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March 2019

  • Friday, March 1st Development and Impact of the Thai Military’s Political Offensive

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    It is recognized that the military coups in Thailand in 2006 and 2014 were the orchestrated attempts of the anti-democratic alliance of the old powers against the rise of electoral politics. After the coups, they have tried to establish firm control through various measures, including the constitutions of 2007 and 2017 and strengthening the bureaucracy. However, little attention has been paid to the Thai military’s expansive civil affairs projects, including rural and urban development programs, mass organizations and mobilization campaigns, ideological and psychological programs. Puangthong argues that the Thai military has always paid great importance to its civil affairs projects as a political offensive to control popular politics since the counter-insurgency period. The conservatives craftily manipulated legal and moral legitimacy in order to protect and expand the army’s role beyond its combatant sphere. The entrenchment has been more apparent and aggressive since the 2006 coup. Old apparatuses were reactivated and new ones were created. Power of the army over other state agencies increased more than ever. On one hand, the military’s civil affairs projects allow the military and conservative elites to dictate the country’s long-term political direction. This potent tool, on other hand, effectively polarizes the populace deeper and thus makes democratization in the future difficult.

    Biography:
    Puangthong R. Pawakapan is Associate Professor of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. She is currently a visiting scholar at the Harvard Yenching Institute, Harvard University, 2018-2019. Her recent works include “The Central Role of Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command in the Post-Counter-insurgency Period,” Trends in Southeast Asia (ISEAS: Singapore 2017); “The Foreign Press’ Changing Perceptions of Thailand’s Monarchy.” Trends in Southeast Asia. (2015); State and Uncivil Society in Thailand at the Temple of Preah Vihear, (2013).


    Speakers

    Puangthong R. Pawakapan
    Speaker
    Department of Political Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st The Bazaar in Ruins: Ownership and Rent in two Central Asian Markets

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    In this paper, I draw on fieldwork in the Barakholka (in Almaty, Kazakhstan) and Kara-Suu bazaar (in southern Kyrgyzstan) to illustrate how these rent-generating institutions have localized patrimonialism through tumultuous renegotiations of property rights. Multiple narratives of ruination echo through this process: the bazaar as residue of a transition from communism; charred remains in the wake of bazaar fires; violent clashes between contenders vying for ownership and control.

    I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, Pakistan. My ongoing research explores emerging commercial configurations in greater Central Asia, such as regional bazaar trade. During 2018-2019, I am a Senior Researcher at CERES.


    Speakers

    Hasan Karrar
    Lahore University of Management Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Book Launch for "Diasporic Media Beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Korea in a celebration of Dr. Sherry Yu’s book “Diasporic Media beyond the Diaspora: Korean Media in Vancouver and Los Angeles.” Dr. Yu will be joined by Dr. Karim Karim who will be the discussant for the event.

    Sherry S. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Culture and Media and the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto.

    Karim H. Karim is a Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication and the Director of the Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam at Carleton University. He is also an Associate of Migration and Diaspora Studies and the Centre for European Studies at Carleton University.

    Coffee and refreshments available at event.


    Speakers

    Sherry Yu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Arts, Culture and Media, and the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

    Karim H. Karim
    Discussant
    Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton Universty; Director, Carleton Centre for the Study of Islam



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 1st Yoga as the Art of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 1, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE B. N. PANDEY MEMORIAL LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF INDIA

    Today we think of yoga as a practice of spiritual and physical health that originated in the search by India’s ancient sages for ultimate truth and release from the world of suffering. But the history of yoga is more than postures, breathing, and meditation. The oldest associations with the word “yoga” in the Rig Veda involved war, and as recently as the 19th century in India, yogis were not only associated with ascetic practices of ultimate liberation, but also the mundane world of politics, violence, and power. The most recent invocation of yoga in the context of domestic and international politics by India’s current prime minister, Narendra Modi, is another example of the way yoga remains deeply invested in the world of political power. This talk, based on a forthcoming book by Sunila S. Kale and Christian Lee Novetzke, revisits a history of yoga in India through the lens of political action and worldly power to suggest that at the core of all practices associated with the term “yoga” lies a theory of practice around mediating the relationship between the self and its many, sometimes agonistic, others.

    Christian Lee Novetzke is a Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. He is the author of Religion and Public Memory (2008), The Quotidian Revolution (2016), and co-author (with Andy Rotman and William Elison) of Amar Akbar Anthony: Bollywood, Brotherhood, and the Nation (2016).


    Speakers

    Christian Novetzke
    Speaker
    Professor of Indian Religions, History, and Culture at the Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 4th Challenges for the G7 and G20 since 2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 4, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    To celebrate the publication of his revised The G20: Evolution, Interrelationships, Documentation, Peter Hajnal will talk about many changes that the G7 and G20 have undergone in the five years since the first edition in 2014.

    One major change was the suspension of Russia’s membership in the G8 in 2014, turning it once again into the G7. Another challenge comes from the rise of populism internationally and US attitudes and actions under the Trump administration – on climate, trade, security and other issues. But on a positive note, both Gs, despite the challenges, are surviving as key institutions of global governance.

    Peter has been a member of the G7/G8/G20 Research Groups since 1988 and attended 14 G7/G8/G20 summits as a member of the field team. He is also a member of the Academic Council on the United Nations System, the Union of International Associations, the Association of Former International Civil Servants and the American Library Association. Before his retirement he was Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto for 11 years. He also served as librarian for 25 years at the University of Toronto and 10 years at the United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library in New York. He was consultant at the United Nations, in post-Yugoslavia Macedonia, at the Civil G8 project in 2006 in Russia, and the Graham Library, Trinity College, University of Toronto, and assessor of the 2005 G8 Stakeholder Consultation for Chatham House. He is also a participant in Canada Declassified, a project of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, Trinity College, University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Peter Hajnal
    Fellow of Senior College and Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 5th Seminar on Deep Empathy & Emotional Intelligence with Dr. Joseph MacInnis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 5, 20193:30PM - 5:30PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Come out to learn about team genius with Dr. Joe MacInnis!

    Deep Empathy is having a visceral, action-inspired feeling for the team, the task, the technology and the terrain. Central to this is the emotional intelligence to understand your own feelings and the feelings of your team partners.

    We will examine the importance of deep empathy and emotional intelligence. We’ll create action steps to improve our deep empathy skills.


    DR JOSEPH MACINNIS is a physician-scientist who examines leadership and team genius in life-threatening environments and how they can be enhanced in our personal and professional lives.

    Dr. MacInnis helped develop some of the systems and techniques that allow humans to function safely deep within the sea. He’s worked on undersea science and engineering projects with the US Navy, the Canadian government and the Russian Academy of Sciences. Supported by the Canadian government, he led ten research expeditions under the ice of the Arctic Ocean. The first person to explore the ocean beneath the North Pole, he was among the first to dive to the Titanic. He’s spent six thousand hours working inside the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. Recently, he was the medical advisor and journalist on the James Cameron National-Geographic seven-mile science dive into the Mariana Trench.

    Dr. MacInnis currently examines and writes about leadership and team genius in lethal environments. He’s produced two leadership training videos for the Canadian military. His latest book, Deep Leadership: Essential Insights from High-Risk Environments, was published by Random House. He has written and hosted radio, television and giant-screen stories for CBC, CBS, Imax Corporation, National Geographic and the Discovery Channel.

    Dr. MacInnis gives leadership and team genius presentations in North America and Europe. His audiences have included Microsoft, IBM, National Geographic, Rolex, Visa and the U.S. Naval Academy. His work has earned him numerous distinctions including six honorary doctorates and the Order of Canada.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Dr.Joseph MacInnis
    Speaker

    Jona Malile
    Admin



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 6th A Religion / Migration Nexus? Faith groups, immigration policy, and public opinion in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 6, 201912:30PM - 2:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A webinar of this event will be available shortly before the panel begins. 

    Immigration to Canada has progressively changed the religious composition of the country, and stimulated a number of heated policy debates around questions of citizenship and belonging. Religious groups have also long been some of the most vocal advocates for family migration and refugee resettlement. At the same time, narratives of displacement, welcome, and belonging have largely ignored the experience and opinions of Indigenous populations.

    This discussion will examine how religion and shaped migration and vice versa: How have faith groups influenced immigration patterns and policy? How is immigration changing religion in a secular Canadian society? And what do Indigenous experiences of displacement tell us about popular narratives of welcome?

    Shachi Kurl:

    “Migration’s Impact on Secularism in Canada” 

    Geoffrey Cameron:

    “Religion and the course of private refugee sponsorship in Canada”

    Sadia Rafiquddan:

    “Words Matter: Reframing the narrative of refugees, Indigenous peoples and Muslims in Canada” 

    Discussant: Michael Donnelly, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Shachi Kurl is Executive Director of the Angus Reid Institute. She is a frequent guest on CBC’s “At Issue,” Canada’s most-watched political panel, and her analysis has been published in The Globe and Mail, the National Post, and other influential forums.

    Geoffrey Cameron (MPhil, PhD) is Director of Public Affairs for the Baha’i Community of Canada, a Research Associate with the Global Migration Lab, and he teaches at McMaster University. He is co-editing a forthcoming volume, “Private Refugee Sponsorship: Concepts, Cases, and Consequences”.

    Born in Sargodha, Pakistan, Sadia Rafiquddin draws inspiration from her parents’ move to Canada as refugees in 1990. She is a freelance writer, broadcaster and photographer focusing on human rights stories for CBC, Ferst Digital Inc., Philanthropic Foundations Canada, Hacking Health and Apathy is Boring among others. Her radio documentary Engaged at 14:“I was worried about science class. And now I am getting married?” for CBC’s The Doc Project, was awarded two silver prizes at the New York Festival’s World’s Best Radio Programs in 2018.


    Speakers

    Shachi Kurl
    Panelist
    Angus Reid Institute

    Geoffrey Cameron
    Panelist
    Baha’i Community of Canada, Global Migration Lab

    Sadia Rafiquddin
    Panelist
    Writer and broadcaster

    Michael Donnelly
    Speaker
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Baha'i Community of Canada

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 6th Lux Interview

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 6, 20194:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - Classroom, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Will Kosiancic
    (613) 867-9345


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Democracy in Asia: Building Sustainable Institutions and Practices in Turbulent Times

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This symposium brings together a distinguished group of scholars whose work either frames contemporary global assessments of the state of democracy around the world or focuses attention directly on the political struggle now underway between democracy and authoritarianism across the Asian region. Its purpose is to bring current comparative research on the evolution of democratic institutions and practices of government into dialogue with cutting-edge conceptual work on democracy and democratization. The participants together address the challenge of maintaining domestic and international stability when countries are facing competing political imperatives generated both by globalizing capitalism and by the contemporary diffusion of systemic power.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM
    2:10-2:15PM Welcoming Remarks
    RANDALL HANSEN
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    2:15-4:00PM Panel I
    LUCAN AHMAD WAY

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Are we actually in the Midst of a Democratic Recession?

    SEVA GUNITSKY
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Great Powers and the Future of Democracy

    LYNETTE ONG
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto
    Studying “China in the World” in 2019

    PHILLIP LIPSCY
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University
    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
    Democracy, Financial Crises, and Economic Volatility

    MAIKO ICHIHARA
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan
    Understanding Japan’s International Democracy Assistance Policy

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    4:00-4:15PM Break

    4:15-5:55PM Panel II

    YUSUKE TAKAGI
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan
    Democracy in Asia: The Case of the Philippines

    JOSEPH WONG
    Professor, Department of Political Science
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School
    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto
    Japan: Asia’s First Unlikely Democracy

    DAN SLATER
    Professor of Political Science
    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies
    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan
    Indonesia: Asia’s Newest Unlikely Democracy

    SANG-YOUNG RHYU
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea
    Upgrading Democracy in Korea: Resilient Consolidation and Complex Challenges

    DIANA FU
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    State Control in China under Xi Jinping

    Chair:
    LOUIS PAULY
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    Discussant:
    DAVID A. WELCH
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    5:55-6:00PM Closing Remarks
    TAKAKO ITO

    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    6:00-7:00PM Reception

    Event Program and Announcement

    Democracy in Asia Symposium Program

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science

    David A. Welch
    Discussant
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Takako Ito
    Closing Remarks
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Seva Gunitsky
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lucan Ahmad Way
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Panelist
    Professor, Department of Political Science

    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Associate Vice-President and Vice-Provost, International Student Experience, University of Toronto

    Maiko Ichihara
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Law and the School of International and Public Policy, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

    Phillip Lipscy
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Stanford University

    Thomas Rohlen Center Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Sang-young Rhyu
    Panelist
    Professor, Political Economy, Graduate School of International Studies, Yonsei University, South Korea

    Dan Slater
    Panelist
    Professor Political Science

    Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professor of Emerging Democracies

    Director, Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies (WCED), University of Michigan

    Yusuke Takagi
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Japan


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Political Science

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Kyiv, Constantinople, Moscow: an Ecclesial Triangle

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20195:00PM - 6:30PM5 Elmsley Place (next to Brennan Hall on USMC Campus)
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    Description

    In the Summer and Fall of 2018, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, who possesses a primacy of honour among Orthodox worldwide, announced that he would grant autocephaly—i.e. full self-governance—to Orthodoxy in Ukraine. The Russian Orthodox Church protested, and eventually broke communion with Constantinople. Around New Year, The Orthodox Church of Ukraine, as the autocephalous body is
    officially known, was recognized by the Ecumenical Patriarch so that there are now two Orthodox Churches in the country, both claiming canonical status. The presentation will shed light on this complex theological, canonical, and political situation.

    Thomas Bremer is professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Münster, Germany.
    He is author or (co)editor of several books, among them, Eastern Orthodox Encounters of Identity and Otherness: Values, Self-
    Reflection, Dialogue (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014) and Cross and Kremlin (Eerdmans, 2013), a short history of the Russian
    Orthodox Church. His research focuses on ecumenical relations between Eastern and Western Churches, on Orthodoxy in
    Russia, Ukraine, and in the Balkans, and on churches and politics in Eastern Europe.

    For futher information on the event, please contact Dr. Brian Butcher: brian.butcher@utoronto.ca

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Thomas Bremer
    Professor of ecumenical theology and Eastern Christian studies at the University of Munster, Germany


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Sponsors

    Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern European Christian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    University of St. Michael's College, University of Toronto

    Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Orthodox School of Theology

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 7th Which Alternative? Lessons from Germany's Past for a Europe in Tumult

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 7, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    In the past decade, Europe has drifted in and out of crises. The Eurozone crisis, the refugee crisis, and the resurgence of the far right have shaken the confidence of some of the most committed defenders of the European political project. Germany has found itself at the center of many of these issues, and its presence has often reinvigorated long-harbored global anxieties about German political power. Germany’s past, however, can teach us a great deal about both the potential and the limits of this current continental search for political alternatives. This talk will offer a set of theses on the recent influx of minorities, the faltering of the European Union, and the gradual transformation of Germany’s political landscape, including the rise of a New Right.

    Jennifer Allen is an assistant professor of modern German history at Yale University. She is working on a book titled Sustainable Utopias: Art, Political Culture, and Historical Practice in Late Twentieth-Century Germany, which charts Germany’s postwar efforts to revitalize the concept of utopia. She argues that, contrary to popular accounts, German interest in radical social alternatives had not diminished by the late twentieth century. Rather, Germans pursued the radical democratization of politics and culture through a series of modest grassroots projects. They not only envisioned a new German utopia but attempted to enact their vision, reclaiming utopian hope from the dustbin of historical ideas. In addition to the themes of utopia and anti-utopianism, Allen’s research explores the theories and practices of memory; counterculture and grassroots activism; and the politics of cultural preservation during and after the Cold War. Her work has been supported by the Volkswagen and Mellon Foundations; the American Academy in Berlin; the Institut für Zeitgeschichte; DAAD; the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego; and the Institutes for European Studies and International Studies at UC Berkeley. Allen received her Ph.D. in history from UC Berkeley in 2015. She is currently the Berthold Leibinger Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin and a visiting researcher at the Dahlem Humanities Center at the Free University in Berlin.

     


    Speakers

    Jennifer Allen
    Yale University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Natalia Roudakova is a cultural anthropologist (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007) working in the field of political communication and comparative media studies, with a broad interest in moral philosophy and political and cultural theory. She has worked as Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication, University of California in San Diego, and as Visiting Scholar in the Media and Communication Department at Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands) and in the Department of Communication at Södertörn University, Stockholm (Sweden). In 2013-2014, Roudakova was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California, where she completed her book, titled Losing Pravda: Ethics and the Press in Post-Truth Russia which is now out with Cambridge University Press.

    Losing Pravda examines the spectacular professional unraveling of journalism in Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union and its broader social and cultural effects. Roudakova argues that a crisis of journalism is unlike any other: it fundamentally erodes the value of truth-seeking and truth-telling in a society. In many ways, Roudakova tracks how a post-truth society comes into being. Russia’s case thus becomes far from unique, illuminating instead the historical and cultural emergence of phenomena such as “fake news,” misinformation (kompromat), and general distrust in politics and public life that have now begun to plague Western democracies as well. Roudakova’s account of one country’s loss of the culture of truth-seeking can serve as an important “wake-up call” for Western nations going forward.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Natalia Roudakova



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20193:00PM - 4:30PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management
    University of Toronto
    105 St. George Street
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    *Please register for this event here*

    The University of Toronto and the Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto are pleased to present a special symposium marking this year’s International Women’s Day on Friday, March 8. “Mentoring Women Leaders: A Conversation on International Women’s Day” will feature prominent women from various fields who will examine both advancements made by women in recent years as well as the challenges they continue to face. Among the speakers will be Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor of the University of Toronto, who will deliver the keynote speech on the careers of female academics. Other presenters will include the University of Toronto’s Vice-President, HR & Equity, Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, who will speak on the importance of women in terms of the university’s human resources, and Dr. Rachel Silvey, the Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, who will talk on women in Southeast Asia in a conversation moderated by Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin of the Department of Political Science. The Consul-General of Japan Takako Ito will focus on Japan’s various initiatives to raise the status of women such as the World Assembly of Women (WAW!) to be held in March in collaboration with Women 20 (W20). The assembled group of prominent women and their insights are certain to make this event both important and timely.

    *********************************************

    Event Program:

    3:00 – Welcoming Remarks by Dr. Louis Pauly, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    3:05 – Keynote Speech by Dr. Rose Patten, Chancellor, University of Toronto; Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto

    3:20 – Panel Discussion

    Panelists:
    Dr. Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Dr. Rachel Silvey, Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Ms. Takako Ito, Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Moderator: Dr. Sylvia Bashevkin, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    3:50 – Audience Q&A

    4:00 – Adjournment

    4:00-4:30 – Networking Reception

    Speakers

    Louis W. Pauly
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    Panelist
    Vice-President, HR & Equity, University of Toronto

    Rachel Silvey
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

    Takako Ito
    Panelist
    Consul-General of Japan in Toronto

    Sylvia Bashevkin
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Rose Patten
    Keynote
    Chancellor, University of Toronto

    Adjunct Professor, Rotman School of Management



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 8th Notes for a History of Prakrit Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE INDIA-CANADA ASSOCIATION LECTURE

    Prakrit was, along with Sanskrit and Tamil, one of the main languages of literature in premodern South Asia. It flourished in the first half of the first millennium BCE, although it continued to be cultivated for many centuries afterwards. This talk will begin by sketching the historical outlines of this tradition and then explain why it is important to corroborate, elaborate, and reflect upon its history. First, Prakrit textuality was closely connected to broader developments in the religious and expressive literatures of South Asia, and gives us a unique perspective onto those developments. Second, the many ways in which Prakrit texts defy being ‘historicized’—verses that slip in and out of anthologies, stories told again and again, works that survive only in fragments or abridgements—actually tell us something important about the historical being of literary texts.

    Andrew Ollett is a Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows. He works on the literary and intellectual traditions of premodern South Asia.


    Speakers

    Andrew Ollett
    Speaker
    Junior Fellow at Harvard University’s Society of Fellows

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th G7 Research Group Presents: Road to Biarritz 2019 - Priorities of the French G7 Presidency

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 201912:00PM - 2:00PMCombination Room, Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue
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    Description

    As France has assumed the presidency of the G7 for 2019, Marc Trouyet, France’s Consul General in Toronto, will share insights about his government’s preparation and its priorities for the summit it will host in Biarritz on August 24-26. He will also discuss continuities and cooperation with Canada’s 2018 presidency and themes at the Charlevoix Summit last June. The event will be moderated by Professor David Wright, Kenneth and Patricia Taylor Distinguished Professor of Foreign Affairs at Victoria College and Canada’s former and longest serving Ambassador to NATO.

    Biography:

    Marc Trouyet, the Consul General of France in Toronto since 2015, serves in the territorial jurisdiction of Ontario and Manitoba. Mr. Trouyet has been a diplomat for almost 15 years. His previous post as head of the department of French Overseas Development Assistance in Paris.

    For four years, he served as Deputy Head of Mission of the French Embassy in Australia. When Mr. Trouyet was Deputy Permanent Representative to the French United Nations mission in Rome, he worked extensively with the World Food Program, the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the Food and Agricultural Organization. He previously was the officer in charge of sustainable development issue in the UN division of the French Foreign Affairs department.

    Prior to joining the foreign service, Mr. Trouyet held positions in the governing council of the Paris City Council. A Graduate of l’Ecole nationale d’administration (ENA), Mr. Trouyet received his bachelor in Political Science and a Masters in Town Planning.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Marc Trouyet
    Speaker
    Consul General of France to Toronto

    David Wright
    Moderator
    Kenneth and Patricia Taylor Distinguished Professor of Foreign Affairs at Victoria College


    Sponsors

    G7 Research Group

    Co-Sponsors

    International Relations Society

    European Studies Students Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 11th Life Force Atrocities during the Korean War and their Aftermath: Repression, Resistance and the Construction of Solidarities of Bereavement

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Korean civil war, thousands of real and imagined “leftists” were massacred by the emerging South Korean state. In the wake of South Korea’s long process of post-authoritarian transitional justice, the nature of many of these atrocities has to come to light, in turn leading to increased interest from South Korean and international scholars. This talk builds upon this research by focusing on the role that the family structure played in determining the targets and methods of the perpetrators. Drawing on Elisa Von Joeden-Forgey’s concept of “life force atrocities,” I discuss the ways in which counter-insurgency forces incorporated the decimation the family unit as part of the broader process of anti-leftist liquidation. This pattern was continued into the post-war years, as survivors and families of accused “leftists” were denied the right to properly mourn and placed under the “guilt by association system”. I argue that this process of systematic persecution gave rise to novel forms of communal identities, anchored around the notion of the collective bereaved family. This, in turn, led to unique forms of political resistance in the 1960-1961 period.

    Dr Wright is currently the Korea Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto. He completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2016. He is currently working on completing his manuscript “Civil War, Politicide, and the Politics of Memory in South Korea, 1948-1961”. His work has been published in Cross Currents, The Asia Pacific Journal, and by Routledge.


    Speakers

    Brendan Wright
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; Director, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th Zimbabwe 2019: Real Quest for Democracy or Smoke and Mirrors?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Room 108N
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    Description

    The forced departure of President Mugabe, the transition to a new ZANU-PF leadership and the aftermath of the controversial 2018 elections have altered the Zimbabwean political landscape. Initial hopes that Zimbabwe was at a possible inflection point for democracy and development have vanished with the deepening political and economic crisis, the labor strikes and the regime’s violent crackdown in January 2019. Democratic space and opportunities for inclusive development are deteriorating as a result. What can be done to protect and enhance democratic space notably for women and youth and non-violent transformations from below? To better understand the situation, Global Affairs Canada supported a CANADEM team in making an assessment in February. Two members of the team will present and discuss their key findings at the brown bag lunch.

    JULIET KIRANGWA KAYE AND JEAN-MARC MANGIN, EQUIPE UBUNTU

    Jean-Marc and Juliet are the co-partners of EquipeUbuntu, a small consulting firm providing needs assessment, strategic advice and capacity-building.

    From 2010 to 2016, Jean-Marc was the Executive Director of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences, the largest national organization of Canadian researchers and scholars. After fifteen years as a public servant with the UN, international NGOs and the Canadian Government, Jean-Marc became in 2006 the executive director of CUSO, Canada’s oldest volunteer-sending NGO, and was the first executive director of the Global Call for Climate Action, a civil society initiative bringing together over 350 international organizations and networks in support of transformational change and rapid action to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Jean-Marc has lived for more than 10 years in the Global South, mostly in Africa. Jean-Marc holds a M.A. in Political Sciences from the University of Toronto.

    From 2004 to 2016, Juliet provided advice to over 400 entrepreneurs in the Greater Toronto Area in developing and executing their business plans. 83% were self-sustaining within 2 years; 8% earned over $1 million within 5 years. Prior to moving to Canada, Juliet worked with FAO and WFP in Ghana, Malawi and Zimbabwe in managing food security programs and in providing policy analysis. She has worked directly with farmers, extension services and agro-businesses as well as with policy units within the UN and local governments. Most recently, she supported private entities and consortiums achieving national food self-sufficiency goals in Guyana and Jamaica. Juliet holds a M.A. in Agricultural Economics from Makerere University in Uganda.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Juliet Kirangwa Kaye
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Jean-Marc Mangin
    Speaker
    CANADEM

    Wilson Prichard
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Master of Global Affairs Associate Professor, Political Science Research Director, International Centre for Tax and Development


    Co-Sponsors

    Trudeau Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th PCJ Society: CV/Resume Writing Workshop

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20192:30PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    208N
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    Description

    This CV/Resume writing workshop is open to anyone interested in touching up on their resume, or learning how to write one from scratch. A representative from U of T’s Career Centre will be coming in to give you tips and tricks to write an impressive and concise resume! Learning these techniques is especially helpful as this is a popular time to be applying for jobs and internships. You are highly encouraged to bring a copy of your resume with you to this workshop, but if you do not have one then this is a great opportunity for you to get started! Please email pcjsociety@utoronto.ca with any questions.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th Forced Migration in Central America: The Causes of "Caravans" and Canada's Response to a Regional Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    States in the North of Central America (NCA)– El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala – are characterized by endemic poverty, corruption, gang violence, criminality, sexual-identity and gender-based violence, and weak or repressive states. The situation has given rise to a major displacement crisis.

    The region saw a tenfold increase in refugees and asylum-seekers from 2011 to 2016. Over 350,000 people claimed asylum globally from 2011 and 2017, with 130,500 in 2017 alone. Most made claims in Mexico and the US, but an increasing number sought refuge in Belize, Costa Rica, and Panama. In the first two months of 2019 alone, almost 8000 refugee claims were made in Mexico; the majority from Honduras and El Salvador. Women, families, and unaccompanied minors are over-represented in displaced populations.

    Internal displacement is likewise significant. The region has the world’s most urbanized displaced population, with roughly 95% living in urban areas, making traditional, camp-based humanitarian assistance challenging.

    Regional displacement has international implications. Between 400,000 and 500,000 NCA nationals cross irregularly into Mexico annually, most attempting to reach the US. Mexico has become a country of destination, and the new Mexican government has quickly put in place reception measures and enhanced access to the labour market for refugees.

    To manage large displacements, states need to apply a comprehensive regional approach. UNHCR is supporting a state-led process known as the MIRPS – the Comprehensive Regional Protection and Solutions Framework – which seeks to promote mechanisms of responsibility-sharing for the prevention, protection and solutions of displaced populations.

    This timely panel will offer an in-depth analysis of the current situation, examine the policies of the new government in Mexico, and ask what Canada can do to assist host states and displaced people.


    Speakers

    Jean-Nicolas Beuze
    Speaker
    UNHCR Representative in Canada

    Carol Girón
    Speaker
    Regional Coordinator of Policy & Programming, Scalabrini International Migration Network, Guatemala City, Guatemala

    Arnau Baulenas Bardia
    Speaker
    Human rights lawyer, Instituto de Direchos Humanos, Universidad Centroamericano, San Salvador, El Salvador

    Patricia Landolt
    Moderator
    Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 12th From Syria To Hope: Social and Political Representation of Refugees in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 12, 20197:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    The event will screen From Syria To Hope, an official Films with a Cause documentary made in collaboration with York Region Muslims to explore the lives of three Syrian families who came to Canada as refugees. After the short screening there will be a Q&A period with the Director, Yazmeen Kanji, an undergraduate student at the University of Toronto. For the remainder of the event there will be a panel discussion about how refugees are socially and politically represented in Canada, specifically in the context of the Syrian refugee crisis.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 14th Nikhil Pal Singh - Race Realism and the US Rise to Globalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMUniversity College, Room 140
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    Series

    CSUS and F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    As Donald Trump conjures visions of battering “Chinese walls” to US commerce and erecting border walls to stem drugs, crime and surplus people from “s**thole countries” of the Western hemisphere at the center of his foreign policy project, we might want to reconsider the place of racial imaginaries within US foreign relations. In dominant scholarly accounts of post-WWII US foreign policy-making, civilizational, race-thinking retreated in the face of both IR realist and liberal internationalist concerns with the management of decolonization under aegis of global capitalism. In this talk, Dr. Nikhil Pal Singh considers how a tradition of what we might term, “race realism” has endured, shadowing and supplementing post-WWII globalism. In this, as in many aspects of the contemporary moment, Trumpism marks a return of what has been repressed.

    Contact

    Don Newton
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Dr. Nikhil Pal Singh
    Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History Faculty Director, NYU Prison Education Program New York University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 14th First Contact: Indigenous Film Screening

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 14, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The PCJ Society has partnered with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) and Canadian Studies Student Union to present a film screening event on Aboriginal peoples, First Contact.

    Most Canadians have never taken the time to get to know Indigenous People or visit their communities. First Contact takes six average Canadians, all with strong opinions about Indigenous People, on a unique 28-day journey into Indigenous Canada. Leaving their everyday lives behind, the six travel deep into Winnipeg, Nunavut, Alberta, Northern Ontario, and the coast of British Columbia to visit Indigenous communities. First Contact is a journey that will turn the six participants’ lives upside down, challenging their perceptions and confronting their opinions about a world they never imagined they would see. It is an experience that will change their lives, forever.

    The movie will run for roughly 50 minutes, before which we will open up a panel discussion with Professors from the Indigenous Studies Department at U of T, as well as members of audience (speaker information to follow).

    This event is free and open to all University of Toronto students. Tickets are limited. Please register on Eventbite.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Brenda Wastecoot
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto

    Muriam Fancy
    Moderator
    Peace, Conflict and Justice Student

    John Andras
    Discussant
    Founding Director of Honouring Indigenous Peoples Director, Portfolio Manager Andras Group, Mackie Research Capital



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th Munk School Graduate Student Conference “The New Economy: What’s New?”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 20199:30AM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Tickets: $5 General Admission/ Free for University Students (with student ID) & Munk Alumni

    The title of the 13th annual Munk Graduate Student Conference is “The New Economy: What’s New?” and discusses the state of the modern economy and how it will be affected by a variety of factors over the following decade. The event will feature four panels: (1) Investing in the New Economy- Latin America; (2) Migration and its effect on the New Economy; (3) Canada’s role in the New Economy; and finally, (4) Perspectives of Munk Graduate Students on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the New Economy, which will only feature graduate students. The knowledge and experience gained will be both applicable and relevant to students as they transition out of academia and begin to navigate the complexities of the current labour market.

    PANEL 1: Investing in the New Economy: Latin America
    Panelists: Jonathan Hausman, Jesus Bravo, Daniel Bernhard, Moderator: Dr. Darius Ornston
    PANEL 2: Migration and its Effect on the New Economy
    Panelists: Dr. Sharry Aiken, Alexia Campbell, Dr. John Isbister
    PANEL 3: Canada’s Role in the New Economy
    Panelists: Dr. Trevin Stratton, Professor Paul Acchione, Adam Jagelewski, Dr. Danny Harvey, Moderator: Dr. Enid Slack
    PANEL 4: Munk Graduate Students Panel: AI in the New Economy
    Moderator: Dr. Robert Austin

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    University of Toronto Graduate Student Union

    Master of Global Affairs Student Union

    CERES student Union

    Student Initiative Fund


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th University of Graz Exchange Opportunity Info Session

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201911:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Doris Knasar from the Office of International Relations at the University of Graz will give an overview of the study and research options for exchange students as well as student life on campus and in the city of Graz. The University of Graz is a comprehensive public research institution offering a range of English-taught courses for bachelor and master students across the disciplines (from liberal arts to naturals sciences, business, education and law). Research options are possible on all levels.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Doris Knavar
    Graz University, Austria


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    The European Studies Students’ Association at the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th 70 Years of Russian Musical Resistance: From Gulag Songs to Pussy Riot

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Artemi Troitsky is the leading Russian music journalist, radio host, producer, author and critic. He is the author of nine books on the history of Russian and Soviet music and youth culture, and he lectures widely around the world. Troitsky produces weekly shows for Radio Liberty and ARU.TV and regularly contributes to newspapers Novaya Gazeta, Postimees, and The Moscow Times. He is also a frequent contributor on Echo Moskvy, TV Dozhd, and BBC Russian Service.


    Speakers

    Artemi Troitsky
    music journalist and radio host


    Sponsors

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 15th David Peterson Public Leadership Program:
    Taylor Owen: What’s Behind the Techlash? (and what to do about it)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 15, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    2018 was the year of the techlash. It was the year that long-simmering concerns about the potential negative effects of technology on our economy, on our personal lives and even on our democracy broke into public debate. But what is behind this reaction? How did Silicon Valley go from a catalyst of innovation that was broadly seen as aligned with economic growth and democratic participation to the source of serious questions about the integrity of our society and democracy? And what should we as citizens and our governments do to respond?

    Taylor Owen is the Beaverbrook Chair in Media, Ethics and Communications and Associate Professor in the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University. He was previously Assistant Professor of Digital Media and Global Affairs at the University of British Columbia, and the Research Director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. His Doctorate is from the University of Oxford and he has been a Trudeau and Banting scholar, an Action Canada and Public Policy Forum Fellow, the 2016 Public Policy Forum Emerging Leader, and sits on the Board of Directors of the Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) and on the Governing Council of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Taylor Owen
    Beaverbrook Chair in Media, Ethics and Communications and Associate Professor, Max Bell School of Public Policy, McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, March 16th A Body in Fukushima: Reflections on the Nuclear in Everyday Life

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, March 16, 20191:00PM - 5:00PMInnis Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    NOTE: This event consists of three components: (1) Photo Exhibitions – March 4 to April 14; (2) A Body in a Library Performance by Eiko Otake – March 15; (3) Video Screening and Symposium – March 16. All three are free of charge. Registration is required ONLY for the the third part – Video Screening and Symposium.

    This is a multi-sited, multi-media, and multi-disciplinary event that demonstrates how art can contribute to critical reflection on the nuclearization of everyday life in our contemporary world. Since 2014 Eiko Otake and William Johnston have photographed the performer among the ruins and abandoned places that have been left in the aftermath of the nuclear catastrophe of March 2011. Following a magnitude 9 earthquake off the coast of Northeastern Japan, a massive tsunami inundated reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Plant, resulting in meltdowns in three reactors. The Fukushima disaster is regarded as the second largest nuclear accident in history, and yet its full consequences remain temporally and spatially boundless and ultimately unknowable — a reality that Otake’s haunting bodily performances and Johnston’s striking photography make so compelling. Otake’s and Johnston’s collaborative work on Fukushima has been exhibited in major venues across the Americas and appears in Canada for the first time.

    Otake is a world-renowned, movement-based artist who performed as Eiko and Koma for more than forty years before beginning her solo performances for the project, A Body in Places. Her awards include a Guggenheim, MacArthur, Samuel H. Scripps American Dance Festival Award, and Dance Magazine Award for lifetime achievement. William Johnston is a photographer and historian whose critically acclaimed written work and photography have focused on issues of the body, sexuality, disease, the environment, and public health. The symposium accompanying the exhibitions and performance will feature presentations by leading scholars and artists working across disciplines.

    PHOTO EXHIBITIONS
    DATES: March 4 – April 14, 2019 (depending on the library hours)
    LOCATIONS:
    Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street, Toronto, ON
    1st floor exhibition area,and 8th floor, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library
    Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge St., Toronto, ON
    3rd and 5th floors

    CURATORS:
    Takashi Fujitani, Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies
    Henry Heng Lu, Independent Curator and Founder, Call Again

    A BODY IN A LIBRARY PERFORMANCE BY EIKO OTAKE
    DATE: Friday, March 15, 5:15 – 7:00 PM
    LOCATION: Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

    VIDEO SCREENING AND SYMPOSIUM
    * Registration is required *
    DATE: Saturday, March 16, 1:00 – 5:00 PM, followed by reception
    LOCATION: Innis Town Hall, Innis College, 2 Sussex Ave., Toronto, ON
    SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS:
    Eiko Otake, Independent movement-based performance artist
    William Johnston, Department of History, Wesleyan University

    CHAIR
    Takashi Fujitani, Department of History and Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto
    PANELISTS
    Marilyn Ivy, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
    Photography and 3.11, with a meditation on William Johnston’s photographs of Eiko Otake in Fukushima
    Katy McCormick, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University
    Searching for A Body, Finding Trees
    Lisa Yoneyama, Women and Gender Studies Institute and Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
    Post-Fukushima Epistemology
    Tong Lam, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Fallout, promise! Some reflections on pink landscapes

    For more information from the Toronto Public Library, please click here.

    Main Sponsor

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Toronto Reference Library

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Studies Department, University of Toronto

    School of Image Arts, Ryerson University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 18th Leading Up to Osaka 2019: Japan’s Role in Global Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 18, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    With less than four months until the 2019 G20 summit is hosted in Osaka, Japan, this panel event will bring together experts to discuss Japan’s role in global governance and plurilateral summitry, specifically in the context of the G7 and G20. Organized by the G20 Research Group, the G7 Research Group, the International Relations Society (IRSOC), the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU), and co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, this discussion will focus on the history of Japan’s involvement in global governance, its contribution to the management of global affairs and the challenges it faces as the current G20 host and on the international stage writ large. This event will host J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy and Interim Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Professor Louis Pauly, G7 and G20 expert Dr. Peter Hajnal, and Japan International Cooperation Agency civil servant Mrs. Kazuko Funakoshi.

    Speaker Biographies:

    Alessandra Cicci is co-chair of the executive of summit studies for the G20 Research Group for the 2019 summit in Osaka, Japan and a Senior Researcher for the G7 Research Group. She holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, Italian and European Union Studies and graduated from St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto in 2018. She currently works in Government Relations at a public affairs firm and will begin a dual-degree program at Sciences Po and the Munk School in September for a Master of Public Policy and Master of Global Affairs.

    Kazuko Funakoshi has extensive career experience in development finance, and is currently studying at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Prior to the Munk School, she was leading the Official Development Assistance (ODA) loan projects team in Nepal at the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)—the government agency in charge of Japan’s ODA. At JICA, Kazuko formulated and implemented large-scale infrastructure projects across Asia in various sectors such as energy, environment, transport and housing—some of which were co-financed with the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. She also has experience with emergency response operations (Specifically, the 2015 Nepal Earthquake). She holds a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics from Kyoto University in Japan.

    Ji Yoon Han is co-chair, with Alessandra Cicci, of the executive of summit studies for the G20 Research Group for the 2019 Summit in Osaka. She graduated with a Honours Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Bioethics from the University of Toronto. Ji Yoon has previously served as compliance analyst, lead analyst and compliance director for both the G20 and G7 Research Groups. Her research interests are in green financing and renewable energy, developed through her work on clean energy, tax administration and international financial institution reform. Ji Yoon has attended G7 and G20 summits in Hamburg, Charlevoix and Buenos Aires.

    Peter Hajnal is a Fellow of Senior College and Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto. He has been a member of the G7/G8/G20 Research Groups since 1988 and attended fourteen G7/G8/G20 summits. Before his retirement he was Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto for 11 years; served as librarian for 25 years at the University of Toronto and 10 years at the United Nations Dag Hammarskjöld Library in New York; and conducted a number of consultancies. In addition to a number of articles, book chapters and conference presentations, he is the author or editor of eleven books, including The G8 System and the G20: Evolution, Role and Documentation (Ashgate, 2007; also published in Russian and Chinese editions). His latest book is the second, revised edition of The G20: Evolution, Interrelationships, Documentation (Routledge, 2019).

    Louis W. Pauly is the J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is cross-appointed to the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, where he also serves as Interim Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan. A graduate of Cornell University, the London School of Economics, New York University, and Fordham University, he was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2011. With Emanuel Adler, he edited the journal International Organization from 2007 to 2012. In 2015, he received the Distinguished Scholar Award in International Political Economy from the International Studies Association. His major publications include Power in a Complex Global System; Hong Kong’s International Financial Centre; Global Ordering: Institutions and Autonomy in a Changing World; Global Liberalism and Political Order; Complex Sovereignty; Governing the World’s Money; Democracy beyond the State?; The Myth of the Global Corporation; Who Elected the Bankers? Surveillance and Control in the World Economy; and Opening Financial Markets: Banking Politics on the Pacific Rim.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Peter Hajnal
    Panelist
    Fellow, Senior College

    Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Kazuko Funakoshi
    Panelist
    Master of Global Affairs (MGA) Candidate Former Civil Servant, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)

    Alessandra Cicci
    Speaker
    Co-Chair, G20 Research Group

    Ji Yoon Han
    Speaker
    Co-Chair, G20 Research Group

    Louis W. Pauly
    Discussant
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    G20 Research Group

    G7 Research Group

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    International Relations Society

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 19th Japan’s Role in the Global Governance of Non-Proliferation and Outer Space

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 19, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    Lecture Summary:
    Japanʼs presence in the global rule-making process was timid, to say the least, during the Cold War. Although it presented itself as a victim of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan was also under the extended nuclear deterrence of the United States. However, recent initiatives such as the Arc of Freedom and Prosperity or Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision brought Japan into the global governance stage. This lecture will discuss cases of global governance on nuclear non-proliferation and outer space.

    Japan faces a non-proliferation challenge from North Korea and a space threat from China. Taking initiatives in these domains is essential to Japanʼs security as well as to maintaining global order for peaceful use of nuclear and space technologies. As a tech-advanced country, Japan plays a certain role in providing ideas and technical support for both domains. These cases show how Japan sees itself as a player in the global governance structure.

    Speaker Biography:
    Kazuto Suzuki is Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics at the Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan. He worked as an assistant researcher in the Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique in Paris, France, and as Associate Professor at the University of Tsukuba (2000 to 2008). Suzuki was a visiting researcher at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University (2012 to 2013), and he served on the Panel of Experts for the Iranian Sanction Committee under the United Nations Security Council (2013 to July 2015). He is a former President of the Japan Association of International Security and Trade.

    Suzuki’s research focuses on the conjunction of science/technology and international relations, including space policy, non-proliferation, and export control and sanctions. His recent work includes Space and International Politics (2011, in Japanese, awarded the Suntory Prize for Social Sciences and Humanities), Policy Logics and Institutions of European Space Collaboration (2003) and many others.

    Event Announcement

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Kazuto Suzuki
    Speaker
    Vice Dean and Professor of International Politics, Graduate School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University, Japan

    Takako Ito
    Opening Address
    Consul General of Japan in Toronto

    David A. Welch
    Chair
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs

    Louis W. Pauly
    Welcoming and Closing Remarks
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 20th A Conquest that Changed an Empire: The Ottoman Military in Syria

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 20, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room (SS2098)
    Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    When Selim I conquered Syria in 1516, he changed the Ottoman Empire in more ways than simply adding territory. This lecture discusses the effect of the conquest of Syria on two fundamental Ottoman military institutions—the timar cavalry system and the Janissary infantry corps—and demonstrates the use of government documents to critique the representation of these changes in the political literature of the time as illegitimate. These shifts are usually attributed to the military and price revolutions of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. However well before these developments, circumstances resulting from the Ottoman presence in the Arab lands caused both military forces to intensify the recruitment of outsiders. The resulting alterations in both military systems were not confined to Syria, but spread throughout the empire and made the Ottoman Empire another kind of state, not just larger but institutionally and ideologically different.


    Speakers

    Linda Darling
    Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg, Universität Bonn, and University of Arizona


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 20th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 20, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Join us as Professor Sánchez-Cuenca, discusses “Spain: A Wounded Country After Economic, Political and Territorial Crises.” This presentation is part of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series.

    Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences at Carlos III University of Madrid. He has written extensively on political violence, terrorism, theory of democracy, and Spanish politics. His latest book is The Historical Roots of Political Violence (Cambridge University Press, 2019).


    Speakers

    Professor Ignacio Sanchez-Cuenca
    Associate Professor, Political Science and Director of the Carlos III-Juan March Institute of Social Sciences Carlos III University of Madrid



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Indigenous Intersections Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place,
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    INDIGENOUS INTERSECTIONS explores indigeneity as a category of identity with specific attention to the U.S. context. Through invited keynote lectures, panel presentations, and critical discussion inviting audience participation, this symposium interrogates the following questions: How does indigeneity intersect with race, gender, and sexuality? As significant numbers of indigenous peoples from Latin America migrate to the United States, how does indigeneity shift across the borders of settler states? How can Native Americans, Indigenous migrants, and communities of color (not mutually exclusive categories) support each other’s projects of sovereignty and decolonization?

    Invited Speakers:

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University, author of Indian Given: Racial Geographies across Mexico and the United States (2016) and The Revolutionary Imagination in the Americas and the Age of Development (2003)

    Beginning with her seminal essay “Who’s the Indian in Aztlán? Rewriting Mestizaje, Indianism, and Chicanismo from the Lacandón,” Professor Saldaña-Portillo has been at the forefront of re-thinking Chicanx-Native American relations in the United States. Her most recent monograph, Indian Given, winner of the 2016 Best Book Award from the National Association of Chicano and Chicana Studies, examines the long and continued significance of British and Spanish colonial racialized notions of place.

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon, author of Recognition Odysseys: Indigeneity, Race, and Federal Tribal Recognition Policy in Three Louisiana Indian Communities (2011), co-editor (with Brenda Child) of Indian Subjects: Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education (2014), and author of the forthcoming Indian on Both Sides: Indigenous Identities, Race, and National Borders.

    Professor Klopotek’s pathbreaking 2011 interdisciplinary ethnography Recognition Odysseys explores the central role race plays in federal processes of tribal recognition. Turning his attention to the U.S.-Mexico border in his forthcoming monograph Indian on Both Sides, Professor Klopotek examines the continuing significance of race in determining who counts as Indigenous in the United States.

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor of American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, author of numerous volumes including Indian Blood: HIV and Colonial Trauma in San Francisco’s Two-Spirit Community (2016) and Louisiana Creoles: Cultural Recovery and Mixed Race Native American Identity (2007); editor of Obama and the Biracial Factor: The Battle for a New American Majority (2012).

    Located at the intersections of Indigenous studies, queer studies, mixed-race studies, and public health, Professor Jolivétte’s 2016 monograph Indian Blood, a Lamda Literary Award finalist, explores the long impact of colonial trauma on two-spirited, mixed-race Native people as well as possibilities for healing and decolonization. Professor Jolivétte’s varied, illustrious career has included serving as Executive Director of the American Indian Community Cultural Center for the Arts in San Francisco, the Indigenous Peoples’ Representative at the United Nations Forum on HIV and the Law in 2011, and Tribal Historian for the Atakapa-Ishak Nation from 2008-2011.

    Indigenous Intersections Symposium Schedule

    9:00-9:30am – Coffee Reception
    9:30-10:00am – Introduction: Intersections of Indigeneity, Race, Gender, and Identity in the Americas – Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto
    10:00-11:00am – Andrew Jolivétte, San Francisco State University
    11:00-11:30am – Question and Answer with moderator Rinaldo Walcott, University of Toronto
    11:30am-1:00pm – Lunch Break
    1:00-1:45pm – Brian Klopotek, University of Oregon
    1:45-2:15pm – Question and Answer with moderator Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto
    2:15-3:00pm – María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo, New York University
    3:00-3:30pm – Question and Answer with moderator Nicholas Sammond, University of Toronto
    3:30-4:00pm – Coffee Break
    4:00-5:00pm – Roundtable Discussion with Professors Saldaña-Portillo, Klopotek, and Jolivétte – Moderated by Jedediah Kuhn, University of Toronto


    Speakers

    María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo
    Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, New York University

    Brian Klopotek
    Associate Professor, Ethnic Studies and Native American Studies Program Coordinator, University of Oregon

    Andrew Jolivétte
    Professor, American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Bissel-Heyd Fellowship in American Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st The Constitution of 1936 and Stalin's Turn to Mass Repressions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    In her presentation, Prof. Velikanova discusses a new element in the historical picture explaining why politics shifted to mass repressions in 1937. Besides Stalin’s protracted conflict with regional party/state clans and the inflammatory role of new NKVD head Nikolai Yezhov, the dictator’s conceptualization of popular commentaries on the constitution and the results of the 1937 census could reverse his views on society and the hope that ordinary Soviets were sufficiently Sovietized. Together with international developments in the fall of 1936 that heightened Stalin’s fear of war, popular discussion of the constitution can provide the missing piece in the puzzle for why relative moderation ended and repressions expanded from former oppositionists to the officials and finally to the wider population.

    Olga Velikanova is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Texas and a former alumna of CERES. She obtained her PhD from Saint Petersburg State university. She specializes in Soviet popular opinion studies and works extensively with declassified Communist party and secret police archives. She is author of five books discussing Soviet social mobilization campaigns and popular perceptions of Soviet politics and of Lenin’s image involving historical, anthropological and political culture methods. Her last book, Mass Political Culture under Stalinism: Popular Discussion of the Soviet Constitution of 1936 (Palgrave 2018) is the first full-length study of Stalin’s Constitution, exploring the government’s goals and Soviet citizens’ views of constitutional democratic principles and their problematic relationship with the reality of Stalinism.


    Speakers

    Olga Velikanova
    University of North Texas


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 21st Identification Technologies and Biometric Power: A Transition from Occupied China to Post-World War II Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The invention of identification technologies is deeply connected with the surveillance of colonial populations. Fingerprinting, the forerunner of biometrics, was created by the British police in colonial India in 1897, and was also employed in Manchuria and Northeast China under Japanese occupation from the 1920’s to 1945. Why did fingerprint identification attract the Japanese imperialist power, and how effectively was it practiced? We examine narratives surrounding the Japanese identification systems in Manchuria, especially regarding Chinese workers who were placed under severe surveillance, and discuss how a similar scheme survived the lost war and was actually legitimated in post-World War Ⅱ Japan. The expansion and transformation of biometric power can be seen in the Japanese government’s repeated attempts to establish “perfect” identification systems. Surveillance has spread from ex-colonial populations to foreign workers and to citizens, culminating in recent legislative changes concerning enhanced technologies.

    ASAKO TAKANO is an Associate Professor at Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan. She received her Ph.D. in Social Sciences from Hitotsubashi University, and published her book in Japan in 2016, Fingerprints and Modernity.

    MIDORI OGASAWARA is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Queen’s University, and a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. She conducted field research in China to investigate the Chinese experiences of Japanese colonial identification systems and obtained her Ph.D. in Sociology from Queen’s in 2018.


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Asako Takano
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Meiji Pharmaceutical University in Tokyo, Japan

    Midori Ogasawara
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University; Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Ottawa


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd – Saturday, March 23rd Beauty, Brutality, and the Neocolonial City

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20199:30AM - 3:00PM108N, North House, University of Toronto
    Saturday, March 23, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMUniversity of Toronto
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    Description

    Please use the registration button above to sign up for the lecture on March 22. To sign up for a reading on March 23, please click here to register on Eventbrite.

    This two-day event brings together international scholars and critics to explore the complexity, dynamism, and significance of Manila within and beyond Asia. As a city that has experienced the multiple vestiges of empire, the disciplinary machinations of dictatorial rule, the effects an infamous “war on drugs”, and the continued realities of uneven resource distribution, Manila serves as a productive physical and ideological space to explore the dialogic nature of beauty and brutality—as these concepts intertwine in the urban repertoires of the global south. On March 22, speakers will reflect on how Manila influences their work as diasporic critics scholars. On March 23, renowned Filipino American author Jessica Hagedorn will have her Toronto debut and read from her most famous works. She will also converse with Lucy San Pablo Burns (UCLA), discussing her thoughts on the city, and Manila, as an imaginative space for her artistry and craft. Books can be purchased at the venue, in collaboration with Another Story Bookshop.

    FRIDAY, MARCH 22
    108N – NORTH HOUSE, MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC POLICY,
    1 DEVONSHIRE PLACE
    Program:
    9:30 AM – 10:00 AM – Welcoming Remarks
    10:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Dialogue 1: Sensing the City
    SPEAKERS: Ferdinand Lopez (Toronto); Gary Devilles (Ateneo De Manila); Paul Nadal (Princeton); Genevieve Clutario (Harvard)
    12:00 PM – 1:00 PM – Lunch
    1:00 PM – 3:00 PM – Dialogue 2: Intimacies and the City
    SPEAKERS: Robert Diaz (Toronto); Denise Cruz (Columbia); Martin Manalansan (Minnesota); Christine Balance (Cornell); Allan Isaac (Rutgers)

    ***********************
    SATURDAY, MARCH 23
    NEXUS LOUNGE, 12TH FLOOR, OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), 252 BLOOR ST. W.
    A Reading with Noted Author Jessica Hagedorn, in Conversation with Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns (UCLA)
    Program:
    4:00 PM – 4:10 PM – Welcoming Remarks
    4:10 PM – 4:30 PM – Performance by Patrick Salvani
    4:30 PM – 6:00 PM – Reading with Jessica Hagedorn, and Conversation with Lucy Burns (UCLA)


    Speakers

    Christine Bacareza Balance
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies and Performance Studies, Cornell University

    Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department, University of California, Los Angeles

    Genevieve Clutario
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Harvard University

    Denise Cruz
    Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

    Robert Diaz
    Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

    Gary Devilles
    Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of the Filipinos Studies, Ateneo De Manila University

    Jessica Hagedorn
    Author of Toxicology, Dream Jungle, The Gangster of Love and Dogeaters; Winner of the American Book Award

    Allan Punzalan Isaac
    Associate Professor, English and American Studies, Rutgers University

    Ferdinand Lopez
    Associate Professor of English, University of Santo Tomas; an incoming PhD student in Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto

    Paul Nadal
    Post-Doctoral Research Associate of American Studies, Princeton University

    Martin Manalansan
    Associate Professor, American Studies, University of Minnesota


    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI)

    New College Initiatives Fund

    School of Cities, University of Toronto

    Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd The Feminist Awakening in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    On the eve of International Women’s Day in 2015, the Chinese government arrested five feminist activists and jailed them for thirty-seven days. The Feminist Five became a global cause célèbre, with Hillary Clinton speaking out on their behalf and activists inundating social media with #FreetheFive messages. But the Five are only symbols of a much larger feminist movement of university students, labor activists, civil rights lawyers, performance artists, and online warriors prompting an unprecedented awakening among young Chinese women. Through interviews with the Feminist Five and other Chinese activists, Hong Fincher illuminates both the difficulties they face and their “joy of betraying Big Brother,” as one of the Feminist Five wrote of the defiance she felt during her detention. Tracing the rise of a new feminist consciousness now finding expression through the #MeToo movement, Hong Fincher describes how the movement against patriarchy could reconfigure China and the world.

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher is a journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China (Verso 2018), which was named a best book of 2018 by Vanity Fair, Newsweek and others. She is the first American to receive a Ph.D. from Tsinghua University’s Department of Sociology in Beijing. She also has a master’s degree from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree with high honors from Harvard University. Her first book was the critically acclaimed Leftover Women: The Resurgence of Gender Inequality in China (Zed 2014).

    * Dr. Fincher’s book Betraying Big Brother: The Feminist Awakening in China will be available for purchase at the venue.*


    Speakers

    Dr. Leta Hong Fincher
    Speaker
    Journalist, scholar and author of Betraying Big Brother:The Feminist Awakening in China.

    Prof. Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Prof. Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Asian Institute

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd “Not in Our Name: The Spread Of Extremism In Central Asia”: A Film Screening and Conversation with Noah Tucker

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The documentary “Not in Our Name” is part of Central Asia’s First Regional Counter-Extremism Project, a research and documentary project developed by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) to help communities in Central Asia understand and prevent the spread of violence and extremism.

    For more information and interviews with the team visit: https://pressroom.rferl.org/p/6831.htm

    Q&A via Skype with Noah Tucker, Associate for the Central Asia Program at the Elliott School of International Affairs, The George Washington University. Senior Editor for Central Asia at RFE/RL.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 22nd The UN Peacekeeper Sexual Abuse Crisis: Is Canada Doing Enough?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 22, 20193:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The Trudeau government has repeatedly proclaimed that “Canada is back” in global affairs. In its public efforts to recommit to United Nations peace operations, Canada launched an initiative to increase the number of women participating in peace operations and deployed some 250 troops to the UN’s stabilization mission in Mali. While UN peacekeeping missions have made important contributions to maintaining peace and preventing conflict in recent years, the UN’s efforts have also been marred by sexual abuse scandals—exposing a startling accountability gap.

    AIDS-Free World’s Code Blue Campaign is leading an effort to end impunity for sexual abuse by UN personnel. For its part, Canada has pledged to take action to prevent and respond to sexual exploitation and abuse, including through its second National Action Plan to implement the UN Security Council’s resolution on Women, Peace and Security.

    But is Canada doing enough? Framed by Canada’s feminist foreign policy and an intensified focus on ending sexual violence in the #MeToo era, panellists will critically assess Canada’s current approach. What actions should Canada take to strengthen accountability for sexual violence in the aid sector?

    3:10-3:15 – Opening remarks

    3:15-4:00 – Panel Discussion

    4:00-4:45 – Q & A

    4:45-6:00 – Reception

    Contact

    Grace Egan


    Speakers

    Dr. Karen Breeck
    Speaker
    Major (Retired), Canadian Armed Forces

    Kaila Mintz
    Speaker
    Coordinator, AIDS-Free World’s Code Blue Campaign

    Sandra Biskupski-Mujanovic
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate Women's Studies and Transitional Justice Western University

    Gerald Bareebe
    Moderator
    PhD Candidate Department of Political Science University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Code Blue Campaign

    Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th Truth, Justice and Reconciliation in Colombia: Transitioning from Violence

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 201912:00PM - 1:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The signing of the peace agreements between the FARC-EP and the Colombian Government in late November 2016 generated hopes for peace in Colombia. However, the consolidation of peace and justice requires us to think about how to operationalize peace agreements. Agreements are not enough. Thus, reflecting on the existing challenges for the implementation of the agreements allows us to understand the current landscape in which the Colombian state is defaulting on its promise to implement a peace accord. This is the result of the tension between theory―the legislative frameworks guaranteeing human rights―and practice―the realization of these ideas― which frames Colombia’s challenges in consolidating the implementation of the peace agreements with the FARC-EP.


    Fabio Andrés Díaz is a Colombian political scientist. He is a Research Associate at the Department of Political and International studies at Rhodes University in South Africa and a Researcher at the International Institute of Social Studies in the Netherlands. Fabio works at the intersection between theory and practice, and his research interests are related to state strength, civil war, conflict and protests in the midst of globalization. In addition to his academic publications, his analysis has been published by Al Jazeera, Time, The Conversation, Los Angeles Times, among others.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Fabio Andrés Díaz
    Research Associate Department of Political and International Studies, Rhodes University in South Africa Researcher, International Institute of Social Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th International Investment Agreements and their Impact on State Regulatory Space: The Case of Israel

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    International investment agreements (IIAs) are a significant manifestation of the impact of legal globalization on national public policy. These are thousands of (mostly) bilateral treaties through which states commit to protect the rights of foreign investors. Moreover, these obligations can be enforced by a system of binding international investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), which allows investors to file claims against host countries that allegedly violated their obligations under their IIAs. The legitimacy of IIAs and ISDS is highly contested, however. On the one hand, they encroach on states’ regulatory space (SRS) and delegate legal authority to ad-hoc arbitration bodies, which lack transparency and accountability. On the other hand, their alleged positive effect on foreign investment is uncertain. As a party to about forty IIAs, Israel’s SRS is certainly affected by IIAs. Such potential impact came to the fore when an American company, Noble Energy, indicated that it might turn to ISDS against the Israeli government in relations to a disputed gas exploration project. I examine the implications of IIAs and ISDS to SRS both globally and with respect to Israel. After elaborating on and illustrating these relationships in the global arena, I present a measure of SRS that facilitates a systematic comparison of IIAs across time and space on this key dimension. I show that, of late, states around the world conclude IIAs with greater regulatory space and that Israel tracks this global trend. An analysis of investment disputes in the energy sector suggests that Israeli IIAs expose the country to costly ISDS claims and potentially limit its ability to regulate in important policy areas.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Yoram Haftel
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of International Relations, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Dan Breznitz
    Chair
    Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab, Munk Chair of Innovation Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th Sex and Power in Occupied Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Based on Robert Kramm’s book Sanitized Sex, the talk will discuss the various attempts to sanitize sexuality through the regulation of prostitution, venereal disease and intimacy in occupied Japan after World War II. It features sexuality as key element in issues of security, health and morale during the occupation period. In doing so it underscores how the sanitization of sex was a male-dominated struggle for control and authority in the clash of two competing patriarchal, imperial powers: Japan and the United States. That said, the talk is more than a study of the postwar sexual encounters. An analysis of sex, its regulation and negotiation between occupiers and occupied sheds new light on the everyday experiences and asymmetries of power in occupied Japan, the legacies of the Japanese Empire, and the particularities of postwar U.S. imperialism in the postcolonial formation of the Asia-Pacific region.

    Robert Kramm is a post-doctoral fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities and is affiliated with the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong. He holds a doctoral degree in history from ETH Zurich and received his B.A. and M.A., also in history, from the University of Erfurt.


    Speakers

    Robert Kramm
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities, Department of History, University of Hong Kong

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies; Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 25th What US Officials Said about NATO Enlargement, What the Russians Heard, and the Problem of Value-Complexity

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 25, 20195:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The fierce scholarly and practitioner debate on the question “did the United States promise not to enlarge NATO” has taken our attention away from an important policy problem and one newly released U.S. and Russian historical materials highlight very well: how do leaders manage tradeoffs and uncertainty? Pursuing one set of interests can harm the achievement of other interests. And sometimes, policies take a while to form, adding to uncertainty in relations among countries. American University Professor James Goldgeier will explain why Bill Clinton and his top advisers convinced themselves that they could both enlarge NATO and keep Russia on a Western-oriented track, despite Boris Yeltsin’s warnings to the contrary, and he will discuss the implications of their approach for U.S.-Russia relations today.

    James Goldgeier is Visiting Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Professor of International Relations at the School of International Service at American University, where he served as Dean from 2011-17. He holds the 2018-19 Library of Congress Chair in U.S.-Russia Relations at the John W. Kluge Center. Previously, he was a professor at George Washington University, where from 2001-05 he directed the Elliott School’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies. He also taught at Cornell University, and has held a number of public policy appointments, including Director for Russian, Ukrainian and Eurasian Affairs on the National Security Council Staff, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Henry A. Kissinger Chair at the Library of Congress. In addition, he has held appointments or fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Hoover Institution, the Brookings Institution, and the Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation. He is past president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs, and he co-directs the Bridging the Gap project, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He has authored or co-authored four books.


    Speakers

    James Goldgeier
    American University and Council on Foreign Relations



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 26th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series
    Deputy Minister Stephen Lucas: Governing Minerals for Renewable Energy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 26, 20199:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Renewable energy is the best means of bringing global emissions within the required 1.5 degrees limit. While this is an imperative technical response to climate change, the full cost of renewables needs investigation. Specifically, the value chains of minerals used to produce renewable energy remains hidden.

    Join us for a keynote presentation from Dr. Stephen Lucas, Deputy Minister, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Government of Canada followed by a discussion with Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Office of the Auditor General of Canada on the governance of the mineral supply chain for renewable energy.

    Speakers:

    Dr. Stephen Lucas was appointed Deputy Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) on January 23, 2017. As Senior Associate Deputy Minister (Climate Change) from June 2016 to January 2017, Dr. Lucas led ECCC activities in support of the development and adoption of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Before joining ECCC, Dr. Lucas was Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet for Plans and Consultations and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Privy Council Office. From 2013 to 2014, he was Assistant Secretary, Economic and Regional Development Policy, at the Privy Council Office.

    As Assistant Deputy Minister, Science and Policy Integration at Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) from 2009 to 2013, he was responsible for strategic policy development related to energy, mineral and forest resources, climate change and clean energy and international and intergovernmental relations. Prior to that, from 2007 to 2009, he was Assistant Deputy Minister, Minerals and Metals Sector, at NRCan, where he provided leadership on innovation, green mining and corporate social responsibility.

    Dr. Lucas started his career as a research scientist at the Geological Survey of Canada in 1988. He has a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Geological Engineering from Queen’s University and a Ph.D. in structural geology and tectonics from Brown University.

    Ms. Julie Gelfand was appointed as Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development in March 2014. Before joining the Office of the Auditor General, Ms. Gelfand held the positions of Chief Advisor at Rio Tinto Canada and of Vice-President of Environment and Social Responsibility at the Rio Tinto Iron Ore Company of Canada (IOC).

    Prior to joining IOC, Ms. Gelfand was Vice-President, Sustainable Development at the Mining Association of Canada and co-chair of the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Centre of Excellence, under the federal CSR Strategy for the Canadian International Extractive Sector.
    From 1992 to 2008, she served as President of Nature Canada. She also founded and chaired the Green Budget Coalition.


    Speakers

    Dr. Stephen Lucas
    Deputy Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada
    Government of Canada

    Ms. Julie Gelfand
    Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
    Office of the Auditor General, Government of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 26th What is Ottoman Historiography? Competing and Converging Narratives in 15th- and Early 16th-Century Rumeli

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 26, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Seminar Room (Sidney Smith 2098)
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    In the first decade of the 16th century, the historian Kemālpashazāde (d. 1534) composed an elaborate History of the Ottoman Dynasty, in which he included a lengthy account of the pre-Ottoman past of the Balkans (Rumeli) based—after a thorough redaction—on an apocryphal Christian work of medieval Bulgarian history. By taking this peculiar case of convergence between Muslim and Christian historical narratives as a starting point and trying to locate it in its proper cultural and political contexts, this talk will embark on an attempt to tackle the wider issue of the make-up and dynamics of historical writing in a period of ideological experimentation in the nascent Ottoman imperial enterprise. It will explore the competitive nature of various historiographic strands originating in Rumeli and relating its history, as well as possible venues of interaction between them, in order to demonstrate how the consolidation of the dynasty’s authority in the region was paralleled by a process of appropriation of its past through the merger of these originally competing traditions.


    Speakers

    Delyan Rusev
    University of Sofia and University of Chicago


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 26th Changing Foreign Policy in Canada and the Nordic Region

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 26, 20196:00PM - 7:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This conference will deal with the recent evolution of foreign policy in Canada and in the Nordic countries. Both Canada and Scandinavia have a reputation of commitment with international mediation and peace and a relevant involvement with multilateral institutions. Nevertheless, in all these cases foreign policy has undergone important transformations in recent times. The aim of this event would be to discuss the extent of these changes, discover similarities among the Canadian and Nordic experiences, and establish a dialogue that can potentially result in policy improvements.


    Speakers

    Kristin Haugevik
    Speaker
    Senior Research Fellow, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs NUPI, Oslo

    Anders Wivel
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Copenhagen

    John Kirton
    Speaker
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Darius Ornston
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Sponsors

    Nordic Studies Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 27th India, 2019: An Infuriating, Lovable Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 27, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In April and May, the 2019 Indian general elections will be held, determining the fate of Narendra Modi and the experiment in BJP government. Join political scientist Ramesh Thakur of Australian National University and longtime journalist Haroon Siddiqui to explore the outlook for the elections and beyond. Reception with refreshments to follow.

    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 27th Book Launch: Global Environmental Governance and the Accountability Trap

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 27, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    An examination of whether accountability mechanisms in global environmental governance that focus on monitoring and enforcement necessarily lead to better governance and better environmental outcomes.

    The rapid development of global environmental governance has been accompanied by questions of accountability. Efforts to address what has been called “a culture of unaccountability” include greater transparency, public justification for governance decisions, and the establishment of monitoring and enforcement procedures. And yet, as this volume shows, these can lead to an “accountability trap”—a focus on accountability measures rather than improved environmental outcomes. Through analyses and case studies, the contributors consider how accountability is being used within global environmental governance and if the proliferation of accountability tools enables governance to better address global environmental deterioration. Examining public, private, voluntary, and hybrid types of global environmental governance, the volume shows that the different governance goals of the various actors shape the accompanying accountability processes. These goals—from serving constituents to reaping economic benefits—determine to whom and for what the actors must account.

    After laying out a theoretical framework for its analyses, the book addresses governance in the key areas of climate change, biodiversity, fisheries, and trade and global value chains. The contributors find that normative biases shape accountability processes, and they explore the potential of feedback mechanisms between institutions and accountability rules for enabling better governance and better environmental outcomes.

    Contributors Graeme Auld, Harro van Asselt, Cristina Balboa, Lieke Brouwer, Lorraine Elliott, Lars H. Gulbrandsen, Aarti Gupta, Teresa Kramarz, Susan Park, Philipp Pattberg, William H. Schaedla, Hamish van der Ven, Oscar Widerberg.

    Edited by Susan Park and Teresa Kramarz and published by MIT Press.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Lorraine Elliott
    Speaker
    Australian National University

    Matthew Hoffmann
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science; Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab

    Teresa Kramarz
    Speaker
    Editor; Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director, Munk One; Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab

    Susan Par
    Speaker
    Editor, University of Sydney



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Embedding Research Excellence: Perspectives from Sub-Saharan Africa

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Governments and regional bodies across Sub-Saharan Africa are increasingly eager to support science. Regional and national policy documents and programmes reflect this enthusiasm and ambition and commitments to more resource for science, research and innovation (SRI). This is matched by rising levels of financial support from funders outside the region looking for new ways to support research that conform to Sub-Saharan African aspirations and needs.

    Behind this consensus about the need to support SRI however lays some stark differences about the criteria that should be used to evaluate the contributions of science. In this talk I will reflect on recent research and focus on the complex array of expectations about what science can and should deliver. National, regional and international funders adopt a variety of sometimes ambiguous rationales about the pathways through which these contributions from science funding are delivered, with distinctions between ‘basic’ and ‘applied’ science failing to provide significant clarity. On the one hand there is a desire for excellent research as sanctioned by academics acting with high degrees of autonomy and, on the other, for science that is deeply embedded in local social and policy realities and whose success or failure requires input and evaluation by a much broader array of stakeholders.

    These aims are not impossible to resolve, but reconciliation is far from straightforward and significant policy and communication rifts make it difficult to achieve. The talk will identify a number of relatively straightforward ways in which the process of supporting science can be improved and enhanced so that science contributes to multiple agendas. However, it will also highlight more fundamental challenges which confront science funders across the globe related to the ways in which support for research is framed and provided.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Joanna Chataway
    Head of Department at UCL STEaPP (Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Trends in Internet Control in Southeast Asia and China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What are the current trends in internet control in China and Southeast Asia? How has increasing state control over the internet impacted human rights and civil liberties in the region? What implications do such trends hold for Canada?

    As a fast-growing region with increasing ties to Canada, issues of technology, security, privacy and surveillance across Asia cannot be ignored. From increasing threats to press freedom in the Philippines under Rodrigo Duterte to the broad monitoring of telecommunications in Singapore, Southeast Asia is home to numerous examples of state control over the internet, media, and speech at large. Such a discussion would be incomplete without considering China, where the Communist regime continues to tighten its grip on information flow across cyberspace. And with the recent Sino-Canadian dispute over the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, the presence of Chinese cybertechnology in Canada and the intersection between cybertechnology issues and the Asia-Pacific at large have been thrust to the forefront of socio-political discourse in our country.

    Irene Poetranto is a Senior Researcher for the Citizen Lab and a Doctoral Student in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interest is on the cybersecurity policy development in the Global South, especially in Asia. Her dissertation project focuses on the issue of Internet controls in Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. She obtained her Master’s degree in Political Science and Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto, and Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

    Lotus Ruan is a researcher at The Citizen Lab, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on the interplay of the state and private companies in terms of internet management and innovation in the digital age with an area focus on China. Prior to joining University of Toronto, Lotus received her master’s degree in Asia Pacific Policy Studies at the University of British Columbia and worked as a journalist and news editor in China for over two years.

    Contact

    Mia Nguyen


    Speakers

    Irene Poetranto
    Senior Researcher, Citizen Lab; Doctoral Student, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Lotus Ruan
    Researcher, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 28th Malenkij Robota: The Human Toll and the Politics of Memory

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 28, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This presentation is based on the documentary book published last year by Tamas Stark, Ph.D. on the history of the deportation of civilians to the Soviet Union towards the end of the Second World War.

    During the Second World War, more than 600,000 Hungarian citizens were captured by the Soviet army. One third of the prisoners were civilian internees who were deported from Hungary to the Soviet Union in 1945. The Soviet leadership did not make a distinction between civilians and soldiers and the war was seen as useful for the purpose of supplying a labor force, as well as expanding the communist system in the occupied territories. The presentation will give a detailed picture on the process of the deportation of the civilians and on their fate in Soviet forced labor camps. The presentation also tries to uncover the motives and plans of the Soviet military leadership directing the deportation of hundreds of thousands of civilians from east-central Europe during the last months of the war. Finally, the lecturer will speak about the controversial politics of memory of the current Hungarian government.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Tamas Stark
    Hungarian Academy of Sciences



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Women in Politics, Women in Leadership

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20199:00AM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This workshop brings together a distinguished group of scholars, politicians and policy makers to discuss the role of women in politics and political leadership in Canada and beyond. Although the last decades have seen a remarkable increase in the prominence of women in politics, parity is rarely realised and in many countries progress appears to have halted. In the workshop participants will discuss the challenges that remain for women to run, win and hold elected office as well as discuss institutional, legislative and behavioural changes that may be used to overcome these challenges A final panel focuses specifically on Canada and will explore the way forward for women in Canadian politics.

    WORKSHOP PROGRAM

    08.30 – 09.00 Conference Registration

    09.00 – 10.30 Panel 1: Women obtaining positions of influence in- and outside the legislature
    Panel speakers: Paru Shah (Milwaukee) & Julie Dolan (Macalaster College), Rosie Campbell (King’s College London), André Blais & Semra Sevi (Université de Montréal), Robyn Bourgeois (Brock University)
    Chair: Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant (Queen’s University)

    10.30-10.45 Coffee Break

    10.45-12.15 Panel 2: Women in Politics
    Panel speakers: Kelly Dittmar (Rutgers), Nadia Brown (Purdue), Tiffany Barnes (Kentucky), Malliga Och (Idaho), Erica Rayment (University of Toronto)
    Chair: Erin Tolley (University of Toronto)

    12.15 Lunch – Q&A with Kate Graham on the Canada2020 project “no second chances” focusing on Canada’s female first ministers

    1.15-2.45 Panel 3: Women in Leadership
    Panel speakers: Diana O’Brien (Texas A&M), Linda Trimble (Alberta), Sarah Liu (Edinburgh), Cora Voyageur (Calgary University)
    Chair: Peter Loewen (University of Toronto)

    2.45-3.00 Coffee Break

    3.00-4.30 Panel 4: Legislative Framework and Policy Solutions
    Panel speakers: Susan Franceschet (Calgary University), Magda Hinojosa (Arizona), Netina Tan (McMaster), Cheryl Collier (Windsor) & Tracey Raney (Ryerson), Chantal Maillé (Concordia)
    Chair: Donna Dasko (Canadian Senator)

    4.30-5.30 Panel 5: Women in Politics in Canada, the way forward
    Panel speakers: Sylvia Bashevkin (University of Toronto), Yaprak Baltacioglu (Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy), Manon Tremblay (University of Ottawa), Elizabeth Renzetti (Globe and Mail)

    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Co-Sponsors

    Minister for the Status of Women

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th What Comes After the Last Chance Commission? Policy Priorities for 2019-2024

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Ahead of the 2019 institutional reconfiguration of the EU is a fitting moment to take stock of the European integration process and decide which priorities should define the strategic agenda of the next generation of incumbents.

    While acknowledging that the entire EU collective is concerned – member states and institutions alike – this report is addressed to the one actor that has a more direct role in fleshing out the policy agenda for Europe: the European Commission.

    This report assesses how the ‘last chance Commission’ of President Juncker has fared; whether it has followed the ten guidelines it set out at the beginning of its mandate; how far it was blown off course by critical events; and whether we might see the return of a ‘political’ Commission in the second half of this year.

    Against the backdrop of global trends and deepening divisions between member states and within the European Parliament, the contributors to this report distil key policy priorities in areas that will determine the future European Union, from the single market and the rule of law to migration, external security and climate change.

    Thanks to its wide research coverage of EU policy and strong in-house expertise, CEPS is uniquely placed to comment on these issues and recommend action.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Steven Blockmans
    Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS)


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Mavkas in the Room: Silences, Denials, Discomforts in East European History

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20192:30PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Unlike the more notable elephant, whose sheer size is a marker of problems parties refuse to discuss, the Mavka hints at other kinds of silences in family histories and narratives about the past. The Mavka is a forest nymph, a girl or young woman that died tragically, but whose spirit lingers on in the forests of Eastern Europe. Her very existence is born not only of the trauma of an unnatural death, but also efforts to suppress the details of what happened to her.

    On March 29, a panel of scholars across the disciplines of History and Slavic Languages and Literatures will discuss a range of silences that affect scholarship on the region as well as personal and familial accounts of the past. We will discuss why gender has been muted or is absent in studies of the artistic avantgarde and the nationalist underground during WWII and the implications of integrating those perspective into histories of the region. Viewing East European, Russian, and Soviet history as a family drama, we also consider how violence and trauma over the centuries has shaped what is said and what remains unsaid. Additionally, panelists will reflect on conceptual, practical and methodological hurdles facing scholars aiming to address these silences and restore agency to voices that remain unheard. Chief among them will be the silences facing the researcher—personal and professional reasons for pursuing one research agenda over another. We will also discuss how to broach topics that remain taboo, how to deal with historical figures that are unsympathetic and those we might love too much, and how to address questions that make us uncomfortable, both individually and collectively.

    Speakers:

    Orysia Kulick (Petro Jacyk Post-Doctoral Fellow, University of Toronto)
    Markian Dobczansky (Postdoctoral Research Scholar in Ukrainian Studies, Columbia University)
    Oksana Dudko (PhD Candidate, History Department/Anne Tanenbaum Center for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto)
    Mayhill Fowler (Assistant Professor of History, Stetson University)
    Anna Muller (Assistant Professor of History; The Frank and Mary Padzieski Endowed Professor in Polish/Polish American/Eastern European Studies, University of MIchigan-Dearborn)
    Dragana Obradovic (Associate Professor, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto)

    Discussants:
    Alison K. Smith (Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of Toronto)
    Lynne Viola (Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Defending the Liberal Revolution in France: The Legislative Assembly and the Demise of the Constitution of 1791

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    On 1 October 1791, the French Legislative Assembly convened in Paris, initiating the constitutional regime that revolutionaries in 1789 had committed themselves to establish. Within a year, however, the monarchy had been overthrown, and the Constitution of 1791 had collapsed. In explaining the French Revolution’s transition during this period from a moderate to a more radical phase, historians have emphasized factors such as the importance of the Flight to Varennes, the rise of the popular movement, and the dynamic of revolutionary discourse. Such explanations have tended to dismiss support for the constitutional regime on the eve of its demise as marginal, insincere, or irrelevant. Yet the advent of republican democracy in France should not completely eclipse the significance of the constitutional monarchy’s failure. This paper suggests that debate within the Legislative Assembly reveals not conflict between republicans and royalists, but a more nuanced struggle between differing conceptions of the revolution, the location of national sovereignty, and the importance of a written constitution. For example, the opposition of some deputies to the declaration of war against Austria on 20 April 1792 reflected determination to defend the constitution and the liberal principles it embodied. Beyond the Assembly, the paper also examines the departmental denunciations of the Paris crowd’s invasion of the Tuileries Palace on 20 June 1792. These addresses and petitions went beyond manifestations of loyalty to Louis XVI to express commitment to the ideal of constitutionalism. Thus this paper argues that there were many in France who still hoped to defend the liberal revolution of 1789, with its promise of individual liberty, property rights, and the rule of law, on the eve of a second revolution which would sweep away the Constitution of 1791.

    Bill Cormack received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario in 1992. In 1995, Cambridge University Press published his first book, Revolution and Political Conflict in the French Navy 1789-1794. Since 1998, he has been a member of the Department of History at the University of Guelph in Ontario, where he teaches modern European history. His new book, Patriots, Royalists, and Terrorists in the West Indies: The French Revolution in Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1789-1802, comes out with the University of Toronto Press in January 2019. His current research concerns the French Legislative Assembly and the demise of the Constitution of 1791.


    Speakers

    William Cormack
    University of Guelph


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Holy Infrastructure: Transnational Korean Churches in Seoul and Los Angeles

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMAP367, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    A multisite church is a single church that meets at multiple locations, often through the use of audio, projection, and even hologram technologies. Nearly all megachurches in the world have adopted this franchise-like form in the last decade, but this fairly new organizational practice originated in South Korea in the 1970s. This talk draws upon transnational ethnographic research at two of the first multisite churches in the world: Yoido Full Gospel Church and Onnuri Church. Following the speaker’s participant-observation on production technology teams at these churches, this talk illustrates Christian efforts to create and maintain “holy infrastructures” [kŏrukhan inp’ŭra] through one’s body, actions, and the objects of one’s practice. Ultimately, this talk asks how one might imagine ethics and pursue the good life in a world permeated by often unseen networks of contact and communion, conscription and contagion.

    Heather Mellquist Lehto is a cultural anthropologist who studies religion, technology, and social relations. She is currently a Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Anthropology at the University of Toronto, and she holds a PhD in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and a master’s degree in religious studies from Harvard Divinity School. Her first book manuscript, Holy Infrastructure: The Multisite Church Revolution in South Korea and the United States draws on two years of multisited ethnographic research in Seoul and Los Angeles to explore the coordination of technological and religious innovation in some of the world’s first and largest multisite churches.


    Speakers

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Heather Mellquist Lehto
    Speaker
    Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 29th Cosmogony and Literacy in the Bengali “Book of Light”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 29, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THE ANNUAL BENGAL STUDIES LECTURE

    Once considered the “primordial source of all books” and a proxy for the Qurʾān itself, the Persian and Bengali versions of theNūrnāma (Book of Light) virtually disappeared from the religious landscape of contemporary Bangladesh and West Bengal. The Book of Light narrates the creation of the world by God through the body of the Muḥammad of light. This creation story played a key role in shaping the popular understanding of Islamic cosmology, language, and the significance of the written word in Bengali Islam. With this lecture, I will address the topic of vernacular literacy and multilingualism in Bengal between the 17th and 19th century through the study of the Nūrnāma tradition. A fresh look at the textual tradition that surrounded the transmission of this creation story reveals ways to conceive of vernacular Islam beyond categories of elite vs. popular, or orthodox vs. heterodox.

    Thibaut d’Hubert is associate professor in the department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations (SALC) at the University of Chicago. He published several articles in periodicals and collective volumes, and contributed entries on Bengal for Brill’s Encyclopedia of Islam, THREE. In his book titled In the Shade of the Golden Palace: Ālāol and Middle Bengali Poetics in Arakan(New York: Oxford University Press, 2018), d’Hubert studies the encounter of Persian, Sanskrit, and vernacular poetics in the courtly milieu of the frontier region between today’s Bangladesh and Myanmar. He is also the co-editor with Alexandre Papas of the volume Jāmī in Regional Contexts: The Reception of ʿAbd al-Raḥmān Jāmī’s Works in the Islamicate World, ca. 9th/15th-14th/20th (Handbook of Oriental Studies, Leiden: Brill, 2019).

    Reception to follow

    *In the Shade of the Golden Palace by Thibaut d’Hubert will be available for purchase at the venue.*

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Thibaut d'Hubert
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of English

    Department for the Study of Religion


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2019

  • Monday, April 1st EGL Work in Progress Series

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 1, 20193:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab hosts regular EGL Work in Progress Talks. The talks are an informal, interdisciplinary forum where faculty and Ph.D. students can discuss ongoing research in the field of environmental politics, policy, and governance. At these events, two presenters offer a 10-minute overview of an ongoing project to serve as a fodder for discussion. If you are interested in hearing more about this and other Environmental Governance Lab events please email eg.lab@utoronto.ca for more information.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 2nd Innovation under Hypercompetition: Firm Capabilities and Strategies for Survival

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 2, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Innovation is the source of sustainable competitive advantage for firms. Innovation itself has been argued to stem from control of valuable and non-imitable resources. As the pace of technology change has increased, however, firms find that resources or resulting innovations fail to secure sustained competitive advantage. Drawing upon field research on contract manufacturers in China, this talk will discuss how resource-constrained SMEs develop different categories of innovations and their impacts on firm organization and performance.

    Michael Murphree is assistant professor of international business at the University of South Carolina and is currently a visiting professor with the Innovation Policy Lab at the University of Toronto. Professor Murphree is currently working with the Innovation Policy Lab on a study of knowledge transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship, economic growth and employment in the offshore petroleum industry in Newfoundland and Labrador. His primary research interests include globalization, innovation in emerging economies, technology standards and market formation, and intellectual property rights. His research considers China in comparative perspective with other emerging economies and the developed West, particularly Europe. His other research interests are globalization, state-firm relations, innovation, technology standards and market formation, and intellectual property rights, especially in China and East Asia. He has conducted field research in China since 2007 and speaks fluent Mandarin. Professor Murphree has published numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as a book, chapters in edited volumes and numerous commissioned reports for groups including the Global Commission on Internet Governance and the U.S. National Academies.


    Speakers

    Michael Murphree
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of International Business, University of South Carolina; Visiting Professor with the Innovation Policy Lab, University of Toronto

    Darius Ornston
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Joseph Wong
    Chair
    Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Professor, Department of Political Science; Associate Vice-President, International Student Experience, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 2nd Defining and Defending Sanctuary Cities

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 2, 20191:00PM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A webinar of this event will be available shortly before the panel begins. 

    While the concept of sanctuary cities ancient, it has taken on new importance along with the politicization and securitization of migration.

    In the US, local sanctuary policies and social movements can play an important role in defending undocumented people. This is particularly important given schisms between city, state, and federal policy, and the proportion of undocumented people with partners, spouses, and children with US citizenship. Sanctuary policies can also play an important role in ensuring that undocumented people can access healthcare and social services, and feel safe to report crimes, unfair labour practices, and domestic abuse.

    At the same time, sanctuary policies can serve as a point of backlash from law enforcement agencies, immigration authorities, and often first and second-generation immigrant communities. 

    This panel will unpack the role of sanctuary movements in the US context, and compare them with policies in Canada, where the role of immigration enforcement and undocumented populations is far less politicized from either end of the spectrum. The panel brings together practitioner and academic perspectives, in conversation with policymakers from the City of Toronto.

    Alexandra Délano Alonso: “The Limits and Possibilities of Sanctuary: Modes of Resistance and Solidarity in the Trump era”

    Idil Atak: “Toronto’s Sanctuary City Policy: Rationale and Barriers”

    Ritika Goel: ““No Sanctuary Without Health: Uninsured in Canada”

    In conversation with Chris Brillinger, Executive Director, Social Development, Finance and Administration at City of Toronto

    Idil Atak is an Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Criminology at Ryerson University. She received her Ph.D. from the Université de Montréal’s Faculty of Law. She was a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at the McGill Centre for Human Rights & Legal Pluralism. Idil is the Editor-In-Chief of International Journal of Migration and Border Studies (IJMBS). She is a member of the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration’s (IASFM) Executive Committee, the past president of the Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS), and a research associate at Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law (McGill University). 

    Her research interests include irregular migration, refugee protection, and international and European human rights law. She is currently conducting a SSHRC-funded research on the intersection of security, irregular migration and asylum, along with Professors Graham Hudson (Ryerson University) and Delphine Nakache (University of Ottawa). Idil served as a legal expert for the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Ankara, then as deputy to the Permanent Representative of Turkey to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg.

    Alexandra Délano Alonso is Associate Professor and Chair of Global Studies at The New School and the current holder of the Eugene M. Lang Professorship for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring. She received her doctorate in International Relations from the University of Oxford. Her work focuses on diaspora policies, the transnational relationships between states and migrants, sanctuary, and the politics of memory in relation to borders, violence and migration. She is a faculty fellow at the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility and a member of the Sanctuary Working Group at The New School.

    She is the author of From Here and There: Diaspora Policies, Integration and Social Rights beyond Borders (Oxford University Press, 2018). Her book Mexico and Its Diaspora in the United States: Policies of Emigration since 1848 (Cambridge University Press, 2011) was the co-winner of the William LeoGrande Prize for the best book on US-Latin America Relations and was published in Spanish by El Colegio de México in 2014. Recent publications include the special issue “Microfoundations of Diaspora Politics” (co-editor and co-author with Harris Mylonas, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 2018) and “Borders and the Politics of Mourning” (co-editor and co-author with Benjamin Nienass, Social Research, Summer 2016).

    Dr. Ritika Goel is a family physician and activist in Toronto. She works with migrants with precarious immigration status, and people experiencing homelessness and poverty, at Queen West Community Health Centre and the Inner City Health Associates. Ritika has been involved with various social justice issues such as working for access to healthcare for uninsured migrants, defending our public healthcare system, and upstream policy change on the social determinants of health. She is Chair of the Social Accountability Working Group at the College of Family Physicians of Canada, a Board Member of Canadian Doctors for Medicare and a founding member of the OHIP for All campaign. If you’re interested in learning more about the intersections of social justice, politics and health, you can follow her on Twitter @RitikaGoelTO.”

    Chris Brillinger is the Executive Director of the Social Development, Finance & Administration Division, responsible for Social Policy & Research, Community Resources and Financial and Administrative oversight and support for the City’s human services cluster.

    An Urban Planner by training, Chris has held a variety of positions in a number of non-governmental organizations prior to joining local government. Several of Chris’s; most recent achievements include the development of the Toronto Seniors Strategy, Toronto Newcomer Strategy, Toronto Youth Equity Strategy, Toronto Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy 2020 recommending a new set of priority neighbourhoods for the City of Toronto, TO Prosperity, the poverty reduction strategy for the City of Toronto, and Tenants First: A Way Forward for Toronto Community Housing and Social Housing in Toronto.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 3rd Religion, Race, and the Politics of Human Rights in the Twentieth Century U.S.

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 3, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Wars are often moments of religious mobilizations, when priests and ministers reassure the public that God is on its side. During World War II, however, the opposite happened. Rather than espouse Christian nationalism, America’s most important Protestant leaders fervently embraced the United Nations and human rights. This talk looks at the emergence of Protestant globalism during the mid-twentieth century and how thinking about the whole world transformed American attitudes toward domestic problems, especially segregation. Although the Cold War would soon eclipse the wartime enthusiasm for internationalism abroad, domestic politics were permanently transformed as Protestant leaders reevaluated their views on race in light of universal human rights. Using a global frame of reference, this talk casts new light on the history of antiracism, human rights, and political polarization in the United States.

    Contact

    Don Newton


    Speakers

    Gene Zubovich
    Visiting Fellow, Emmanuel College Centre for the Study of the United States Centre for Religion and Its Contexts University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 3rd Ban Damunhwa and its Neoliberal Affect of Fairness and Equity

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 3, 20193:00PM - 5:00PMAP 330, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    This talk discusses the rapid emergence of ban damunhwa (“anti-multiculture”) or the sentiment of anti-immigration in South Korea. Ban damunhwa discourse centers on a variety of issues such as the state’s multicultural policy, crimes by foreigners and problems of the so-called “illegal sojourners” and has been most active and visible on the Internet especially since the mid-2000s. In this talk, I specifically focus on the way ban damunhwa defines the state’s multicultural policy as what gives special preferences to migrants, which, in turn, is said to destroy the livelihoods of the nationals. Represented as “voices of ordinary citizens,” ban damunhwa narratives appeal to, not nationalist or racist sentiments, but rather a neoliberal commonsense of fairness and equity, under which migrants emerge as demonic free-riders. I show how ban damunhwa not only serves as a symptom of a neoliberal ethic but also mirrors the dilemma of the people who struggle under neoliberal system of precarity and yet persist it by reproducing its main ideologies.

    EuyRyung Jun is assistant professor of anthropology at Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, South Korea. Jun primarily works on migration, multiculturalism, right-wing populism, and biopolitics and animal discourse. She has published articles in FOCAAL, Positions, Anthropological Quarterly, Kyeongje wa Sahoe [Economy and Society], and Hanguk Munhwa Inryuhak [Korean Cultural Anthropology]. She also writes for Kyunghyang Shinmun, a major newspaper in South Korea, on animal issues.


    Speakers

    EuyRyung Jun
    Assistant Professor, Department of Archaeology and Cultural Anthropology, Chonbuk University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 4th International Relations Society Conference 2019 - Building Biodiversity and Controlling Climate Change: International and Canadian Contributions, Day 1

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 4, 20199:00AM - 3:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This is a two day conference:

    April 4 from 9-3pm Campbell Conference Facility & 3-5pm Rigby Room, Trinity College
    April 5 from 10-1pm Combination Room, Trinity College

    The International Relations Society is proud to announce its annual conference, this year on the topic of climate change. The two-day conference titled “Building Biodiversity and Controlling Climate Change: International and Canadians Contributions” will take place at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Trinity College on April 4 and 5, 2019.

    The conference will explore the intersectionality of climate change, unpacking the effects of it on the political, economic, and socio-cultural arenas in international affairs, and to identify the actions that students and others in the university community can take now to effectively control climate change. This year, we invite all students of the university community to partake in discussing the urgent threat of climate change through six panels featuring distinguished professors, politicians, and professionals.

    Conference Agenda:
    THURSDAY, APRIL 4TH
    9:00-9:15 – Registration
    9:15-9:20 – Acknowledgement of Traditional Land and Opening Remarks
    9:20-9:25 – Welcoming Remarks by Provost Mayo Moran
    9:25-9:40 – Keynote Introduction
    9:40-10:3 – Keynote Address by Dr. Cristiana Pasca Palmer, Executive Secretary of the Convention on Biological Diversity
    10:30-11:30 – Panel 1: Biodiversity, Sustainability, and Equitable Development
    – Speakers: Mike Schreiner (Leader of the Ontario Green Party), Freedom-Kai Phillips (Research Associate, Centre for International Governance Innovation)
    11:30-11:45 – Break
    11:45-12:45 – Panel 2: Climate Change and Health
    – Speakers: -Lawrence Loh (U of T, Faculty at Dalla Lana School of Public Health), Kate Mulligan (U of T, Faculty at Dalla Lana School of Public Health), Stephanie Gower (U of T, Faculty at Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto Public Health )
    12:45-1:45 – Lunch
    1:45-2:45 – Panel #3: Climate Financing and Clean Capitalism
    – Speakers: Ellen Lourie (North American Policy Associate, IETA), Tim Stoate (VP Impact Investing, The Atmospheric Fund)
    2:45-3:00 – Health Break + Transition to Rigby Room, Trinity College
    3:00-4:00 – Panel 4: Global Responses to Climate Change
    – Speakers: Jessica Green (U of T, Faculty at Department of Political Science)
    4:00-5:00 – Panel 5: Improving Implementation and Accountability Assessment
    – Speakers: John Robinson (U of T, Faculty at Munk School of Global Affairs, Trinity College Fellow), Jiyoon Han (Co-Chair of Summit Studies, G20 Research Group), Julia Tops (Co-Chair of Summit Studies, G7 Research Group)

    FRIDAY, APRIL 5TH Combination Room, Trinity College
    10:00-11:00 – Panel 5: Local Responses to Climate Change
    – Speakers: Diane Saxe (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario), Laurel Besco (U of T, Faculty in Department of Geography), Stephen Scharper (U of T, Faculty in the School of the Environment)
    11:00-11:15 – Break
    11:15-11:20 – Keynote Introduction
    11:15-12:00 – Keynote Address by Elizabeth May, Leader of Green Party
    12:00-1:00pm Lunch

    Lunch and all refreshments will be provided on both days for registrants.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 4th “Frenemies? EU-Israel Relations”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Hila Zahavi (Ph.D., Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) is the Director of the Simone Veil Research Centre for Contemporary European Studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Dr. Zahavi leads the European Commission funded “Near-EU Jean Monnet Research Network.” She also serves as a member of the core committee of COST action “CA17119 – EU Foreign Policy Facing New Realities: Perceptions, Contestation, Communication and Relations.” Recently Dr. Zahavi co-edited a Special Issue of the European Journal of Higher Education titled “Twenty Years of the Bologna Process – Reflecting on its Global Strategy from the Perspective of Motivations and External Responses” (2019). Her Ph.D. research (completed in August 2018) dealt with higher education as a tool in foreign policy. Her research interests focus on higher education policies from a political perspective, the political dimensions of the Union’s foreign and security policy, and Israeli-European Union relations. Since 2015, Dr. Zahavi teaches different courses on the European integration process in the Department of Politics and Government at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Dr. Hila Zahavi
    Speaker
    Director of the Simone Veil Research Centre for Contemporary European Studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

    Prof. Emanuel Adler
    Chair
    Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies


    Sponsors

    The Andrea and Charles Bronfman Chair of Israeli Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Department of Political Science

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 4th Magical Capitalism, Gambler Subjects: South Korea's Bitcoin Investment

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMAP 330, Anthropology Building, 19 Russell St.
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    Description

    “First, it was just tech people. Now, literally everyone is interested in Bitcoin,” said New York Times while reporting on the Bitcoin mania that haunted South Korean society in the winter of 2017-2018. In this talk, I take this collective effervescence as an entry point to explore the “magical” features of contemporary financial capitalism. Drawing upon an ethnographic research on a South Korean Bitcoin investor online community, I first examine how the logics of uncertainty and luck are found at the heart of casino capitalism and how lay investors deal with the ambiguous future and luck in their everyday practices. In analogizing their logic and practices with those of gamblers, I illuminate how the emerging mass investment culture exhibits the religious and magical understanding of the world based on self-fulfilling “performativity” and what André Orléan calls “collective belief.” In consequence, this talk seeks to situate the Bitcoin frenzy and its mass investment culture within the broader transformation of human condition with the triumphant rise of financial capitalism. 

    Seung Cheol LEE is an assistant professor of Anthropology and East Asian Studies at the University of Mississippi. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on the formation of mass investment culture in South Korea in the context of its post-developmental and post-work transition. 


    Speakers

    Seung Cheol LEE
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Mississippi



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 4th Navigating Uncharted/Turbulent Waters: Greece’s Geopolitics after(?) the Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 4, 20195:30PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Europe’s Southern and Eastern neighbourhoods have changed considerably during the past few years, and the key words describing the regional security environment are fluidity, instability and unpredictability. Furthermore, there is a general failure of governance as the Eastern Mediterranean and its adjoining regions remain an extremely turbulent and unstable neighbourhood and the security environment continues to be ‘Hobbesian’.

    Greek security policy makers will function for the foreseeable future under the Damocles sword of the country’s economic limitations, which is imposing a number of serious constraints and limitations. As key organizations such as the EU and NATO are evolving in an effort to adapt to new global, regional and domestic trends, Greece needs to find its own niche in the distribution of regional roles and influence and convince its partners and allies of its own added value in managing common security challenges. A difficult task, indeed, for a country with limited resources, but the alternative is strategic marginalization and inability to protect its vital national interests.

    Thanos Dokos is the Director-General of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP), a think tank based in Athens, which conducts policy-oriented research on European and regional developments. He has been working on issues of European and regional security in the Mediterranean/Middle East, as well as parts of the former Soviet space, for more than 20 years. For research purposes he is using a broad definition of security, including both hard and soft security dimensions. His current work focuses on global and regional trends and the policy challenges for international organizations and regional stakeholders in the Mediterranean. He has a B.A in International Studies: Webster University (in Geneva), and MSc in International Relations, University of Southampton, and M.Phil in International Relations, University of Cambridge, and a Ph.D in International & Strategic Studies, University of Cambridge.


    Speakers

    Dr. Thanos Dokos
    Director-General of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP)


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Co-Sponsors

    Hellenic Studies Program, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    The Skoutakis Family


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 5th Normative Power Europe Meets Israel

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Hila Zahavi (Ph.D., Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) is the Director of the Simone Veil Research Centre for Contemporary European Studies, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Dr. Zahavi leads the European Commission funded “Near-EU Jean Monnet Research Network.” She also serves as a member of the core committee of COST action “CA17119 – EU Foreign Policy Facing New Realities: Perceptions, Contestation, Communication and Relations.” Recently Dr. Zahavi co-edited a Special Issue of the European Journal of Higher Education titled “Twenty Years of the Bologna Process – Reflecting on its Global Strategy from the Perspective of Motivations and External Responses” (2019). Her Ph.D. research (completed in August 2018) dealt with higher education as a tool in foreign policy. Her research interests focus on higher education policies from a political perspective, the political dimensions of the Union’s foreign and security policy, and Israeli-European Union relations. Since 2015, Dr. Zahavi teaches different courses on the European integration process in the Department of Politics and Government at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Hila Zahavi
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 5th International Relations Society Conference 2019 - Building Biodiversity and Controlling Climate Change: International and Canadian Contributions, Day 2

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 201910:00AM - 1:00PMCombination Room, Trinity College
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    April 4 from 9-3pm Campbell Conference Facility & 3-5pm Rigby Room, Trinity College
    April 5 from 10-1pm Combination Room, Trinity College

    The International Relations Society is proud to announce its annual conference, this year on the topic of climate change. The two-day conference titled “Building Biodiversity and Controlling Climate Change: International and Canadians Contributions” will take place at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Trinity College on April 4 and 5, 2019.

    The conference will explore the intersectionality of climate change, unpacking the effects of it on the political, economic, and socio-cultural arenas in international affairs, and to identify the actions that students and others in the university community can take now to effectively control climate change. This year, we invite all students of the university community to partake in discussing the urgent threat of climate change through six panels featuring distinguished professors, politicians, and professionals.

    FRIDAY, APRIL 5TH Combination Room, Trinity College
    10:00-11:00 – Panel 5: Local Responses to Climate Change
    – Speakers: Diane Saxe (Environmental Commissioner of Ontario), Laurel Besco (U of T, Faculty in Department of Geography), Stephen Scharper (U of T, Faculty in the School of the Environment)
    11:00-11:15 – Break
    11:15-11:20 – Keynote Introduction
    11:15-12:00 – Keynote Address by Elizabeth May, Leader of Green Party
    12:00-1:00pm Lunch

    Lunch and all refreshments will be provided on both days for registrants.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 5th China, the War on Terror, and the Mass Internment of Turkic Minorities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    There is evidence that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) has indefinitely and arbitrarily detained as many as 800,000 to 2 million of its Uyghur, Kazakh, and Kyrgyz citizens in mass internment camps where they are subjected to great psychological and physical duress. Coupled with the establishment of a dystopian surveillance state throughout the Uyghur region of China, these camps appear to represent a concerted state-led effort to transform the identity and culture of Uyghurs and other Turkic minorities. This talk will discuss this issue with particular reference to how the present situation has emerged from an intersection of China’s Neo-colonial policies towards its Turkic minorities with the Islamophobic ideologies of the global war on terror.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sean Roberts
    Sean R. Roberts is an Associate Professor of the Practice of International Affairs and Director of the International Development Studies program at The George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 5th When Dictators Step Down: A Roundtable

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 5, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Central Asia Lecture Series

    Description

    When Kazakhstan’s Nursultan Nazarbayev resigned from the office of the presidency in March 2019, it surprised observers and Kazakhstanis alike. Was this a new form of “authoritarian succession” that others in Eurasia might emulate? Would Kazakhstan’s role in the region shift? What were the prospects for dynastic succession? In this roundtable, we explore what a dictator’s resignation might mean.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Sean Roberts
    George Washington University

    Edward Schatz
    University of Toronto

    Lucan Way
    University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 8th Reflections on Kakehashi 2019: Creating Lasting Bridges between Canada & Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 8, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In February 2019, seventeen University of Toronto students travelled to Japan to participate in the Kakehashi Project. Promoted by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan and facilitated by the Centre for the Study of Global Japan in association with the Canadian administrator of the project, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, the program aims to develop a network of exchanges in order to deepen mutual understanding and friendship between Japan and Canada.

    In this workshop, participating students will reflect on their Kakehashi experience, examining its impact on their academic and cultural relationship to Japan and Japanese studies. Join us as students address topics ranging from emerging technologies to economics and feminism in Japan.

    PROGRAM

    2:10-2:15 Welcome
    Professor Louis Pauly, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    2:15-2:45 Panel I: Internet of Things in Japan: Cross-Sectoral Applications

    Speakers:
    Benson Ompoc, Kakehashi Delegate
    Jasmine Wright, Kakehashi Delegate
    Vijai Singh, Kakehashi Delegate

    Moderator: Dr. Seung Lee, Associate, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    2:45-3:15 Panel II: Feminism in Contemporary Japan

    Speakers:
    Khadija Ahmed, Kakehashi Delegate
    Cydney Melnyk, Kakehashi Delegate
    Stephanie Xu, Kakehashi Delegate

    Moderator: Dr. Seung Lee

    3:15-3:50 Panel III: Japanese Politics and Diplomacy

    Speakers:
    Dennis Venslauskas, Kakehashi Delegate
    Kiara Sunho Lee, Kakehashi Delegate
    Yuna Ban, Kakehashi Participant
    Irish Marigmen, Kakehashi Delegate

    Moderator: Dr. Seung Lee

    3:50-4:00 Concluding Remarks, Professor Louis Pauly

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Kakehashi Project Participants
    Speakers

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    Associate, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Seung Hyok Lee
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto

    Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 8th Holocaust in Hungary: 75 Years Later

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 8, 20193:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event is free and open to the public. 

    Event: 4 pm to 6 pm with a reception at 3 pm 

    The Jews of Hungary, Germany’s ally, were the last to be pulled into the Nazi machinery of murder. But in the summer of 1944, Adolf Eichmann and his team, working together with Hungarian police, rounded up 450,000 Jews and transported them to Auschwitz to be killed.

    Our speakers reflect on the devastation of the Holocaust in Hungary and its ongoing significance, 75 years later. Livia Prince is a survivor of Auschwitz and an alumna of U of T (BA Classics, 1979). Ferenc Lazcó, a historian from Maastricht University, is the author of Hungarian Jews in the Age of Genocide: An Intellectual History, 1929-1948. Judith Szapor, a historian of modern Europe from McGill University, is the author of Hungarian Women’s Activism in the Wake of the First World War: From Rights to Revanche.

    This event is presented by the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies in partnership with the Faculty of Arts & Science; the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies; the Elizabeth and Tony Comper Holocaust Education Fund; the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (funded by the DAAD with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office); the Hungarian Studies Program at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; and the Department of History.


    Speakers

    Livia Prince
    Panelist

    Ferenc Laczó
    Panelist

    Judith Szapor
    Panelist

    Doris Bergen
    Moderator



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 10th A New Era of China-Canada-US Relations: Strategic Tensions & Economic Interests

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 10, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center. Dr. Li is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Committee of 100, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. He is the author/editor of numerous books, including Rediscovering China: Dynamics and Dilemmas of Reform (1997), China’s Leaders: The New Generation (2001), Bridging Minds Across the Pacific: The Sino-US Educational Exchange (2005), China’s Changing Political Landscape: Prospects for Democracy (2008), China’s Emerging Middle Class: Beyond Economic Transformation (2010), China’s Political Development: Chinese and American Perspectives (2014), Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership (2016), and The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks in China (2017).He is the principal editor of the Thornton Center Chinese Thinkers Series published by the Brookings Institution Press.

    Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Dr. Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director and Senior Fellow of the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 11th Securitizing Overseas NGOs, Foundations and Thinktanks in China: Two Years of Implementation of a New Policy and Legal Framework

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 11, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    We are now into the third year of implementation of a new law and framework for Chinese security governance of overseas NGOs, foundations and thinktanks in China — which already has one of the largest and most rapidly growing NGO and charitable communities in the world. This presentation analyzes these important policy and regulatory shifts in China in control and monitoring of the overseas NGO, foundation and thinktank sector, including the recent detention of a Canadian citizen in which this new framework has been mentioned, and draws some conclusions about the future work of these organizations in China.

    Mark Sidel is Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and consultant for Asia at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL). He was part of the team that opened the Ford Foundation office in Beijing in the late 1980s, has consulted widely with international donors and NGOs in China, including the Ford, Gates, Asia and other foundations, and has worked in China since 1972. He writes and speaks frequently on the nonprofit sector and philanthropy in China, India, Vietnam, and elsewhere in Asia.


    Speakers

    Mark Sidel
    Doyle-Bascom Professor of Law and Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Consultant for Asia at the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law (ICNL)


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 11th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Toomas Ilves - How to Digitalize a Country: The Example of Estonia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 11, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Campbell Conference Facility
    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Join us for the next installment of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series, featuring Toomas Ilves, former President of Estonia. Mr. Ilves will discuss how the small Baltic state became a world leader in digitization of everything from voting to medicine.

    About our Speaker
    Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former President of Estonia (2006-2016) is a Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Global Digital Policy Incubator, Stanford University. Before assuming the presidency, Ilves served as vice-president of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament (2004-2006) and foreign minister of Estonia (1996-2002).

    He is best-known internationally for his work 1995-2016 pushing Estonia to digitize its government. Ilves has chaired the High-Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms convened by ICANN and served as co-chair of the advisory panel of the World Bank’s World Development Report 2016 “Digital Dividends” and was also the chair of World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Cyber Security. Ilves co-chairs The World Economic Forum working group The Global Futures Council on Blockchain Technology and is a member of the advisory board of the Oxford University Centre for Technology and Global Affairs.

    Under Ilves’ leadership, Estonia gained a reputation as a global leader in digital services and cyber security. A sense of his achievements can be gleaned from “An Interview With The Architect Of The Most Digitally Savvy Country On Earth”, Forbes (April 23, 2018).

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Toomas Hendrik Ilves
    Former President of Estonia Distinguished Visiting Fellow Hoover Institution, Stanford



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 12th Toomas Ilves: Addressing the Vulnerabilities of Democracy in the Digital Age

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 12, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Boardroom, Observatory Site
    315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    About our Speaker
    Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former President of Estonia (2006-2016) is a Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Global Digital Policy Incubator, Stanford University. Before assuming the presidency, Ilves served as vice-president of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament (2004-2006) and foreign minister of Estonia (1996-2002).

    He is best-known internationally for his work 1995-2016 pushing Estonia to digitize its government. Ilves has chaired the High-Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms convened by ICANN and served as co-chair of the advisory panel of the World Bank’s World Development Report 2016 “Digital Dividends” and was also the chair of World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Cyber Security. Ilves co-chairs The World Economic Forum working group The Global Futures Council on Blockchain Technology and is a member of the advisory board of the Oxford University Centre for Technology and Global Affairs.

    Under Ilves’ leadership, Estonia gained a reputation as a global leader in digital services and cyber security. A sense of his achievements can be gleaned from “An Interview With The Architect Of The Most Digitally Savvy Country On Earth”, Forbes (April 23, 2018).

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Toomas Hendrik Ilves
    Former President of Estonia Distinguished Visiting Fellow Hoover Institution, Stanford



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 12th In the Presence of the Divine: Identity and Meaning in Newar Buddhist Art

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 12, 20196:00PM - 8:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Event Series "The Newars and Their Neighbours"

    Description

    Vibrant colors and pulsating sounds of religious devotion punctuate the streets and gullies of Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley. Among the Valley’s Newar Buddhist community, art and ritual work in concert to make the divine present in the urban landscape of the city. For Newar Buddhists, art and ritual performance reinforce core philosophical principles and cultural ideals related to sacred space and ritual cosmology. This lecture examines the role of festivals and image processions in manifesting the divine in the city of Patan. The vibrant ritual festivities and artistic traditions build layers of sacred geography and Buddhist cosmology into the streets and courtyards of the city spaces. Thus, this lecture explores the creation of sacred space in the city of Patan through festivals and other celebrations to examine how the Newar Buddhist community navigates the diversity of religious experience in the Kathmandu Valley to ultimately reaffirm their own religious identity.

    Kerry Lucinda Brown, Professor of Art History at Savannah College of Art and Design, is a specialist in South Asian and Himalayan art. Her research explores the relationship between art and religious identity in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley, situating Newar Buddhist art within the larger context of South Asian Buddhist heritage.


    Speakers

    Kerry Lucinda Brown
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Savannah College of Art and Design

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 15th How Ukraine is Ruled: Informal Politics and Neopatrimonial Democracy after the Euromaidan Revolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 15, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What has changed and remained the same in Ukrainian politics after the Euromaidan revolution? Definitely, the Ukrainian political system has become more democratic, transparent, and competitive. At the same time, the patrimonial nature and organizing principles of the political system remain the same. Surprisingly, after the Euromaidan revolution, Ukraine’s patrimonial politics are paradoxically contributing to the institutionalization of political pluralism and political competition, via a series of formal and informal power-sharing arrangements between the major Euromaidan players. In my presentation, I try to examine the decisive role of informal politics and shadow patron-client networks in Ukraine that remain an under-researched topic for a long time and demonstrate how a neopatrimonial democracy in which state capture is the primary gain, unexpectedly stimulates competitive politics.

    Dr. Oleksandr Fisun is Professor of Political Science and Department Chair at the V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University in Ukraine. His primary research interests are Ukrainian politics and comparative democratization. He has held visiting fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, the National Endowment for Democracy (Washington, DC), the Ellison Center for Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington (Seattle), Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta (Edmonton), and the Aleksanteri Institute at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He is the author of Demokratiia, neopatrimonializm i global’nye transformatsii [Democracy, Neopatrimonialism, and Global Transformations] (Kharkiv, 2006), as well as numerous book chapters and articles on regime change, informal politics, and neopatrimonialism in Ukraine.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oleksandr Fisun
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science and Department Chair, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 16th Beyond the Headlines: India, Pakistan and the Kashmir Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 16, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Joseph McQuade is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute’s Centre for South Asian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge as a Gates Scholar, with a dissertation that examined the origins of terrorism in colonial South Asia in international perspective. This research is currently being revised into a book manuscript, tentatively titled Anti-colonial nationalism and the birth of ‘terrorism’ in colonial India, 1857-1947. His postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto will interrogate the role of terrorism and insurgency in defining national identity in postcolonial India and Burma (Myanmar). His broader research and teaching interests include critical genealogies of ‘terrorism’ as a political and legal category, the global history of political violence, and the relationship between insurgency and nation-states.

    Kanta Murali is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include comparative political economy of development, Indian politics, politics of growth and economic policy, state-business relations and labor policy. Her Ph.D. dissertation (“Economic Liberalization, Electoral Coalitions and Private Investment in India”) at Princeton University aims to understand the political conditions favourable to growth-oriented policies in poor democracies by focusing on a specific empirical puzzle related to India. It examines sub-national policy variation in the competition for private investment in India after the country undertook market reforms in 1991 and analyzes the political factors behind why some subnational governments have been more pro-active in undertaking investment promotion policies than their counterparts.

    Jaby Mathew is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto. Mathew received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto and he is currently revising his doctoral dissertation “Representation in the Shadow of Colonialism: Conceptions of Political Representation in 19th and 20th Century India” into a book manuscript. Mathew’s research focuses on modern Indian thought, contemporary democratic theory, and postcolonial theory with particular attention to the ethics of comparison and translation.

    Christoph Emmrich is Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor for South and Southeast Asian Buddhism at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Department for Historical Studies and is Chair of the UofT/McMaster Numata Buddhist Studies Program. His research bridges Southeast and South Asia as it engages with fields as diverse as Burmese and Nepalese Buddhism, and Tamil Jainism.


    Speakers

    Joseph McQuade
    Panelist
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Kanta Murali
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science; Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Jaby Mathew
    Panelist
    Postdoctoral Associate, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 17th The 2019 Lionel Gelber Prize Ceremony:
    Adam Tooze: Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 17, 20195:30PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Lionel Gelber Prize

    Description

    The 2019 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    The event will be live webcast beginning at 5:30pm: The 2019 Lionel Gelber Prize Award Ceremony and Lecture

    The Lionel Gelber Prize was founded in 1989 by Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber. The prize is a literary award for the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs that seeks to deepen public debate on significant international issues. Presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Foreign Policy magazine, the winning author receives $15,000.

    Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World

    Crashed: The global financial crisis of 2007 – 2009 undermined global capitalism, exposed the failures of banks to manage their risks, almost broke the Eurozone and played a role in the Ukrainian conflict, Brexit and the election of Donald Trump. In a bold work of extraordinary range and ambition, Adam Tooze has written the standard work on the crisis and its aftermath. This is a big picture book, covering developments in the United States, China and Europe, but Tooze never loses sight of the role of key individuals and the political context in which vital economic decisions were taken.

    Adam Tooze is the author of The Deluge (winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize) and The Wages of Destruction (winner of the Wolfson History and Longman-History Today prizes). He is the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History at Columbia University where he directs the European Institute. He previously taught at Yale University and the University of Cambridge. He writes for the Financial Times, the Guardian and the Wall Street Journal.

    Contact

    Gelber Prize Manager
    (416) 946-5670


    Speakers

    Adam Tooze
    Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History Director of the European Institute Columbia University, New York, NY



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 18th Hysterical Borders: Barriers, Incarceration, and Migration Deterrence Policies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 18, 201912:00PM - 2:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    A webinar of this event will be available shortly before the panel begins. 

    Irregular migration represents a tiny fraction of overall global mobility. Most irregular migrants overstay visas or lose legal status rather than attempt to cross borders on foot or arrive at shores by boat. Among these, a significant proportion have legitimate claims to asylum.

    Nonetheless, irregular migration over borders plays a disproportionate role in political discourse, and politicians in liberal states have embarked on progressively more restrictive policies to close borders, detain migrants, and extend controls to transit and host states. These policies can have far-ranging effects, including more lethal migration routes, larger markets for smugglers and traffickers, undermining liberal international norms, and fostering hysterical domestic responses to irregular migration.

    The final event in our Global Migration Challenges series will look at the effects of EU attempts to externalize migration controls in West Africa, unpack the Trump administration’s policies of deterrence, detention, and family separation, and present evidence about how changes in US policy affect irregular migration to Canada.

    Philippe M. Frowd: “Playing the numbers game in Europe’s African borderlands”

    Luis Campos: “Broken Borders and Broken Promises: An Update on U.S. Asylum Law and Policy and the Legal Resistance at the American Southern Border”

    Craig Damian Smith: “America First, Canada Last? The Effects of US Policy Change on Emerging Irregular Migration Systems to Canada”

    In conversation with Prof. Alison Mountz, Director, International Migration Research Centre and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University

    Luis Campos is Immigration Counsel to Haynes and Boone LLP in Dallas, Texas and a former Assistant Professor of Law at the University of New Brunswick. Dr. Campos has led Haynes and Boone’s pro bono program of representing Central American asylum seekers affected by the government’s Zero Tolerance Policy. In this role, he coordinates the firm’s deportation defense teams; frequently visits immigration detention facilities throughout the Southwest; and appears in related federal court proceedings. Dr. Campos received his legal education in the U.S. and Canada (J.D., SMU; M.A., U Texas; LL.M. and S.J.D., U Toronto).

    Philippe M. Frowd is Assistant Professor in the School of Political Studies at the University of Ottawa, Canada. His research focuses on the politics of border security and migration management, with a particular focus on transnational security relationships in the Sahel. His bookSecurity at the Borders (Cambridge, 2018)draws on research in Mauritania and Senegal to examine the new practices and technologies that shape borderwork in the region. Philippe’s work has appeared in diverse venues including Security DialogueInternational Political Sociology, and the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

    Craig Damian Smith is the Associate Director of the Global Migration Lab. His research focuses on migration, displacement, European foreign policy, and refugee integration. His current SSHRC-funded research looks at the emergence of irregular migration systems to Canada and their effects on Canada’s domestic politics and international migration relations. He consults on refugee integration policies in EU Member states, and has made several appearances before the Canadian House of Commons Citizenship and Immigration Committee. In addition to his scholarly work, he has provided media commentary on migration and refugee issues to outlets including the Globe and Mail, National Post, BBC, CBC, and NBC.

    Alison Mountz is a professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration at the Balsillie School of International Affairs at Laurier University. Her work explores how people cross borders and access migration and asylum policies. She researches the tension between the decisions, desires, and displacements that drive migration and the policies and practices designed to manage migration. She analyzes geographies of political asylum and detention, including recent research on islands and US war resister migration to Canada, asking how people seek, find, and forge safe haven. Her monograph, Seeking Asylum: Human Smuggling and Bureaucracy at the Border (Minnesota), was awarded the Meridian Book Prize from the Association of American Geographers. She recently published Boats, Borders, and Bases: Race, the Cold War, and the Rise of Migration Detention in the United States (California, with Jenna Loyd). Mountz directs Laurier’s International Migration Research Centre and edits the journal Politics & Space. She was the 2015-2016 Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Harvard University and is a member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 18th The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy:
    Dani Rodrik: Globalization's Wrong Turn: What's wrong with globalization, and can it be fixed?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 18, 20196:00PM - 7:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street W
    Toronto, ON
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    Description

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy
    To fix globalization, we need to understand where we took a wrong turn. In this lecture, Professor Dani Rodrik will explore the shift to what he calls “hyperglobalization” that took place during the 1990s and why it was based on a faulty understanding of how markets work. He will then outline an alternative perspective for a policy agenda that is more consistent with inclusive prosperity at home while preserving multilateralism abroad.

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy is possible because of the generous support of Paul Cadario, Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.

    About our Speaker:
    Dani Rodrik is the Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He rejoined the Kennedy School in July 2015 after two years at the Institute for Advanced Study as the Albert O. Hirschman Professor in the School of Social Science. An internationally renowned and award-winning economist, his research covers globalization, economic growth and development, and political economy. He is currently President-Elect of the International Economic Association. His newest book is Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy (Princeton University Press; 2017). He is also the author of Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science (W.W. Norton, 2015) and The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy ((W.W. Norton, 2011). Professor Rodrik’s monthly columns on global affairs appear on Project Syndicate. He holds a Ph.D. in economics and an MPA from Princeton University, and an A.B. from Harvard College.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Dani Rodrik
    Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, April 21st Asian Heritage Month Festival 2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, April 21, 20192:00PM - 6:00PMToronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W.; Metro Hall Rotunda, 55 John St.
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    Description

    Opening Ceremony with Special Presentations & Launch of Asian Canadian Artists in Digital Age Workshops

    *Please click here to RSVP on Eventbrite*

    @ City Hall Rotunda & City Hall Library (100 Queen St. W.)
    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 | 2-6 PM

    Mr. Justin Poy | “What’s happening in the world of film in China, and its opportunities for Canada”?”

    Over the last two decades we have seen China develop into a blockbuster machine. Yet, Chinese films rarely get much international attention. Is it an intentional snub? Or are Chinese films not made for the international market? Was “Wolf Warrior 2” actually a good action flick? Or was it good considering it came from China? With recent big budget flops like “Asura” (backed in part by Alibaba’s Jack Ma), that cost $122MM USD to make yet only brought in $7.1MM before it was yanked from theatres, to cross over movies like “The Great Wall” starring leading man, Matt Damon, that garnered a dismal audience and reviews — what is actually happening that has made “Chinawood” rethink their movie production formula? How can Canada optimize this opportunity, and what are the implications for Toronto, Hollywood North?

    Mr. Stephen Siu | “Jews in Shanghai — Revisited and Parallels to Canada”

    Stephen is the producer of the “Jews in Shanghai” project in Toronto and a researcher on that period of history who has met with Dr Ho Feng Shan’s daughter Manli Ho in both Winnipeg and Toronto, and interviewed the head of the Jewish Studies Centre in Shanghai. Dr Ho was the Chinese Consul General to Vienna from 1938 to 1940, and he was called “Chinese Schindler” because he saved thousands of Jews. How will this talk rekindle memories of the Holocaust, and in what ways Toronto is serving similar roles as Shanghai in addressing multiculturalism and providing asylum?

    SUNDAY, APRIL 21 – THURSDAY, APRIL 25
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Rotunda

    THURSDAY, MAY 16 – THURSDAY, MAY 30
    Art & Photo Exhibitions at City Hall Library

    THURSDAY, MAY 30 | 1-2 PM
    Professor Chef Leo Chan’s Presentation at City Hall Library
    “Chinese festivals and Foods” | City Hall Library will focus on the Dragon Boat Festival

    *******************
    @ Metro Hall Rotunda (55 John St.)
    MONDAY, MAY 13 – SUNDAY, MAY 19
    Asian Heritage Month Art & Photo Exhibitions at Metro Hall Rotunda


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Patron, Asian Heritage Month-CFACI

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor and Past Chair, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST)


    Co-Sponsors

    Canada Council for the Arts

    Cambridge Food & Wine Society

    Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto

    Department of Canadian Heritage and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, Government of Canada

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Social Services Network

    The Justin Poy Agency

    York Centre for Asian Research, York University

    WE Artists' Group

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Asian Heritage Month - Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 23rd Urban Data as Public Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 23, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    At this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Internet companies applied their online knowledge to the analogue world for the first time. Facebook, Palantir, Microsoft and Google tried to impress the business elite with three-storey-high temporary buildings at the most central spots in Davos, and Google revealed its ambition to build an entire suburb of Toronto.

    In this talk Von Borries argues that Google’s “Sidewalk City Lab” applies reinforced learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence (AI), to the real world. (Similar approaches can be observed at Microsoft’s CityNext, Baidou AI City Xiongang, Moscow, Taipei and Singapore Smart Nation, and it is only a question of time until Facebook and Tencent will join in.) This has implications not only for architecture as a creative handcraft, but more importantly for the relationship between people (especially minorities, notoriously overlooked by code based on statistics), as well as social relations, and the private sector.

    In this new setting, city planning and architectural design are sourced through machine learning algorithms fed by the big data collected from anyone involved— be they future tenants or critics—potentially any user of Google’s services, in the case of Toronto. Ultimately, we all become unconscious architects as our digital lives are exploited as data. Still, for some time, the results will be unpredictable, even for Google’s coders. It remains to be seen if this can be interpreted as an opportunity or as a failure.

    The Taiwanese architect Hsieh Ying-Chun has another approach to collaboration. He considers architecture and town-planning a collective endeavour and a participatory effort.

    Smart city algorithms lead to the disappearance of the architect. This lecture aims to highlight how “Urban Data as Public Space” is actually working and how it is different from supposedly similar developments on China’s New Silk Road. Lanzhou New Area is a rather top-down, centrally planned development, reminiscent of Corbusier’s 90 year-old Plan Voisin for Paris, but pimped up with cinema-city style theme parks. Last but not least, Von Borries will connect this discussion to central Moscow, where urban facades mimic a clichéd Russian-ness for the football World Cup and beyond, combined with facial recognition software for all.

    The lecture will be accompanied by excerpts of Christian von Borries’ upcoming social science fiction film AI is the Answer – What was the Question?

    Christian von Borries is a musician and film director who was guest professor for architecture at Nuremberg’s Art Academy. He is a visiting professor at the School of Inter-Media Art at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou. He lives in a self developed green house on top of an old warehouse building in Berlin. His artistic practice can be read in the tradition of the Situationist’s psychogeography. He just cocurated a tech fair in Seoul and Beijing called A BETTER VERSION OF YOU. Together with Andreas Dzialocha, he is AI Unit.


    Speakers

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Academic Director, Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, Graduate Department of History

    Christian von Borries
    Speaker
    Musician and film director; Visiting Professor at the School of Inter-Media Art, China Academy of Art in Hangzhou


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 24th Julian Jackson: Interpreting de Gaulle

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the early summer of 1940, when France was overrun by German troops, one junior general who had fought in the trenches in Verdun refused to accept defeat. He fled to London, where he took to the radio to address his compatriots back home. “Whatever happens,” he said, “the flame of French resistance must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished.” At that moment, Charles de Gaulle entered history.

    For the rest of the war, de Gaulle insisted he and his Free French movement were the true embodiment of France. Through sheer force of personality he inspired French men and women to risk their lives to resist the Nazi occupation. Sometimes aloof but confident in his leadership, he quarreled violently with Churchill and Roosevelt. Yet they knew they would need his help to rebuild a shattered Europe. Thanks to de Gaulle, France was recognized as one of the victorious Allies when Germany was finally defeated. Then, as President of the Fifth Republic, he brought France to the brink of a civil war over his controversial decision to pull out of Algeria. He challenged American hegemony, took France out of NATO, and twice vetoed British entry into the European Community in his pursuit of what he called “a certain idea of France.”

    Julian Jackson’s magnificent De Gaulle, the first major biography in over twenty years, captures this titanic figure as never before. Drawing on the extensive resources of the recently opened de Gaulle archives, Jackson reveals the conservative roots of de Gaulle’s intellectual formation, sheds new light on his relationship with Churchill, and shows how he confronted riots at home and violent independence movements from the Middle East to Vietnam. No previous biography has so vividly depicted this towering figure whose legacy remains deeply contested.

    De Gaulle has been recognized with the Amercian Library in Paris Prize 2018 for the best book about France written in English, the Franco-British Literary Prize 2018, and the prestigious Duff Cooper Prize for Non-Fiction 2018. It is being translated into French, Portugese, Hebrew, Chinese, and Japanese and was noted a ‘book of the year’ by several British newspapers.


    Speakers

    Julian Jackson
    Queen Mary University of London


    Sponsors

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 24th Hon. Kevin Rudd: China-Canada-U.S. Relations: What Happens Next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 24, 20195:00PM - 6:00PMDesautels Hall (Second Floor, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto
    105 St George Street
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    Series

    Digital Leadership in Public Policy Series

    Description

    About Our Speaker: Kevin Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute as its inaugural President in January 2015. He served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister from 2007 to 2010, then as Foreign Minister from 2010 to 2012, before returning as Prime Minister in 2013. As Prime Minister, Rudd led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis. Australia’s fiscal response to the crisis was reviewed by the IMF as the most effective stimulus strategy of all member states. Australia was the only major advanced economy not to go into recession. Rudd is also internationally recognized as one of the founders of the G20, which drove the global response to the crisis and in 2009 helped prevent the crisis from spiraling into a second global depression. As Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Rudd was active in global and regional foreign policy leadership. He was a driving force in expanding the East Asia Summit (EAS) to include both the U.S. and Russia in 2010. He also initiated the concept of transforming the EAS into a wider Asia-Pacific community to help manage deep-rooted tensions in Asia by building over time the institutions and culture of common security in Asia. On climate change, Rudd ratified the Kyoto Protocol in 2007 and legislated in 2008 for a mandatory 20 percent renewable energy target for Australia. Rudd launched Australia’s challenge in the International Court of Justice with the objective of stopping Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean. Rudd drove Australia’s successful bid for its current non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council and oversaw the near-doubling of Australia’s foreign aid budget. Rudd is Chair of the Board of the International Peace Institute, and Chair of Sanitation and Water for All. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, a Distinguished Fellow at Chatham House in London, a Distinguished Statesman with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Paulson Institute in Chicago. Mr. Rudd is a member of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization’s Group of Eminent Persons. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the Schwarzman Scholars program at Tsinghua University, and is an Honorary Professor at Peking University. Rudd is proficient in Mandarin Chinese. He remains actively engaged in indigenous reconciliation.

    Contact

    Daniel Ellul
    (416) 978-6119


    Speakers

    Hon. Kevin Rudd
    26th Prime Minister of Australia
    President, Asia Society Policy Institute
    Senior Fellow - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 25th Steering Low-Carbon Growth in Emerging African Cities: Insights from Dar es Salaam

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 25, 20194:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    By the end of the 21st century, over 30 African cities will have populations exceeding 10 million people, placing them among the world’s largest megacities. The region’s rapid urbanization will stimulate investments in new urban infrastructure, including power plants, roads, and residential buildings, which will push city-level energy use and carbon emissions to new levels. The region’s impending urbanization and infrastructure growth presents an opportunity in the global fight against climate change. By coordinating efforts now, urban planners, infrastructure service providers, and municipalities can “get it right” and invest in sustainable and low-carbon infrastructure to avoid locking into carbon-intensive patterns of urban growth.

    Using findings from interviews and stakeholder workshops undertaken over three months of fieldwork in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, this presentation will explore three key questions: What role do African cities and municipal governments play in producing low-carbon urban growth? Which institutions or governing bodies should take the lead, and why? And what are the opportunities to scale up investments to finance sustainable technologies and infrastructure? The presentation will elucidate possible governance and financing options for Dar es Salaam as well as their relevance for other cities in the region.

    SPEAKER

    Chibulu Luo is the recipient of the 2018-2019 Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. She is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Toronto. Chibulu is also a former Young Scientist with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); a Doctoral Research Awardee with International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Canada; a Doctoral Scholar with the University of Toronto’s Centre for Global Engineering; and a researcher with the Engineering Education for Sustainable Cities in Africa (EESC-A) project within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

    Chibulu has worked extensively in environmental policy and development, including with the Earth Institute at Columbia University, the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF), the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and the World Bank. She holds Master’s degrees in Engineering Management and Mechanical Engineering.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 26th History of a Day: Time, Terror, Agency and the Overthrow of Maximilien Robespierre

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room
    Sidney Smith 2098
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    On 27 July 1794 – 9 Thermidor year II in the new Revolutionary Calendar – Maximilien Robespierre, the most notorious politician of the French revolution, was toppled from his position on the Committee of Public safety which was running the Terror in France. He was executed the followjng evening. His overthrow is conventionally viewed as marking the beginning of the end of the Terror. Events on 9 Thermidor started with a parliamentary coup in the national assembly led by many of his colleagues on the Committee of Public Safety. It was followed by a mobilisation of the Parisian popular movement in support of Robespierre led by the Paris Commune, before the national assembly reorganised and won the day. Many historians have seen the ootcome of the day as inevitable. Yet for those who were caught up in it, it was anything but. The forces behind Robespierre looked superior to those of his opponents and the outcome of the action wavered dramatically over the 24 hours. It was a day that involved tens of thousands of Parisians. How, then, does one tell the story of those 24 hours, in ways which do justice to the experience of those Parisians and the forces of sheer contingency and chance?

    Colin Jones is Professor of History at Queen Mary University of London and since 2018 is also Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. He is Fellow of the British Academy and Past President of the Royal Historical Society. He is the author of many books on the history of France including The Great Nation. France from Louis XIV to Napoleon (1715-99) (2002), Paris: Biography of a City (2004), The Smile Revolution in 18th-century Paris (2015) and Versailles (2018).


    Speakers

    Colin Jones
    Queen Mary University


    Sponsors

    Department of History

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 26th The French Trials of Cléophas Kamitatu: Refugee Politics, Leftist Activism, and Françafrique in 1970s Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In the 1970s, the French lawyer Jean-Jacques de Félice served as defense counsel for Cléophas Kamitatu-Massamba of Congo-Zaïre, who was expelled from France in 1972 even though he had obtained political refugee status. At the request of Mobutu Sese Seko, the French Minister of the Interior had censored Kamitatu’s critical portrayal of the Mobutu regime, La Grande Mystification du Congo (published by François Maspero Press in 1970). The Kamitatu case illustrates how, even as France ratified the 1967 Protocol of the Geneva Convention on Refugees in 1971, immigration, censorship, and late Gaullist era Africa policies dominated political discussions. The attempts to censure Kamitatu’s book published by a French publisher and to deport him despite his status as political refugee show how various facets of French government engaged with international laws regulating refugees and deportation at the very time that Jacques Foccart, who had oriented France’s Africa policy since 1958, sought to integrate Congo-Zaïre into France’s sphere of influence in Africa. Kamitatu’s story thus exposes the network of Jacques Foccart as detrimental to French civil liberties, African opposition politics, and international refugee protocols alike. The chapter draws primarily on Kamitatu’s legal case files in the archives of his lawyer, Jean-Jacques de Félice. It places cause lawyering in historical perspective, promotes use of the lawyer’s archive as fertile historical method, and considers state and non-state actor networks in a common analytical framework.

    Meredith Terretta earned her PhD in African history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds the Gordon F. Henderson Research Chair in Human Rights and teaches history at the University of Ottawa. She specializes in themes of African liberation movements, legal activism, histories of refuge-seeking, and human rights. She has recently coedited African Asylum at a Crossroads: Activism, Expert Testimony, and Refugee Rights (Ohio University Press, 2015). Her most recent single-authored book is Nation of Outlaws, State of Violence: Nationalism, Grassfields Tradition, and State-Building in Cameroon (Ohio University Press, New African Histories Series, 2014). Her articles appear in numerous journals including The Journal of Contemporary History, The Canadian Journal of History, Matériaux pour l’histoire de notre temps, Politique africaine, The Journal of World History, Human Rights Quarterly, and The Journal of African History. She is currently working on a book tentatively titled Activism at the Fringes of Empire: Rogue Lawyers and Rights Activists In and Out of Twentieth Century Africa. She is President of the Canadian Association of African Studies.


    Speakers

    Meredith Terretta
    University of Ottawa



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 29th Between Trauma and Nostalgia: Public Opinion and Identities in Donbas after 2014

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Oleksii Polegkyi is a Bayduza Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Contemporary Ukraine Studies Program, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta and member of Political Communication Research Unit at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. Previously he was a research fellow at the Graduate Institute of Russian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan and visiting post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies Kőszeg in Hungary. He earned PhD in Political Sciences from the University of Wroclaw, Poland and the University of Antwerp, Belgium. He received an MA in Philosophy from the T. Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine and was a recipient of the Taiwan Fellowship Program, Lane Kirkland Fellowship, Open Society Foundation Fellowship as well as research grants from Polish National Science Centre, Erste Foundation and others. His research interests include post-communist transformations in post-Soviet area, media and political discourse in Ukraine, foreign policy, nation and identity building in the post-Soviet states.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oleksii Polegkyi
    Speaker
    Bayduza Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Contemporary Ukraine Studies Program, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 30th Migrants, Muslims and the Future of Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 30, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Islam and Global Affairs Initiative

    Description

    Nine minutes before attacking two mosques and killing 50 Muslim worshippers in Christchurch, the shooter released a 73-page manifesto outlining his anti-immigration and white supremacist agenda. World leaders condemned the terrorist attack, but continue to face serious questions about their own immigration and border security policies at home.

    Across North America and Europe, migration is a point of fierce debate. Proponents argue that immigrants make a positive social, economic, and cultural impact, while others express concerns that unchecked migration threatens security and jobs.

    Exploiting this reasonable debate are white extremist groups that frame migration as a “race war” and declare that Muslims should be purged. These radicalized white extremists have developed globalized digital networks that have inspired horrifying terrorist attacks in Oslo, Quebec City, and Christchurch.

    Has the democratic debate about migration become irreversibly securitized? How can analysts and policymakers reasonably and responsibly debate immigration policies, without fuelling dangerous anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim extremism? What does the hard evidence have to say about the effects of migration on the future of democracy?
    To answer these pressing questions, the Islam and Global Affairs Initiative at the Munk School presents a dynamic panel discussion with renowned experts.

    Chris Cochrane is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He is the author of Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas (MQUP, 2015) and co-author of Canadian Politics: Critical Approaches (Nelson, 2014). His current research looks at ideology, political disagreement, and anti-immigrant sentiment in Canada and other democratic countries.

    Doug Saunders is a distinguished author and award-winning journalist with a regular column with The Globe and Mail. An expert on migration and international affairs, he is the author of the acclaimed books “The Myth of the Muslim Tide” (2012) and “Maximum Canada: Why 35 Million Canadians Are Not Enough” (2017).

    Naseem Mithoowani Naseem Mithoowani has been practising immigration and refugee law for over 10 years. She graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School, and is now a partner at the law firm of Waldman & Associates. She has defended the rights of women to wear religious face covering at citizenship oath ceremonies and fought for civil compensation on behalf of victims of draconian security certificate regimes. She is an adjunct professor of law at Osgoode Hall Law School, where she teaches immigration law. She also is involved in an initiative to implement a Muslim legal aid clinic to the GTA, sits on a committee at the University of Toronto to implement legal support to students targeted on campus by CSIS, and is a Board Member of the Urban Alliance on Race Relations.

    Aisha Ahmad (moderator) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto Scarborough. She is the author of Jihad & Co.: Black Markets and Islamist Power (Oxford UP, 2017). She has conducted research in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Kenya, Mali, Lebanon, and Iraq on the economics of jihadist insurgencies.


    Speakers

    Chris Cochrane
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto

    Naseem Mithoowani
    Speaker
    Lawyer, Waldman & Associates

    Doug Saunders
    Speaker
    Journalist, International Affairs Columnist, The Globe and Mail

    Aisha Ahmad
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2019

  • Thursday, May 2nd Book Launch "Mackenzie King in the Age of the Dictators" by Roy MacLaren

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 2, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Until the outbreak of hostilities in 1939, Mackenzie King prided himself on never publicly saying anything derogatory about Hitler or Mussolini, unequivocally supporting the appeasement policies of British prime minister Neville Chamberlain and regarding Hitler as a benign fellow mystic. In Mackenzie King in the Age of the Dictators Roy MacLaren leads readers through the political labyrinth that led to Canada’s involvement in the Second World War and its awakening as a forceful nation on the world stage.

    Roy MacLaren has been a diplomat, businessman, minister in three federal cabinets, and Canada’s high commissioner to the United Kingdom.

    The Bill Graham Centre is a joint undertaking of Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, in the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 3rd Glenn Gould Roundtable 2019: Japanese and Other Perspectives on the Canadian Icon of Music and Technology

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 3, 20192:00PM - 4:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A gathering of colleagues, friends, writers/artists and scholars of Glenn Gould (1932-1982) to develop new perspectives by sharing memories, recent news and achievements as well as forthcoming events and projects. The event will involve presentations and a film screening.

    PRESENTATIONS:
    “Glenn Gould and Japan: A Two-Way Street”
    Junichi Miyazawa
    Junichi Miyazawa, Ph.D., is music/literary critic and award-winning professor of humanities at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo. In 2018/19 he is Visiting Scholar at Massey College; Visiting Professor at Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University, and St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto. He is one of the world’s leading Glenn Gould scholars. His major books are: Glenn Gould: A Perspective (Tokyo, 2004), McLuhan’s View (Tokyo, 2008), and Thinking Music (co-authored, Tokyo, 2017).

    “Malleability and Machines: Glenn Gould and the Technological Self”
    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Edward Jones-Imhotep is a cultural historian of science and technology and Associate Professor of History at York University. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University. His book,The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press), won the 2018 Sidney Edelstein Prize for the best scholarly book in history of technology.

    “Evolving Interpretative Approach in Glenn Gould’s Recordings of Alban Berg’s Piano Sonata”
    Michael Thibodeau
    Dr. Michael Thibodeau is a recent graduate of the University of Toronto. Equally at home in the library carrel as on the piano bench, Michael has spent unreasonable amounts of time researching the interpretative processes performers use to bring notation into sound. His dissertation is an ontological examination of concepts belonging to common practice—namely, musicality and authenticity.

    “Matter of North: An Anthology”
    Anthony Cushing
    Anthony Cushing received his Ph.D. in musicology from Western University in 2013. He completed an undergraduate degree in music at Acadia University where he majored in composition and cello performance. In 2003, he had the distinction of being the first graduate student in music at the University of Southern Maine where he studied composition with J. Mark Scearce and Elliott Schwartz. His current research interest is in Glenn Gould’s Solitude Trilogy radio documentaries.

    FILM SCREENING:
    Radio as Music (1975)
    A long-forgotten film in which Gould talks about composing radio documentaries with interviewer John Thompson and sound technician Donald Logan. (30 minutes)

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Caryl Clark
    Chair
    Professor, Music History & Culture, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

    Junichi Miyazawa
    Co-Chair/Speaker
    Visiting Scholar, Massey College, University of Toronto
    Visiting Professor, Robarts Centre for Canadian Studies, York University and St. Michael's College, University of Toronto
    Professor, School of Cultural & Creative Studies, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo

    Anthony Cushing
    Speaker
    Independent Scholar

    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, York University

    Michael Thibodeau
    Speaker
    Pianist

    Peter Goddard
    Panelist
    Music Journalist

    David Jaeger, C. M.
    Panelist
    Music Producer, Composer & Broadcaster

    Brian Levine
    Panelist
    Executive Director, Glenn Gould Foundation

    Donald Logan
    Panelist
    Sound Technician

    Faye Perkins
    Panelist
    Representative for Glenn Gould Estate/Primary Wave

    Lorne Tulk
    Panelist
    Sound Technician


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Faculty of Music

    Primary Wave


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 7th “A Hell of a Lot Worse Than Waterboarding”?: Law and American State Violence From Bush to Trump

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 7, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Donald Trump has notoriously promised to “bring back a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding” along with other unlawful practices. Furthermore, his administration has advanced policies that undermine international human rights commitments, particularly related to migration and refugees. While Trumpism is undoubtedly shocking, it exists within a continuum of American challenges to international law, justified in the name of national security. Drawing from Sanders’ new book, Plausible Legality (Oxford University Press, 2018), this talk traces how the Bush and Obama administrations, to varying degrees, legally rationalized torture, targeted killing, and mass surveillance after 9/11. What do these largely successful efforts to construct legal cover for human rights abuses tell us about the capacity of legal rules to constrain state violence, both in the past and today? Can the law prevent “worse” from occurring in the future?

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Dr. Rebecca Sanders
    Department of Political Science, University of Cincinnati


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 7th What Does the Election of Volodymyr Zelensky Mean for Ukraine?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 7, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    On April 21, Ukraine elected its sixth President since independence. Volodymyr Zelensky is the first Ukrainian President without political experience. In addition, outside of Israel, Ukraine is now one of the few countries in the world with a Jewish head of state. What does the election tell us about Ukrainian democracy? What are its implications for relations with Russia?

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marta Dyczok
    Western University

    Oleksandr Fisun
    Karazin Kharkiv National University

    Anna Shternshis
    University of Toronto

    Lucan Way
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 8th Prospects for Japan's G20 Osaka Summit

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 8, 20199:00AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Japan is hosting the 2019 G20 summit in Osaka on June 28-29, 2019. In anticipation of that meeting, the Centre for the Study of Global Japan and the G20 Research Group of the University of Toronto are hosting a one-day symposium on May 8, 2019 to survey the agenda for the summit and provide an assessment of its prospects.

    In addition to leaders of G20 countries, other leaders and the heads of many international organizations have been invited. It will be the largest summit Japan has ever hosted. According to Prime Minister Abe, “At the Osaka Summit, Japan is determined to lead global economic growth by promoting free trade and innovation, achieving both economic growth and reduction of disparities, and contributing to the development agenda and other global issues. Furthermore, we will discuss how to address the digital economy from an institutional perspective and issues that arise from an aging society. We will introduce Japan’s efforts, including the productivity revolution amid a “Society 5.0” era, towards achieving a society where all individuals are actively engaged.”

    The day-long U of T symposium will be held in the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place on May 8, beginning at 9AM. A range of distinguished officials and scholars from Japan, Canada, Europe, and the United States will discuss the evolving G20 agenda. All are welcome to attend.

    View a live webcast of the symposium here.

    ———-

    PROGRAM | PROSPECTS FOR JAPAN’S G20 OSAKA SUMMIT

    8:30AM | REGISTRATION

    9:00-9:15AM | WELCOME
    Consul-General Takako Ito, Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto

    OVERVIEW
    John Kirton, Co-Founder and Director, G7 Research Group
    Co-Founder and Director, G20 Research Group and Interim Director, International Relations Program, University of Toronto

    Louis Pauly, Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    9:15-10:30AM | G20 SUMMIT PERFORMANCE, 2008-2019
    Chair: John Kirton

    Evolution of the G20
    Len Edwards, G20 Sherpa for Canada (2008-10)

    Japan, the United States, and the G20 Economy
    Robert Fauver, US G7 Sherpa (1993-94)
    President, Fauver Associates, LLC

    Do G20 Commitments Count? The 2019 Compliance Report
    Alessandra Cicci and Ji Yoon Han, Co-Chairs, Summit Studies, G20 Research Group (2019 Osaka Summit), University of Toronto

    10:30-11:00AM | BREAK

    11:00AM-12:15PM | PREPARATION AND PROSPECTS FOR THE OSAKA SUMMIT
    Chair: Louis Pauly

    The Agenda for Osaka
    Shotaro Oshima, G7 Sherpa (2002)
    Chairman, Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES)
    Adjunct Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)

    Osaka G20 Conception and Hopes
    Jonathan Fried, Current G20 Sherpa for Canada
    Canada’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative, World Trade Organization

    Japan and Global Economic Challenges in a Rapidly Changing World
    Motoshige Itoh, Professor Emeritus, University of Tokyo, Japan
    Professor, International Social Sciences, Gakushuin University, Japan

    12:15-1:15PM | LUNCH BREAK

    1:15-2:30PM | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY: CHALLENGES IN TRADE AND FINANCE
    Chair: Tiff Macklem, Dean, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Challenges in the Trading System
    Matthew Goodman, Senior Vice President; Simon Chair in Political Economy and
    Senior Adviser for Asian Economics, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington, DC

    The World Economic Outlook & G20 Options
    Patrick Cirillo, Principal Assistant to the Secretary, International Monetary Fund

    Multilateral Cooperation for Financial Stability: A Historical Perspective and Prospect
    Sara Konoe, Professor, Faculty of Economics, Kansai University, Japan

    2:30-3:45PM | SOCIETY 5.0: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, AND THE PROMISE OF INCLUSION
    Chair: David Welch, University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo
    Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation, University of Waterloo

    New Frontiers for Economic Governance and the Promotion of Diversity
    Paola Subacchi, Professor, International Economics, Queen Mary University London
    Visiting Professor, University of Bologna, Italy

    Science in Global Health and Wellness
    Mal Evans, Chief Scientific Officer, KGK Science, London, ON

    Sustainable Oceans and the Management of Plastic Waste
    Atsushi Sunami, President, Ocean Policy Research Institute of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation
    Executive Advisor to the President and Adjunct Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan

    Performance and Possibilities for G20 Gender Governance
    Julia Kulik, Director of Research, G20 Research Group, University of Toronto

    3:45-4:15PM | BREAK

    4:15-5:30PM | SOCIETY 5.0: TECHNOLOGY, INNOVATION, AND FUTURE PROSPERITY
    Chair: Alan Alexandroff, Director, Global Summitry Project; Senior Editor, Global Summitry: Politics, Economics and Law in International Governance, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Governance of AI in Society 5.0: Japan’s Domestic Challenge and International Strategy
    Hideaki Shiroyama, Professor, Public Administration, Graduate School of Public Policy and Graduate School for Law and Politics, University of Tokyo, Japan

    The G20’s Governance of Climate Change
    Ella Kokotsis, Director of Accountability, G20 Research Groups, University of Toronto

    Innovation in a Global Digital Environment
    Carin Holroyd, Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan
    President, Japan Studies Association of Canada

    5:30-5:45PM | CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS
    The Honourable William C. Graham, Chancellor of Trinity College, University of Toronto

    5:45-6:30 | RECEPTION

    Event Poster

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     CSGJ G20 Osaka symposium poster

    View the event poster here.

    View the full program here. 

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Consul-General Takako Ito
    Welcoming Remarks
    Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto

    John Kirton
    Chair
    Co-Founder and Director, G7 Research Group

    Co-Founder and Director, G20 Research Group

    Interim Director, International Relations Program, University of Toronto

    Len Edwards
    Panelist
    G20 Sherpa for Canada (2008-10)

    Robert Fauver
    Panelist
    US G7 Sherpa (1993-94)

    President, Fauver Associates, LLC

    Alessandra Cicci
    Panelist
    Co-Chair, Summit Studies, G20 Research Group (2019 Osaka Summit), University of Toronto

    Ji Yoon Han
    Panelist
    Co-Chair, Summit Studies, G20 Research Group (2019 Osaka Summit), University of Toronto

    Julia Kulik
    Panelist
    Director of Research, G20 Research Group, University of Toronto

    Alan Alexandroff
    Chair
    Director, Global Summitry Project; Senior Editor, Global Summitry: Politics, Economics and Law in International Governance, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Hideaki Shiroyama
    Panelist
    Professor, Public Administration, Graduate School of Public Policy and Graduate School for Law and Politics, University of Tokyo, Japan

    Ella Kokotsis
    Panelist
    Director of Accountability, G20 Research Groups, University of Toronto

    Carin Holroyd
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan

    President, Japan Studies Association of Canada

    The Honourable William C. Graham
    Concluding Remarks
    Chancellor, Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Patrick Cirillo
    Panelist
    Principal Assistant to the Secretary, International Monetary Fund

    Sara Konoe
    Panelist
    Professor, Faculty of Economics, Kansai University, Japan

    David Welch
    Chair
    University Research Chair and Professor of Political Science, Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo

    Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation, University of Waterloo

    Paola Subacchi
    Panelist
    Professor, International Economics, Queen Mary University London

    Visiting Professor, University of Bologna, Italy

    Mal Evans
    Panelist
    Chief Scientific Officer, KGK Science, London, ON

    Atsushi Sunami
    Panelist
    President, Ocean Policy Research Institute of the Sasakawa Peace Foundation

    Executive Advisor to the President and Adjunct Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), Tokyo, Japan

    Louis Pauly
    Chair
    Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Shotaro Oshima
    Panelist
    G7 Sherpa (2002)

    Chairman, Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES)

    Adjunct Professor, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)

    Jonathan Fried
    Panelist
    Current G20 Sherpa for Canada

    Canada’s Ambassador and Permanent Representative, World Trade Organization

    Motoshige Itoh
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, University of Tokyo, Japan

    Professor, International Social Sciences, Gakushuin University, Japan

    Tiff Macklem
    Chair
    Dean, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Matthew Goodman
    Panelist
    Senior Vice President; Simon Chair in Political Economy and Senior Adviser for Asian Economics, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Washington, DC


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    G20 Research Group, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 9th Delayed Promises: Female Film Projectionists On and Off Screen in the People's Republic of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 9, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A Talk By TINA CHEN

    The celebration and promotion of mobile film projection has been central to the multi-media landscape of the PRC at two historical moments: 1950s-1960s and 2010s-present. In each moment, the female film projectionist occupies privileged space, albeit in radically different contexts. This talk explores apparent visual, rhetorical, and experiential continuities framing the female film projectionist from socialist to post-socialist China. Through critical consideration of female film projectionists as conduits of advanced media technology and spatial projects, this talk considers how and why feminism has been a delayed promise in the PRC.

    Tina Mai Chen is Professor of History at the University of Manitoba. Her current research considers the intersection of feminism, cultural politics, media landscapes, and subjectivity in the People’s Republic of China. She is co-editor with David Churchill of The Material of World History as well as Film, History, and Cultural Citizenship: Sites of Projection.

    ROUNDTABLE: From Socialist Mobile Cinema to Global Media Now

    TINA CHEN (University of Manitoba)
    YI GU (University of Toronto)
    TONG LAM (University of Toronto)
    YUROU ZHONG (University of Toronto)


    Speakers

    Tina Chen
    Head, Department of History, University of Manitoba

    Yi Gu
    Assistant Professor, Art History, University of Toronto

    Tong Lam
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto

    Yurou Zhong
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History , University of Toronto

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 10th The 2019 Toronto Conference on Germany

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 10, 201910:00AM - 2:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    10:00 – 10:15

    Welcome

    Randall Hansen, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Thomas E. Schultze, Consul General of Germany in Toronto
    Knut Dethlefsen, Friedrich Ebert Foundation

    10:15 – 10:35

    E-Day: What Do the European Elections Hold in Store for a Continent in Flux?
    Wolfgang Schmidt, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Finance

    10:40 – 11:55
    Session 1: Madness at the Polls: Canadian and European Elections in an Era of Right-wing Populism

    Wolfgang Schmidt, State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Finance

    Nathan Cullen, Member of Canadian Parliament

    Moderator: Shachi Kurl, Executive Director, Angus Reid Institute

    11:55 – 13:00
    Lunch break

    13:00 – 14:15
    Session 2: A Coalition of the Modest? Canadian and German Leadership for a Liberal Democratic World Order

    Janice Gross Stein, Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    John Ralston Saul, Co-Chair, Institute for Canadian Citizenship and former President, PEN International

    Moderator: Roland Nelles, Chief US Correspondent, Der Spiegel

    14:15 – 14:30
    Closing remarks

    This event is sponsored by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Friedrich Ebert Foundation, and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) with funds from the German Foreign Ministry.

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Friedrich Ebert Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 10th Tong Lam: Moving Images, Moving People

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 10, 201911:00AM - 6:00PMBachir/Yerex Presentation Space, 401 Richmond Street West, Suite 450A
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    Description

    Presented by the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival in partnership with Vtape. Supported by the University of Manitoba, the University of Toronto, and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

    Tong Lam’s series meticulously documents contemporary China’s outdoor film phenomena, where films are sometimes screened next to dancing people and even animals, and where propaganda films have to compete with images of conspicuous consumption. In addition to showing the diversity of people and places in a rapidly changing nation, Lam’s work also invites viewers to consider an increasingly complex global media environment overrun with commercials, misinformation, and media spectacle.

    Curated by Tina Chen (Head, Department of History, Unviersity of Manitoba)

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada

    University of Manitoba


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 14th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Shalini Randeria: Population Panic, Ethno-nationalism and the Anti-Feminist Backlash

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 14, 20194:00PM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    The lecture will address the politics of demographic panics the world over, which are entangled with geo-politics and the increasing strength of ethno-national identities. Imaginations of the purity of the nation, perceptions of differential fertility rates coupled with increasing international migration fuel pro-natalist discourses and policies especially in Eastern Europe, which is also witnessing a strong anti-feminist and anti-LGBTQ rights backlash. The same mix of factors, however, lead to selective anti-natalism for the poor and for religious minorities in India, for example, where a model of economic development based on neo-Malthusian premises continues to animate a state-driven population control program. The contemporary dynamics of the governance of reproduction in a world imagined as simultaneously under-populated and over-populated will be considered against the background of the global history of (post)- colonial population control.

    About our speaker: Shalini Randeria is the Rector of the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna, Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, as well as the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy. She serves on the Board of European Forum Alpbach, the Board of Trustees of the Central European University (CEU), the Academic Advisory Board of the Wien Museum as well as the Advisory Board of the Higher Education Support Program of the Open Society Foundations. Her research focuses on the anthropology of law, state and policy, reproductive rights, population policy and gender, the anthropology of globalisation and development, displacement, and civil society, social movements and NGOs.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Shalini Randeria
    Speaker
    Professor & Director, Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Geneva, Switzerland

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Professor & Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 14th Book launch: Enduring Alliance: A History of NATO and the Postwar Global Order by Timothy Andrews Sayle

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Born from necessity, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) has always seemed on the verge of collapse. Even now, some seventy years after its inception, some consider its foundation uncertain and its structure weak. At this moment of incipient strategic crisis, Timothy A. Sayle offers a sweeping history of the most critical alliance in the post-World War II era.
    In Enduring Alliance, Sayle recounts how the western European powers, along with the United States and Canada, developed a treaty to prevent encroachments by the Soviet Union and to serve as a first defense in any future military conflict. As the growing and unruly hodgepodge of countries, councils, commands, and committees inflated NATO during the Cold War, Sayle shows that the work of executive leaders, high-level diplomats, and institutional functionaries within NATO kept the alliance alive and strong in the face of changing administrations, various crises, and the flux of geopolitical maneuverings. Resilience and flexibility have been the true hallmarks of NATO.
    As Enduring Alliance deftly shows, the history of NATO is organized around the balance of power, preponderant military forces, and plans for nuclear war. But it is also the history riven by generational change, the introduction of new approaches to conceiving international affairs, and the difficulty of diplomacy for democracies. As NATO celebrates its seventieth anniversary, the alliance once again faces challenges to its very existence even as it maintains its place firmly at the center of western hemisphere and global affairs.

    “The logic, history, and analysis of Enduring Alliance are impeccable, and Timothy Andrews Sayle’s account is particularly useful at this moment when the Atlantic partnership is on unsteady ground. A must-read for policymakers seeking to ensure the Pax Atlantic is the indispensable and truly enduring alliance of our times.”
    – Admiral James Stavridis, USN (Ret), Supreme Allied Commander at NATO, 2009-2013, and author of The Accidental Admiral

    “Enduring Alliance is a deeply researched and engaging account of the complicated and consequential history of the United States and NATO. Sayle offers new insights, exposes various myths, and explores the complexities and challenges of this unique, oft-troubled, but resilient alliance. Must-read for scholars of history, security studies, and institutions, as well as anyone concerned about the state of NATO today.”
    – Francis J. Gavin, author of Nuclear Statecraft

    “Enduring Alliance is an ambitious, wide-ranging, and much-needed book in the development of inter-alliance politics within NATO.”
    – Matthew Jones, London School of Economics, and author of After Hiroshima

    “Timothy A. Sayle’s Enduring Alliance abounds with keen insights and brilliant turns of phrase. Enduring Alliance excavates a vital history that speaks to our present moment and will be a valuable resource for scholars, students, and interested readers and policymakers.”
    – Christopher McKnight Nichols, Oregon State University, and author of Promise and Peril

    “At a time when the president of the US is questioning the future of NATO, it is essential to understand the alliance’s past. Timothy Andrews Sayle’s engaging account shows why NATO came into being, how it has endured, and where it may be going. Highly recommended.”
    – Mary Sarotte, author of 1989


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 21st Comms Meeting

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 21, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    Speakers

    Adrienne Harry
    Munk School PAE



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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