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July 2018

  • Monday, July 16th Rethinking Class and Labour through the Works of Hagen Koo

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, July 16, 20189:30AM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM

    9:30-10:00am – Coffee

    10:00-10:10am – Opening Remarks: Yoonkyung Lee (University of Toronto)

    10:10-11:30am – Keynote Speaker: Hagen Koo (University of Hawaii), Rethinking Working Class Formation in South Korea, followed by Q & A

    11:30am-12:45pm – Lunch Reception

    12:45-2:30pm – Panel Presentations

    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (University of Toronto)

    Panel Speakers:
    Jennifer Chun (University of Toronto), Religion, Ritual and Spaces of Worker Protest in South Korea
    Veda Hyunjin Kim (University of Massachusetts-Amherst), Hagen Koo’s Korean Workers and Marxism in the Third World
    Namhee Lee (UCLA), The Democratic Transition, Working-Class Identities, and the Current State of Research
    Hwa-Jen Liu (National Taiwan University), Comparisons as Conversations
    Gay Seidman (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Honouring Hagen Koo: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    KEYNOTE: HAGEN KOO
    Rethinking Working Class Formation in South Korea
    South Korea has experienced one of the world’s most interesting and dynamic working-class movements during the past half century. Hagen Koo, author of the award-winning book, Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation (Cornell University Press, 2001), discusses the distinctive aspects of this movement and examines their broad theoretical implications, from a retrospective perspective.

    Hagen Koo is emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Born in Korea, he received his BA in Korea and worked as a journalist before coming to America. He started his graduate program at the University of British Columbia but completed his Ph.D. degree at Northwestern University. He published extensively on the political economy of development in East Asia and social transformation in South Korea during the period of rapid industrialization. His major work includes State and Society in Contemporary Korea (1993), and Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation (2001), which received a book award from the American Sociological Association and has been translated into several languages. He continues to work on the issues of inequality and changing class relations and is now completing a book on the demise of the middle class in South Korea in the neoliberal era. Currently, he is a visiting scholar at Free University of Berlin.

    PANELIST PRESENTATIONS:
    JENNIFER CHUN
    Religion, Ritual and Spaces of Worker Protest in South Korea
    This talk revisits Hagen Koo’s classic insights about the role of religious actors in supporting grassroots labour struggles in South Korea. In particular, I discuss the ongoing visibility of religious actors and religiously-inflected spectacles in the landscapes of worker protest, particularly for laid-off workers and workers in precarious jobs. Why do religious leaders continue to play such visible solidarity roles in the struggles of striking workers? How do ritualized protest acts, such as “prayer protests” and Buddhist prostration rituals, shape the aesthetic and ideological spaces of public protest?

    Jennifer Jihye Chun is Associate Professor in the Asian American Studies Department and the International Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto Scarborough. She has published widely on the changing world of work and politics, focusing on the intersections of gender, race, class and migration. She is the author of the award-winning book Organizing at the Margins: The Symbolic Politics of Labor in South Korea and the United States (Cornell University Press, 2009) and has recently co-edited a double special issue in Critical Sociology (2018) entitled, “Care Work in Transition: Transnational Circuits of Gender, Migration and Care.” She is currently writing a book monograph on space and public cultures of protest in South Korea.

    VEDA HYUNJIN KIM
    Hagen Koo’s Korean Workers and Marxism in the Third World
    I base my talk on a critical theory of imperialist capitalism and Hagen Koo’s (2001) book, Korean Workers. I argue that we can re-read our dear book of Koo, Korean Workers to re-calibrate our intellectual endeavour to pursue the programme of Third World Marxism in studies on Northeast and Southeast Asia. The South Korean political economy has been subjugated by the West—as the Asian Financial Crisis and subsequent neoliberal policy imposition starkly demonstrate—and the South Korean state’s foreign affairs are reliant on US-empire. In consequence, the South Korean social sector became Manichaean in a hegemonic/ambivalent manner (as opposed to the violent/absolute one in Fanon’s theory) and hence people’s lifestyles were creolised. I present two precariatisation experiences. Specifically, I examine SsangYong Motors’ laid-off workers and Daechuri displaced farmers, which starkly display 1) forced social changes resulting from the exertion of imperial power, 2) social isolation of the grievance groups, and 3) united resistance against power by partaking in counterpublic formation. The narrative structures in my presentation of two precariats’ resistances and class formation processes in Korean Workers are commensurate. Korean Workers is a keystone of Third World Marxism, if we take the following principles: Marxist perspective (in whatever variant), global perspective, and the close scrutiny of people’s responses.

    Veda Hyunjin Kim bodily learnt about the dialectics between the imperialism and colonised lives, while he resided in UK as a poor coloured folk. He earned an MA degree from the University of Chicago and now studies for a doctoral degree in University of Massachusetts Amherst. His current concentration is on democratisation dynamics in the context of post-WWII neo-imperialism and Marxist democratization theories.

    NAMHEE LEE
    The Democratic Transition, Working-Class Identities, and the Current State of Research
    Abstract: One of the key arguments in Hagen Koo’s pathbreaking Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation is that Korean working-class formation has been closely associated with broader socio-political processes, particularly with the democratic movement of the 1970s and the 1980s. Given the deeply transformed sociopolitical reality of South Korea since the late 1980s—the democratic transition, the collapse of the “actually existing socialism,” the global neoliberalism and the institutionalization of market and labour flexibility, and the influx of migrant workers from the 1990s, among others—what is at stake in the formation of working-class identities? What is the current state of research; in particular, how has the “cultural turn” in the field engaged with, expanded, or limited our understanding of the shifting grounds of and re-formatting working-class identities in South Korea?

    Namhee Lee is associate professor of modern Korean history at UCLA and her publications include The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea (Cornell University Press, 2007). She is currently working on a book about social memory of the 1980s in the context of the persistence of the cold war in Korea as well as the global context of neoliberalism.

    HWA-JEN LIU
    Comparisons as Conversations
    Abstract: Based on Koo’s “condensed industrialization” thesis and its negative consequence imposed on organized labour, I was inspired to further explore different types of damages that condensed industrialization has had on labour and environment and the subsequent solidification of social powers countering and moderating such damages. Through the double comparisons of Korea and Taiwan, of labour and environmental movements, I conclude that, though these two movements may seem diagonally opposite, each has certain strengths that complement the other and hence the making of a labour-environment alliance is a worthy endeavor in the new millennium.

    Current project: I’m currently working on a “polluters” project. This project compiles a list of polluting corporations from historical records, and surveys their unions’ various responses and actions in environmental disputes. I will select specific pollution cases and interview workers involved in an attempt to understand how the act of pollution itself changed workers’ standing in their communities.

    Hwa-Jen Liu teaches sociology at National Taiwan University. She specializes in social movements, late industrialization, and comparative methods and is the author of Leverage of the Weak: Labor and Environmental Movements in Taiwan and South Korea (the University of Minnesota Press, 2015).

    GAY SEIDMAN
    Honouring Hagen Koo: Looking Back, Looking Forward
    Like many researchers who focus on labour movements in the global South, I have long turned to Professor Koo’s work for insight into the dynamics of South Korea’s labour movement. My remarks will highlight some of the lessons I have taken from his work, and some of the questions his work raises for broader discussions of labour dynamics in the twenty-first century going forward.

    Gay Seidman is the Martindale Bascom Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Focusing mainly on labour and social movements in the global South, her books include Manufacturing Militance (Univ. of California Press, 1994) and Beyond the Boycott (Russell Sage 2007). Her current work explores refugee experiences in Cape Town’s divided labour market.


    Speakers

    Namhee Lee
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Modern Korean History, UCLA

    Hagen Koo
    Keynote
    Emeritus Professor of Sociology, University of Hawaii

    Jennifer Chun
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department and the International Institute, University of California Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Veda Hyunjin Kim
    Speaker
    University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Hwa-Jen Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, National Taiwan University

    Gay Seidman
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, July 16th Civil Society and Asia’s Labor Migration Regimes

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, July 16, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since the 1970s, there has been an enormous expansion of temporary labor migration within Asia. Some foreign workers are highly skilled, highly mobile expatriates looking to expand their professional horizons. Millions of others, however, are employed on limited-term contracts in a diverse range of blue-collar occupations, in the service sector, or as para-professionals in industries like healthcare. This army of skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled temporary labor migrants—who are overwhelmingly South or Southeast Asian—plays a vital role in the economic systems of the wealthier countries in the region. They work in factories, on construction sites and plantations, and staff restaurants and hospitals. They also keep house and care for the aged and the very young.

    The marginality of many foreign workers in the wealthier labor markets of the region is in large part defined by the uncertainty of their migration status. But migration status is not the only determinant of marginality: temporary labor migrants’ capacity to access the protections available to citizens may also be limited by their labor market position, which in turn determines their access to the host country’s industrial relations system, and by the presence or absence of strong local voices on their behalf.

    This paper analyzes the role of civil society in challenging the labor migration regimes of seven Asian destination countries. In doing so, it distinguishes between non-governmental organizations (NGOs), which have long been the leading force in activism on behalf of temporary labor migrants, and labor unions, which have traditionally rejected the presence of foreign workers but which have faced increasing pressure to support them. The paper argues that the particular history of labor migration flows in each of these countries and the particular ways in which the migration and employment relations axes within each of these destination countries influences the forms migrant labor activism takes and its likelihood of success.

    Bionote
    Professor Michele Ford is Director of the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia. She also holds an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. Michele’s research, which focuses Southeast Asian labour movements, labour migration and trade union aid, has been supported by several Australian Research Council grants. Michele is the author of From Migrant to Worker: The Global Unions and Labor Migration in Asia (Cornell ILR Press, in press) and Workers and Intellectuals: NGOs, Trade Unions and the Indonesian Labour Movement (NUS/Hawaii/KITLV 2009). She is also editor of Social Activism in Southeast Asia (Routledge 2013) and the co-editor of several volumes including Beyond Oligarchy: Wealth, Power, and Contemporary Indonesian Politics (Cornell SEAP 2014).

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Wayne Palmer
    Chair
    Lecturer, Department of International Relations, Bina Nusantara University

    Professor Michele Ford
    Speaker
    Director, Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, July 18th From Qingdao to Johannesburg: China-Russia cooperation and international summitry in an age of uncertainty

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, July 18, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    We are honored to welcome Chinese Ambassador to Canada Lu Shaye, and the Charge d’Affaires of the Russian Embassy Mr. Vladimir Proskuryakov to this panel event, along with Professor Andrew Cooper, Associate Senior Fellow at the Centre for Global Cooperation Research.

    In light of the recent international G7 and Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summits, which brought to surface a period of global uncertainty, this event will focus on the topic of China-Russia cooperation in global governance leading into the 10th annual BRICS Summit taking place in Johannesburg on July 25th-27th, 2018. Several important questions will be addressed at the event, in relation to recent world events whose full impacts have yet to be realized. What is the role of the BRICS in this age of increasing uncertainty? How will China and Russia approach the BRICS 2018 Johannesburg Summit? How will these countries address their shared security agenda over the denuclearization of North Korea? How can the BRICS build upon the agenda and accomplishments of the SCO Qingdao Summit?


    Speakers

    Ambassador Lu Shaye
    Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Canada

    Professor Andrew Cooper
    Associate Senior Fellow, Centre for Global Cooperation Research

    Vladimir Proskuryakov
    Charge d'Affaires, Embassy of the Russian Federation in Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    G7 and G20 Research Groups

    BRICS Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2018

  • Tuesday, September 4th Indology During National Socialist Times - A German Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 4, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The history of German Indology during NS times has been part of many historical narratives, mostly because it seemed obvious to trace the Nazi idea of an Aryan race back to German Indologists. But the approach had its drawbacks: the focus was on two German Indologists with NS leanings, while the history of others and especially Jewish Indologists in Germany was never studied. It has also proved quite detrimental that the discussion of these topics has often been caught in the political crossfire. All this seemed to leave not enough space for carving out a way in which German Indologists might live with their past. In this talk Jürgen Hanneder shall try to formulate such a perspective and demonstrate that if we look more closely and use more of the rich archival sources, a differentiated picture emerges.

    Biography:

    Prof. Dr. Jürgen Hanneder has studied Indology, Tibetology and Comparative Religion in various German Universities, then continued in Oxford and Marburg with his PhD, and worked as an assistant professor and in academic projects in Bonn, Halle, and Freiburg. In 2007, he succeeded to the chair of Indology in Marburg in 2007. His main fields of research lie within the Sanskrit literature of Kashmir, which is also a focus of many Indological projects in Marburg, but he is also interested in the history of Indology.

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Jurgen Hanneder
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Indology and Tibetology, Marburg University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 6th Imaging the Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 6, 20189:00AM - 5:00PMMunk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Imaging The Asia-Pacific Photo Exhibit will be displayed at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy from September 5 to October 5, 2018.The second installation site is at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, where the photo exhibit will be on display from October 22 to November 20, 2018.

    In 2012-2013 the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute envisioned a photo contest on the theme of “Imaging the Asia-Pacific,” and has presented it annually ever since. Open to all students at the University of Toronto, the contest has asked students to submit photographic representations of East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific. The photos may have been taken in any location inside or outside the region (including Toronto), but they are expected to be of high artistic quality and to offer images that go beyond clichés. Not only has the contest helped to make students aware of learning opportunities in the Chu Program and the Asian Institute; it also encourages them to consider the possibilities of interdisciplinary and multimedia approaches to the study of the Asia-Pacific. This exhibit is made up of only a small sampling of some of the most unique, beautiful and thought-provoking works the contest has received over the years.

    We invite viewers to contemplate the photos, to appreciate the artistic and intellectual talent on display, and to join us in imagining the region, its pasts, and its futures through the medium of photography.

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 6th Sarah Igo: Sex, Science, and Secrets in the Sixties

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 6, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMVictoria College, Room 323
    73 Queen’s Park Crescent
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    Sarah Igo: Sex, Science, and Secrets in the Sixties

    My talk, based on my recently published book, The Known Citizen, focuses on a moment when ideas in the United States about privacy and social research were evolving in tandem. I examine shifting sensibilities about confidentiality and consent in the 1960s and 1970s through the case of Laud Humphreys, a sociologist who conducted a path-breaking ethnographic study of gay male sex in public restrooms. Humphreys was initially applauded for the boldness of his research. Soon enough, however, he would be roundly condemned for invading the private lives of his unwitting subjects. The reaction to Humphreys’ Tearoom Tradereveals fresh skepticism about the “right to know” in an era of unprecedented federal funding and prestige for social science. It also highlights newfound concerns by the later sixties about the shrinking space for unmonitored action in the modern U.S.—even for behavior that offended dominant norms, was legally punishable, and officially shunned.

    For more info: http://hps.utoronto.ca/sarah-igo-sex-secrets-and-social-research-in-the-sixties/


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 13th – Friday, September 14th Interdisciplinary Simmel: A Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 13, 20182:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, September 14, 20189:00AM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Thursday September 13

    2:00 Opening Remarks: Willi Goetschel and Dan Silver

    2:15 Omar Lizardo, Simmel’s dialectic of content and form in recent work in cultural sociology

    3:00 Thomas Kemple, Simmel’s Sense of Modernity: Adventures in Time and Space

    3:45 Coffee Break

    4:15 Natàlia Cantó Milà, Simmel’s Sociology of Relations

    5:00 Elizabeth Goodstein, Simmel’s Phenomenology of Disciplinarity

    Friday September 14

    9:15 John McCole, Georg Simmel: Deconstructing the Self and Recovering Authentic Individuality

    10:00 Oliver Simons, Georg Simmel’s Theory of Form

    10:45 Coffee Break

    11:00 Daniel Silver and Milos Brocic, Three Conceptions of Form in Simmel’s Sociology

    11:45 Willi Goetschel, Form and Relation: Difference and Alterity in Simmel

    12:30 Open Discussion

    Sponsors

    Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service)

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Department of Philisophy, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 13th Book Launch: The Age of Eisenhower

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 13, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    William I. Hitchcock is the William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has written or edited six books on the international, diplomatic and military history of the 20th Century, in particular the era of the world wars and the cold war.

    He received his B.A. degree from Kenyon College in 1986, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1994. His book The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe (Free Press, 2008), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, a winner of the George Louis Beer Prize, and a Financial Times bestseller.
    His most recent book is the New York Times bestseller, The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s
    He lives in Charlottesville with his wife, Elizabeth Varon, who is a historian of the US Civil War.

    Books for sale and signing. Refreshments provided.


    Speakers

    William I. Hitchcock
    William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virg



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 14th Goliath's Advantage: Why Big Firms are Getting Bigger and What that Means For Wages, Productivity, and Inequality

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 14, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Throughout the global economy, big companies are getting bigger. They’re more productive, more profitable, and they pay better. The people lucky enough to work at these companies are doing relatively well. Those who work for the competition aren’t. Policymakers have taken notice. Competition policy is seeing renewed interest and “monopoly” is suddenly on the tip of every columnist’s tongue. However, new research shows that big firms have gotten bigger not so much because of permissive antitrust enforcement, but because these firms have developed highly effective proprietary digital technologies. Indeed, firms–predominately large firms–are investing nearly as much in proprietary software as they invest in new physical capital. This trend has let large firms increasingly dominate their industries, slowed productivity growth, and contributed to unequal and stagnant wages.

    James Bessen, an economist, serves as Executive Director of the Technology & Policy Research Initiative at Boston University School of Law. Mr. Bessen has done research on whether patents promote innovation, why innovators share new knowledge, and how technology affects jobs, skills, and wages. With Michael J. Meurer, Bessen wrote Patent Failure (Princeton University Press, 2008), highlighting the problems caused by poorly defined property rights. His research first documented the large economic damage caused by patent trolls and showed the link between information technology and job growth. His latest book, Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth (Yale University Press, 2015), looks at history to understand how new technologies affect wages and skills today. Bessen’s work has been widely cited in the press as well as by the White House, the U.S. Supreme Court, judges at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Federal Trade Commission. In 1983, Bessen developed the first commercially successful “what-you-see-is-what- you-get” PC publishing program, founding a company that delivered PC-based publishing systems to high-end commercial publishers.




    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    James Bessen
    Executive Director of the Technology & Policy Research Initiative at Boston University School of Law



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 14th Professor Ronald F. Inglehart - The Silent Revolution in Reverse: The Rise of Trump and the Authoritarian Populist Parties

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 14, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria University in the University of Toronto
    93 Charles Street W
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C7
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    Series

    Munk Environics Lecture

    Description

    Ronald F. Inglehart is the Lowenstein Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan. Author of over 300 publications, he holds honorary doctorates from Uppsala University, Sweden, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Lueneburg, Germany. Inglehart helped found the Euro-Barometer surveys and is founding president of the World Values Survey Association, which has surveyed representative national samples of the publics of 105 countries containing over 90 percent of the world’s population. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. In 2011, Inglehart won the Johan Skytte prize in Political Science, often considered the highest prize awarded in the field.

    Professor Ingleharts’ recently published book, Cultural Evolution: People’s Motivations are Changing, and Reshaping the World, argues that people’s values and behavior are shaped by the degree to which survival is secure; it was precarious for most of history, which encouraged heavy emphasis on group solidarity, rejection of outsiders, and obedience to strong leaders. For under extreme scarcity, xenophobia is realistic: if there is just enough land to support one tribe and another tribe tries to claim it, survival may literally be a choice between Us and Them. Conversely, high levels of existential security encourage openness to change, diversity and new ideas. The unprecedented prosperity and security of the postwar era brought cultural change, the environmentalist movement, and the spread of democracy. But in recent decades, diminishing job security and rising inequality have led to an authoritarian reaction. Evidence from more than 100 countries demonstrates that people’s motivations and behavior reflect the extent to which they take survival for granted—and that modernization changes them in roughly predictable ways. This book explains the rise of environmentalist parties, gender equality, and same-sex marriage... and the current reaction producing Trump, Brexit, and France’s National Front, through a new, empirically-tested version of modernization theory.

    “This book is the product of an extremely ambitious project—ambitious in terms of the broad scope of the various aspects of society that its theoretical insights purport to explain, but also in terms of the range of the social science disciplines that are swept up and integrated into this “evolutionary modernization theory.” One could even regard this enterprise as striving towards what would be the equivalent of “unified field theory” in physics. What Chutzpah! And what a burden of proof such an ambitious enterprise would face. Remarkably, Inglehart succeeds in this demanding task, the ultimate product of which I regard as one of the most important works in the social sciences in decades”.

    –Richard Gunther, Ohio State University

    “Cultural Evolution culminates a remarkably productive half century’s exploration of cultural change by Ronald Inglehart. This renowned scholar now extends the reach of his theory to global history, while honing his concepts to dissect, for example, the emergence of rightwing populism and LGBTQ activism. This is Inglehart at his most ambitious and most astute. It is a powerful book”.

    –Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University

    “Cultural Evolution is an intellectual tour-de-force. Drawing on insights from years of research in societies representing 90% of the world’s population, the renowned political scientist Ronald Inglehart traces the most important changes taking place across the globe—the shift from Materialist to Postmaterialist values. His brilliant new Evolutionary Modernization theory explains changes in religion, conflict, gender equality, democracy, happiness, among other phenomena through the same parsimonious scientific lens. It is a fantastic read for anyone interested in understanding the dynamics of culture change”.

    –Michele Gelfand, University of Maryland


    Speakers

    Ronald F. Inglehart
    Speaker
    Research Professor, Center for Political Studies Professor, Department of Political Science University of Michigan

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 20th Phantom Services: Deflecting Migrant Workers in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 20, 201812:30PM - 2:30PMIgnat Kaneff Building, room 4034, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, 4700 Keele St.
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    Description

    As China urbanizes, more migrants need and expect public services. Many municipalities, however, deflect demands for benefits instead of meeting them or denying them outright. Within cities, the authorities may establish nearly impossible eligibility requirements or require paperwork that outsiders struggle to obtain. Municipal leaders may also nudge migrants to seek healthcare or education elsewhere by enforcing dormant rules, shutting a service down, or encouraging them to pursue cheaper options in another city or in the countryside. Urban officials deflect migrants for both political and practical reasons. Limiting access isolates and disempowers migrants and is cheaper than offering benefits. Phantom services are also politically appealing at a time when the central government is calling for greater benefits for non-locals and urging people to move to small cities, but municipal authorities must deal with migrants who continue to appear in large numbers in the biggest, most desirable cities.


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Brien
    Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Osgoode Hall Law School

    The Nathanson Centre

    York Centre for Asian Research


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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