Film Festival Screening: A Time To Swim

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 15, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall Theatre
    University of Toronto
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    The registration for this event is now CLOSED. Rush tickets will be available but entries are not guaranteed.

    Please arrive 30 minutes before the show at the Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave. (entrance off of St. George Street).

    Canada/Malaysia 2017
    82:00
    English, Malay with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    Director
    Ashley Duong (in attendance)

    Cast
    Mutang Urud
    Noeli Urud
    Agan Urud
    Natasha Blanchet-Cohen

    Official Selection
    2018 CAAMFest
    2017 LA Asian Pacific Film Fest

    Much has changed in Sarawak, Malaysia since Mutang Urud was exiled to Montreal, Canada, more than 20 years ago. A renowned activist for Indigenous rights, Mutang has started a family and now lives as a stay-at-home dad. Filmmaker Ashley Duong follows Mutang as he travels with his family back to Borneo to reunite with his village relations, their travel visa contingent on Mutang staying away from the local politics.

    The remote village in Sarawak, however, is not like he remembers it. His cousins who once fought for the forest alongside him have joined forces with the logging companies that are destroying it. Despite the threat of a lingering arrest warrant, Mutang can’t deny his activism. A Time To Swim traces Mutang’s search for belonging in a village where everyone is related, yet the very idea of home and heritage seems to be slipping away. – KE

    Ashley Duong is a Montreal-based filmmaker and multimedia storyteller working to amplify marginalized voices. A Time to Swim is her feature-length directorial debut. She has also recently produced Land and Legends, an interactive podcast about the connection between the landscapes and myths of the Kelabit.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please note, registration opens 30 minutes before showtime. Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Images

    a man facing away from the camera stands on a small boat and casts a net towards the water.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Cinema Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 16th Living to Die, Living as the Dead: On Labor Power and Race in Hokkaido’s Settler Colonialism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 16, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    My talk advances consideration of the relations between the settler-colonial logic of elimination and the capitalist logic of exploitation through the prism of racism. The settler-colonial studies paradigm has convincingly established that its distinct mode of domination is the structure of elimination, not exploitation, and racism plays a decisive role in this eliminatory politics. But it rarely explores the way in which racism not only mediates but also shapes the relations between elimination and exploitation in the formation of capitalist society. This talk is an attempt to address this under-theorized terrain by taking the Ainu – indigenous people of present-day Hokkaidō, Sakhalin, and Kuril Islands – and their systematic dispossession by Meiji-era imperial Japan as a focal point of analysis.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Katsuya Hirano teaches history at UCLA. He is the author of The Politics of Dialogic Imagination: Power and Popular Culture in Early Modern Japan (U of Chicago Press). He has published numerous articles and book chapters on cultural and intellectual history of Japan, Fukushima nuclear disaster, settler colonialism, and critical theory, including “Thanatopolitics in the Making of Japan’s Hokkaido: Settler Colonialism and Primitive Accumulation” (Critical Historical Studies). His current book project examines the relation between racism and capitalism in the making of the imperial Japanese nation with a focus on the settler-colonization of the lands that once belonged to the indigenous Ainu.

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Katsuya Hirano
    Department of History, University of California, Los Angeles


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 17th Community Film Screening of "Face, the Other Side"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 17, 20182:30PM - 5:30PMInnis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Ave
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    Description

    Film screening: 2:45 PM – 4:15 PM
    Discussion and Q&A with Director LEE Sun Hee: 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
    * Event is presented bilingually, in both English and Korean: film screening has Korean audio with English subtitles; Discussion/Q&A will have Korean/English interpretation

    Film Synopsis:
    The culture of men watching illegally filmed videos of sexual violence is becoming a huge problem in Korea. Videos of sexual intercourse filmed without the consent of women, are publicly shared on illegal sex violence video sites. Female victims of these videos are branded as ‘something-something girl’ and become content products that are bought without copyrights. These transactions have created a huge market. Women can’t help but live in constant fear of getting their exposed bodies or sexual intercourses filmed anywhere, anytime, by anyone. Yet, the police are tepid with investigations and punishments, and consequently female victims’ lives are destroyed psychologically, socially, and financially. Infuriated by reality, some ordinary women have turned into political feminist warriors. Getting by with part-time jobs, they voluntarily gather together, and spend countless hours trying to identify the faces of the consumers of illegal videos so that they can collect enough evidence to report to the police. They also erase the victims’ videos and help them restore their life. Face, the Other Side goes beyond investigative reporting rather than simply unearthing the criminal cartel that consumes, produces, and distributes sexual violence videos. The film is an empowering story of young women growing into feminists and activists to reclaim the control of their bodies. They are the ones who change the world. [CHO HyeYoung]

    Director Bio:
    LEE Sun Hee
    Femi-tator – it is a word that I coined, as well as a value, and an occupation. My job is to organize and systematize women’s indignation. I write, make speeches, and sometimes bring my camera around to make documentaries, and dream of a world where feminism is common sense.
    In a few years, I hope to see NAH Hye-suk, the protagonist of my screenplay, Draw the Light, from long ago, on the screen and saying the line, “Virginity isn’t my hobby.”


    Speakers

    Sun Hee LEE
    Film Director


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Community Network in Asia Pacific Studies

    Women Initiate New Domains

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department at the University of Toronto

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Centre for Feminist Research at York University

    Cinema Studies Student Union

    McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, November 18th – Monday, November 19th Contemporary International History State of the Field Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, November 18, 201812:30PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Monday, November 19, 20189:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Contemporary International History is a highly popular graduate program at outstanding universities, and undergraduate courses in the field are often filled first. Popular histories and even academic studies of wars since 1939 occupy frequently appear on bestseller lists, and filmmakers seek out spy stories and tales of international intrigue. Yet within the university, particularly in history departments, contemporary international history has been in retreat for several decades. Many smaller departments lack a specialist in the field, and historians in most universities do not participate in thriving International Relations programs. There is no counterpart among historians to the International Studies Association with its large annual conference and significant international range. This conference will assess the state of the field of Contemporary International History, its past, present, and future. Bringing together prominent international scholars, political scientists whose work reflects historical research, and younger academics undertaking new directions, the conference will provide a better understanding of the importance of Contemporary International History in the academy and in public discourse and policymaking.

    Sunday, November 18
    12:30 – 12:40 pm Welcome Remarks
    Provost Mayo Moran and Professor Carol Chin

    12:40 – 2:00 pm
    Panel One: The State of United States International History
    Daniel Sargent, University of California, Berkeley
    William Hitchcock, University of Virginia
    Chair / Commentator: Carol Chin, University of Toronto

    2:00 – 2:20 pm Coffee Break

    2:20 – 3:50 pm
    Panel Two: The State of Canadian International History
    Asa McKercher, Royal Military College
    Greg Donaghy, Dept. of Global Affairs
    Jack Cunningham, Trinity College, University of Toronto
    Chair / Commentator: Jon Allen, Munk School of Global Affairs and
    Public Policy, University of Toronto

    3:50 – 5:10 pm
    Panel Three: Launch of Canada Declassified
    Matt Wiseman, University of Toronto
    Tim Sayle, University of Toronto
    John Dirks, Trinity College
    Elizabetta Kerr, University of Toronto
    Chair / Commentator: John Kirton, University of Toronto

    Monday, November 19

    9:15 – 10:30 am
    Keynote Address: Margaret MacMillan, Oxford University
    Chair: The Hon. Bill Graham (introduced by Provost Mayo Moran)

    10:30 – 10:45 am
    Coffee Break

    10:45 – 12:15 pm
    Panel Four: New Approaches to International History
    Julie Gilmour, University of Toronto
    Simon Miles, Duke University
    Chair / Commentator: Andres Kasekamp, University of Toronto

    12:15 – 1:30 pm Lunch

    1:30 – 3:00pm
    Address: International History Today and Tomorrow
    Fredrik Logevall, Harvard University (introduced by Janice Stein) Chair / Commentator: Ron Pruessen, University of Toronto

    3:00 – 3:15 pm Coffee Break

    3:15 – 4:45 pm
    Panel Six: The Next Generation of International Historians
    Susan Colbourn, Yale University Tim Sayle, University of Toronto Cindy Ewing, University Of Toronto
    Michael Morgan, University of NorthCarolina
    Chair / Commentator: John English, University of Toronto

    4:45 – 5:00 pm
    Closing Remarks
    Robert Bothwell, University of Toronto

    5:00 – 6:00 pm
    Book Launch: The Final Act
    Michael Morgan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 19th China and Europe: Prospects for Cooperation and the Future of Multilateralism

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 19, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The topic of this academic seminar is situated in the global shift of retreating American global leadership. America’s protectionist and isolationist tendencies have given rise to competing views about the world order, and contending emerging powers who may champion or restructure the liberal rules-based international system. China’s increasingly proactive foreign policy and the initiative of European states to uphold principles such as free trade hint at future prospects for further collaboration among like-minded partners, outside of traditional alliance networks. For example, in the area of global environmental governance, China’s growing portfolio in renewable energy investment and climate action is aligning it with the interests and positions of countries such as France and Germany. This raises the question of whether Europe and China should still be viewed in a East vs West dichotomy, or rather now as potential partners with shared policy priorities and collaborative approaches to global governance. Please join us – our speakers Professor Robert Austin, Dr. Anton Malkin, Mr. Bowen Yu and Mr. Asif Farooq will discuss China-EU relations, China’s role in the Balkans, Made in China 2025 and its implications for China-EU relations, and more!


    Speakers

    Mr. Bowen Yu
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Professor Robert Austin
    Associate Professor, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Anton Malkin
    Research Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation

    Mr. Asif Farooq
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Association of Political Science Students

    European Studies Students' Association

    International Relations Society


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 19th Housing Access & Urban Governance: Lessons from Mexico’s Recent Experience

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 19, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Changes to federal housing policy in Mexico in the 1990s helped finance the largest housing boom in the country’s history. During the 2000s, millions of Mexicans acquired mortgages to buy homes in the fringes of cities throughout the country. At the same time, decentralization efforts were under way to increase the capacity of local governments to, among other things, manage urban growth. Yet, even large municipalities have been ill equipped to provide adequate infrastructure and services to the new remote housing locations that have popped up in the last two decades. Furthermore, an increasing number of Mexican households have struggled to keep up with their mortgage payments with the result that some new developments have alarmingly high housing vacancy rates, all while about a third of Mexicans live in poor housing conditions.

    What can Mexico’s experience teach other cities and countries as they confront their own housing challenges? On November 19, IMFG Post-Doctoral Fellow Alejandra Reyes will present on the tension between federal housing finance strategies and municipal governance and implementation, the policy shortcomings at different levels, and the implications of a lack of coordination.

    Speaker

    Alejandra Reyes is the 2018-2019 Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance. She received her BA in Architecture at UC Berkeley and an MS and PhD in Community and Regional Planning at the University of Texas at Austin. Her academic interests lie at the intersection of housing and urban development, policy and governance, and socioeconomic disparities.

    Seating is limited for this event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Alejandra Reyes, IMFG 2018-2019 Post-Doctoral Fellow



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 20th Imaging the Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 20, 20189:00AM - 5:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor of Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Imaging The Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit has now been moved to the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, where the photo exhibit will be on display from October 24 to November 20, 2018.

    In 2012-2013 the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute envisioned a photo contest on the theme of “Imaging the Asia-Pacific,” and has presented it annually ever since. Open to all students at the University of Toronto, the contest has asked students to submit photographic representations of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The photos may have been taken in any location inside or outside the region (including Toronto), but they are expected to be of high artistic quality and to offer images that go beyond clichés. Not only has the contest helped to make students aware of learning opportunities in the Chu Program and the Asian Institute; it also encourages them to consider the possibilities of interdisciplinary and multimedia approaches to the study of the Asia-Pacific. This exhibit is made up of only a small sampling of some of the most unique, beautiful and thought-provoking works the contest has received over the years.

    We invite viewers to contemplate the photos, to appreciate the artistic and intellectual talent on display, and to join us in imagining the region, its pasts, and its futures through the medium of photography.

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 21st Japan as a 'Normal Country'? Retrospect and Prospect

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 21, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Japan Now Lecture Series

    Description

    THERE IS AN ONGOING DEBATE ABOUT WHETHER JAPAN IS—and if not, whether it can or should become—a “normal country.” For decades the received wisdom has been that Japan—at least in its international presence—lacked something vitally necessary for it to be taken seriously and treated with the respect befitting a country of its size and sophistication.

    Despite the general sense that Japan was not a “normal” country, neither the Japanese people, nor their leaders and officials, have been able to agree on the nature of the problem and the appropriate solution. For that matter, it has been a matter of some debate whether there is even a problem to fix. In what sense, if at all, is Japan an “abnormal” country? What would it mean for it to become normal?

    In 2011, the University of Toronto Press published a collection of essays on this theme[1]. The purpose of this symposium is to look back on the analysis in that volume to see how well it has stood up in the intervening tumultuous years, and what, if anything, we can learn from that exercise to inform Japanese policy and Japan’s regional and global role in the next several years to come. In addition, in view of the fact that this year marks the 90th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Canada and Japan, what role might Canada play as a constructive partner?

    [1] Yoshihide Soeya, Masayuki Tadokoro, and David A. Welch, eds., Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011.

    Panelist Biographies:

    Yoshihide Soeya is Professor of political science and international relations at the Faculty of Law of Keio University. His areas of interest are politics and security in East Asia, and Japanese diplomacy and its external relations. He received Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1987, majoring in world politics. He served as the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies of the same university for six years until September 2013, and as the Director of its Center for Contemporary Korean Studies for five years until March 2016. Recently, Dr. Soeya was a Japan Scholar of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. from September 2013 to January 2014, and a Korea Foundation Fellow affiliated with the ASAN Institute in Seoul in March-May 2014. His most recent publications in English include “The Rise of China in Asia: Japan at the Nexus,” in Asle Toje, ed., Will China’s Rise be Peaceful? Security, Stability, and Legitimacy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), and “The Case for an Alternative Strategy for Japan: Beyond the Article 9-Alliance Regime,” in Michael J. Green and Zack Cooper, eds., Postwar Japan: Growth, Security and Uncertainty since 1945 (Washington D.C.: Center for Strategic and International Studies, 2017).

    Masayuki Tadokoro is Professor of International Relations at Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. Born in Osaka, he attended Kyoto University and the London School of Economics. Previously he was a professor at the National Defense Academy. In 1988-89, he stayed in Washington D.C. a Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and in 1991 he taught for a semester as Fulbright Scholar in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh. His primary field is international political economy, but he works also on Japanese foreign and security policy. His publications include International Political Economy (Nagoya University Press, 2008); The Dollar transcends “America” (Chuokoron Shinsha, 2001); and The Realities of the UN: A Budgetary Analysis (Yuhikaku, 1996). His recent publications in English include, “After the Dollar?”, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 10:3 (2010); and “Why did Japan fail to become the ‘Britain’ of Asia”, in David Wolff et al., eds., The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective (Brill, 2007). He also edited with David Welch and Yoshihide Soeya, Japan as a ‘Normal Country’?: A Nation in Search of Its Place in the World, (Toronto U.P. 2011). Changed Discourses on Demography in Japan, in Silvio Beretta et al, eds, Italy and Japan: How Similar Are They? , (Springer, 2014).

    David A. Welch is CIGI Chair of Global Security at the Balsillie School of International Affairs and Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo. His 2005 book Painful Choices: A Theory of Foreign Policy Change (Princeton University Press) is the inaugural winner of the International Studies Association ISSS Book Award for the best book published in 2005 or 2006, and his 1993 book Justice and the Genesis of War (Cambridge University Press) is the winner of the 1994 Edgar S. Furniss Award for an Outstanding Contribution to National Security Studies.

    Welch is also co-author of Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation 10th ed. (Pearson Longman, 2016); Virtual JFK: Vietnam If Kennedy had Lived (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009); The Cuban Missile Crisis: A Concise History (Oxford University Press, 2nd ed. 2011); On the Brink: Americans and Soviets Reexamine the Cuban Missile Crisis(2nd ed., Noonday 1990); and Cuba on the Brink: Castro, The Missile Crisis, and the Soviet Collapse (2nd ed., Rowman & Littlefield, 2002).

    Welch is also co-editor of Japan as a ‘Normal Country’? A Nation In Search of Its Place in the World (University of Toronto Press, 2011) and Intelligence and the Cuban Missile Crisis (Frank Cass, 1998). His articles have appeared in Asian Perspective, Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Ethics and International Affairs, Foreign Affairs, The Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Intelligence and National Security, International Security, International Journal, International Negotiation, International Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, The Mershon International Studies Review, The Review of International Studies, and Security Studies.

    Event Announcement

    Japan as a "Normal Country"? Event Announcement

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Yoshihide Soeya
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Science and International Relations, Faculty of Law, Keio University, Japan

    Masayuki Tadokoro
    Panelist
    Professor, International Relations, Faculty of Law, Keio University, Japan

    David A. Welch
    Panelist
    CIGI Chair, Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs
    Professor, Political Science, University of Waterloo
    Founder, Japan Futures Initiative

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Takako Ito
    Concluding Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 21st My Final Territory. Book Launch and Conversation with Yuri Andrukhovych

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 21, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Yuri Andrukhovych is among the most popular writers in Ukraine today. He is the author of the best selling novels, Recreations, The Moscoviad, Perversion, The Twelve Rings and others. The event will include a book launch for his most recent collection of essays in English, My Final Territory, University of Toronto Press, 2018. Also available will be his most recent Ukrainian novel, Kokhantsi iustytsii (The Darlings of Justice).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Yuri Andrukhovych
    Speaker
    Ukrainian writer

    Maxim Tarnawsky
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Danylo Husar Struk Program in Ukrainian Literature of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 21st Ottoman Intellectuals and Patronage Relations with the State: When the Bourgeoisie Is Not There!

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 21, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMNear and Middle Eastern Civilizations Conference Room (BF200B)
    4 Bancroft Ave.
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    This talk will focus on the late Ottoman intellectual tradition that started with the New Ottomans, continued with the Young Turks, and transformed into the intellectual strata of the new Turkish Republic. An important push factor for European intellectuals—a bourgeoisie that turned into the dominant capitalist class and empowered it to disseminate its ideas—was clearly missing in the Ottoman case. This resulted in the state being considered the only institution that could finance the self-proclaimed task of Ottoman intellectuals to “save the Empire.” Interestingly all three of the ideologies—Ottomanism, Islamism, and Turkism—aimed at saving the Ottoman state. This led to the establishment of patronage relations between the state and intellectuals. As a result, the intellectuals in the first era of modern Turkish Republic became “agents of the state” for indoctrination into the new ideology of the state.


    Speakers

    Evren Altinkas
    University of Guelph


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 23rd Leaving Zion: Israel and Its Emigrants in the Early Years of the State

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 23, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Ori Yehudai teaches Jewish and Israeli history at the University of Toronto.He holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago and has previously held positions at NYU and McGill. His main research interests include modern Jewish and Israeli history, migration and displacement, and the reconstruction of the Jewish after the Holocaust. He has recently completed a book manuscript entitled “Leaving Zion: Jewish Emigration from Palestine and Israel after World War II.”

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Ori Yehudai
    Speaker
    University of Toronto

    Emanuel Adler
    Chair
    Andrea & Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy; Professor, Department of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 23rd Mahosadha’s Cunning and the Cretan Labyrinth

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 23, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    LECTURE IN THE ARTS, HISTORIES, LITERATURES, AND RELIGIONS OF BURMA

    One of the Buddha Gotama’s numerous epithets was opamma kusalo muni – sage skilled in parables, exemplified in his life as Mahosadha. The remains of an early second millennium Burmese kingdom, named after its ceremonial center, Pagan, preserve several visual narratives of the story. They incorporate a labyrinth image to represent the setting where medicine curing human ailments was dispensed, and riddles and judicial problems were resolved – antecedent of the Bodhimanda – site of Gotama’s Awakening. Sometime in the late 11th century an unknown artisan, guided by a learned though anonymous Buddhist monk, selected the labyrinth image to reference his society’s conception of the human predicament. That monk’s vastly better known Christian counterparts, a millennium earlier and in another part of the world, chose likewise. The lecture speculates on the reasons and significance of the monk’s choice in the Pagan context.

    Biography:

    Lilian Handlin is a historian. She received her doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she taught until 1977. She is the author and co-author of several books, including the four volume Liberty in America,1600 to the Present (New York, 1986 – 1995) as well as articles and reviews in American history. More recently, she began to publish articles concerned with Myanmar’s early history, grounded in the material culture surviving the kingdom of Pagan. One of her publications compares two Pagan era narratives of the Vessantara with its first Burmese vernacular version composed by an influential 18th century Burmese monk and commentator. The article was published in Steven Collins, ed., Readings in the Vessantara Jataka (New York, Columbia University Press, 2016). An examination of the myth of the Buddha’s eye teeth, in the Pagan context, appeared this summer in Cristophe Munier Gaillard, ed., Mural Art, Studies on Paintings in Asia (Bangkok 2018).


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Dr. Lilian Handlin
    Speaker
    Harvard University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 23rd Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto Annual Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 23, 20186:30PM - 9:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto (TAAT) invites all students/researchers interested in Taiwan to an evening of networking and discussion. Come and join us to meet, mingle, and learn more about our activities.

    6:30 Reception: Refreshments and light snack will be served

    7:00 Keynote Speaker Chungsen Leung: From International Student to MP in One Generation

    Contact

    Ito Peng

    Sponsors

    Centre for Global Social Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 28th Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and the Battle for the Meaning of America - A conversation with John Sides and Sam Tanenhaus

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 28, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    How did Donald Trump win the 2016 presidential election? And what does his victory say about the future of American politics and society? At this event, John Sides will present an overview of his new book, Identity Crisis, and will then engage in conversation with Sam Tanenhaus and the audience on the future of American politics.

    John Sides is a Professor of Political Science at George Washington University and the Editor of The Monkey Cage, a Washington Post-hosted blog. Sam Tanenhaus is an award-winning American writer and journalist who has worked as an editor at the New York Times and Vanity Fair. He is presently writing a biography of William F. Buckley and is a Senior Fellow in Public Policy at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a Visiting Professor at St. Michael’s University at the University of Toronto.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia: Urgency, Knowledge & Innovation-Webinar

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 20188:30AM - 11:30AM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Climate change is an urgent universal crisis facing all human beings. The impacts of climate change are potentially catastrophic and are unevenly distributed among different cities and countries due to environmental, geographical, social, political, and economic factors, rooted in systemic inequalities. Building resilience to climate change is complex, particularly in rapidly growing cities of Southeast Asia. In response to climate change, globalization, and urbanization, many Southeast Asian cities are experiencing a dramatic transformation due to socioeconomic and environmental challenges, especially under China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ (OBOR) initiative.

    This symposium invites scholars and practitioners across different sectors to share the latest knowledge development in the field and explore cutting-edge approaches. It hopes to further strengthen links between a community of climate leaders connected to the ground; and generate opportunities for collaboration in future urban climate resilience governance.

    The symposium consists of two major sessions: a webinar (8:30-11:30 am) via Facebook Live and a panel discussion (2:00-4:00 pm).

    During the webinar, ten scholars and practitioners across the world with expertise in climate issues in Southeast Asia will present their work through Facebook Live (https://www.facebook.com/ucrsea/). Each invited speaker will make a 3-minute elevator pitch to address the most critical environmental/climate issue in the region by answering the following questions briefly:

    1. What is the most urgent environmental/climate issue in your city/country?
    2. Why is it important?
    3. What can we do?

    A 10-minute Q&A session will follow each elevator pitch.

    To register, please fill out a form found in https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeLnQjKQtoCTe9emvtUMrZeA_tET1SXfxXRWwZ0S8HEQQo4kg/viewform?vc=0&c=0&w=1.

    Contact

    Angie Agulto
    416-946-8983


    Speakers

    Ms. Cat Tuong Nguyen
    Project Manager CHANGEVN, Vietnam

    Dr. Indrajit Pal
    Assistant Professor, Disaster Preparedness, Mitigation, and Management Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand

    Ms. Ragene Andrea Palma
    Freelance Urban Planner, Blogger and Contributing Writer CNN Philippines

    Dr. Seak Sophat
    Vice Dean, Faculty of Development Studies Royal University of Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Mr. Win Myo Thu
    Director EcoDev Myanmar

    Ms. Ngoc Tran
    Department of Climate Change Ministry of Natural Resource and Environment, Vietnam



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Echoes of Conflict and Solidarity in Cyberspace: How Social Media Shapes Immigrant Identity-Making

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Although migration scholarship has long theorized how immigrants form new identities and build communities in the hostland, its foundational frameworks have thus far focused largely on the contexts of the sending and receiving countries. Yet, when immigrants arrive from one society to settle in another, their interactions with various immigrant and native groups produce contact across diverse cultures—not just of the society from which they come and to which they now live, but also of societies in faraway foreign lands to which they have never traveled. These ties to places that are neither the immigrants’ homeland nor hostland are facilitated by social media and
    24/7 cable news, invoking collective identities that cut across borders and causing spillover effects of global events that shape both how others view immigrants and how immigrants view themselves. Using ethnographic data and Facebook activities of South Asian Muslim Americans in California during the 2016 U.S. Presidential election, I trace how: 1) social media moderates the impact of global political events and facilitate feelings of solidarity by filtering who, where, and what matters to the host society and thereby the immigrants in it; and 2) how the immigrants themselves use social media to express and perform feelings of solidarity with peoples in distant foreign lands as they enmesh themselves into the politics of the hostland. Overall, these findings highlight the need to analyze immigrant identity-making within a broader framework that can encompass geopolitics not just in the immigrant sending and receiving countries, but also beyond.

    Speaker bio:
    Tahseen Shams is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of Toronto. Her research interests are in the areas of international migration, globalization, race/ethnicity, nationalism, and religion.
    Broadly, she studies how transnational, global forms of inequality intersect with race and ethnicity to affect immigrant groups, particularly those coming from Muslim-majority countries to the United States and Canada. Her work has received funding from the National Science Foundation and has produced publications in Sociological Forum and Ethnic and Racial Studies among others. Currently, she is writing a book on how global geopolitics shapes Muslim American and immigrant identities. She is also pursuing two separate but related research
    projects: one on Muslim American panethnicity, and the other on how U.S. sociopolitics surrounding Islam and Muslims affects the identity-work of Muslim immigrants in Canada.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Tahseen Shams
    Assistant Professor of Sociology at University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia: Urgency, Knowledge & Innovation-Panel Discussion

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 20182:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Climate change is an urgent universal crisis facing all human beings. The impacts of climate change are potentially catastrophic and are unevenly distributed among different cities and countries due to environmental, geographical, social, political, and economic factors, rooted in systemic inequalities. Building resilience to climate change is complex, particularly in rapidly growing cities of Southeast Asia. In response to climate change, globalization, and urbanization, many Southeast Asian cities are experiencing a dramatic transformation due to socioeconomic and environmental challenges, especially under China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ (OBOR) initiative.

    This symposium invites scholars and practitioners across different sectors to share the latest knowledge development in the field and explore cutting-edge approaches. It hopes to further strengthen links between a community of climate leaders connected to the ground; and generate opportunities for collaboration in future urban climate resilience governance.

    The panel discussion is preceded by a virtual conference in the morning, 8:30-11:30 am in Room 108N. Five emerging scholars will share their current research work on urban climate resilience in Southeast Asia, followed by an interactive discussion with the audience.

    To register for this event, please fill out the form found in https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeLnQjKQtoCTe9emvtUMrZeA_tET1SXfxXRWwZ0S8HEQQo4kg/viewform?vc=0&c=0&w=1.

    Contact

    Angie Agulto
    416-946-8983


    Speakers

    Yanjun Cai, Ph.D.
    UCRSEA Postdoctoral Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Katherine Laycock
    Incoming UCRSEA Postdoctoral Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Furqan Asif
    Ph.D. Candidate, International Development, University of Ottawa

    Try Thuon
    UCRSEA Graduate Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Tu Nguyen
    UCRSEA Graduate Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 29th Populists, Reformers, Russian Soft Power and War: Ukraine's 2019 Elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 29, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Five years Ukraine after the Euromaidan Revolution of Dignity, Ukraine will hold presidential and parliamentary elections in March and October 2019 respectfully. The elections will not witness the traditional battle between ‘pro-Western’ and ‘pro-Russian’ forces because16% of pro-Russian voters and 27 election districts are under Russian occupation in the Crimea and Donbas, the Party of Regions no longer exists and the Communist Party is banned. The on-going Russia-Ukraine war in the Donbas will provide the background to an election that will resemble those held those in Europe and the US where populists face reformers. With Russian soft power in Ukraine in terminal decline, the 2019 elections will be a test of Ukraine’s reforms and European integration will prove to be irreversible by 2024.

    Taras Kuzio received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, an MA in Soviet and East European Area Studies from the University of London, and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Birmingham, England. Professor in the Department of Political Science, ‘National University’ Kyiv Mohyla Academy and Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Washington DC. His previous positions were at the University of Alberta, George Washington University, University of Toronto, and Chief of Mission to the NATO Information and Documentation Office in Ukraine. Taras Kuzio is the author and editor of seventeen books, including (with Paul D’Anieri) The Sources of Russia’s Great Power Politics: Ukraine and the Challenge to the European Order (2018), Putin’s War Against Ukraine. Revolution, Nationalism, and Crime (2017), Ukraine. Democratization, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (2015), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), and Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007). Author of five think tank monographs, including The Crimea: Europe’s Next Flashpoint? (2010). Author of 38 book chapters and 100 scholarly articles on Ukrainian and post-communist politics, democratic transitions, colour revolutions, nationalism, and European studies. Guest Editor of Communist and Post-Communist Studies, East European Politics and Society, Demokratizatsiya, Eurasian Geography and Economics, Nationalities Papers, Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics, and Problems of Post-Communism.

    Robert Baines is President and CEO of the NATO Association of Canada where he is focused on communicating the importance of NATO and the international-rules based order to Canadians. He was formerly Executive Director of the Canada-Albanian Business Council and Corporate Development Officer of the NATO Association. He received a B.A. in Politics, Philosophy, and History from Trinity College at the University of Toronto and an M.A. in History from York University. Robert is President of the St. George’s Society of Toronto and is involved on the Young Professionals Boards of many arts groups, including the Canadian Opera Company of which is Co-Chair. Robert is a member of the Canadian Armed Forces Reserve and has received the Canadian Forces Decoration.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Robert Baines
    Commentator
    President and CEO of the NATO Association of Canada

    Taras Kuzio
    Speaker
    Professor in the Department of Political Science, Kyiv Mohyla Academy and Non-Resident Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Relations, Johns Hopkins University.

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program; Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Nato Association of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 30th De Gaulle, le Québec et le Canada: un bilan historiographique 50 ans après **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 30, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    N.B.: This event will be presented in French.

    De Gaulle, le Québec et le Canada: un bilan historiographique 50 ans après /
    De Gaulle, Quebec and Canada: An Historiographic Review 50 Years Later

    Il y a 50 ans, lorsque de Gaulle a crié à Montréal “Vive le Québec libre”, il a semé la consternation en France, au Canada et seuls les indépendantistes et les nationalistes québécois semblent avoir apprécié son discours. Depuis, l’historiographie s’est chargée de décortiquer les raisons de son discours, ainsi que l’histoire plus large des relations France-Québec sous de Gaulle et les conséquences pour le Québec, de sa présidence. Les avis sont partagés, encore aujourd’hui, concernant la vision de de Gaulle sur le Québec et de ses projets, planifiés ou non, pour ses cousins d’outre-mer. Par contre, l’historiographie récente des relations franco-québécoises, a souligné un élément consensuel entre les chercheurs; celui de l’impact fondamental de de Gaulle sur la redécouverte de la France au Québec, mais aussi au Canada à travers les enjeux de la francophonie au sein même de la jeune diplomatie canadienne. Nous aborderons cette redécouverte à travers un bilan historiographique qui témoigne de la richesse de cette histoire.

    When de Gaulle came to Montreal fifty years ago and shouted ‘’Vive le Québec libre’’, he spread dismay among the French and Canadian populations, and only the independentists and nationalists from Quebec seemed to have appreciated his words. Since then, historiography broke down the reasons for his speech as well as the wider historical ‘’France-Québec’’ relationship while de Gaulle was in power and the consequences of his presidency for Quebeckers. To date, opinions remain divided as to what de Gaulle’s vision and future projects for Quebec (his overseas cousins) were, whether these were planned or not. However, the recent historiography highlighted that there was a consensus on one element between the researchers; that being de Gaulle’s fundamental impact on the rediscovery of France in Quebec and in Canada, through what was at stake for the Francophony, within the young Canadian diplomatic circle itself. We will discuss this rediscovery through a historiographical review which testifies to this history’s richness.


    Speakers

    Magali Deleuze

    Professeure agrégée/Associate Professor

    Directrice des Études sur la guerre (Programme d'études supérieures) /Chair of War Studies (Graduate Studies Program)

    Département d'histoire/History Department
    Collège militaire royal du Canada / Royal Military College of Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 30th “English is so precise and Hindi can be so heavy!": Language Ideologies and Audience Imaginaries in a Mumbai Dubbing Studio

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 30, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Since 1994, when Jurassic Park was dubbed into Hindi and enjoyed unparalleled commercial success for a Hollywood film in India, the number of Hollywood films dubbed into Hindi and released in the Indian market has been steadily increasing. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a dubbing studio in Mumbai observing Hollywood films being dubbed into Hindi, as well as participation in the dubbing of an original Netflix series from Hindi to English, this talk examines the language ideologies about Hindi and English that are articulated, performed, and manifest during the dubbing process. It describes the varied ways that voice artists and dubbing directors navigate and negotiate the complex act of rendering dialogue in Hindi when the original lines are written in English and vice versa. It illustrates how the production of dubbed media is a rich site to examine questions of legitimate language, socio-economic change, social imaginaries of difference, and ideas of belonging in contemporary India.

    Biography:

    Tejaswini Ganti is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and core faculty in its Program in Culture & Media at New York University. She is the author of Producing Bollywood: Inside the Contemporary Hindi Film Industry (Duke University Press 2012) and Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema (Routledge 2004; 2nd edition 2013). Her current research examines the politics of language and translation within the Hindi film industry and the formalization of film training through film schools in India.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Tejaswini Ganti
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, New York University


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Cinema Studies Institute

    Department of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January Array

  • Friday, November 16th – Friday, January 11th Environmental Governance Lab Work in Progress Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 16, 20181:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, November 30, 20183:00PM - 4:30PMBloor - Transit House, 1 Devonshire
    Friday, January 11, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab hosts regular EGL Work in Progress Talks. The talks are an informal, interdisciplinary forum where faculty and Ph.D. students can discuss ongoing research in the field of environmental politics, policy, and governance. At these events, two presenters offer a 10-minute overview of an ongoing project to serve as a fodder for discussion. If you are interested in hearing more about this and other Environmental Governance Lab events please email eg.lab@utoronto.ca for more information.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2018

  • Monday, December 3rd Ambiguities of the Ukrainian Women's Experiences of the Holodomor 1932-33: Victimhood, Agency, Perpetration

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 3, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Although the tragedy of the Holodomor (the Great Famine) of 1932-33 figures prominently in public discourse and scholarship in Ukraine today, its gender dimension remains understudied. This talk is based predominantly on an analysis of personal narratives of female survivors of the Holodomor, which allows exploring peculiarities and controversies of women’s experiences of survival under the genocidal circumstances. It focuses on women’s coping strategies and life-saving practices under conditions of total starvation. It also exposes a spectrum of women’s agency aimed to protect family possessions and food supplies from violent expropriations by authorities. The social characteristics, motivations, and roles of local female perpetrators of the famine will be discussed as well.

    Dr. Oksana Kis is a historian and anthropologist, a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (in Lviv). She obtained her academic degree “kandydat nauk” (Ph.D. equivalent) from Ivan Krypyakevych Institute of Ukrainian Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in 2002. In April 2018, she completed her habilitation (“doctor nauk” degree). Since 2010, Dr. Kis has served as a President of the Ukrainian Association for Research in Women’s History. She is also a co-founder and a vice-president of the Ukrainian Oral History Association. Oksana Kis is an Editor-in-Chief of the academic web-site Ukraina Moderna. Her research interests include women’s history, feminist anthropology, oral history, and gender transformations in post-socialist countries. Dr. Oksana Kis will be at CERES in October-November 2018.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oksana Kis
    Speaker
    A Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (in Lviv)

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, December 3rd Kent E. Calder on His Book "Circles of Compensation: Economic Growth and the Globalization of Japan"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 3, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    JAPAN GREW EXPLOSIVELY AND CONSISTENTLY FOR MORE THAN A CENTURY, from the Meiji Restoration until the collapse of the economic bubble in the early 1990s. Since then, it has been unable to restart its economic engine and respond to globalization. How could the same political–economic system produce such strongly contrasting outcomes?

    In this talk, Kent E. Calder discusses his new book Circles of Compensation: Economic Growth and the Globalization of Japan (Stanford University Press, 2017), which identifies the crucial variables as classic Japanese forms of socio-political organization: the “circles of compensation.” These cooperative groupings of economic, political, and bureaucratic interests dictate corporate and individual responses to such critical issues as investment and innovation; at the micro level, they explain why individuals can be decidedly cautious on their own, yet prone to risk-taking as a collective. Calder examines how these circles operate in seven concrete areas, from food supply to consumer electronics, and deals in special detail with the influence of Japan’s changing financial system. The result is a comprehensive overview of Japan’s circles of compensation as they stand today, and a road map for broadening them in the future.

    Circles of Compensation: Economic Growth and the Globalization of Japan (Stanford University Press, 2017) will be available for purchase at the event.

    About the Author
    KENT E. CALDER
    Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies

    Dr. Kent E. Calder is Director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies in Washington, DC. He also currently serves as Vice Dean for Faculty Affairs and International Research Cooperation at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, in the fall of 2014. Before arriving at Johns Hopkins SAIS in 2003, he taught for twenty years at Princeton University, and previous acted as a Visiting Professor at Seoul National University and Lecturer in Government at Harvard University. Dr. Calder has also served as Special Advisor to the U.S. Ambassador to Japan (1997-2001), Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (1989-1993 and 1996), and as the first Executive Director of Harvard University’s Program on U.S.-Japan Relations (1979-1980). He received his PhD from Harvard University in 1979, where he worked under the direction of Ambassador Edwin O. Reischauer.

    A specialist in the political economy of East Asia, Dr. Calder has spent eleven years living and researching in Japan, and four years elsewhere in the region. Some of his major publications include:

    Circles of Compensation: Economic Growth and the Globalization of Japan (Stanford University Press, 2017)
    Singapore: Smart City, Smart State (Brookings Institution Press, 2016)
    Asia in Washington: Exploring the Penumbra of Transnational Power (Brookings Institution Press, 2014)
    The New Continentalism: Energy and Twenty-First Century Eurasian Geopolitics (Yale University Press, 2012)
    Pacific Alliance: Reviving U.S.-Japan Relations (Yale University Press, 2009)
    Embattled Garrisons: Comparative Base Politics and American Globalism (Princeton University, 2007)
    Pacific Defense: Arms, Energy, and America’s Future in Asia (William Morrow and Company, 1996)
    Strategic Capitalism: Private Business and Public Purpose in Japanese Industrial Finance (Princeton University Press, 1993)
    Crisis and Compensation: Public Policy and Political Stability in Japan (Princeton University Press, 1988)

    Event Announcement

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Kent E. Calder
    Speaker

    Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies, Washington, DC

    Vice Dean, Faculty Affairs and International Research Cooperation, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Takako Ito
    Opening Remarks

    Consul General of Japan in Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 4th Book Launch & Panel Discussion How it Happened: Documenting the Tragedy of Hungarian Jewry

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 4, 20185:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    **This event is now sold out. Please join us for the live stream at: https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/Live/449.aspx

    Celebrating the publication of How It Happened: Documenting the Tragedy of Hungarian Jewry, Randall Hansen, Interim Director of the Munk School, invites you to a provocative discussion about the Holocaust in Hungary. Doris Bergen, the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, will moderate a panel featuring the distinguished scholars Judit Molnár, Professor at the University of Szeged, and Attila Pók of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Also speaking will be the book’s editor, Nina Munk, whose great uncle Ernő Munkácsi, the former chief secretary of the Central Jewish Council in Budapest, wrote the original, seminal Hungarian edition of How It Happened immediately after the Second World War.

    A gripping first‐hand account of the devastating “last chapter” of the Holocaust, How It Happened is a unique testament to the senseless brutality that, in a matter of months, decimated what was Europe’s largest and last‐surviving Jewish community. Examining only those critical months of 1944 when Hitler’s Germany occupied its ally Hungary, Munkácsi describes the Jewish Council’s desperation and fear as it attempted to prevent the looming catastrophe and struggled to grasp the immensity of a tragedy that would take the lives of 427,000 Hungarian Jews in the very last year of the war.

    Published by McGill-Queen’s University Press and edited by Nina Munk, this long‐overdue translation by Péter Balikó Lengyel makes available Munkácsi’s profound and unparalleled insight into the Holocaust in Hungary, revealing the “choiceless choices” that confronted members of the Judenrat forced to execute the Nazis’ orders. With an in‐depth introduction by Ferenc Laczó, a brief biography of Ernő Munkácsi by Susan Papp, ample annotations and a glossary by László Csősz and Ferenc Laczó, two dozen archival photographs, detailed maps by Michael J. Fisher, and a thorough index by Rebecca Carter-Chand, How It Happened is an essential resource for historians and students of the Holocaust, the Second World War, and Central Europe. Copies of the book will be for sale at the event.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Nina Munk
    Speaker
    Editor
    Canadian‐American Journalist and Author

    Doris Bergen
    Chair
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Attila Pók
    Speaker
    Deputy Director of the Institute of History, the Research Centre for the Humanities at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences; Executive Vice President of the Hungarian Historical Association; Senior Researcher at the Institute of Advanced Study in Kőszeg

    Judit Molnár
    Speaker
    Professor at the University of Szeged


    Main Sponsor

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, December 10th Regional Integration Trends in Developing Asia & the Economic and Business Impacts of the Trans-Pacific Trade Conflict

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 10, 20185:00PM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    How has the trans-Pacific trade conflict impacted economics and business in Asia? What are the implications for Canada? Join us on December 10 as Bart W. Édes discusses these regional integration trends and more.

    Biography:

    Bart W. Édes has served as the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) Representative in North America since October 2, 2017. In this capacity, he mobilizes financing for ADB’s developing member countries; shares development knowledge and experience; establishes and deepens partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raises public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.

    His earlier ADB experience includes leading teams responsible for knowledge management, social development, gender equity, the social sectors, civil society engagement, ICT for Development, inclusive business, governance, and public sector management. He guided the formulation of ADB’s Public Communications Policy, which set a new global benchmark for transparency and information sharing among the international financial institutions. Mr. Édes has also served as Alternate Chairperson of ADB’s Appeals Committee, and Member of the ADB Integrity Oversight Committee.

    Between 1994 and 2000, Mr. Édes managed communications at SIGMA, a joint initiative of the European Union and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development providing support to public governance reform in Central and Eastern European countries. Mr. Édes has also worked as a journalist, researcher, policy analyst, and specialist on international trade and foreign direct investment.


    Speakers

    Bart W. Édes
    Speaker
    North American Representative, Asian Development Bank

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 11th The Orthodox Church in Ukraine: A Century of Separation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 11, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In light of recent developments in Ukraine toward establishing a unified Ukrainian Orthodox Church, coupled with the ecclesial conflicts between Constantinople and Moscow, this book’s appearance is very timely. In his presentation, Prof. Denysenko will provide an overview of the history of Orthodox Christianity in Ukraine from the early twentieth century to the present. He will touch upon the dynamics of church and state in the attempts to restore an authentic Ukrainian religious identity in the contemporary Orthodox churches, and how these dynamics have played out in the current movement to overcome the divisions among the three Orthodox Churches in Ukraine. This book launch is the second in a series of events looking at Ukrainian Orthodox Christianity and the question of autocephaly hosted by the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies; the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies; the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine; the Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; and the Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Nicholas E. Denysenko
    Speaker
    Emil and Elfriede Jochum Professor and Chair, Valparaiso University

    Myroslaw Tataryn
    Discussant
    Professor Emeritus, Department of Religious Studies; Chair, Department of Religious Studies; Director of the Centre for Responsible Citizenship at St. Jerome's University, University of Waterloo


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office

    Orthodox School of Theology at Trinity College

    Research Program on Religion and Culture, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, U of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 14th The Rohingya Crisis - How Did it Happen, and What Can We Do?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 14, 20185:00PM - 6:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    There have been numerous reports that genocide and ethnic cleansing have been committed against the Rohingya people by Burmese security forces. How did Myanmar, a country that seemed to show such promise and potential, end up committing this genocidal campaign against the Rohingya and what responses are available to achieve justice and accountability for the victims and survivors of these crimes?

    A panel of experts will seek to answer these questions on 14 December 2018. The event features Canadian Special Envoy to Myanmar Bob Rae, in conversation with Kate Cronin-Furman (University College London), Fannie Lafontaine (Laval University), Sebastiaan Verelst (United Nations), Jacques Bertrand (Munk School, University of Toronto), and Mark Kersten (Munk School, University of Toronto). The event is organized by Mark Kersten (Munk School) and Martin Mennecke (University of Southern Denmark) and made possible by the support of the University of Southern Denmark, the Canadian Partnership for International Justice, and the Wayamo Foundation.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2019

  • Thursday, January 10th Marching in Garuda's Nest: East Timor's Path to Independence through Jakarta

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The independence struggle of East Timor from Indonesia rested on a three-pronged strategy. An aspect of it was to Indonesianize the war that Jakarta had unleashed on the half-island country. Under the overall guidance – and sometimes strict instructions – of their nationalist movement, East Timorese students and activists across Indonesia progressively broke the government’s stranglehold on information about East Timor. They informed the Indonesian public and forged formidable alliances with Indonesian human rights activist and political reformists. These Indonesians rallied against the day-to-day human right violations that the Indonesian military committed in East Timor and gradually came to recognize that the exercise of the right to self-determination in East Timor was a step in the direction of their much-delayed democratic transition. This talk will explore how it was that the East Timorese nationalists marched – and won – in Jakarta while fighting a losing battle in East Timor itself.

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael is a former refugee goatherd and currently a stateless person. He is an Associate Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of History at Queen’s University. He holds a Ph.D. in history and LL.M. in public international law. He studied the history and politics of Northeast Africa and Southeast Asia and wrote a dissertation on the East Timorese and Eritrean struggles for independence from Indonesia and Ethiopia, respectively. He is the author of Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and East Timor Compared (Cambridge, 2013), among others. He has since been researching Northeast African political economy of conflict and his book on the root causes, dynamics and consequences of maritime piracy in Somalia has just been published (Piracy in Somalia: Violence and Development in the Horn of Africa). He has previously held teaching and research positions at African, European and U.S. universities; and has worked for United Nations peacekeeping and The Carter Center election monitoring.


    Speakers

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael
    Speaker
    Department of History, Queen's University

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 10th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    Minister Scott Brison on "Digital Disruption: There Ought to be an App for That"

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 10, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    315 Bloor Street W.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    We regret that the event with Minister Brison has been postponed to a later date due to an unforeseen matter. We will be in touch when the event is rescheduled.

    Join us as The Honourable Scott Brison, President of the Treasury Board of Canada and Minister of Digital Government discusses Digital Disruption: There Ought to be an App for That. This event is part of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program Series on Digital Leadership in Public Policy.

    About Our Speaker: The Honourable Scott Brison, was appointed to the federal cabinet as President of the Treasury Board in November 2015. In July 2018, he welcomed additional responsibilities after being appointed Minister of Digital Government. He has served as a member of the Cabinet Committee on Agenda, Results and Communications that tracks progress on the government’s priorities; the Cabinet Committee on Inclusive Growth, Opportunities and Innovation that considers strategies to promote inclusive economic growth, opportunity, employment, and social security; the Cabinet Committee on Open and Transparent Government; and the ad-hoc Cabinet Committee on Defence Procurement.
    During his years in opposition, he notably served as Vice-Chair of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance. On the international scene, he served as a member of the Trilateral Commission, and he was named by the World Economic Forum of Davos, Switzerland, as one of its “Young Global Leaders.” Minister Brison served as Minister of Public Works and Government Services, and Receiver General of Canada from 2004 to 2006 and, previously, as Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister with special emphasis on Canada-U.S. relations. He has had extensive private sector experience as an entrepreneur and investment banker. He has served as Vice-President of a Canadian investment bank and as Chairman of SeaFort Capital Inc., a Canadian private equity firm.

    He graduated Dalhousie University with a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Finance in 1989 and he has completed the Global Leadership and Public Policy for the 21st Century Executive Education Program at the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government.


    Speakers

    The Honourable Scott Brison
    President of the Treasury Board of Canada and Minister of Digital Government, Government of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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