« October 2020 - December 2020 January 2021 - Present

January 2021

  • Tuesday, January 5th MGA Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 5, 202112:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Learn more about the Master of Global Affairs Program before applications are due on January 21, 2021.

    Register to receive the Zoom link before the session starts.

    Contact

    Megan Ball-Chiodi
    416-946-8917


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 8th Book Launch: A Genealogy of Terrorism: Colonial Law and the Origins of an Idea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 8, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Using India as a case study, Joseph McQuade demonstrates how the modern concept of terrorism was shaped by colonial emergency laws dating back into the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Beginning with the ‘thugs’, ‘pirates’, and ‘fanatics’ of the nineteenth century, McQuade traces the emerging and novel legal category of ‘the terrorist’ in early twentieth-century colonial law, ending with an examination of the first international law to target global terrorism in the 1930s. Drawing on a wide range of archival research and a detailed empirical study of evolving emergency laws in British India, he argues that the idea of terrorism emerged as a deliberate strategy by officials seeking to depoliticize the actions of anti-colonial revolutionaries, and that many of the ideas embedded in this colonial legislation continue to shape contemporary understandings of terrorism today.

    *The book is available for purchase on the Cambridge University Press website here: www.cambridge.org/9781108842150
    *To receive a 20% discount, enter the code AGT2020 at the checkout (the code expires on October 31, 2021).
    _________________________

    Joseph McQuade is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada. Dr. McQuade is affiliated with the Queen’s University Global History Initiative and with the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, and is a Managing Editor of the Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies.

    Dr. McQuade completed his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge as a Gates Scholar, with a dissertation that examined the origins of terrorism in colonial India from an international perspective. This research forms the basis of his first book, A Genealogy of Terrorism: Colonial Law and the Origins of an Idea, published by Cambridge University Press in November 2020. His postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto examines how digital platforms have been used to mobilize vigilante violence in India and Myanmar from the 1990s to the present. His broader research and teaching interests include critical genealogies of terrorism, international relations in Asia, and the global history of political violence.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Joseph McQuade
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Beatrice Jauregui
    Discussant
    Associate Professor at the Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies and the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 11th MPP Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 11, 202111:30AM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Information Sessions on Applying to the MPP program at Munk. This session is a great opportunity for prospective students to learn about the application process, financial aid opportunities, and the timetable for applying to MPP-Munk. Applicants are encouraged to bring their questions to the session.

    Contact

    Petra Jory


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 12th Secretary General Vladimir Norov: The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation in a New Multi-Polar World

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 12, 20219:00AM - 10:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Vladimir Norov has been Secretary General of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation since January 2019. A senior diplomat with decades of service to the Republic of Uzbekistan, Norov has had posts as Foreign Minister and Ambassador to Germany, Switzerland, Poland, and Belgium. He speaks English, German, Russian, and Tajik.

    Registrants may send questions for Mr. Norov by 8 January to beltandroad.munkschool@utoronto.ca; we will pose as many questions as time allows.

    This event is part of the Belt and Road in Global Perspective Project and is co-sponsored by the CERES Eurasia Initiative and the Asian Institute.

    Main Sponsor

    CERES - Eurasia Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 12th Borderness and Famine: Why Did Fewer People Die in Soviet Ukraine’s Western Border Districts during the Holodomor, 1932–34?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 12, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    While the Holodomor affected all of Soviet Ukraine, not all regions suffered equally. Drawing on archives in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, as well as witness testimonies, my research demonstrates that the Soviet leadership’s relative sensitivity to the welfare of the population along Soviet Ukraine’s western frontier led the authorities to reduce the border districts’ grain procurement quotas and to prioritize them in rendering food aid – benefits that came at the expense of the republic’s rear areas. Combined with the smuggling of foodstuffs from Poland, such privileging led to markedly higher survival rates among the inhabitants of Soviet Ukraine’s “border belt.” These findings shed new light on the role of the Kremlin and the OGPU (political police) in the Holodomor; popular survival strategies and their effect on policy decisions; the impact of foreign threat; and the spatial logic of Stalinism.

    Andrey Shlyakhter is a historian of the Soviet Union and its neighbours. His research explores the intersection of economic deviance, borderlands, ideology, and state power. He defended his dissertation, “Smuggler States: Poland, Latvia, Estonia, and Contraband Trade across the Soviet Frontier, 1919–1924” in October 2020 at the Department of History, University of Chicago. The dissertation forms part of his postdoctoral book project, Smuggling across the Soviet Borders: Contraband Trades, Soviet Solutions, and the Shadow Economic Origins of the Interwar Iron Curtain, 1917–1932. Currently Dr. Shlyakhter is a Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar (Virtual Engagement).


    Speakers

    Andrey Shlyakhter
    Speaker
    Petro Jacyk Visiting Scholar (Virtual Engagement)

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Moderator
    Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director, Head of the Petro Jacyk Central & East European Resource Centre, and Slavic Resources Coordinator, the University of Toronto Libraries


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 14th Meritocracy and Democracy: the Social Life of Caste in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 14, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    How does the utopian democratic ideal of meritocracy reproduce historical inequality? My larger project pursues this question through a historical anthropology of engineering education in India. It looks at the operations of caste, the social institution most emblematic of ascriptive hierarchy, within the modern field of engineering education. At the heart of the study are the Indian Institutes of Technology, or IITs, a set of highly coveted engineering colleges that are equally representative of Indian meritocracy and, until recently, of caste exclusivity. In this talk, I hope to show that the politics of meritocracy at the IITs illuminates the social life of caste in contemporary India. Rather than the progressive erasure of ascribed identities in favor of putatively universal ones, what we are witnessing is the rearticulation of caste as an explicit basis for merit and the generation of newly consolidated forms of upper casteness.
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    Ajantha Subramanian is Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies at Harvard University. Her first book, Shorelines: Space and Rights in South India (Stanford University Press, 2009; Yoda Press, 2013), chronicles the struggles for resource rights by Catholic fishers on India’s southwestern coast, with a focus on how they have used spatial imaginaries and practices to constitute themselves as political subjects. Her second book, The Caste of Merit: Engineering Education in India (Harvard University Press, 2019), analyzes meritocracy as a terrain of caste struggle in India and its implications for democratic transformation.

    Chinnaiah Jangam is an Associate Professor in the Department of History. He holds M.A. in History from the University of Hyderabad; an M. Phil. In Modern Indian History from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and a Ph. D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He was awarded the Felix Fellowship and Harry Frank Guggenheim Dissertation Fellowship for Doctoral Studies. Jangam was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University (2005-6), New York.  His research focus is on the social and intellectual history of Dalits in modern South Asia. His first book, Dalits and the Making of Modern India, was published by Oxford University Press in 2017.

    Chinnaiah Jangam is an Associate Professor in the Department of History. He holds M.A. in History from the University of Hyderabad; an M. Phil. In Modern Indian History from Jawaharlal Nehru University, and a Ph. D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He was awarded the Felix Fellowship and Harry Frank Guggenheim Dissertation Fellowship for Doctoral Studies. Jangam was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University (2005-6), New York.  His research focus is on the social and intellectual history of Dalits in modern South Asia. His first book, Dalits and the Making of Modern India, was published by Oxford University Press in 2017.


    Speakers

    Ajantha Subramanian
    Speaker
    Professor of Anthropology and South Asian Studies, Harvard University

    Chinnaiah Jangam
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Carleton University

    Bhavani Raman
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto Scarborough


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 15th OPEN HOUSE: MA IN EUROPEAN & RUSSIAN AFFAIRS

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 15, 20213:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Find out more about our two-year MA in Russian & European Affairs in a live video chat with Katia Malyuzhinets, our Program & Internship Coordinator, and Associate Director Prof. Robert Austin.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 18th An American Coup: Reflections on Trumpism and the January 6 Insurrection

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 18, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On January 6, 2021, a mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. They vandalized the capitol building, attacked police officers, planted bombs, and threatened elected officials. So far, five people have died from this assault; at least three congresspeople have contracted Covid-19. Donald Trump and his allies in Congress and the press encouraged anti-democratic insurrection in an effort to overturn the 2020 Presidential Election. How do we make sense of this attempted coup? What are the implications of widespread suspicion and sedition for the future of American democracy? What are the origins of a right-wing authoritarianism in the United States that predates Donald Trump? How might we situate this event within histories of right-wing extremism, neoliberal austerity, mass incarceration, and America’s ‘illiberal tradition’? Julilly Kohler-Hausman (Cornell University), Russell Kazal (UTSC), Alexandra Rahr (UT), and Max Mishler (UT) will offer some initial reflections on the January 6 insurrection and engage in a dialogue before questions and comment from the audience.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Russ Kazal
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History

    Julilly Kohler-Hausman
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, History, Cornell University

    Max Mishler
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, History

    Alexandra Rahr
    Speaker
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer, Centre for the Study of the United States

    Nic Sammond
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, January 19th Canada’s future skills strategy: Workforce development for inclusive innovation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, January 19, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    In January 2019, the Government of Canada established the Future Skills Council with a mandate to provide advice on emerging skills and workforce trends and to identify and promote pan-Canadian priorities relating to skills development and training. The Future Skills Council report, released in November 2020, recommends equitable and competitive labour market strategies in response to disruptive technological, economic, social and environmental events. It aims to provide a roadmap to a stronger, more resilient future for Canada. In this webinar, panelists will discuss the report’s key action areas and pathways to successful implementation.


    Speakers

    Rachel Wernick
    Speaker
    Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Skills & Employment Branch, Employment and Social Development Canada

    Denise Amyot
    Speaker
    President and Chief Executive Officer, Colleges and Institutes Canada

    Dan Munro
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Research Advisor, Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship

    David Ticoll
    Speaker
    Chair, National Stakeholder Advisory Panel, Labour Market Information Council; Senior Associate, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Tara Deschamps
    Moderator
    Journalist with the Canadian Press



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 21st Ta’al Bachir (Come Tomorrow): The Politics of Waiting for Citizenship

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 21, 20212:10PM - 4:10PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    When it comes to extending citizenship to some groups, why might ruling political elites say neither “yes” nor “no,” but “wait”? The dominant theories of citizenship tend to recognize clear distinctions between citizens and aliens; either one has citizenship or one does not. In this presentation, Dr. Lori will discuss her recent book that explains how and why some minorities are neither fully included nor simply expelled by a state. Instead, they can be suspended in limbo – residing in a territory for extended periods without ever accruing any citizenship rights. This in-depth case study of the United Arab Emirates uses new archival sources and extensive interviews to show how temporary residency can be transformed into a permanent legal status, through visa renewals and the postponement of naturalization cases. In the UAE, temporary residency was also codified into a formal citizenship status through the outsourcing of passports from the Union of Comoros, allowing elites to effectively reclassify minorities into foreign residents.

    Noora Lori is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University. Her book, Offshore Citizens: Permanent “Temporary” Status in the Gulf (Cambridge University Press 2019) received the best book prize from the Migration and Citizenship section of the American Political Science Association (2020) and the Distinguished Book Award from the Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Migration Studies section of the International Studies Association (2021). She has published in the International Journal of Middle East Studies (forthcoming), Perspectives on Politics (forthcoming), Journal of Global Security Studies, Oxford Handbook on Citizenship, The Shifting Border, the Asian and Pacific Migration Journal, the Journal of Politics & Society among other journals and edited volumes. Her work has been funded by the ACLS/Mellon foundation, Ziet-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius, the Hariri Institute for Computing and Computer Engineering (BU), the Initiative on Cities (BU) (2016; 2019), as well as other grants. She is the Founding Director of the Pardee School Initiative on Forced Migration and Human Trafficking, which she co-directs with Professor Kaija Schilde. At BU, she received the Gitner Family Prize for Faculty Excellence (2014) and the CAS Templeton Award for Excellence in Student Advising (2015). She was previously an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, a fellow at the International Security Program of the Harvard Kennedy School, and a visiting scholar at the Dubai School of Government. She received her PhD in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University’s (2013) and her dissertation received the Best Dissertation Award from the Migration and Citizenship Section of the American Political Science Association in 2014.


    Speakers

    Noora Lori
    Assistant Professor of International Relations, Pardee School, Boston University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 21st THE INFILTRATORS Screening with Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 21, 20215:30PM - 8:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of the United States for a screening of the 2019 drama, THE INFILTRATORS, followed by a Q&A with the film’s directors, Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera.

    Speaker Bios:
    Cristina Ibarra is a Sundance award-winning filmmaker with a 20-year storytelling practice rooted in her border-crossing homeland along the Texas-Mexico border. The Infiltrators is a docu-thriller about undocumented activists who go undercover inside a detention center to help set free those inside. It’s currently being distributed by Oscilloscope. It won the Audience and the Innovator Award in the NEXT section at the Sundance Film Festival in 2019, among other notable festival awards. The New York Times calls her previous award-winning documentary, Las Marthas, about wealthy South Texas border debutantes who honor George Washington in Laredo, Texas “a striking alternative portrait of border life”. It premiered on PBS’s Independent Lens in 2014 and is distributed by Women Make Movies. The Last Conquistador, a documentary about the racially conflicted construction of a monument to a conquistador in El Paso, Texas, was broadcast on POV in 2008. USA Today describes it as “Heroic”. Her award-winning directorial debut, Dirty Laundry: A Homemade Telenovela, was broadcast on PBS in 2001.

    Alex Rivera is a filmmaker who has been telling new, urgent, and visually adventurous Latino stories for more than twenty years. His first feature film, Sleep Dealer, won multiple awards at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival and the Berlin International Film Festival. Rivera’s second feature film, a documentary/scripted hybrid, The Infiltrators, won both the Audience Award and the Innovators Award in the NEXT section of the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, Best Documentary Feature at the Blackstar Film Festival, and is currently being developed as a scripted series by Blumhouse Television.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States

    Cristina Ibarra
    Speaker
    Film Director

    Alex Rivera
    Speaker
    Film Director



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 22nd A Balkan Journey: Photos by Chris Leslie with Comments by John McDougall

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 22, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMExternal Event, Zoom webinar
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    Description

    This event takes us on a photographic journey through the towns and cities of post-conflict former Yugoslavia in this extensive look inside Chris’s previously unseen 24-year archive from the region. John McDougall examines the wider implications of the war alongside the ripples which are still felt today both in the Balkans and internationally.

    More information on the book:
    www.balkanjourney.com/the-book/

    Chris Leslie is a BAFTA Scotland new talent award-winning photographer and filmmaker producing long-term multimedia documentary projects. Disappearing Glasgow was first published in 2016, documenting his home city of Glasgow and documented the stories of the people on the frontline of demolition and regeneration through films, a book and multimedia. His latest project, A Balkan Journey, is a visual arts project in the form of a book, website and exhibition of a photographic journey through the towns and cities of post-conflict former Yugoslavia in this extensive and previously unseen 24-year archive from the region.

    www.balkanjourney.com
    www.chrisleslie.com

    John McDougall is a writer, photographer & curator based in Glasgow (Scotland) with an interest in the intersections between photography, politics & performance and how the collaborative nature of artistic and creative endeavour can offer pathways and resolutions through difficult times.Past projects have included Milk Shots, Six Foot Photo Month & 2014Frames. Since 2016 John has written for various publications & outlets including Studies in Photography, photomonitor.co.uk, Streetlevel Photoworks, Vu Centre for Photography and Scottish Contemporary Art Network.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 22nd Exhibition Transformation EAST. Lives in Transition

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 22, 202112:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *Click the registration button above for full details on this event.*

    Exhibition Transformation EAST. Lives in Transition
    Virtual Tour and Panel Discussion on January 22, 2021

    The IRTG Diversity together with the Centre canadien d’études allemandes et europénnes and the German Consulate General in Montréal present, in collaboration with colleagues from the worldwide network of DAAD-sponsored Centers for German and European Studies, the exhibition Transformation EAST. Lives in Transition as a virtual tour followed by a panel discussion on Facebook Live (link tba) on January 22, 2021 at:

    6pm MET (Strasbourg)
    12pm EST (Montréal)
    11am CET (Minnesota, Wisconsin)
    9am PST (Victoria)

    This online event features a virtual visit of the exhibition guided by Laurence McFalls (Département de science politique, Université de Montréal) with commentary by

    Alexander Reisenbichler Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES) Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Matthias Rothe (German, Nordic, Slavic & Dutch) College of Liberal Arts, University of Minnesota

    Jay Rowell Centre interdisciplinaire d’études et de recherches sur l’Allemagne (CIERA) CNRS, Université de Strasbourg

    Beate Schmidtke (EUCA-Net: European Studies in Canada) Centre for Global Studies, University of Victoria

    Marc Silberman (German, Nordic, and Slavic+) University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Transformation EAST. Lives in Transition addresses the expectations, trust, and fears that East Germans associated with the reunification process through images and texts. It recalls the solidarity between Germans and their willingness to help each other as well as their tensions and misunderstandings. The exhibition tells of new beginnings and awakenings, as well as of the desire to reappraise the SED dictatorship. It also documents the despair that went hand in hand with economic collapse and the rise in unemployment, as well as the experiences of loss and fears that characterized the 1990s in former East Germany. Subjects explored include the simultaneous renovation and demolition of towns and cities in the east of Germany, the situation of women and families, and a youth culture torn between techno, punk and right-wing extremism. Themes range from resentments to political violence, the question of who has the right to shape national identity, relations with Eastern neighbours, the development of the former East and its successes as well as new social divides that have arisen in recent years.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 22nd Diaspora, Nation, and Other Fantastic Interpretations of the 1821 Greek Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 22, 20212:00PM - 3:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Diaspora and nation are two of the most appealing and enduring notions used to explain the Greek Revolution of 1821. How accurately do they depict the events that shook the Ottoman Empire and mobilized people around the world to support the Greek cause? The talk will suggest two ways to approach empirically the foundational event of Greek history: a) the crucial international context in Europe and beyond; b) the divisions and conflicts among the revolutionaries that nearly lost the war. Both interpretations allow for a more extrovert and historically accurate understanding of the revolution.

    Sakis Gekas is Associate Professor and Hellenic Heritage Foundation Chair of Modern Greek History and Hellenic Studies at York University. He has published on the history of the Ionian Islands and on aspects of Greek and Mediterranean economic and social history. His book, “Xenocracy. State, Class, and Colonialism in the Ionian Islands, 1815-1864,” was published by Berghahn Books in 2017.


    Speakers

    Prof. Sakis Gekas
    Speaker
    Associate Professor and Hellenic Heritage Foundation Chair of Modern Greek History and Hellenic Studies, York University

    Prof. Phil Triadafilopoulos
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 22nd Sticky Activism: The Gangnam Station Murder Case and New Feminist Practices Against Misogyny and Femicide

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 22, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University and the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at the University of Toronto are inviting you to the presentation by Dr. Jinsook Kim (University of Pennsylvania) on January 22, 2021 (Friday), 3 to 4:30 pm (EST).

    This talk examines the convergence of online and offline political action in the form of “sticky note activism” following the 2016 Gangnam Station murder in South Korea, which involved the posting of hand-written sticky notes in public spaces and the dissemination of images of them through digital media. Based on the analysis of the sticky notes and social media posts with the hashtag #survived and the interviews with participants in the activism associated with the murder case, Dr. Kim argues that, as an alternative feminist media practice, sticky note activism has played a crucial role in forming affective counterpublics. In particular, this talk shows how sticky note activism facilitated the mobilization of women’s affect, including grief, rage, fear, and guilt, disrupted and challenged the dominant narratives about the killing, and provided an alternative discourse of femicide. This activism added to a broader context about the politicization of women’s everyday discrimination and safety and the collective articulation of feminist voices and practices challenging misogyny in South Korea.

    Dr. Jinsook Kim earned her Ph.D. in Media Studies from the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include digital media, online hate culture, and social and political activism in the context of South Korea. She is currently working on her first book project, tentatively titled Sticky Activism: Online Misogyny and Feminist Anti-Hate Activism in South Korea. Her work on topics in global digital media culture ranging from feminist activism to sports and nationalism has appeared in the peer-reviewed journals, Feminist Media Studies, Communication, Culture & Critique, and Communication and Sport. https://www.asc.upenn.edu/people/faculty/jinsook-kim-phd

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto) and is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean studies, and the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca || https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    Jinsook Kim
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania


    Sponsors

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University

    Academy of Korean Studies

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 25th Panel discussion: The Palestinian Refugee Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 25, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Palestinian refugee situation, which emerged from events surrounding the State of Israel’s birth over seventy years ago, remains one of the largest and most protracted refugee crises of the post-Second World War era. The Global Migration Lab (GML) Student Research Initiative will hold a panel discussion featuring authors Francesca Albanese and Dr. Lex Takkenberg to mark the publication of the second edition of their book, Palestinian Refugees in International Law.

    The discussion will address some background of the crisis and the status of the refugees today, the role of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), the nature of Western governments’ involvement, and finally, potential durable solutions to the crisis.

    Speakers also include Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, a medical doctor and U of T faculty member who was born and raised in the Jabalia Refugee Camp, as well as Karen AbuZayd, the former Commissioner-General of UNRWA. Dr. Emily Scott (GML research associate; postdoctoral researcher, McGill University) will serve as moderator.

    Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish is a Palestinian Canadian physician and an internationally recognized human rights and inspirational peace activist. Dr. Abuelaish has been nominated five times for the Nobel Peace Prize, and he is fondly known as Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi and the “Martin Luther King of the Middle East”. Dr. Abuelaish’ s book, I Shall Not Hate: A Gaza Doctor’s Journey on the Road to Peace and Human Dignity, an autobiography of his loss and transformation, has achieved worldwide critical acclaim. Published in 2010, (currently in 23 different languages). Currently, Dr. Abuelaish lives in Toronto where he is Full Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto

    Karen AbuZayd served as Commissioner-General for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) from 2005 to 2010 and as Deputy Commissioner-General of UNRWA from 2000 to 2005. Abu Zayd is currently a Commissioner for the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Syria, mandated by the United Nations Human Rights Council in 2011. Karen AbuZayd also wrote the foreword to the recently published second edition of the book, Palestinian Refugees in International Law.

    Francesca P. Albanese is a Research Affiliate for the Study of International Migration (ISIM), Georgetown University and Visiting Scholar, at the Issam Fares Institute for Public Studies Policies and International Affairs, American University of Beirut. She is an international lawyer specialized in human rights and refugee issues in the Arab world. She has 15 years of professional experience, working with the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, European Union (electoral assistance), UN Development Programme, and NGOs (protection, human rights). Albanese received her LL.B (Hons.) at Pisa University, and her LL.M (Human Rights) at SOAS University.

    Dr. Emily Scott is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Centre for International Peace and Security at McGill University. She is Research Associate of the Global Migration Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and member of the McGill Refugee Research Group. She studies international relations and comparative politics, with a focus on humanitarianism, conflict and security, health, and migration. Dr. Scott has worked for organizations like CIDA’s Afghanistan Task Force, the UNDP in East Jerusalem and the West Bank, the Carter Center in South Sudan, and Doctors Without Borders.

    Dr. Lex Takkenberg has worked with UNRWA, the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, from 1989 until late 2019 and is currently a freelance lecturer and consultant. He is the former Chief of the UNRWA Ethics Office. Prior to that, he held positions including UNRWA’s General Counsel, (agency-wide) Director of Operations, and (Deputy) Field Director in Gaza and Syria. Before joining UNRWA, he was the Legal Officer of the Dutch Refugee Council for six years. A law graduate from the University of Amsterdam, he obtained a Doctorate in International Law from the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 25th Insurrection and Accountability in the United States: What just happened? And what happens next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 25, 20213:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The presidency of Donald J. Trump ended as strangely as it began. His scandal-wracked tenure culminated in the shocking siege of the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. A week later, he became the first U.S. president in history to be impeached twice, this time for incitement of insurrection. As unprecedented as it seems, this is hardly the first episode of extremist violence in American history. Concerns about worsening polarization and further far-right violence continue to mount. Once a model for the world, many now question whether America’s democratic experiment will survive intact.

    This panel gathers together scholars and practitioners from the University of Toronto to discuss these momentous events. How did the world’s most powerful security forces fail to prevent a domestic insurrection? How should we understand far-right extremism and political violence in the United States? And how will Americans balance competing calls for security, accountability, justice, and reconciliation?


    Speakers

    Carmen Cheung
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Executive Director of the Center for Justice and Accountability

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Assistant Professor, Digital Media and Global Affairs Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Alexandra Rahr
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer in American Studies, Centre for the Study of the United States at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Kent Roach
    Professor & Prichard Wilson Chair in Law and Public Policy, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 28th – Friday, January 29th Global Careers Through Asia Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 28, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
    Friday, January 29, 202110:00AM - 11:45AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    * This conference is for STUDENTS ONLY and is open to all U of T undergraduate and graduate students. *

    Organized by the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) and Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, the conference brings together students, faculty, alumni and industry professionals to share personal career journeys and industry trends. This year’s online conference offers speakers the opportunity to reflect on how the pandemic and other large-scale global forces have impacted their field of work.

    Upon registering for the Global Careers through Asia Conference you will receive the webinar link for Day 1 and/or Day 2 three days before the conference start date. If you sign up to attend both days of the conference, you will receive both links.

    DAY 1 | January 28, 2021 | 10 :00 am – 11 :30 am

    The first day of the conference features opening remarks from the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union and Professor Rachel Silvey (Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute). The Public Sector and Academia industry panel includes presentations and an interactive Q&A session featuring:

    – Hanae Hanzawa – Human Rights Officer, United Nations Human Rights (OHCHR)
    – Evan Wiseman – Climate Policy Manager, The Atmospheric Fund (TAF)
    – Dr. Yao (Adam) Liu – Assistant Professor at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore
    – Dr. Joseph McQuade – Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    DAY 2 | January 29, 2021 | 10:00 am – 11 :45 am

    The second day of the conference features opening remarks by Professor Francis Cody (Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies) and a Business, Arts & Media industry panel with presentations and an interactive Q&A session featuring:

    – Anastasia Belashov – International Travel Trade Manager, Niagara Falls Tourism
    – Jay Qin – Principal at Sard Verbinnen & Co
    – Atif Khan – Program Manager, Coordinator at Reel Asian International Film Festival

    * Follow the link below (bottom of the page) to view the full program or copy/paste the following link in your web browser address bar: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/files/2021/01/Global-Careers-program-2021.pdf

    ____________________________

    HANAE HANZAWA is a Human Rights Officer at the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Hanae graduated with an MA in Women and Gender Studies and Collaborative Program in Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto and is currently working at the Regional Office for South-East Asia of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Bangkok, Thailand. Hanae’s previous experiences include working at various NPOs, the Asia-Europe Foundation, and UNICEF in Canada, Singapore, and Cambodia in the areas of human rights mainstreaming, child protection, torture prevention, HIV/AIDS, and mental health and addiction.

    EVAN WISEMAN is a Climate Policy Manager of The Atmospheric Fund (TAF). Evan leads TAF’s policy and advocacy work. He has worked for elected officials provincially and federally, and for a government relations firm in Ottawa. Outside of the world of politics, Evan has worked for the Ontario Centres of Excellence supporting its innovation agenda, and as a researcher at the University of Toronto. Evan holds a Master’s degree in History with the Collaborative Program in Asia-Pacific Studies from the Asian Institute, as well as an Honours Bachelor of Arts in History and Political Science from the University of Toronto.

    DR. ADAM LIU is an Assistant Professor at Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. Adam Liu is a political scientist trained at Stanford University, though he doesn’t believe in disciplinary and methodological boundaries. Three broad questions intrigue him at the moment: The political foundations of markets in autocracies; the economic effects of political tensions between nations; and the spatial organization of coercive institutions in autocracies. His dissertation, “Building Markets within Authoritarian Institutions: The Political Economy of Banking Development in China,” won the 2020 BRICS Economic Research Award.

    DR. JOSEPH MCQUADE is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada and Digital Content Manager for the Munk School’s Belt and Road in Global Perspective research initiative. Dr. McQuade is affiliated with the Queen’s University Global History Initiative and with the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, and is a Managing Editor of the Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies.

    JAY QIN is a Principal at Sard Verbinnen & Co. Prior to joining Sard Verbinnen & Co, Jay was a transactional lawyer with two leading UK international law firms. In his near-decade of legal experience, Jay has advised a variety of clients, including those in the technology, venture capital, private equity, retail, and manufacturing sectors. Jay graduated with honours from the University of Toronto with a Bachelor’s in Economics, and a Master’s in East Asian Studies with the Collaborative Program Asia-Pacific Studies at the Munk School’s Asian Institute. He also holds a Juris Doctor and Postgraduate Certificate in Laws from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

    ANASTASIA BELASHOV is an International Travel Trade Manager at Niagara Falls Tourism. Anastasia’s academic training includes a bachelor’s degree in Asia Pacific Studies, Tel Aviv University (Israel), a Master’s degree in Asia Pacific Studies; Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; two years of Research Study at the Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University; and a Certificate in Tourism and Environment at Brock University. Anastasia’s work at Niagara Falls Tourism involves promotion and marketing of Niagara’s attractions, hotels, restaurants, venues, and other assets to international inbound markets through travel trade channels.

    ATIF KHAN is a Graduate Student at the University of Toronto, an Interdisciplinary Artist and a Program Manager at the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival. Atif Khan is a researcher, writer, and artist exploring text, image, and curatorial practice. His research-driven practice intersects key themes of war, surveillance, human death, and visual studies. Broadly, he thinks through how the word “violence” is assembled and given power in the material world by connecting objects, language, words, meaning, and a specific set of archives. Khan’s current research investigates militarized drone system operations across the United States, Somalia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. He is completing an MA in Human Geography and South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 28th Pandemic Politics: How COVID-19 affected the 2020 US Presidential Election

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 28, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online
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    Description

    In this talk, Professor Vavreck will shed light on the dynamics of the 2020 US presidential election, with a particular focus on the role of COVID-19, how it affected most Americans’ lives, how attitudes about mitigation strategies were politicized by elites, and how it might have affected the outcome of the election.

    Lynn Vavreck is the Marvin Hoffenberg Professor of American Politics and Public Policy at UCLA, a contributing columnist to The Upshot at The New York Times, and a recipient of the Andrew F. Carnegie Prize in the Humanities and Social Sciences. She is the author of five books, including the “most ominous” book on the 2016 election: Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and the Battle for the Meaning of America, and The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Presidential Election, described as the “definitive account” of the 2012 election. Political consultants on both sides of the aisle refer to her work on political messaging in The Message Matters as “required reading” for presidential candidates. Her 2020 election project, NATIONSCAPE, is the largest study of presidential elections ever fielded in the United States. Interviewing more than 6,000 people a week, NATIONSCAPE will complete 500,000 interviews before the inauguration in 2021. At UCLA she teaches courses on campaigns, elections, public opinion, and the 1960s. Professor Vavreck holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Rochester and held previous appointments at Princeton University, Dartmouth College, and The White House. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, she remains a loyal Browns fan and is a “known equestrian” – to draw on a phrase from the 2012 presidential campaign.


    Speakers

    Lynn Vavreck
    Speaker
    Marvin Hoffenberg Professor of American Politics and Public Policy at UCLA

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of PEARL, Professor in the Department of Political Science & Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 28th THE POLITICAL LIFE OF ARCHITECTURE: Soft Power and Politics in the Adaptive Reuse of Tbilisi’s Institute of Marx, Engels, and Lenin Building

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 28, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMExternal Event, Zoom webinar
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    Series

    Eurasia Initiative

    Description

    In 1938, the Soviet Georgian administration inaugurated the iconic Institute of Marx, Engels, and Lenin (IMEL) in Tbilisi, Georgia under pretenses of socialist unity and friendship among Soviet nations. Three quarters of a century later, the same building—now privatized, heavily renovated, and re-branded—was re-inaugurated as the seven-star Biltmore Hotel. The hotel’s inauguration included a video projected at enormous scale onto the western façade of the building, telling the story of a new friendship among nations—now between the Republic of Georgia and the United Arab Emirates as the hotel’s financiers.

    In this first talk on the political life of architecture, Suzanne Harris-Brandts tracks the shifting symbolism associated with the building’s adaptive reuse. She discusses the social, political, and economic implications that surround the continued use of friendship rhetoric in politics and architecture in Tbilisi, done to normalize foreign initiatives, and discusses the larger implications for urban development. In doing so, she charts the manipulation of architecture to communicate the power of its patrons.

    The work draws from fieldwork conducted alongside colleague Dr. David Sichinava of Tbilisi State University, including site observations, media analysis, personal interviews, and focus groups. It break down how the IMEL building/Biltmore Hotel served as a medium for soft power and politics and shows how, rather than an outmoded means of public service announcement, symbolic architecture continues to be a crucial arena for political legitimacy in the city.

    Dr. Suzanne Harris-Brandts is an Assistant Professor in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, and a faculty associate with the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at Carleton University. Her research brings together design and the social sciences to explore issues of power, equity, and collective identity in the built environment. Suzanne’s current book project, entitled Constructing the Capital, draws from her dissertation uncovering the politics of urban development and image making in Eurasian capital cities. It examines city building campaigns in part-democratic/ part-authoritarian hybrid regimes, foregrounding the cases of Tbilisi, Georgia and Skopje, North Macedonia. The work demonstrates how architecture and urban design are manipulated for power retention in such regimes, while also highlighting bottom-up, community-based strategies to resist these actions. Suzanne received her PhD in Urban Studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a licenced architect in Ontario and co-founder of Collective Domain, a design-research practice for spatial analysis, urban activism, architecture, and media in the public interest.


    Speakers

    Dr. Suzanne Harris-Brandts
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Carleton University, School of Architecture + Urbanism

    Prof. Robert Austin
    Moderator
    CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 28th La nuit des idées - Alliance Française

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 28, 20217:00PM - 12:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *For full details, please click the registration button above to visit the Alliance Française’s website.*

    With the French General Consulate in Toronto and the Institut Français.

    Bilingual – From 7 p.m. to midnight (ET)

    To start off 2021 on a good note, we’re thrilled to invite you to the sixth edition of the Night of Ideas, annual meeting dedicated to the free flow of ideas and knowledge.

    TORONTO – We Art Closer

    How can ideas, science and the arts bring us closer together in a time of great isolation? How, in the face of the rise of individualisms and nationalisms, of the atomization of community solidarities, of a violent history, an anxiety-provoking present and an uncertain future, dialogue between people, between genders, between cultures, diffuse tensions, to bring down the walls erected on the fault lines, to repair damaged relationships, to create new ones? In the light of the notion of “rapprochement (s)”, the night of ideas in Toronto will offer a series of discussions between Canada and France, artistic performances, readings and screenings online from 7 pm onwards.

    Guests : John Ralston Saul, essayist and philosopher; Wanda Nanibush, Head of Indigenous Collections, Art Gallery of Ontario; Lou Ann Neel, Head of Indigenous Collections and Repatriation Department, Royal BC museum; Kim Thùy, award-winning author; Clément Baloup, comic book writer; Gail Lord, President & Co-Founder, Lord Cultural Resources; Binkady-Emmanuel Hié, Association pour le rayonnement de l’Opéra de Paris; Gaetane Verna, Director of the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery; Emelie Chhangur, Director and Curator of the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University; Karen Carter, Director of the MacLaren Art Centre ; Dalkhafine, visual artist; Hologramme, producer and composer; Marshall Pynkoski and Jeannette Lajeunesse, artistic directors of Opéra atelier; Benoît Dratwicki, artistic director of Centre de Musique Baroque de Versailles; Douglas Eacho, Assistant Professor at the Centre for Drama, Theatre, and Performance Studies, University of Toronto; Liz Santoro, american choreographer and dancer and Pierre Godard, scientist, founders of Le Principe d’Incertitude Dance company.

    How to watch The Night of Ideas?

    1/ RSVP right here.

    2/ Get all the videos the day before the event.

    3/ Get cozy and enjoy the conversations!

    The Night of Ideas’ schedule:

    1PM: Conversation on the restitution of indigenous cultural works with John Ralston Saul

    7PM: CLOSER WITH... LITERATURE – Cultural legacy with Kim Thùy & Clément Baloup

    8PM: CLOSER WITH... DIVERSITY – Diversity in arts with Gail Lord, Emelie Chhagur, Karen Carter & Gaetane Verna

    9PM: CLOSER WITH... STREET ART – Street art with Dalkhafine & Hologramme (w/ Mural Festival)

    10PM: CLOSER WITH... OPERA – Remote artistic creation with Opera Atelier

    11PM: CLOSER WITH... SCIENCE & DANCE – Dance & Science with the dance company Le Principed I’ncertitude

    Featuring program (live at 9pm) : Closer with cinema – Philosophy Meetup Club Toronto

    Podcast Alliance Française Canada – Regards sur la nuit des idées.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 29th The Prague Art Scene: Local Heroes and Big Dreamers

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 29, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMExternal Event, Online
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    Series

    CERES "Making and Remaking Central Europe" Series

    Description

    In my presentation I will deal with the Czech art scene, in particular that of Prague. I will try to capture the artistic operations in full, from established institutions with a long history, to places that are still looking for their place, to those that are no longer on the art map today. Some people miss this last group whereas others do not care.

    By “art,” I refer to that which is not intended to be useful in the form of decoration and is not just a filling of the free time of its potential recipients. For me, art is not a leisure activity used to entertain its creators and spectators. At the same time, though, it is not an illustration of a political or social situation.

    Prague is not Berlin and will never be. However, it has its specific features, local heroes, and big dreams. Let me tell you how some of them become reality.

    David Kořínek (*1970) is an artist and theorist of visual culture.

    David received his master’s degree in film science and aesthetics at Masaryk University in Brno (MUNI), Czech Republic. He worked as a producer for the public service broadcaster, Czech Television.

    He is the founder of the Digital Media Department of Media Studies at MUNI and has led the Media Lab there. With Federico Díaz, he co-founded the Supermedia Studio at the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague in 2008.

    Since 2019 he has been the head of the Center for Audiovisual Studies at the Film and Television Faculty of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague. He is also an associate professor there.

    He has been a member of artistic group Rafani since 2007 and has had exhibitions in many European galleries and institutions. For their feature-length documentary debut, “31 Endings / 31 Beginnings,” Rafani received a Special Award at the Jihlava International Documentary Film Festival in 2011.

    Rafani has been nominated for Person of the Year in the field of Czech art several times. They have received this award twice.

    David Kořínek deals with the theory of the moving image in the context of visual arts and has written about this topic for several international anthologies.

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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February 2021

  • Tuesday, February 2nd Policy in Place: Models for Federal-Provincial-Municipal Collaboration

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 2, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the importance of cities as partners in implementing and enforcing national and provincial policies, programs, and services. How can federal-provincial-municipal collaboration be improved? What models exist for all three orders government to come together and address shared policy challenges?

    On February 2, Dr. Neil Bradford will address these questions by revisiting Canada’s history of successful tri-level agreements between federal, provincial, and municipal governments on issues from homelessness to economic development and infrastructure. Working from his recent IMFG paper, Dr. Bradford will show how these agreements offer a model for a more collaborative form of policymaking that includes all orders of government, including municipalities, and communities.

    Neil Bradford is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Governance, Leadership, and Ethics program at Huron University College at Western. His research focuses on place-based public policy and multi-level governance, and has been published in journals such as Urban Affairs Review, the Canadian Journal of Political Science, and the Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society. He is also the author of multiple reports on urban and regional development and intergovernmental relations for Canadian and international research institutes, including the Institute for Research on Public Policy, the Canadian Urban Institute, and the OECD.

    Kofi Hope is a Rhodes Scholar and has a Doctorate in Politics from Oxford University. He is the Senior Policy Advisor at the Wellesley Institute and the co-founder of Monumental, a new start-up focused on supporting organizations work towards an equitable recovery from COVID-19. He is an emeritus Bousfield Scholar and current adjunct professor at UofT’s School of Urban Planning. He was founder and former Executive Director of the CEE Centre for Young Black Professionals. In 2017 he was winner of the Jane Jacobs Prize and in 2018 a Rising Star in Toronto Life’s Power List.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Neil Bradford
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Governance, Leadership, and Ethics program at Huron University College at Western

    Kofi Hope
    Moderator
    Rhodes Scholar and has a Doctorate in Politics from Oxford University, Adjunct professor at UofT’s School of Urban Planning



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 3rd Colonizing Language: Cultural Production and Language Politics in Modern Japan and Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 3, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join this virtual event via Zoom: https://utoronto.zoom.us/j/86914380300
    Meeting ID: 869 1438 0300
    Passcode: 464253

    With the launch of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937, Japan’s colonies saw the full-scale launch of kōminka (imperialization) policies designed to turn the colonized into loyal subjects of the emperor. In this book talk, Christina Yi will explore the central role kokugo (national language) ideology played in the articulation and promotion of imperial identity during the latter years of Japan’s colonial rule, exploring how and why “Korean” literature was repositioned within a larger Japanese language canon. Although it is often understood that the kōminka movement introduced a new paradigm of the “imperial subject,” who might be included in this category varied according to class, gender, ethnicity, and place.

    This presentation will elaborate on this point through a close comparative analysis of Kim Sŏngmin’s 1936 novella Hantō no geijutsukatachi (Artists of the Peninsula) and its 1941 film adaptation Hantō no haru (Spring on the Peninsula; dir. Yi Pyŏng-il).

    CHRISTINA YI is Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Literature at the University of British Columbia. She is a specialist of modern Japanese-language literature and culture, with a particular focus on issues of postcoloniality, language ideology, genre, and cultural studies. Her first monograph, Colonizing Language: Cultural Production and Language Politics in Modern Japan and Korea, was published by Columbia University Press in 2018. She was also the co-editor for a special feature on zainichi (resident) Korean literature and film for Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture 12 (2019).


    Speakers

    Christina Yi
    Asian Studies, University of British Columbia


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Department of East Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 4th Learning to be Loyal: Ideology and Patriotic Education in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 4, 20213:30PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    How do governments cultivate loyal citizens? Leading China experts present their latest research on patriotic education in China and ideology.

    KARRIE J. KOESEL is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame where she specializes in the study of contemporary Chinese and Russian politics, authoritarianism, and religion and politics. She is the author of Religion and Authoritarianism: Cooperation, Conflict and the Consequences (Cambridge University Press, 2014) and co-editor of Citizens & the State in Authoritarian Regimes: Comparing China and Russia (Oxford University Press, 2020). She is currently working on a book manuscript, Learning to Be Loyal: Patriotic Education in Authoritarian Regimes that explores how authoritarian leaders cultivate popular legitimacy and loyalty among young people; how they socialize citizens and the future elite to be patriotic and supportive; and whether these strategies free autocrats from the need to rely so heavily on coercion to stay in power.

    RORY TRUEX is an Assistant Professor in Princeton’s Department of Politics and Princeton’s School of Public and International Affairs. His research focuses on Chinese politics and theories of authoritarian rule. His book Making Autocracy Work: Representation and Responsiveness in Modern China investigates the nature of representation in authoritarian systems, specifically the politics surrounding China’s National People’s Congress (NPC). He argues that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is engineering a system of “representation within bounds” in the NPC, fostering information revelation but silencing political activism. Original data on deputy backgrounds and behaviors is used to explore the nature of representation, policymaking, and incentives in this constrained system. He is currently working on a new set of projects on repression, human rights, and dissent in contemporary China. His research has been published in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Comparative Political Studies, China Quarterly, among other journals.

    YINGYI MA is an Associate Professor of Sociology and the Provost Faculty Fellow on internationalization at Syracuse University. In 2019, she was selected as a Public Intellectual Fellow at the National Committee on US-China Relations. Professor Ma is a sociologist of education and migration. She has published extensively in the areas of education stratification, international student mobility and higher education in China. Her new book, Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education, is published by Columbia University Press in Feb 2020, and has since been featured in various national and international media outlets such as Washington Post and Times Higher Education. She got her PhD in sociology from Johns Hopkins University in 2007.


    Speakers

    Karrie J. Koesel
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Notre Dame

    Rory Truex
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University

    Yingyi Ma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Director of Asian/Asian American Studies, Syracuse University

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 4th Racial Borders

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 4, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    Tendayi Achiume is Professor of Law at the at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law, and a research associate of the African Center for Migration and Society at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa. She is also the UN Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, and is the first woman to serve in this role since its creation in 1994. The current focus of her scholarship is the global governance of racism and xenophobia; and the legal and ethical implications of colonialism for contemporary international migration. In 2016, she co-chaired the Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law. She is also a recipient of the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award—the highest university-wide honor for excellence in teaching. Her publications include: Migration as Decolonization, Stanford Law Review; Governing Xenophobia, Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law; Syria, Cost-Sharing and the Responsibility to Protect Refugees, Minnesota Law Review; and Beyond Prejudice: Structural Xenophobic Discrimination Against Refugees, Georgetown Journal of International Law.


    Speakers

    E. Tendayi Achiume
    Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law / UN Special Rapporteur on contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance


    Main Sponsor

    Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Women & Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 5th Snakes and Ladders: Censorship in Czech and Hungarian State-Socialist Academic Publishing

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 5, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Zoom webinar
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    Series

    Making and Remaking Central Europe Lecture Series

    Description

    This presentation of a book project draws on the previous research on censorship in the Eastern bloc, but advances the discussion and the theory of state-socialist censorship by 1. re-focusing the inquiry from literature to social sciences and humanities; 2. attempting a more complex treatment of writing and publishing under the conditions of censorship, by bringing together multiple actors and levels at which censorship was deployed; 3. striving for a nuanced account of repression, resistance, negotiation, and complicity. It looks at all stages of the writing process from the inception of an idea to post-publication reception and at the institutional and policy context surrounding this process. The agency and negotiations of the creative actors, rather than their instrumentalization by censoring repressions of the state institutions stand in the centre of this inquiry.

    Czechoslovakia and Hungary are the countries of investigation, but the project takes a broader perspective that includes the former Soviet Union and most other countries of East Central and Eastern Europe. Oral history interviews constitute the backbone of the project, complemented by contemporary science-policy documents and the archive of the Editorial Board of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences.

    Libora Oates-Indruchová obtained her PhD from Lancaster University, UK and a „habilitation“ in Literary and Cultural Studies from Szeged University, Hungary. She is Professor of Sociology of Gender at the University of Graz (A). Her research interests include cultural representations of gender, gender and social change, censorship, and narrative research, with a focus on state-socialist and post state-socialist Czech Republic. She recently published “Self-Censorship and Aesopian Language of Scholarly Texts of Late State Socialism” (The Slavonic and East European Review 96 [2018], 4: 614-641). Her book Censorship in Czech and Hungarian Academic Press, 1969-89: Snakes and Ladders was published by Bloomsbury Academic in 2020.


    Speakers

    Prof. Libora Oates-Indruchová
    Speaker
    University of Graz

    Prof. Barbara J. Falk
    Moderator
    CERES; Canadian Forces College



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 8th De *l’Histoire naturelle* de Buffon au *Regnum Animale* d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the End of the Old Regime

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 8, 20211:00PM - 3:00PMExternal Event, Zoom webinar
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    This event will be conducted partially in English and partially in French.

    Après un doctorat en médecine vétérinaire (DMV) obtenu en 1992 à l’Université de Montréal, Swann Paradis a exercé la médecine vétérinaire (animaux de compagnie) au Québec pendant plus de 15 ans, parallèlement à ses études littéraires. Ses champs d’intérêt incluent l’histoire naturelle au XVIIIe siècle (littérature, philosophie et sciences), de même que le « roman terrifiant » et le« Romantisme noir », la poésie québécoise et franco-ontarienne contemporaine et l’écriture poétique. Il prépare actuellement une monographie qui devrait paraître quelque part au XXIe siècle chez Hermann, dont le titre provisoire est : Le sixième sens de la taupe. Buffon dans la fabrique des quadrupèdes. Il travaille actuellement sur un projet de recherche ayant reçu l’appui d’une« Subvention Savoir » du CRSH (2016-2020), pour le projet intitulé : « De la ménagerie du Prince d’Orange au Jardin du Roi : Arnout Vosmaer (1720-1799) dans l’ombre de Buffon (1707-1788) ».

    At the beginning of his article on the Bengal Loris published in the 7th and last volume of the Supplément à l’Histoire naturelle in 1789, Buffon (1707-1788) offers a detailed description of an exotic species, based on a monograph written approximately twenty years earlier in 1770 by Aernout Vosmaer (1720-1799), who was the director of stathouder William V of Holland’s Cabinet of Natural History since 1756. Buffon, lacking access to a live or even stuffed specimen, had to rely on the description proposed by Vosmaer, who observed the live exotic animal in the Prince of Orange’s menagerie between 1770 and 1774 ; moreover, to support his harsh critic of how Vosmaer named this strange quadruped — The ‘‘Bengal Five-Toed Sloth’’, Buffon added a black & white copperplate — drawing from Jacques de Sève, engraving by Madeleine Rousselet (ou Veuve Tardieu) — a mirror copy of the coloured plate made from a pen and watercolour drawing by Aert Schouman, published alongside Vosmaer’s original monograph. As natural history was a hotbed of political rivalry, this anecdotic controversy is typical of many others between these two important centres of exotic animal specimens: the French and Dutch national menageries, based respectively in Versailles and Voorburg (a suburb of The Hague).

    À partir de cet exemple emblématique, nous voudrions exposer, au cours de cette présentation bilingue, comment la rivalité entre ces deux puissances coloniales en déclin a des résonances en amont et en aval dans la joute polémique qui se développe entre deux figures incontournables de la scène naturaliste périrévolutionnaire. Pour ce faire, à partir de certaines descriptions textuelles et iconographiques d’animaux exotiques, qui ont donné lieu à des échanges « musclés » entre le célèbre intendant du Jardin du Roi et son homologue néerlandais, beaucoup moins connu, il s’agira de déterminer si, par-delà les motivations nationalistes des protagonistes, ne se dégagerait pas aussi un certain « cosmopolitisme scientifique » propre à la République des Lettres, qui viendrait en quelque sorte réhabiliter la contribution néerlandaise, jusqu’ici plutôt occultée, dans l’histoire de l’histoire naturelle.


    Speakers

    Prof. Swann Paradis
    Université York – Collège Glendon



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 9th The Tenure of Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin (1977-1983): Lessons for History and International Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 9, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This lecture will summarize the significance of Prime Minister Menachem Begin for Israeli diplomatic history. It will offer insights regarding his relevance for studying international relations more broadly. The lecture will be aimed at beginners and non-specialists. Insights will be shared from the author’s dissertation and book, The Limits of a Grand Strategy Paradigm in International Relations: Lessons from Israeli History, 1977–1983.

    Dr. Ari Barbalat recently completed his PhD in International Relations from UCLA, graduating in June 2020. He volunteers for the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture and Project Abraham (with Toronto’s Yazidis community). He lives in Thornhill.


    Speakers

    Dr. Ari Barbalat
    PhD in International Relations from UCLA



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 10th Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #1: Munk One Labs

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 10, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Munk One challenges students to think about some of the world’s most intractable problems.

    Join us for this interactive session to learn about our small community in Canada’s largest university.

    We will talk about Munk One’s interdisciplinary curriculum, seminar discussions, and lab-based learning. You’ll also learn about our Dragons’ Den-style competition, and how you can turn your ideas into reality with funding for a pilot project!

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 11th Can Transparency and Accountability Improve National Essential Medicines Lists?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 11, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    This virtual seminar, presented by Dr. Nav Persaud asks, “Can transparency and accountability improve national essential medicines lists?”

    About this Event
    Essential medicines lists in more than 100 countries prioritize access to some treatments. But some withdrawn or banned medicines are included in national essential medicines lists. Information about why specific medicines are on national essential medicines lists and effective processes for removing medicines could help improve health.

    About Dr. Nav Persaud:
    He is the Canada Research Chair in Health Justice and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, and a family physician at St. Michael’s Hospital in Unity Health Toronto.

    Hosted by Dr. Jillian Kohler:
    Connaught Scholar, Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health & Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Director at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency & Accountability in the Pharmaceutical Sector


    Speakers

    Dr. Nav Persaud
    Canada Research Chair in Health Justice and Associate Professor, Temerty Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto

    Dr. Jillian Kohler
    Connaught Scholar; Professor, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Munk School; Director, WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency & Accountability in the Pharmaceutical Sector


    Main Sponsor

    External Booking


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 11th Depictions of Self and Other: What Do Autobiographical Comics Tell Us About Life in the US?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 11, 20213:30PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    In 2017, the Library of Congress Magazine released a special issue on its growing comic book collection that urges readers to “open a comic book” where one “can see America in the pages—its people, its values, its culture, how it’s changed.” This workshop will think historically and visually about the process of making comics and the autobiographical nature of this work. Starting with the Underground Comix movement in the late 60s and ending with the recent proliferation of Web Comics on platforms like Instagram, we will explore how the hand of the artist reveals to readers the idiosyncrasies and personal lived experiences of independent comic book creators in the United States. Turning to a handful of revealing case studies, we will reflect on the various aspects of an artist’s identity, embodied and intellectual, including race, gender, religion, class, and political perspectives. We will also think about the various communities in which these artists take part as citizens, critics, activists, and/or scholars. The goal of this workshop is to use autobiographical comics as a starting point for understanding individual lived experiences within the United States and how these narratives map onto or challenge broader frameworks of belonging, such as nationhood, capitalism, and political protest.

    Speaker Bio:
    Christina E. Pasqua is a PhD Candidate in the Department for the Study of Religion and the Book History and Print Culture Program. Her dissertation “Drawing Out the Word: Remediating the Bible through Comics” explores the role of the comic book in the larger history of the Bible’s translation into English in North America. At the intersection of cultural history and cultural anthropology, her visual and literary analysis of Bible comics focuses on the technical skill involved in producing these texts and pays particular attention to how genre conventions, marketing strategies, gender relations, and an artist’s individual style or biography inform the creation of these visual translations. Christina is also dedicated to putting visual theory into practice: for example, creating digital stories based on visual methods of ethnographic documentation (e.g., photography, videography, and photo essays), website building and graphic design on WordPress and Canva, and practicing watercolour painting and comic book making. This creative labour is connected to her growing interest in translating her research into arts-based media that better reflects how she herself is a visual learner, thinker, researcher, and educator.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Christina E. Pasqua
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate, Department for the Study of Religion and the Book History and Print Culture Program, University of Toronto

    Alexandra Rahr
    Moderator
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 12th Japan and Asia in the pandemic era: RCEP

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 12, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    In November, 2020, 15 countries comprising all of ASEAN plus Japan, China, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand decided to meet the economic challenge of the pandemic by signing the world’s largest regional trade agreement. What does the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership mean for Canada, for the new Biden Administration, and for leadership in Asia? The Centre for the Study of Global Japan is partnering with the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and UBC’s Centre for Japan Research to talk with international experts on the implications of RCEP.

    Guest Speakers:

    – Wendy Cutler, Vice President and Managing Director, Washington, D.C. Office, Asia Society Policy Institute

    Wendy Cutler is Vice President at the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) and the managing director of the Washington D.C. office. In these roles, she focuses on expanding ASPI’s presence in Washington and on leading initiatives that address challenges related to trade and investment, as well as women’s empowerment in Asia. She joined ASPI following an illustrious career of nearly three decades as a diplomat and negotiator in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), including serving as Acting Deputy U.S. Trade Representative. In that capacity, she worked on a range of U.S. trade negotiations and initiatives in Asia.

    – Shihoko Goto, Deputy Director for Geoeconomics and Senior Associate for Northeast Asia, Asia Program, Wilson Center

    Shihoko Goto is the Deputy Director for Geoeconomics and the Senior Northeast Asia Associate at the Wilson Center’s Asia Program. She is a leading expert on economics and politics in Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea, as well as U.S. policy in the region. A seasoned journalist and analyst, she spent ten years reporting from Tokyo and Washington for Dow Jones and UPI on the global economy, international trade, and Asian markets and politics. A contributing editor to The Globalist, Goto previously worked for the World Bank and has been awarded fellowships from the East-West Center and the Knight Foundation, among others.

    – Michael Plummer, Director, School of Advanced International Studies Europe, and Eni Professor of International Economics, Johns Hopkins University

    Professor Michael Plummer is Director of SAIS Europe since 2014 and the Eni Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins University, as well as a non-resident senior fellow at the East-West Center. He was Head of the Development Division of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2010-2012), a professor at Brandeis University (1992-2001) and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Asian Economics (2007-2015). He was president of the American Committee on Asian Economic Studies (ACAES) from 2008 until 2015. A former Fulbright Chair in Economics and Pew Fellow in International Affairs at Harvard University, he has been an Asian Development Bank distinguished lecturer on several occasions and team leader of projects for various organizations including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the United Nations, the ADB, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization. He has consulted many governments in the Asia-Pacific region and Europe on issues related to economic cooperation and is co-author/editor of over two-dozen books, and author of over 100 journal articles and book chapters.

    – Jeff Reeves, Vice-President of Research, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Dr. Jeffrey Reeves is Vice-President of Research for the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. Prior to joining APF Canada, Dr. Reeves was the Director of Asian Studies at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Dr. Reeves has over 15 years direct experience living and working in Asia, including as an Associate Professor with the Daniel K. Inouye Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies in the United States, as a Research Fellow with Griffith University in Australia, and as a University Instructor at Peking University in the People’s Republic of China. Dr. Reeves has worked with the United Nations Development Program and World Wildlife Foundation in Beijing and as a Research Assistant with the London School of Economics and Political Science’s (LSE) Asia Research Centre in London. Dr. Reeves served in the United States Peace Corps from 2001 to 2003 in Khovd, Mongolia.

    – Yves Tiberghien, Professor of Political Science, Director Emeritus of the Institute of Asian Research, and Co-Director of the Center for Japanese Research, University of British Columbia

    Yves Tiberghien (Ph.D. Stanford University, 2002; Harvard Academy Scholar 2006; Fulbright Scholar 1996) is a Professor of Political Science, Director Emeritus of the Institute of Asian Research, and Co-Director of the Center for Japanese Research. Yves is also Distinguished Fellow at the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada. His current research focuses on the ongoing transition in the global economic and environmental order. Latest book:Geopolitics in East Asia: Response to COVID-19 (forthcoming 2021).

    – Deanna Horton, Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto (moderator)

    As part of her Canadian foreign service career, Deanna Horton spent a total of twelve years in Japan, including as Deputy Head of Mission, and also served as Ambassador to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. She was a NAFTA negotiator and then spent seven years in Washington, most recently as Minister (Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs). As a Munk School Senior Fellow she has led a digital mapping project on Canada’s footprint in Asia https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/canasiafootprint/ and related research on technology multinationals. Ms. Horton is also a Distinguished Fellow at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and a Canadian Global Affairs Institute Fellow and she writes on economic and trade policy issues with a focus on Asia. She received a Diploma in International Studies from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies Bologna Center, a M.A. (International Affairs) from Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and a B.A. (Hons) from McGill University. She also spent two years studying Japanese at the U.S. State Department Foreign Service Institute in Yokohama, Japan.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Wendy Cutler
    Speaker
    Vice President and Managing Director, Washington, D.C. Office, Asia Society Policy Institute

    Shihoko Goto
    Speaker
    Deputy Director for Geoeconomics and Senior Associate for Northeast Asia, Asia Program, Wilson Center

    Michael Plummer
    Speaker
    Director, School of Advanced International Studies Europe, and Eni Professor of International Economics, Johns Hopkins University

    Jeff Reeves
    Speaker
    Vice-President of Research, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Yves Tiberghien
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science, Director Emeritus of the Institute of Asian Research, and Co-Director of the Center for Japanese Research, University of British Columbia

    Deanna Horton
    Moderator
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Japanese Research, University of British Columbia

    Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 16th EUROPEAN STUDIES STUDENT ASSOCIATION: 30th Anniversary of the Visegrád Group

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 16, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Zoom event
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    Series

    Making and Remaking Central Europe Series

    Description

    What is the Visegrád Group? What led to its creation? What are the characteristics of the member countries? How is the V4 relevant today?

    Join us for an engaging (virtual) conversation on the 30th anniversary of the establishment of Central Europe’s Visegrád Group (V4) with the Consul General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto, Krzysztof Grzelczyk, Professor Robert C. Austin, and Professor Tamara Trojanowska from the University of Toronto.

    This online discussion will delve into the political, cultural, and economic aspects of the Visegrád Group from its founding and the three decades that followed. Through ‘Canadian’ eyes, it assesses the successes and failures of the alliance, examines the interaction within and outside the alliance, explores the cultural dynamics of the four countries, and the future trajectory of the V4.

    This event is held in partnership between the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto and the European Studies Students’ Association at the University of Toronto.

    Sponsors

    European Studies Students' Association

    Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 17th Crimea since Occupation: Where Things Stand

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 17, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Zoom webinar
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    Description

    Participants:
    Gwendolyn Sasse, Director, Centre for East European and International Studies, Berlin. Author of The Crimea Question: Identity, Transition, and Conflict, Cambridge: Harvard University Press (2014)

    Max Sviezhentsev, Graduate of Western University (Dissertation “Phantom Limb’: Russian Settler Colonialism in the Post-Soviet Crimea (1991-1997)), part of CrimeaSOS newsteam

    Oleksandr Fisun, the Chair of the Department of Political Science at the V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University in Ukraine

    Victor Ostapchuk, Associate Professor of Ottoman and Turkish Studies, University of Toronto

    Moderator: Lucan Way, Professor of Political Science and Jacyk Program Co-Director, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 18th Virtual Launch of the 2020 Canada-United Kingdom Colloquium Report on Nuclear Energy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 18, 20218:00AM - 9:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Please join us as we launch the official report of the 2020 Canada-UK Colloquium on the Nuclear Agenda: Challenges & Opportunities, prepared by Ivan Semeniuk.

    Nuclear energy currently provides some 10% of the world’s electricity from about 440 power reactors. It is the world’s second largest source of low-carbon power (29% of the total in 2017), used by over 50 countries. As an important carbon-free source of power, and the only one offering large scale continuous generation, it has a key role to play in combating global climate change.

    Both Canada and the UK are committed to a transition to a low-carbon and low-pollution economy, which cannot be accomplished without proper consideration of the nuclear option. Both countries are Tier-1 nuclear nations, with a full spectrum of nuclear capabilities such as research reactors, power reactors, fuel manufacturing capabilities, R&D, etc. The nuclear facilities in Canada and the UK have been consistently ranked as among the best in the world for safe and reliable performance. Both countries adhere to internationally respected, independent regulation, operating in a coherent legislative and legal framework that meets and exceeds international expectations.

    Yet public concern, including fears of contamination, has hampered the uptake of nuclear power. Countries such as Austria, Australia, Italy and New Zealand have chosen nuclear free energy strategies. Others, including Germany, Spain and Switzerland are choosing not to build more nuclear reactors. Even where nuclear power forms part of the energy mix, such as in Canada and the UK, it is still challenged by many as a good source of energy for the future. There are concerns regarding relatively high costs of investment, perceived adverse safety, environmental and health effects, and potential security risks stemming from misuse of nuclear materials, weaponization and proliferation, as well as management of nuclear waste and costs of decommissioning.

    The 2020 CUKC convened experts, political leaders, civil servants, and industry representatives to discuss the nuclear agenda, with the goal of sharing best practice, promoting constructive policy dialogue between Canada and the UK, and making policy recommendations. In doing so, it seeks to advance mutual understanding on clean energy sources and suggest tangible future steps for innovation and collaboration on nuclear power and the global nuclear landscape.

    ***

    >>> LAUNCH OF THE OFFICIAL REPORT

    DATE: Feb 18, 2021 (8-9AM EST//1-2PM GMT)

    AGENDA

    Opening Remarks

    Dr. Mel Cappe
    Anthony Cary, CMG

    Welcome Remarks

    H.E. Susan le Jeune d’Allegeershecque CMG (British High Commissioner to Canada)
    H.E. Janice Charette (Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom)

    Panel discussion featuring:

    Shawn Tupper, Associate Deputy Minister, Natural Resources Canada
    John Gorman, President & CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association
    Julia Pyke , Director of Financing and Economic Regulation, Sizewell C (EDF)
    Duncan Hawthorne, CEO, Horizon Nuclear Power

    Interactive discussions & Q/A

    ***

    Please note that this event will be conducted on Zoom and streamed LIVE on Youtube. We will send you the Youtube URL on the week of Feb 15th for you to tune in, and there will be opportunities for you to pose questions via chatbox

    We wish to thank our sponsors:

    In Canada: Natural Resources Canada, NB Power, Bruce Power, Ontario Power Generation, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Canadian Nuclear Association, Cavendish Nuclear, Massey College, ARC, Moltex, OCNI

    In the UK: Sizewell C (EDF), Horizon Nuclear Power, UK Research and Innovation, NDA, National Nuclear Laboratory, Nuclear Industry Association , Cavendish

    ***

    Report by Ivan Semeniuk (French translation by Benoit Hardy-Chartrand)

    Project Management by The Park Group

    Contact

    Tina Park


    Speakers

    Mel Cappe
    Opening Remarks
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Anthony Cary, CMG
    Opening Remarks
    Chairman, British Committee of the Canada UK Council

    Her Excellency Susan le Jeune d’Allegeershecque, CMG
    Opening Remarks
    British High Commissioner to Canada

    Her Excellency Janice Charette
    Opening Remarks
    Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom

    Shawn Tupper
    Panelist
    Associate Deputy Minister, Natural Resources Canada

    John Gorman
    Panelist
    President & CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association

    Julia Pyke
    Panelist
    Director of Financing and Economic Regulation, Sizewell C (EDF)

    Duncan Hawthorne
    Panelist
    CEO, Horizon Nuclear Power


    Main Sponsor

    External Booking


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 19th Survival – Inside Terroristic Spaces under Nazism and Stalinism, 1944-1953

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 19, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Zoom webinar
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    Description

    This talk will explore the theme of survival by ordinary people in terroristic spaces created by totalitarian dictatorships in the 20th century in the context of the choices and decisions made by victims and perpetrators alike. Three case studies will be examined: Nazi concentration camps; Budapest under the reign of terror of the Arrow Cross regime, and finally, Hungarian Stalinism. The discussion will also focus on agency: the relationship between structure and the individual.

    Laszlo Borhi is an expert on Central European history, particularly the history of international relations and dictatorships. His most recent book examines these areas. “Dealing with Dictators: the United States, Hungary, and East Central Europe, 1942-1989” (2016) explores America’s Cold War efforts to make the dictatorships of Eastern Europe less tyrannical and more responsive to the country’s international interests.


    Speakers

    Professor Laszlo Borhi
    Peter A. Kadas Chair in the Department of Central Eurasian Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 22nd Économistes and the Reinvention of Empire: France in the Americas and Africa, c. 1750-1802

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 22, 20211:00PM - 3:00PMExternal Event, Zoom event
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    In this talk, Pernille Røge will discuss her book of the same title. The presentation will include material about Senegal, Guyana, Saint-Domingue, and Guadeloupe that did not make it into the book.

    Pernille Røge is Associate Professor of French and French Colonial History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her scholarly interests focus on interconnections between eighteenth-century political economic theory and colonial policy and practice. Her publications on the French, British, and Danish colonial empires have appeared in edited volumes and peer reviewed journals, including Dix-huitième Siècle, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, and History of European Ideas. She is co-editor of a collection of essays entitled The Political Economy of Empire in the Early Modern World (Palgrave MacMillan, 2013) and a special issue of IRSH entitled Free and Unfree Labor in Atlantic and Indian Ocean Port Cities (1700-1850) (2019).


    Speakers

    Prof. Pernille Røge
    University of Pittsburgh



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 23rd The Myanmar Coup: Why Now, and What to Expect?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 23, 20213:30PM - 5:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Matthew J Walton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. His research and publications focus on ethnic politics and Buddhist political thought in Myanmar, including his book Buddhism, Politics and Political Thought in Myanmar (2016, Cambridge University Press).

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto; Director, Masters’ Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School). He has conducted extensive research on the peace process in Myanmar, and is the co-author with Alexandre Pelletier and Ardeth Thawnghmung of Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar (forthcoming 2021, Cornell UP).


    Speakers

    Jacques Bertrand
    Professor and Associate Chair in the Department of Political Science; Director, Collaborative Master's Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Matthew J Walton
    Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 23rd Inclusionary Zoning: Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 23, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The final recommendations for Toronto’s Inclusionary Zoning (IZ) policy are planned to go before City Council in the first half of 2021. The IZ tool has been implemented across the United States and in the United Kingdom as a way to produce new affordable housing by compelling developers to set aside a portion of their new housing units as affordable housing. What lessons can be extracted from these localities to help inform the implementation of IZ in Toronto? Two of our panelists will present their research, which evaluated how well IZ worked in London, UK and three US regions (San Francisco Bay Area, Washington DC area, and Boston suburbs) to generate more affordable housing and create mixed-income communities. The formal presentations will be followed by a discussion on how these experiences from other jurisdictions might be considered in the Toronto context.

    Panelists

    Deanna Chorney is a project manager with the City of Toronto’s City Planning division. In her current role she works with a team of housing experts to maintain the City’s supply of existing affordable rental housing and secure new affordable rental and ownership housing. Since 2016, she has been leading work on advancing inclusionary zoning, including supporting the City’s position on provincial legislation and proposing a local framework that responds to Toronto’s specific housing needs and market conditions.

    Fei Li is an Assistant Professor at the Urban Studies Institute, Georgia State University (Atlanta). Her research interests involve transportation, housing, segregation, inequality, public health, and the social impacts of emerging technologies. Her current research focuses on 1) the integration of multimodal urban transport and smart technologies in promoting sustainable, safe and equitable mobility; 2) healthcare accessibility and the disparate impact of COVID-19; and 3) inclusionary housing policies. Fei holds a PhD in Public Administration from New York University and a bachelor’s degree from Peking University (China).

    Jenny Schuetz is a senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings. She is an expert in urban economics and housing policy, focusing particularly on housing affordability. Jenny has written extensively on land use regulation, housing prices, and neighbourhood change. She has served as a principal economist in the Federal Reserve System. She is a non-resident senior fellow at GWU’s Center for Washington Area Studies and teaches in Georgetown’s urban planning program. Jenny earned a PhD in Public Policy from Harvard University, a Master’s in City Planning from M.I.T., and a B.A. from the University of Virginia.

    Jeanhy Shim is the Founding President of Housing Lab Toronto – an independent real estate development consulting firm, and Founding Partner of PMA Sales Lab – a neighbourhood-focused housing advisory firm. For the past 28 years, she has provided strategic market analysis and development advisory services to developers and financial institutions in the Toronto region. Jeanhy serves on the Board of Directors at Waterfront Toronto, and is a founding Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Committee at Urban Land Institute Toronto. She has a Master’s degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a B.A. from McGill University.

    Moderator

    Susannah Bunce is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Geography and City Studies program at the University of Toronto Scarborough. Susannah’s research focuses on socio-environmental processes in urban neighbourhoods and community-based engagement. Her research on Community Land Trusts examines the provision of affordable housing, community decision-making, and collective practice. Susannah is also the co-lead, along with Dr. Alan Walks (Geography & Planning, UofT), of the Affordable Housing Challenge Project at the School of Cities, University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Deanna Chorney
    Panelist
    Project manager with the City of Toronto's City Planning division.

    Fei Li
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor at the Urban Studies Institute, Georgia State University (Atlanta)

    Jeanhy Shim
    Panelist
    President and Founder of the Toronto Housing Lab and Founding Partner of PMA Sales Lab

    Jenny Schuetz
    Panelist
    Senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings

    Susannah Bunce
    Moderator
    Associate Professor in the Department of Human Geography and City Studies program at the University of Toronto Scarborough



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 24th The Changing Face of Diplomacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 24, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    You are invited to join a panel of practitioners and scholars to discuss recent and ongoing changes to the practice of diplomacy. Our panelists will address: the centralization of foreign policy in leaders’ offices; the evolving role of ambassadors and embassies; the rise of non-state actors; the advent of digital diplomacy. Following short presentations, we will have Q&A and general discussion.


    Speakers

    Senator Peter Boehm
    Chairman of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee; former Deputy Minister of International Assistance, Global Affairs Canada; former G-8 Sherpa; and former Canadian Ambassador to Germany

    Ambassador Sabine Sparwasser
    German Ambassador to Canada; former Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, German Ministry of Foreign Affairs; and former Director of the German Foreign Service Academy

    Rosemary McCarney
    Senior Fellow in Foreign and Defence Policy, Massey College; former Canadian Ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva; and former President and CEO, Plan Canada

    Mark Raymond
    The Wick Cary Associate Professor of International Security and the Director of the Cyber Governance and Policy Center at the University of Oklahoma; and the author of Social Practices of Rule-Making in World Politics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019)

    Jon Allen
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; former Assistant Deputy Minister, Americas, Global Affairs Canada; and the former Canadian Ambassador to Israel and Spain

    Jack Cunningham
    Program Coordinator, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History; former editor of International Journal


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Konrad Adenauer Stiftung

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 24th The Politics of Retribution in the Film Industry through the lens of Certification Committees in Postwar Hungary

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 24, 20212:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Zoom webinar
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    Description

    This presentation will examine the fate of actors/actresses in the film and theatre industry in Hungary postwar. How did the politics of retribution unfold in the reorganization of the field of theatre and film in Hungary after 1945?

    Certification committees were established to examine the activities of actors, actresses and technical workers in the theatre and film industry both interwar and during the war, to determine whether they would be certified to resume work again. In order for an actor or actress to work in the industry, it was essential to obtain certification. This presentation will examine the inner workings of two certification committees for actors and actresses through the historical lens of the postwar era and the methodology and decisions of the examiners. It will also describe the language used in the process, and why certain individuals were certified quickly and with very little administrative process, while others received several months, years or a lifetime ban from acting in film and/or in theatres.

    Susan M. Papp has had a distinguished career as an award-winning broadcaster and filmmaker. One of her documentaries received the prestigious Michener Award for Public Service. Dr. Papp is also the author of many scholarly articles and several books, including a history of the Munk-Munkácsi family in the volume How it Happened: Documenting the Tragedy of Hungarian Jewry. One of her books, Outcasts: A Love Story, is based on a true story that took place during the Holocaust. Originally written in English, Outcasts has been translated into three languages and made into a documentary film. Susan Papp earned her Ph.D. in Modern European History from the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, The Politics of Exclusion and Retribution in the Hungarian Film Industry, 1929-1947, will provide the topic of her presentation.


    Speakers

    Dr. Susan Papp



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 24th Japanese Foreign Policy in the Abe Era and Beyond: Book Launch Event

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 24, 20217:00PM - 8:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Abe Shinzo, who stepped down in September 2020 as the longest-serving Prime Minister in Japanese history, sought to fundamentally transform Japan’s foreign relations. What is his legacy, and where is Japanese foreign policy headed under Prime Minister Suga Yoshihide? This panel will draw on a recently published book co-edited by Takeo Hoshi (University of Tokyo) and Phillip Lipscy (University of Toronto), The Political Economy of the Abe Government and Abenomics Reforms. Welcoming chapter authors Adam Liff (Indiana University) and Mary M. McCarthy (Drake University), the panelists will discuss Japan’s diplomacy, security policy, approach to issues of historical memory, economic relations, and climate change policy.

    Panelists:
    Takeo Hoshi (University of Tokyo)
    Adam Liff (Indiana University)
    Phillip Lipscy (University of Toronto)
    Mary M. McCarthy (Drake University)

    The Political Economy of the Abe Government and Abenomics Reforms: This volume seeks to explain the political economy of the Abe government and the so-called ‘Abenomics’ economic policies. The Abe government represents a major turning point in postwar Japanese political economy. In 2019, Abe became the longest serving Prime Minister in Japanese history. Abe’s government stood out not only for its longevity, but also for its policies. Abe came to power promising to reinvigorate Japan’s economy under the banner of Abenomics. He pursued a host of structural reforms and industrial promotions to increase Japan’s potential growth rate. Abe also achieved important legislative victories in security policy. However, the government also faced significant controversies. The book will hold appeal for scholars and students specializing in the study of Japanese politics, comparative political economy, the politics of contemporary advanced democracies, macroeconomic policy, labor market reforms, corporate governance, gender equality, agricultural reforms, energy and climate change, and East Asian security.

    Panelist Bios:

    – Takeo Hoshi (University of Tokyo)
    Takeo Hoshi is Professor of Economics at the University of Tokyo. His research area includes corporate finance, banking, monetary policy and the Japanese economy. Hoshi is also Co-Chairman of the Academic Board of the Center for Industrial Development and Environmental Governance (Tsinghua University). He received the 2015 Japanese Bankers Academic Research Promotion Foundation Award, the 2011 Reischauer International Education Award of Japan Society of San Diego and Tijuana, the 2006 Enjoji Jiro Memorial Prize of Nihon Keizai Shimbun, and the 2005 Japan Economic Association-Nakahara Prize. His book Corporate Financing and Governance in Japan: The Road to the Future (MIT Press, 2001) co-authored with Anil Kashyap received the Nikkei Award for the Best Economics Books. He co-authored The Japanese Economy (MIT Press, 2020) with Takatoshi Ito. Hoshi received his B.A. from the University of Tokyo and Ph.D. in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    – Adam Liff (Indiana University)
    Adam P. LIFF is associate professor of East Asian international relations at Indiana University’s Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, where he also serves as founding director of its 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative. His research focuses on international security affairs and the Asia-Pacific—especially Japanese and Chinese security policy; U.S. Asia-Pacific strategy; the U.S.-Japan alliance; and the rise of China. Beyond IU, Dr. Liff is a Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Associate-in-Research at Harvard University’s Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies and Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Politics from Princeton University, and a B.A. from Stanford University.

    Phillip Lipscy (University of Toronto)
    – Phillip Y. Lipscy is associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto. He is also Chair in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. His research addresses substantive topics such as international cooperation, international organizations, the politics of energy and climate change, international relations of East Asia, and the politics of financial crises. He has also published extensively on Japanese politics and foreign policy. Lipscy’s book from Cambridge University Press, Renegotiating the World Order: Institutional Change in International Relations, examines how countries seek greater international influence by reforming or creating international organizations.

    Mary M. McCarthy (Drake University)
    – Mary M. McCarthy is an associate professor of politics and international relations at Drake University. She specializes in Japan’s domestic and foreign policies, with a current focus on the legacies of the Asia-Pacific War on Japan’s foreign relations. She is editor of the Routledge Handbook of Japanese Foreign Policy (2018) and her most recent publications include “The Creation and Utilization of Opportunity Structures for Transnational Activism on WWII Sexual Slavery in Asia” in Jenny Wustenberg and Aline Sierp, ed. Agency in Transnational Memory Politics (Berghahn Books, 2020). Dr. McCarthy received her B.A. in East Asian studies and her Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Takeo Hoshi
    Professor, Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo

    Adam Liff
    Director, 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative (21JPSI), Indiana University Hamilton Lugar School of Global & International Studies

    Phillip Lipscy
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Mary M. McCarthy
    Associate Professor, Politics and International Relations, Department of Political Science, Drake University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 25th Japanese Nationalism from the Ground Up: A Profile of Nippon Kaigi and its Local-Level Activists

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 25, 20212:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Recent years have seen a rise in attention to Nippon Kaigi, or “Japan Conference,” an unincorporated lobby association that is credited with providing ideological motivation and legislative guidance to Japan’s top elected officials and other powerholders. The group serves as a meeting-point for religious organizations, ethics training groups, political reform associations, and others that diverge in terms of teachings and practices but cooperate in efforts to return Japan to the imagined glories of its imperial past. While much ink has been spilled on the group’s history and the influence of its prominent signatories, comparatively little attention has been paid to Nippon Kaigi’s ground-level operations. In this presentation, McLaughlin will draw on his ethnographic engagements with Shinto priests, members of ethics training seminars, and other Kaigi affiliates to create a complex picture of how the group manifests through local-level activities. By paying particular attention to gender roles, ritual practices, doctrinal instruction, and other factors that are often left out of estimations of Nippon Kaigi’s political impact, McLaughlin will demonstrate how a profile of the organization that gives precedence to the quotidian lives of its participants may reorient research on nationalism in Japan today.

    Levi McLaughlin is Associate Professor at the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University. He is co-author of Kōmeitō: Politics and Religion in Japan (IEAS Berkeley, 2014) and author of Soka Gakkai’s Human Revolution: The Rise of a Mimetic Nation in Modern Japan (University of Hawai`i Press, 2019).

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Levi McLaughlin
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 25th Automation and Immigration

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 25, 20213:10PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    Migration and automation are dominant trends of our age. Both are changing how we work and live. When it comes to migration, many voters want tighter restrictions. They are worried that migrants are ‘stealing their jobs’ and ‘changing the culture’. Politicians are responding with promises to get tough. Automation is different. People worry about automation but not in the same way. Voters are not calling for the numbers of machines to be reduced or even controlled. There are no anti-robot political parties. Politicians do not win elections by getting tough on computer chips.

    The question is ‘why?’ Why is there such significant opposition to migration and yet so little to automation? Why limit migrants but not robots?

    The paper asks these questions not only in relation to the public debate on migration but also the debate amongst philosophers. In the first part, it looks at some of the main philosophical arguments for immigration restrictions and shows how the arguments apply equally to automation. In the second part, the paper offers a hypothesis as to why migration, not automation, generates public opposition. It is human to classify other humans in terms of in-groups and out-groups. Migrants, being human, are readily identified as an out-group. Machines are not human. In short, anti-migrant prejudice seems to explain the difference. If prejudice is so crucial in explaining opposition to immigration, we have further reason to doubt the permissibility of immigration restrictions.


    Speakers

    Kieran Oberman
    Senior Lecturer in Politics, University of Edinburgh

    Tom Parr
    Associate Professor, University of Warwick



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 25th South Korean Platform Labour Market and its Mismatch with Social Protection System

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 25, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    The Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University and the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at the University of Toronto are inviting you to the presentation by Prof. Sophia Seung-Yoon Lee (Chung-Ang University) on February 25, 2021 (Thursday), 4 to 5:30 pm (EST).

    Korea’s platform labor market expanded considerably in a short period of time and there is also a diversity of platform labor. The purpose of this talk is to understand the operation of the Korean platform labor market and how the forms for work mismatch with Korean social security system. The study categorizes platform companies and platform labor in the Korean platform labor market, and examines differences and commonalities in their labor processes through case studies on delivery platforms, domestic service platforms, and freelance platforms. The differences according to the type of platform labor are as follows. First, the delivery platform was mainly mediated by four-way relations, and the domestic services and freelance platforms by three-way relationships. Second, the intensity of labour control and involvement of platform labor of platform companies was strong in the order of delivery platform, house service platform and freelance platform. Third, the differences in social security experiences and needs were mainly found in industrial accident insurance. The analysis confirms that the mismatch between platform labor and social security system does not only come from the vague employment relationship of platform workers, but rather the differences among the types of platform work need to be considered in discussing social security reform to solve the mismatch problem.
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    Sophia Seung-Yoon Lee received her DPhil (PhD) in Social Policy from the University of Oxford (UK) with her thesis on A Comparative study of East Asian welfare states and nonstandard workers. Her research interests are East Asian welfare state and labour markets, precarious work, basic income and institutionalism. Some of her selected publications are “Institutional legacy of state corporatism in de-industrial labour markets: a comparative study of Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, Socio-economic Review (2016),” “Precarious Workers in South Korea, 한국의 불안정 노동자 Seoul: Humanitas, co-authored (2017),” “Precarious Elderly Workers in Post-Industrial South Korea, Journal of Contemporary Asia (2018).” She was a member of the 4th National Pension Reform Committee of Korea’s Ministry of Health and Welfare and currently the vice chairperson of Youth Policy Coordination Committee of Rep. of Korea.

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto) and is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies, and the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca || https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    Sophia Seung-Yoon Lee
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Social Welfare, Chung-Ang University, South Korea

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 25th Power and Corruption in Skopje’s “White Palace” Party Headquarters: THE POLITICAL LIFE OF ARCHITECTURE

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 25, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMExternal Event, Zoom webinar
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    Description

    This is the second lecture in a two-part series, “The Political Life of Architecture.” The two parts can be viewed together or independently.

    The first part of this series, on the IMEL/Biltmore Hotel in Tbilisi, is available on our YouTube channel (search: CERESMunk).

    Just south of Skopje’s central square is one of the city’s most opulent neoclassical buildings, known locally as the “White Palace.” Contrary to first impressions, this building inspired by classical antiquity is not old, but was constructed in 2012 as the political headquarters of the VMRO-DPMNE party. In this second talk on the political life of architecture, Suzanne Harris-Brandts tells the story of how the White Palace came to take on its opulent form and the power and wealth that it has afforded the VMRO-DPMNE party along the way. She breaks down three interconnected scales at which power is expressed relative to the party headquarters: (1) the Architectural, foregrounding the White Palace’s design and construction; (2) the Urban, examining broader city building and real estate extortion practices in Skopje funding the party, and; (3) the Historical/Regional, looking at the irredentist, ethnonationalist narratives expressed through architectural symbolism, supporting the party ideologically. Built during VMRO-DPMNE’s time in office (2006-2016) and amidst its undertaking of the highly contentious ‘Skopje 2014’ urban renewal campaign, the White Palace exemplifies the interconnected nature of power and space in North Macedonia. The nuances of how different forms of authoritarian rule operate spatially through the city’s built landscape and how they result in distinct approaches to city building are thus epitomized in the project. This research is based on data collected through fieldwork in Skopje, including site observations, media analysis, personal interviews, and focus groups. It is part of a chapter in the forthcoming book ‘Spatializing Authoritarianism,’ edited by Natalie Koch and published by Syracuse University Press.

    Dr. Suzanne Harris-Brandts is an Assistant Professor in the Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism, and a Faculty Associate with the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at Carleton University. Her research brings together design and the social sciences to explore issues of power, equity, and collective identity in the built environment. Suzanne’s current book project, entitled ‘Constructing the Capital,’ draws from her dissertation uncovering the politics of urban development and image making in Eurasian capital cities. It examines city building campaigns in part-democratic/ part-authoritarian hybrid regimes, foregrounding the cases of Tbilisi, Georgia and Skopje, North Macedonia. The work demonstrates how architecture and urban design are manipulated for power retention in such regimes, while also highlighting bottom-up, community-based strategies to resist these actions. Suzanne received her PhD in Urban Studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a licenced architect in Ontario and co-founder of Collective Domain, a design-research practice for spatial analysis, urban activism, architecture, and media in the public interest.

    Videos of our public events are posted on our YouTube channel within approximately 10 days.


    Speakers

    Dr. Suzanne Harris-Brandts
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Carleton University, School of Architecture + Urbanism

    Dr. Robert Austin
    Moderator
    CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th The S. J. V. Chelvanayakam Fonds at the UTSC Library Archives: Virtual Launch Webinar

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 20219:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Please join us for the launch of the S. J. V. Chelvanayakam digital archive. S. J. V. Chelvanayakam (1898-1977) was an extraordinarily significant political leader of the Tamil community in postcolonial Sri Lanka. As a leader, lawyer, and parliamentarian, Chelvanayakam’s life bears witness to significant political events in the island from the 1950s to the 1970s.

    Speakers:
    • Bruce Matthews, Acadia University (Emeritus), “S. J. V. Chelvanayakam”
    • Thamilini Jothilingam, UTSC, “A Return to Words: Metadata, Metahistory, and Digital Memory”
    • Sujith Xavier, University of Windsor, “They’re talkin’ ’bout a reconciliation: Listening to the Whispers in the Chelvanayakam Archives”
    • Vasuki Nesiah, New York University, “Towards a Larger Freedom”
    • T. Sanathanan, University of Jaffna, “Translations of a Document”

    The webinar will be in English and Tamil with live interpretation in both languages.

    The Chelvanayakam papers were meticulously collected by Mr. Chelvanayakam’s daughter, Susili Chelvanayakam Wilson. The archive was then donated to the University of Toronto Scarborough Library by Susili Chelvanayakam Wilson and Mr. Chelvanayakam’s granddaughter, Malliha Wilson.

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Tamil Worlds Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 26th 2021 PCJ Student Conference: The Changing Landscape of Global Health: Unpacking the Dimensions of Health Crises and Responses in a COVID-19 World

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 26, 202110:00AM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The 15th annual Peace, Conflict and Justice Student Conference will unpack the global responses to and implications of COVID-19 through four interdisciplinary dimensions. The conference will feature a range of academics, professionals, and student speakers from the University of Toronto and the wider community.

    The conference will kick off with a keynote address from Dr. Peter Singer, Special Advisor to the Director General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, and Assistant Director General of the World Health Organization.

    More information about the four forums and speakers can be found below.

    Keynote Address: 10:00 – 10:20
    Dr. Peter Singer, Special Advisor to the Director General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, and Assistant Director General of the World Health Organization.

    Forum #1: 10:20 – 11:20 – Policy Change and Management in a Globalized World
    Dr. Joy Fitzgibbon, Director of the Margaret MacMillan Trinity One Program at Trinity College
    Abdullah Fadil, UNICEF Sudan
    Dr. Fiona Miller, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
    Second-Year PCJ Students, Nivaal and Maryam Rehman

    Forum #2: 11:20 – 12:20 – Economic Implications
    Dr. Wilson Prichard, International Centre for Tax and Development
    Pedro Antunes, The Conference Board of Canada
    Adam Zendel, UofT Department of Geography and Planning
    Fourth-Year PCJ Student, Ally Johnston

    Forum #3: 1:20 – 2:20 – Injustice and Instability in the Healthcare System
    Dr. Anna Banerji, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
    Dr. Michael Widener, UofT Department of Geography and Planning
    Dr. Asem Lashin, Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and the Health Science Centre
    Dr. Patrick Fafard, UOttawa Faculty of Public and International Affairs

    Forum #4: 2:20 – 3:20 – Human and Social Response
    Dr. Karen Naimer, Physicians for Human Rights
    Dr. Kia Darling-Hammond, National Black Social Justice Coalition
    Dr. Nicholas Spence, UofT Department of Sociology
    Second-Year PCJ Student, Atharv Agrawal
    Second-Year PCJ Student, Abhay Singh Sachal
    Third-Year PCJ Student, Ruth Masuka
    Third-Year UofT Student, Aishwarya Patel

    Forum Descriptions

    Instability and Injustice in the Healthcare System:

    The Instability and Injustice in the Healthcare System Forum examines ways in which pre-existing inequities in the healthcare system have been exasperated by the pandemic. The forum takes up this issue by employing health geographies, addressing healthcare policies and possibilities, as well as speaking from frontline and firsthand experience. The goal of the forum is to demonstrate how minority groups, specifically Indigenous populations, have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic in terms of higher rates of pre-existing illness, as well as ongoing lack of access to healthcare infrastructure.

    Economic Implications Forum:

    The Economic Implications Forum focuses on how COVID-19 has impacted Canada financially. Our discussions will include the impact on Canadians individually, particularly on students and workers in precarious fields. Our speakers will also provide insight into Canada’s financial response to COVID, fiscal policy, and future trajectory of our economy.

    Policy Change and Management in the Globalized World:

    The Policy Change and Management in the Globalized World Forum covers a range of topics pertaining to how COVID-19 has impacted health and social policy in Canada and abroad. The forum explores how the pandemic has impacted access to education and the challenges that this has posed for policymakers. In addition, it analyzes the distribution of vaccines and testing materials in Canada and how this process will impact healthcare in the long-term. Finally, the forum discusses challenges in containing the spread of the virus, providing insight into how global solidarity can be built through healthcare and social policy.

    Human and Social Response:

    The Human and Social Response Forum focuses on student and social life and changes in the quality of life brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. It addresses student responses to the pandemic and how students have coped with change and uncertainty. The forum also examines local community and international responses and changes in social structure. Finally, the forum explores the development of a “new norm,” while considering the complexities of human behaviour.

    Speaker Bios

    Keynote: Dr. Peter Singer
    Dr. Peter Singer is Special Advisor to the Director General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, and Assistant Director General of the World Health Organization. He supports the Director General to transform WHO into an Organization sharply focused on impact at the country level. Dr Singer co-chaired the transition team; was the architect of WHO’s strategy and its “triple billion” target; supports colleagues to guide consistent strategy implementation of WHO’s programme budget, results framework, delivery stock-takes, investment case, and innovation strategy; and provides leadership to the Global Action Plan for Healthy Lives and Wellbeing to strengthen collaboration among 13 multilateral agencies to accelerate the health-related Sustainable Development Goals.
    Before joining WHO, Dr. Peter Singer co-founded two innovative, results driven, social impact organizations. From 2008-2018 Singer was Chief Executive Officer of Grand Challenges Canada. From 1996-2006 he was Sun Life Financial Chair and Director of the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics. He is also Professor of Medicine at University of Toronto.
    In 2007, Dr. Singer received the Michael Smith Prize as Canada’s Health Researcher of the Year in Population Health and Health Services. In 2011, Singer was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada for his contributions to health research and bioethics, and for his dedication to improving the health of people in developing countries. As a researcher, Dr. Singer published over 300 articles, received over $50 million in research grants, and mentored hundreds of students. He studied internal medicine at University of Toronto, medical ethics at University of Chicago, public health at Yale University, and management at Harvard Business School. He served his community as Board Chair of Branksome Hall, an internationally minded school for girls.

    Injustice and Instability in the Healthcare System

    1. Anna Banerji
    Dr. Anna Banerji is a pediatric, infectious, tropical disease, and global health specialist. She is currently an Associate Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. She is the faculty lead for Indigenous and Refugee Health, as well as the creator of the Indigenous Health Conference at the University of Toronto. In 2012, she received the Diamond Jubilee Medal for her work in tracking respiratory syncytial virus across Northern Canada, noting specifically the virus’s disproportionate impacts on Inuit children.

    2. Michael Widener
    Dr. Michael Widener is a Canada Research Chair in Transportation and Health and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto. He has a cross-appointment in Epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. He is a member of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute where he serves as co-chair of the Health and Transportation subcommittee. Dr. Widener’s research examines themes of access to healthy food and healthcare facilities, as well as health and transportation geographies. His research interests also include GIS, agent-based modelling, and spatial optimization.

    3. Asem Lashin
    Dr. Asem Lashin is a member of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and an oncology-hematology specialist. He has been a front-line worker during the COVID-19 pandemic at the Health Science Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba. His work currently focuses on the neonatal intensive care unit as he completes his new subspecialty in neonatology. His insights will discuss the challenges of working with the most vulnerable groups of patients — premature babies — during the pandemic.

    4. Patrick Fafard
    Dr. Patrick Fafard is a Full Professor at the University of Ottawa in the Department of Social Sciences. He is an Associate Director at the University of Ottawa’s Global Strategies Lab and a member at the university’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy. He has served as the Director General in the Intergovernmental Affairs Secretariat of the Privy Council Office and has held the role of Executive Director of the Saskatchewan Commission on Medicare, as well as the Executive Director of Policy and Planning in the Saskatchewan Department of Health. His research interests include public health policy, the social determinants of health, health services, global health, and ethics and health.

    Economic Implications

    1. Adam Zendel
    Mr. Adam Zendel is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto’s Geography and Planning Department and a researcher for the Cultural Economy Lab. Mr. Zendel’s doctoral research explores elements of labour geographies pertaining to touring musicians and crew members. He is currently working on an article exploring the impacts of COVID-19 on the live music industry, with a focus on the experiences of musicians and crew members. He will be sharing his findings during our panel, along with knowledge on other issues COVID-19 is posing on cities and workers more broadly.

    2. Pedro Antunes
    Mr. Pedro Antunes is the Chief Economist and primary spokesperson at The Conference Board of Canada. Mr. Antunes provides expert testimony before parliamentary and senate committees. He has contributed notable research on the impact of Canada’s demographic change on labour markets, the fiscal sustainability of health care, productivity, and long-term economic growth. He will be joining our panel to provide insight on Canadian fiscal policy and long-term responses to COVID-19. Mr. Antunes’ work can be accessed at the Conference Board of Canada’s research database.

    3. Wilson Prichard
    Dr. Wilson Prichard is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, the Chief Executive Officer of International Center for Tax and Development, and an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and the Department of Political Science. His research and expertise notably address the question of taxation and development, including government revenues, state-building and accountability, and the political foundations of development. Dr. Prichard will be joining our panel to speak on how Canada might pay for the response to COVID-19, guided by the stronger-than-ever argument for expanding taxation for the wealthiest sectors of our economy. His insights will focus on possible policy responses.

    4. PCJ Student, Ally Johnston
    Ally Johnston is a fourth-year Peace, Conflict and Justice student at the University of Toronto. She has been a member of the G7 Research Group for three years, researching and analyzing compliance. In 2020, Ally participated in a study exchange program at Sciences Po, where she studied economics. This past summer, she also worked at a data consulting firm. During the panel, Ally will be discussing the Canada Emergency Response Benefit program.

    Policy Change and Management in a Globalized World

    1. Abdullah Fadil
    Mr. Abdullah Fadil is currently a UNICEF Representative in Sudan. He has been the Director for the United Nations Monitoring Mechanism for Syria and the Deputy Head of Mission and Chief of Staff for the Joint Mission in Syria. Mr. Fadil has also served as the Chief of Human Resources Officer, Head of Office, and Chief Mission Support in the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization. He has over twenty years of expertise in addressing disputes related to political analysis, diplomacy, strategic planning, and conflict resolution in Africa, Europe and the Middle East. His focus is on the complexity of peacekeeping, peace-building and conflict and post-conflict countries.

    2. Fiona Miller
    Dr. Fiona Miller is a Professor of Health Policy and the Chair in Health Management Strategies at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. She is affiliated with the University of Toronto’s Joint Centre for Bioethics, the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment, the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation’s Committee on the Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability, and the Sustainable Built Environment Performance Assessment Network. Her current research interests examine the development of health technologies and their adoption, with a specific focus on the role of institutions.

    3. Dr. Joy Fitzgibbon
    Dr. Fitzgibbon is Associate Director and Assistant Professor in the Margaret MacMillan Trinity One Program. She is a Fellow of Trinity College and a Senior Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. Joy’s research focuses on solutions to governance dilemmas in global health pandemics, including COVID-19, and on violence against women in conflict zones. She has served as a governance and policy advisor on the board of Food for the Hungry Canada, lectured in the International Paediatric Emergency Medicine Elective and in the Canadian Disaster and Humanitarian Response Training Program and submitted policy reports to the Canadian Centre for Arms Control and Disarmament and the then Canadian International Development Agency.

    4. PCJ Students, Maryam and Nivaal Rehman
    Maryam and Nivaal Rehman are twin activists and co-founders of The World With MNR, a non-profit organization that takes action for climate justice, gender equality, and inclusivity. In 2019, they released a documentary on girls’ education in Pakistan and screened it globally and at the United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative’s 20th anniversary celebrations. They have conducted interviews with Malala Yousufzai, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the International Monetary Fund’s Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva, and the President of the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde. For their activism, they have received the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award, now the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers.

    Human and Social Response

    1. Karen Naimer
    Ms. Karen Naimer is currently the Director of Programs for the not-for-profit non-governmental organization, Physicians for Human Rights (PHR). In this role, Ms. Naimer oversees all activities within PHR’s program division. Her oversight includes research, investigations, asylum, capacity development, and advocacy-related projects. She also supervises initiatives ranging from PHR’s U.S. Asylum Network to international programs focusing on documenting and responding to sexual violence in conflict zones and mass killings.

    2. Nicholas Spence
    Dr. Nicholas Spence is a member of the Department of Sociology and Interdisciplinary Center for Health and Society at the University of Toronto. Dr. Spence’s research focuses on social inequality and the multiple determinants of health and well-being. He is affiliated with the Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations and Health Disparities. He also serves as the Associate Director of the Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium and Senior Editor of the International Indigenous Policy Journal.

    3. Kia Darling-Hammond
    Dr. Kia Darling-Hammond is the Director of Education Programs and Research for the National Black Justice Coalition, a civil rights organization dedicated to the empowerment of Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer and same gender loving people. She has distinguished herself as a thought leader and collaborator in the worlds of youth service, education, mental health, well-being, and social justice research, with more than twenty years of experience as an administrator, researcher, teacher, and mentor. Dr. Darling-Hammond’s scholarship explores the possibilities for thriving among young adults who experience complex marginalization.

    4. Abhay Singh Sachal
    Abhayjeet (Abhay) Singh Sachal is a humanitarian, environmentalist, and activist. After a trip to the Arctic in 2016, Abhay co-founded Break The Divide Foundation, a non-profit organization that connects youth around the world with one another. Based on principles of environmentalism, sustainability, and reconciliation, Break The Divide focuses on fostering empathy and understanding to inspire action projects in communities. Abhay was recently named one of Canada’s Top 25 Under 25 Environmentalists and featured as one of 10 International Youth Changemakers in Canada.

    5. Atharv Agrawal
    Atharv Agrawal is a socioeconomic empowerment and inclusion activist and Lester B. Pearson International Scholar. He has worked as a student consultant at IBM Canada’s Pro Bono Initiative, where he engaged with local non-profits to tackle business challenges. Currently, Atharv is a member of Global Spark, a nationwide non-profit, where he is spearheading their podcast entitled CC: World; a student researcher at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy; and an executive member of the Hart House Debates and Dialogue Committee.

    6. Aishwarya (Arya) Patel
    Aishwarya is an incoming third-year student at the University of Toronto pursuing a Bachelor of Music in Comprehensive Studies as a pianist and composer, a minor in Political Science, and two certificates in Health Applications in Music and Music Technology. Throughout the summer of 2020, Aishwarya interviewed students, designed the layout, and created illustrations for the COVID-19 Perspectives book, a project sponsored through the University of Toronto’s 2020 COVID-19 Student Engagement Award. The powerful cadences of personal growth that Aishwarya has gained from her experiences living in Zimbabwe, Canada, and the United States have resonated with her and cultivated the roots of her desire to give back to the community.

    7. Ruth Masuka
    Ruth Masuka is a third-year Peace, Conflict and Justice student at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses centre around art as a bottom-up peacebuilding mechanism. She studies the ways in which non-institutional community spaces and informal activities act as catalysts for civil enfranchisement.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2021

  • Tuesday, March 2nd The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy: Employer Organization and the Law: Historical Legacies and the Long Shadow of the American Courts

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 2, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy

    Description

    A strong and well-organized labor movement is clearly essential to achieving high levels of economic equality and shared prosperity in post-industrial political economies. However, a large comparative literature suggests that durable progress is possible only where employers too are well organized. Based on a comparison with Germany, this paper suggests that interventions by the American courts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries had a profound and enduring impact on the organization, goals, and strategies of American employers – discouraging and indeed actively disarticulating forms of business organization that were emerging in this period in Europe’s more coordinated “social” market economies.

    About the Speaker:

    Kathleen Thelen is Ford Professor of Political Science at MIT.

    Her work focuses on the origins and evolution of political-economic institutions in the rich democracies. She is the author, among others, of Varieties of Liberalization and the New Politics of Social Solidarity (2014) and How Institutions Evolve (2004), and co-editor of Advances in Comparative Historical Analysis (with James Mahoney, 2015), and Beyond Continuity (with Wolfgang Streeck, 2005). Her awards include the Aaron Wildavsky Enduring Contribution Prize (2019); the Michael Endres Research Prize (2019), the Barrington Moore Book Prize (2015), the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award of the APSR (2005), the Mattei Dogan Award for Comparative Research (2006), and the Max Planck Research Award (2003). She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2015 and to the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences in 2009. She was awarded honorary degrees at the Free University of Amsterdam (2013), the London School of Economics (2017), the European University Institute in Florence (2018), and the University of Copenhagen (2018).

    Thelen has served as President of the American Political Science Association (APSA), Chair of the Council for European Studies and as President of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics. Thelen is General Editor, along with Eric Wibbels, of the Cambridge University Press Series in Comparative Politics, and a permanent external member of the Max Planck Institut für Gesellschaftsforschung in Cologne, Germany.

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy was established through the extraordinary generosity of Paul Cadario, Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.


    Speakers

    Kathleen Thelen
    Speaker
    Ford Professor of Political Science, MIT

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Associate Director, Global Engagement Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Carolyn Tuohy
    Opening Remarks
    Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Distinguished Fellow Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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