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April 2022

  • Friday, April 1st How did China, India and Russia Globalize their Economies? From Textiles to Telecommunications.

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 1, 202210:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    The talk will be based on Roselyn Hsueh’s forthcoming book – Micro-institutional Foundations of Capitalism: Sectoral Pathways to Globalization in China, India, and Russia (Cambridge University Press, expected May 2022)

    What is the relationship between internal development and integration into the global economy in developing countries? How and why do state–market relations differ? And do these differences matter in the post-cold war era of global conflict and cooperation? Drawing on research in China, India, and Russia and examining sectors from textiles to telecommunications, Micro-institutional Foundations of Capitalism introduces a new theory of sectoral pathways to globalization and development. Adopting a historical and comparative approach, the book’s Strategic Value Framework shows how state elites perceive the strategic value of sectors in response to internal and external pressures. Sectoral structures and organization of institutions further determine the role of the state in market coordination and property rights arrangements. The resultant dominant patterns of market governance vary by country and sector within country. These national configurations of sectoral models are the micro-institutional foundations of capitalism, which mediate globalization and development.

    Roselyn Hsueh is an associate professor of political science at Temple University, where she co-directs the Certificate in Political Economy. She is the author of Micro-Institutional Foundations of Capitalism: Sectoral Pathways to Globalization in China, India, and Russia (Cambridge University Press, May 2022), China’s Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization (Cornell University Press, 2011), and scholarly articles on states and markets, comparative regulation and governance, and political economy of development. She is a frequent commentator on politics, finance and trade, and economic development in China and beyond. BBC World News, The Economist, Foreign Affairs, National Public Radio, and The Washington Post, among other media outlets, have featured her research. The Fulbright Global Scholar Award and other prestigious fellowships have funded research and international fieldwork. She holds a B.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.


    Speakers

    Roselyn Hsueh
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Temple University

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director of the East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 1st A Violent Peace: Race, U.S. Militarism, and Cultures of Democratization in Cold War Asia and the Pacific

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 1, 20221:30PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    BOOK TALK

    A Violent Peace: Race, U.S. Militarism, and Cultures of Democratization in Cold War Asia and the Pacific (Stanford University Press, 2022).

    A Violent Peace offers a radical account of the United States’ transformation into a total-war state. As the Cold War turned hot in the Pacific, antifascist critique disclosed a continuity between U.S. police actions in Asia and a rising police state at home. Writers including James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, and W.E.B. Du Bois discerned in domestic strategies to quell racial protests the same counterintelligence logic structuring America’s devastating wars in Asia. Examining U.S. militarism’s centrality to the Cold War cultural imagination, Christine Hong assembles a transpacific archive—placing war writings, visual renderings of the American concentration camp, Japanese accounts of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, black radical human rights petitions, Korean War–era G.I. photographs, Filipino novels on guerrilla resistance, and Marshallese critiques of U.S. human radiation experiments alongside government documents. By making visible the way the U.S. war machine waged informal wars abroad and at home, this archive reveals how the so-called Pax Americana laid the grounds for solidarity—imagining collective futures beyond the stranglehold of U.S. militarism.

    Christine Hong is Associate Professor of Literature, chair of Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, and co-director of the new Center for Racial Justice at UC Santa Cruz. She is the author of A Violent Peace: Race, Militarism, and Cultures of Democratization in Cold War Asia and the Pacific (Stanford University Press, 2019). Along with Deann Borshay Liem, she co-directed the Legacies of the Korean War oral history project. She serves on the board of directors of the Korea Policy Institute, an independent research and educational institute, and she is the co-editor of the journal of Critical Ethnic Studies.

    Co-presented by the Centre for the Study of Korea, the Centre for the Study of the United States, and the David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto and is co-sponsored by Heung | 흥 Coalition


    Speakers

    Christine Hong
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Literature, Chair of Critical Race and Ethnic Studies, UC Santa Cruz

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Heung | 흥 Coalition


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 1st The Politics of Surveillance Infrastructure in the Economy of Global China: Origins, Capacities and Adaptation

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 1, 20223:30PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This talk considers the origins and potentials of Chinese-built security projects around the world in places such as Cambodia, Malaysia, Nigeria and Ecuador. By considering the securitization of Xinjiang as a limit case for global China security projects and the way Chinese military operations in North Africa figure in discourses, theorization and technologies used in Xinjiang, the talk will examine the history and capacities of Chinese-built security infrastructure. Drawing these examples, it will then consider some of the emergent patterns and trends that appear through the privatization and export of Chinese-built surveillance systems and dataveillance tools. Ultimately, the talk problematizes assumptions concerning the actualization of the transfer of authoritarian politics through infrastructure.

    Anthropologist Darren Byler is Assistant Professor of International Studies at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is the author ofTerror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City (Duke University Press 2022) and In the Camps: China’s High-Tech Penal Colony (Columbia Global Reports 2021). His current research interests are focused on infrastructure development and global China.

    The event is a part of the BRIGP project and is open only to UofT faculty and students .

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Eurasia Initiative, University of Toronto

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Simon Fraiser University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institue


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 1st Ladies and Gentlemen (and Prostitutes): Prostitution Policies and the Making of Gendered Citizenry in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 1, 20227:00PM - 9:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    This presentation explores the sexual/gender hierarchy that prostitution policies constituted in the national community of postcolonial South Korea. It starts with an exegesis of the reformatories designed for ‘prostitutes’ (yullak haengwija) and other ‘women deemed as needing of protection’ (yobohoyŏja) based on both documents and interviews. While these reformatories for women were built specifically to protect, socially rehabilitate, and offer education and training to prostitutes, I argue that they were a space exemplary of the state of exception or heterotopia riddled with violence and abuse. Simultaneously, these facilities were also zones that produced knowledge on prostitutes, alongside venereal disease clinics and designated red-light districts. In such arenas, women were held subject to the gaze of government surveillance and experts from diverse disciplines from medicine to social science observed, surveyed, and examined prostitutes to demystify them and control their alleged threat. I elucidate how the state institution of knowledge on prostitution and prostitution policies together contributed to the making of an idealized gender/sexual hierarchy in the nation, consisting of ‘prostitutes, ladies, and gentlemen’.

    SPEAKER: JEONG-MI PARK (Associate Professor, Sociology, Chungbuk National University)

    After earning her BA, MA, and PhD at Seoul National University, Jeong-Mi Park conducted research as a research professor at Hanyang University (2011-2015) and a Kluge Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center in the Library of Congress (2015-2016). As a historical sociologist, she has analyzed the historical transformations of state policies, citizenship, and social movements in South Korea from a feminist perspective. Her publications include “Liberation or Purification? Prostitution, Women’s Movement and Nation Building in South Korea under U.S. Military Occupation, 1945-1948” (Sexualities, 2019, in English) and “From Blood to Culture? Family, Nationality, and the Gender Politics of Membership” (Korean Journal of Sociology, 2020, in Korean). She has completed her book manuscript tentatively entitled The State’s Sexuality: Prostitution and Postcolonial Nation Building in South Korea, and this presentation is chapter 4 of the manuscript.

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    This virtual event is organized by Laam Hae (Politics, York University)

    This virtual event is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. This event is co-sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at University of Toronto.

    This is a free event but registration is required. Upon registration, you will receive a Zoom link.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca | https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    JEONG-MI PARK
    Associate Professor, Sociology, Chungbuk National University


    Sponsors

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University

    York Centre for Asian Research, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 4th Songs from Prisons in Early 20th-Century U.S. Songbooks: Incarceration, Race, Morality, and the Question of 'Prison Music'

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 4, 20222:00PM - 3:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In the 1920s and 1930s, U.S. audiences gained unprecedented access to music produced in prisons. The professionalization of folklore and ethnography, an increased curiosity about the realities of imprisonment, and developments in portable recording technology precipitated the collection of music by incarcerated people. Published books containing transcriptions of songs collected in prisons brought this music to a wide audience.

    In this talk, I read volumes containing songs from prisons published by several authors: Howard Odum (1926), Carl Sandburg (1927), John and Alan Lomax (1934), and Lawrence Gellert (1936). I argue that these songbooks show that the 1920s and 1930s were a pivotal moment, during which “prison music” underwent a series of shifts. Whereas earlier volumes framed songs from prisons as evidence of immorality and criminality, later on, such songs became prized objects of U.S. heritage to be conserved and analyzed by scholars. Finally, they became something people sang in their homes. This process was concurrent with the consolidation of music from prisons into a genre of sorts. Different authors used different designations for music in this genre, but always connected it directly to its genesis in the prison.

    Thus, by the end of the 1930s, knowing “prison music,” owning folk song collections containing it, and singing it at home was becoming part of a well-bred, educated, and moral middle-class identity. A complicating factor to this repositioning, however, is that many of the authors involved in publishing music from prisons, as well as the bulk of their audiences, were non-incarcerated and white, while much of the music they published was by Black incarcerated people. Therefore, in the final part of the talk, I examine the moral quandaries created by encouraging such audiences to sing the music of incarcerated people. I draw on Dylan Rodriguez’s critique of the term “prison writing” as “domesticating and delimited,” to consider how the equally fraught category of “prison music” was historically constructed and to provide context for the ways that music publications from the 1920s and 1930s shaped understandings of incarceration that persist into the present.

    —Speaker Bio—
    Velia Ivanova is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto. She holds a PhD in Music from Columbia University and is currently working on a book project about the musical legacy of prison ethnography. Velia’s work has been published in the Journal of the Society for American Music and has been supported by the Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship (Library of Congress), the Margery Lowens Dissertation Research Fellowship (Society of American Music), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

    —COVID Protocols—

    In order to minimize uncertainty and disruption to our students, staff, faculty and university communities, U of T will maintain our COVID-19 vaccination and masking policies until at least the end of the current term.
    – Masks are required to be worn in all indoor University spaces. Wear a medical (or medical grade) mask.
    – U of T community is required to complete UCheck prior to coming to campus (Green screen will be verified by the entrance).
    – Guests (outside of U of T community) are required to show proof of vaccination, ID and complete self-assessment (https://people.utoronto.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/2021-Visitor-Paper-Self-Assessment.pdf) in order to attend an in-person event. Completed forms can be emailed to csus@utoronto.ca.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Velia Ivanova
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 5th Property tax - Approaches, Successes and Challenges of Property Tax Reforms for Subnational Domestic Resource Mobilisation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 5, 20229:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Property taxes are still a large and untapped potential source of revenue, especially in the Global South. Tapping into this potential requires an understanding of the political, legal, and administrative challenges of property tax reforms and its various approaches at the subnational level.

    The webinar will provide a platform to discuss aspects and approaches to improving property taxation. Various speakers from different backgrounds such as local government, academia, and development cooperation will present their work on developing, supporting, or researching property tax reforms. The information shared and discussions with participants will provide a broader and deeper understanding on property tax reforms.

    This webinar on local property taxation is co-organised by the GIZ Good Financial Governance Programme and the OECD-UCLG World Observatory on Subnational Government Finance and Investment.

    Speakers

    Colette Nyirakamana
    Research Lead, LoGRI, and Senior Research Associate, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Wilson Prichard
    Associate Professor, Munk School and Political Science, Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies and CEO, International Center for Tax and Development


    Main Sponsor

    External Booking


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 5th Great Powers, Climate Change, and Global Environmental Responsibilities

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 5, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, In Person - Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School
    1 Devonshire Place
    Online - via Zoom
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    Description

    Climate change and other environmental threats have moved to the top of the international agenda. All major powers are now committed to fighting global warming and ensuring environmental sustainability. But it has not always been the case. How did the society of states come to accept a responsibility for the global environment? And how deeply committed are states to safeguarding the planet?

    In this event on Great Powers, Climate Change and Global Environmental Responsibilities, the panelists will discuss how international power inequality affects the search for global environmental solutions, and what special role the most powerful states play in the international fight against global warming. Great powers are also great polluters, particularly when it comes to global greenhouse gas emissions. Through the 2015 Paris Agreement and recent international conferences, all major powers – from the United States to China, India, Brazil and the EU – have committed to bringing greenhouse gas emissions under control and decarbonising their economies by 2050. Yet, there is little evidence as yet that they are delivering on their promises and acting as responsible great powers. 


    Speakers

    Robert Falkner
    Speaker
    Associate Professor and Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, and Distinguished Fellow, Munk School

    Steven Bernstein
    Discussant
    Distinguished Professor of Global Environmental and Sustainability Governance, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto and Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor and Director, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 5th North American Methane Policy and "Green Bilateralism"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 5, 20224:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event, hosted by Gerald Ford School of Public Policy
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    Description

    Join us for a conversation about the findings of three papers from 2020-21’s North American Colloquium on climate policy. The authors of the following papers, dealing with the topics of “North American Methane Policy and ‘Green Bilateralism,'” will present their key findings and take questions in a discussion moderated by Heather Millar (University of New Brunswick):

    “Canada-US Green Bilateralism: Targeting Cooperation for Climate Mitigation” by Debora VanNijnatten (Wilfrid Laurier University) and Mark McWhinney (Carleton University)

    “Methane Politics and Policy in North America” by Barry G. Rabe (University of Michigan)

    “The ‘Dark Horse’ of Climate Change: Agricultural Methane Governance in the United States and Canada” by Patricia (Trish) Fisher (University of Michigan)

    About the Speakers
    Barry Rabe is the J. Ira and Nicki Harris Family Professor of Public Policy at the Ford School. He is also the Arthur Thurnau Professor of Environmental Policy, with courtesy appointments in the Program in the Environment, the Department of Political Science, and the School for Environment and Sustainability. Rabe examines the political feasibility and durability of environmental and energy policy, with a particular emphasis on efforts to address climate change in the United States and other nations. Rabe’s research regularly considers political and policy issues in the context of federalism, including his 2020 Brookings Institution Press book, Trump, the Administrative Presidency, and Federalism, co-authored with Frank Thompson and Kenneth Wong. Rabe is also the author of Can We Price Carbon? (MIT Press), Greenhouse Governance (Brookings, 2010), Statehouse and Greenhouse (Brookings, 2004), Beyond NIMBY (Brookings, 1994), and When Federalism Works (Brookings, 1986). He is the recipient of four American Political Science Association awards in honor of his research and publications. This includes the 2017 Martha Derthick Award in recognition of the book on federalism and intergovernmental relations that has had an enduring impact for more than a decade. This award recognized Statehouse and Greenhouse, which previously won the Lynton Caldwell Award for its contribution to environmental politics and policy. Rabe is a non-resident senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

    Debora L. VanNijnatten is Professor in the Department of Political Science and North American Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. She is also on the faculty of the Balsillie School of International Affairs and a Research Fellow at the Laurier Center for the Study of Canada. Her research and publications have focused on transboundary environmental governance in North America, at the Canada-US, US-Mexico and continental scales. She has been an avid observer of Canadian and American climate policy, as well as Canada’s bilateral and international engagement on climate change mitigation. She is also studying shared surface and subsurface water management in the US-Mexico Rio Grande basin and the US-Canadian Great Lakes Basin. She is the co-author/editor of 5 books (including successive editions of Canadian Environmental Politics and Policy; Environmental Policy in North America: Approaches, Capacity and the Management of Transboundary Issues; and Climate Change Policy in North America: Designing Integration in a Regional System) and 50 articles and book chapters on various aspects of transboundary environmental cooperation.

    Mark McWhinney is a Political Science PhD student at Carleton University. His research is focused on ameliorating science-policy interfaces between disparate research disciplines. In particular, he is interested in bridging gaps in Canadian defence procurement policy through the employment of climate scenarios and statistically downscaled modelling. He has worked on climate change issues through a bilateral cooperative lens, specifically focusing on carbon capture and storage as an undervalued means of reaching net-zero.

    Patricia (Trish) Fisher is a graduate student at the University of Michigan pursuing dual master’s degrees public policy and public health. Trish’s research interests lie at the intersection of climate, food, and health policy; she is particularly interested in protein transition policy that centers climate justice and health equity. As a Research Assistant for the North American Colloquium on Climate Change, Trish conducts research on agricultural methane governance in the United States and Canada. Trish continues to consult with nonprofits and foundations, specializing in strategy development and business planning. Over the past seven years, she has consulted with hundreds of organizations including Meals on Wheels San Francisco, Skoll Global Threats Fund, and the California Department of Public Health. Trish has a BA in History and Middle Eastern & North African Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles and studied abroad in Egypt and Lebanon.

    Heather Millar, who will moderate the conversation, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of New Brunswick. Her research interests include Canadian provincial energy and climate politics; risk perception, policy learning and feedback; and social acceptance of new technologies. Heather is also affiliated with the Institute for Science, Society, and Policy at the University of Ottawa and the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Heather has recently published research articles on provincial climate and energy policy in Environmental Politics, Review of Policy Research, and Policy Sciences.

    North American Colloquium
    This event is a product of the 2020-21 North American Colloquium (NAC) on Climate Policy, organized by the International Policy Center (IPC) at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy with generous support from the Meany Family Foundation, and co-sponsored by the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto and the Center for Research on North America at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The objective of the NAC is to provide a forum that strengthens a wider North American conversation and more fruitful trilateral cooperation between Canada, Mexico and the U.S. Sign up here to stay informed about related events.

    Main Sponsor

    External Booking

    Co-Sponsors

    Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan

    Munk School of Global Afairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 5th Regional Connectivity Building in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 5, 20228:00PM - 9:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    This panel brings together three eminent commentators offering a Southeast Asian perspective on regional connectivity, smaller state external policy and elite legitimation. It highlights why the region matters in relation to Chinese foreign policy and Asian security. It also touches on the geopolitics of Southeast Asia’s quest for infrastructure and investment, China’s Belt and Road Initiative, economic, political and security implications of regional connectivity and engagement with partners outside ASEAN.

    Cheng-Chwee Kuik (National University of Malaysia) will address the geopolitics of regional connectivity building in Southeast Asia. He will cover: why connectivity cooperation is not only about big-power pushes, but also small-state pulls; how the connectivity-building process is reflective of the features of the “multiplex world”; and to what extent host-country agency is a function of internal resilience and external alternatives.

    Lynette Ong (University of Toronto) will provide a political economy analysis of infrastructure development in authoritarian contexts, with a focus on how elite contestation and mass resentment surrounding China-backed projects played out in Malaysia’s historic 2018 election.

    Amitav Acharya (American University, formerly of York University) will draw on his long-standing work on regionalism in Southeast Asia. He will discuss the political and security implications of regional connectivity projects with particular focus on their impact on ASEAN.

    *******************

    The webinar is part of YCAR’s Canada, ASEAN and the Indo-Pacific Series, and will be moderated by Julia Bentley, York Centre for Asian Research. For more information: info@canada-asean.org.

    This event is co-presented by the Canada-ASEAN Initiatives, York Centre for Asian Research, York University, the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto, and the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives, University of Victoria.

    ******************

    PARTICIPANTS’ BIOS:

    Cheng-Chwee Kuik is head of the Centre for Asian Studies at the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies (IKMAS) at the National University of Malaysia (UKM). He is also a non-resident fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. Professor Kuik has held consultant positions with Oxford, the Council of Foreign Relations, Asian Development Bank and the Malaysian government. His most recent book is Rivers of Iron: Railroads and Chinese Power in Southeast Asia (2020), co-authored with David M. Lampton and Selina Ho. He is also co-editor, with Alice Ba and Sueo Sudo, of Institutionalizing East Asia (2016). His publications on small-state hedging, Southeast Asian international relations and Asian security have appeared in peer-reviewed journals and edited books. He was guest editor of a special issue of Asian Perspective in spring 2021, “Southeast Asian Responses to China’s Belt and Road Initiative.”

    Lynette H. Ong teaches at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Her research sits at the intersection of authoritarianism, contentious politics ,and the political economy of development. She is an expert on China and Southeast Asia, particularly Singapore and Malaysia. She has held visiting fellowships at Harvard University, Peking and Fudan Universities in China. She frequently provides policy advice to the Canadian and other governments on engagement with China. Professor Ong is the author of Outsourcing Repression: Everyday State Power in Contemporary China (forthcoming, 2022) and The Street and the Ballot Box: Interactions between Social Movements and Electoral Politics in Authoritarian Contexts (forthcoming, 2022). Her publications have appeared in Perspectives on Politics, Journal of Comparative Politics, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Foreign Affairs. She is also the author of Prosper or Perish: Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China (2012).

    Amitav Acharya is Distinguished Professor of International Relations at American University in Washington DC, and holds the UNESCO Chair of Transnational Challenges and Governance. His work on global international relations theory highlights concepts of world order from the non-Western world to counterbalance the dominating influence of European history. Professor Acharya’s work has been influential in shaping policy on Asian regionalism and human security. Prof. Acharya’s recent books include The Making of Global International Relations (2019); Constructing Global Order (2018), and The End of American World Order, 2nd edition (2018). His expertise on regional security, ASEAN and Southeast Asia is reflected in publications such as The Quest for Identity: International Relations of Southeast Asia (2000), Constructing a Security Community in Southeast Asia; ASEAN and the Problem of Regional Order (2001) and East of India, South of China: Sino-Indian Encounters in Southeast Asia (2017).


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Cheng-Chwee Kuik
    Panelist
    Head of the Centre for Asian Studies at the Institute of Malaysian and International Studies (IKMAS), National University of Malaysia (UKM)

    Amitav Acharya
    Panelist
    Distinguished Professor of International Relations, American University, Washington DC

    Julia Bentley
    Moderator
    External Research Associate at York University’s Centre for Asian Research and Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Canada-ASEAN Initiatives, York Centre for Asian Research, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives, University of Victoria


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 6th Distributed Humanitarianism: Digital Disruption and Poland’s Aid to Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 6, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Abstract: Since the end of World War II, most response to large scale refugee movements has been handled by the international humanitarian system. Made up of UN agencies, national governments, and large international NGOs, this system relied heavily on its ability to move goods to refugees in camps. This system, as many have pointed out is both broke (underfunded) and broken, and increasingly fails to meet refugees needs. However, a new alternative is emerging. Since the Russian invasion of Ukraine on February 24, millions of Polish citizens, mostly self-organized, have provided food, housing, clothing and more to the two million Ukrainians who have crossed into Poland. In the absence of both the nation-state and international aid agencies, this internet-mediated volunteer response has become one of the fastest, most efficient and cost-effective humanitarian actions ever. In this talk, I look at the volunteer response as a form of distributed networked action and ask if it can permanently disrupt the traditional humanitarian system.

    Bio: Elizabeth Cullen Dunn is Professor of Geography and the Director of the Center for Refugee Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. She has conducted research on Poland since 1992, and her first book, Privatizing Poland, was awarded the Orbis Book Prize. Her latest book, No Path Home, looks at the failure of humanitarian aid in the wake of the Russian invasion of Georgia in 2008. Her current research, funded by the National Science Foundation, focuses on humanitarian labor, including volunteer action and the role of refugee resettlement agencies in agricultural labor markets.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Iwona Kaliszewska
    Speaker
    Deputy Director (International Collaboration) and Assistant Professor at the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, University of Warsaw.

    Elizabeth Cullen Dunn
    Speaker
    Professor of Geography and the Director of the Center for Refugee Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington

    Cassandra Hartblay
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Global Disability Studies; Assistant Professor Department of Health & Society, University of Toronto Scarborough; Graduate Department of Anthropology Centre for European, Russian & Eurasian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Department of Anthropology

    Department of Health & Society


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 7th China and the Russian Invasion of Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 7, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    China represents Russia’s most powerful ally today. Yet, Russia’s invasion and subsequent international isolation have severely tested this friendship. Three experts on China and its influence in the post Soviet region will discuss the future of the Chinese-Russian alliance, its impact on the war, as well as the affect of the war on Chinese foreign policy.

    PANELISTS’ BIOS:

    JUDE BLANCHETTE
    Jude Blanchette holds the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Previously, he was engagement director at The Conference Board’s China Center for Economics and Business in Beijing, where he researched China’s political environment with a focus on the workings of the Communist Party of China and its impact on foreign companies and investors. Prior to working at The Conference Board, Blanchette was the assistant director of the 21st Century China Center at the University of California, San Diego. Blanchette is a public intellectual fellow at the National Committee on United States-China Relations and serves on the board of the American Mandarin Society. He is also a senior advisor at Martin+Crumpton Group, a geopolitical risk advisory based in Arlington, Virginia. He holds an M.A. in modern Chinese studies from the University of Oxford and a B.A. in economics from Loyola University in Maryland.

    PATRICIA KIM
    Patricia M. Kim is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow at Brookings and holds a joint appointment to the John L. Thornton China Center and the Center for East Asia Policy Studies. She is an expert on Chinese foreign policy, U.S.-China relations, and U.S. alliance management and regional security dynamics in East Asia. Previously, Kim served as a China specialist at the U.S. Institute of Peace, where she focused on China’s impact on conflict dynamics around the world and directed major projects on U.S.-China strategic stability and China’s growing presence in the Red Sea region. Kim received her doctoral degree from the Department of Politics at Princeton University and her bachelor’s degree with highest distinction in political science and Asian studies from the University of California, Berkeley. She is fluent in Mandarin Chinese and Korean, and proficient in Japanese. Kim is also a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

    YURII POITA
    Yurii Poita is Head of the Asia-Pacific section at the Center for Army, Conversion and Disarmament Studies (CACDS), and the Asian Section at the New Geopolitics Research Network (NGRN), Ukraine. He is a scientist and researcher of China-Ukraine relations, incl. defence cooperation; China’s influence in the post-Soviet space; and “hybrid” methods of influence. Poita was educated at the Zhytomyr Military Institute (Ukraine) with a degree in military sciences, at the Kyiv International University (with a Master degree in international relations), and is currently working on his PhD dissertation at the Kazakh National University al-Farabi. He has experience in the defense, in think tanks, as well as on individual research projects in a number of Ukrainian, Kazakh and European institutions and think tanks.


    Speakers

    Jude Blanchette
    Panelist
    Freeman Chair in China Studies, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

    Patricia M. Kim
    Panelist
    David M. Rubenstein Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center and the Center for East Asia Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution

    Yurii Poita
    Panelist
    Head of the Asia-Pacific section at Center for Army, Conversion and Disarmament Studies (CACDS), and the Asian Section at the New Geopolitics Research Network (NGRN), Ukraine

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director of the East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Lucan Way
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science and co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Asian Institute

    East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 8th The Emotive Quality of Narrative and Song in the Bengali Dharmaraj Pūjā

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 8, 20225:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Bengal Studies Lecture

    Description

    Bhujangabhusan Chakravarti was a Bengali Brahman from Birbhum District, West Bengal who used to sing a key pālā (episode) of a medieval text known as the Dharmamangal at the annual pūjā for the Bengali vernacular deity known as Dharmaraj. The performed text is only a small portion of the written text, which is over 1,000 pages in length, but runs close to one hundred pages in transcription, which moves back and forth from singing to spoken exegesis to explain to the audience what is going on and why. The performer cleverly and skillfully weaves together singing and speech to dazzle the audience with his erudition, but there is also a pedagogical and rhetorical dimension underlining his commentaries. My paper explores the contours of song and speech as a form of code shifting that allows for the accomplishment of different things: for the performer, it brings about a sense of ānanda (bliss) and for the audience a sense of jñān (knowledge). For the audience, the latter is important because the medieval text is not readily available, nor is it understood by the largely non-literate participants. Bhujangbhushan thus fulfills a dual role as an entertainer as well as a spiritual teacher, fusing the two through his use of easily comprehensible verse. The conclusion suggests that ritual becomes efficacious in the act of performance by drawing out people’s emotions within a dialectical process involving both performers and their audiences.


    Speakers

    Frank J. Korom
    Speaker
    Professor of Religion and Anthropology, Boston University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, April 9th Community film screening: “Light for the Youth” & Conversation with the director Shin Su-won

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, April 9, 20222:30PM - 5:45PMExternal Event, Innis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue, Toronto
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    Description

    Synopsis
    Seyeon is a manager at a company called ‘Human Network’ and lives with her daughter Mirae. Her company manages collecting overdue credit card bills, and recently corporate has been pressuring her due to her low numbers. June, who is a commercial high school student, wants to be a photographer but works at Seyeon’s call center for the money. Through tragic incidents, Seyeon realizes that she was the part of the system. The film comments on precarious labor conditions and hardships especially on women and the youth.

    DIRECTOR | SHIN SU-WON
    Shin Su-won is a film director and screenwriter. Shin wrote and directed PASSERBY #3 (2010), CIRCLE LINE (2012), PLUTO (2013), MADONNA (2015), GLASS GARDEN (2017), LIGHT FOR THE YOUTH (2019) and most recently HOMMAGE (2022). Shin is renowned for innovative cinematography, astonishingly creative narrative structure, and social messages and her films were invited and awarded in many prestigious international film festivals. In particular, in 2015, MADONNA was invited to screen in the Un Certain Regard section of the 68Cannes Film Festival.

    This event is organized by Hong KAL (Visual Art and Art History, York University) and Hae Yeon Choo (Sociology, University of Toronto). This event is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University, which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. This event is co-presented by the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at University of Toronto and the York Centre for Asian Research (YCAR) at York University.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca | https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/

    Sponsors

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 12th The Future of the Internet

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 12, 20229:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The future of the internet is the future of humanity. What was once a tool, is now an inescapable part of our lives and livelihoods. It is ever more ubiquitous and complex, consistently creating challenges for which there are no easy answers. From fake news and deepfakes to privacy and data protection, the internet has created wicked problems alongside its immense potential to continue transforming humanity.
    Where once the job of an internet evangelist may have been to persuade people of the value of getting online, now their job is to persuade us that the torrent of online challenges is not only surmountable, but that the answer is more connectivity, not less.

    In this presentation Vint Cerf, an American Internet pioneer recognized as one of “the fathers of the Internet”, will review the policy issues that have arisen with the growth of the Internet and its new applications, looking ahead to the future impact and implications of the online world.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Vint Cerf
    Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist, Google

    Stephen Schmidt
    Chair of the International Telecommunications Society and VP, Telecom Policy at Telus Communications

    Peter Loewen
    Professor and Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Sponsors

    International Telecommunications Society

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Telus


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 12th Feminist Perspectives on Russia’s War against Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 12, 202211:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Marusya Bociurkiw is a storyteller and theorist, and Professor of Media Theory at Ryerson University, where she teaches courses in media studies, social justice media and documentary production, and conducts research in the areas of feminist/queer archives, affect theory, media activism, and migration studies. She is also an award-winning filmmaker and author. She has directed 10 films, and is author of 6 books including, most recently, Food Was her Country: The Memoir of a Queer Daughter (Caitlin Press/Dagger Editions). Her most recent film, the award-winning documentary “This Is Gay Propaganda: LGBT Rights & the War in Ukraine”, screened in 12 countries and was translated into 3 languages. Her books have won and been shortlisted for several awards including Kobzar Award, Lambda Literary Award and Independent Publisher Award. She is the recipient of FCAD’s SRC Award (2014) and the Ryerson-wide Knowledge Mobilization & Engagement Award (2018), in recognition of her community-based research creation in the areas of affect theory, feminist archival studies, LGBT activism and migration studies.

    Anna Dovgopol is a Gender Democracy Program Coordinator at Heinrich Boell Foundation, Kyiv Office – Ukraine. She has an MA degree in Gender Studies from Central European University. Anna is a gender expert and a trainer, and a feminist. She has over 10 years of experience with LGBT and feminist activism in Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan, including 3 years as a member of KyivPride Organizing Committee.

    Tamara Martsenyuk holds a Ph.D. (Candidate of Sciences) in Sociology, she is an Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (Ukraine), Fulbright Scholar at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University (the USA, 2017-2018). She is the author of more than 100 academic publications, chapters of textbooks, and chapters of books, particularly, “Gender for All. Challenging Stereotypes” (2017), “Why not be Afraid of Feminism” (2018), “Defenders of the Galaxy”: Power and Crisis in the Male World” (2020). Tamara teaches at the Department of Sociology courses “Introduction to Gender Studies”, “Gender and Politics”, “Masculinity and Men’s Studies”, “Social Problems in Ukraine and in the World”, and others.
    She is engaged in educational activism, conducts trainings for a wide target audience: journalists, think tanks, civil servants, politicians, civic activists, and more. Helps NGOs and think tanks to develop internal organizational policies on non-discrimination and gender equality. Tamara is the author of a popular online course on Prometheus titled “Women and Men: Gender for All”. Tamara shares the idea of public sociology – science and research for the sake of social change and is therefore constantly involved in various international research or teaching projects.

    Tamara Zlobina holds a Ph.D. (Candidate of Sciences) in Philosophy, she is an Editor in chief of online magazine Gender in detail
    https://genderindetail.org.ua/

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski is Head of the Petro Jacyk Central & East European Resource Centre, and Slavic Resources Coordinator, for the University of Toronto Libraries. She also co-directs (with Professor Lucan Way) the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, and coordinates the Ukraine Research Group, at the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. Her research interests include nineteenth-century French stage representations of Ukraine, its historical figures, and events, as well as bibliography, the history of the book, and Austrian Galicia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marusya Bociurkiw
    Speaker
    Professor and Director. The Studio for Media Activism and Critical Thought, Ryerson U

    Anna Dovgopol
    Speaker
    Expert and trainer in gender issues, feminism, LGBT, Program coordinator at Heinrich-Böll-Stif, Ukraine

    Tamara Martsenyuk
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy

    Tamara Zlobina
    Speaker
    Editor in Chief of Gender in Details (genderindetail.org.ua)

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Head of the Petro Jacyk Resource Centre, co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 12th The Dead-End of Third World Marxism: Park Hyunchae and Samir Amin in the Bandung Period

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 12, 20222:00PM - 4:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Event Description
    In 1985, Park Hyunchae, an eminent South Korean Marxist economist contributed a controversial article to a critical journal , which led a most heated intellectual debate in Korean intellectual history for more than a decade. It is known as “social formation debate” which is about how to define characters of Korean social formation into capitalist mode of production. Park’s article argues the key characters of Korean social formation is “Neo-colonial State Monopoly Capitalism” contesting competitive discourse of the characters as “Colonial Semi-Feudal Society”. The argument generated intense discussions on the historical character of Korean society in relation to the political struggles against the military regime at that moment. In hindsight, however, it was the critical turn that Marxist intervention in the historical knowledge production effectively re-emerged after the division of Korea. Park’s article performs the critique of dependency theories, in particular the argument of Samir Amin. Dependency theory was an alibi fabricated to emphasize the fundamental contradiction of capitalism, the contradiction between capital and labor. Furthermore, Park’s theoretical view seem to oppose Amin’s dependency theory by establishing theory of the national economy (Minjok gyungje ron). In fact, Park’s theory parallels with, at the same time, converges on Amin’s theoretical and political approach when Park’s theory addresses the significance of the national popular development en route to the socialist society since the Bandung era. Based on the imagination of the encounter between the theorists, the talk invites to contemplate difficulties of Marxist theoretical practices in post-colonial capitalist societies in tandem with ‘question of the nation’.

    SPEAKER | DONGJIN SEO
    Professor, Department of Intermedia Art, Kaywon University of Art and Design
    Professor Dongjin Seo attended Yonsei University, where he received Bachelor’s, Master’s, and Doctorate degrees in Sociology. His work critically analyzes relationships between capitalist economy and culture, and his published writings focus on contemporary visual culture and performance art. He is currently working on a book that critically examines the aesthetic shifts in visual culture during recent years. Professor Seo’s major publications include After Contemporary: Time-Experience- Image (Hyunsilbook, 2018), The Nap of Dialectics: Antagonism and Politics (Courier, 2014), The Will for Freedom, The Will for Self- Improvement (Dolbegae, 2009) and Design Melancholia (Hyunsilbook, 2009). He co-curated Solidarity Spores (Asia Culture Center, 2020), and participated as an artist in exhibitions such as Read My Lips (Hapjungjigu, 2017) and Urban Ritornello (Ilmin Museum of Art, 2017). He has also acted as a dramaturg or participant in many performances, including Name Names Naming Named (2017), Other Scenes (2017), and Big Big Big Thank You (2016).

    This virtual event is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. This virtual event is co-presented by the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at University of Toronto and co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology at University of Toronto.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca || https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    Dongjin Seo
    Professor in the Department of Intermedia Art, Kaywon University of Art and Design


    Sponsors

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 13th Virtual Book Launch: "German Social Democracy through British Eyes: A Documentary History, 1870–1914"

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 13, 20224:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Description: The speakers and the audience will discuss a new collection of documents that examines the rise of the most powerful socialist party in the world through the eyes of British diplomats stationed in Germany. The documents raise the question of how people in one nation view people from another. They also illuminate political systems, election practices, and anti-democratic strategies in the highly industrialized federal state of Saxony. These primary sources will interest researchers and students of labour movement history or those wishing to move beyond the Prussian view of German history before 1914.

    Speakers:

    James Retallack
    Author, University Professor of History and Senior Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto

    Andrew G. Bonnell
    Associate Professor in History, University of Queensland, Brisbane

    Molly Robson
    M.A. student, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Doris Bergen
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto (Moderator), with assistance from Dr. Gavin Wiens

    Cloth, paperback, and Ebook copies of “German Social Democracy through British Eyes” are available with 25% discount on the website of University of Toronto Press: https://utorontopress.com/9781487527488/. Use coupon code “Retallack25” on checkout.

    This event is generously supported by the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, the DAAD/University of Toronto Joint Initiative in German and European Studies at the Munk School for Global Affairs & Public Policy, and the Intellectual Community Committee, Department of History, University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    James Retallack
    Speaker
    University Professor of History and Senior Fellow, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, University of Toronto

    Doris Bergen
    Moderator
    Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Chair in Holocaust Studies, University of Toronto

    Andrew G. Bonnell
    Speaker
    Associate Professor in History, University of Queensland, Brisbane

    Molly Robson
    Speaker
    M.A. student, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Co-Sponsors

    JIGES, Munk School

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 18th Deep Reporting from China’s Heartland: a Conversation with Peter Hessler

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 18, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    Dive into China’s heartland with celebrated author and journalist Peter Hessler, who moved back to China in 2019 to teach writing at Sichuan University. Hear his stories about deep reporting from a lesser-known region of China. What was it like for a veteran American journalist to to be teaching and reporting from China’s interior during the pandemic? What is the future of reporting in and on China by foreigners? Join us for this timely conversation.

    SPEAKER’S BIO:

    For more than twenty years, Peter Hessler has been a staff writer at The New Yorker. He first went to live in China as a Peace Corps volunteer, from 1996 to 1998, an experience that became the subject of his first book, River Town. With his next two books—Oracle Bones and Country Driving—he completed a trilogy that spanned a decade in China. In 2011, he moved with his family to Cairo, where he lived for five years. His fifth book, The Buried, described his experiences during the Egyptian Arab Spring.

    In 2019, Hessler moved back to Sichuan province, the region where he had served in the Peace Corps more than two decades earlier. For two years, he taught at Sichuan University, where he also covered the pandemic, reporting in Wuhan and other cities during 2020 and 2021. This experience will be the subject of his next book. In 2011, Hessler was named a MacArthur Fellow. He currently lives in southwestern Colorado.


    Speakers

    Peter Hessler
    Speaker
    Writer and journalist, as well as a staff writer at The New Yorker

    Diana Fu
    Chair
    Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and Director of the East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    East Asia Seminar Series


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 20th In Search of Identity: How the Crimean Tatars Became Indigenous Peoples of Crimea

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 20, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Qurultay of 1991, the first National Convention since their return to Crimea declared Crimean Tatars indigenous peoples of Crimea, articulating their exclusive rights to the land and its resources. It was indeed the first time since korenizatsiia that the Crimean Tatars embraced indigeneity as a mobilizing political identity, aligning themselves with the global indigenous movement. The choice of this mobilizing framework is not self-evident. First, the Crimean Tatars shared more commonalities with other Soviet “deported nationalities”, than with First Nations in Canada or Maori in New Zealand. Second, it is intuitive to suggest that in light of the prevailing Soviet-era classifications on “backward indigenous people” and “developed nations”, Crimean Tatars, who consider themselves an urbanized modern nation would find it contradictory to also identify as indigenous. Finally, while the global indigenous movement poses itself as a counterforce to the capitalist West, Crimean Tatars support the market economy and identify with European liberal values. In light of these paradoxes, this talk asks why Crimean Tatars chose to embrace indigenous identity and align with the global indigenous movement? How this indigenous political identity has been used as a tactic in the Crimean Tatars’ struggle for self-determination? To answer these questions, I will tackle the role of the state in shaping identities, the change in socio-economic conditions in the aftermath of the Soviet collapse, the rise and victories of the global indigenous movement, and the role of the intelligentsia in revisioning national history and popularizing the term “indigenous peoples”.

    Mariia (Masha) Shynkarenko is a PhD Candidate in Politics Department at The New School. Her dissertation explores the instrumentalization of collective identities as tactics of resistance in the Crimean Tatars’ movement for self-determination. Her broader academic interests include nonviolent civil resistance, authoritarianism, and politics of history. Masha is currently an International Graduate Visiting Student at CERES and a Visiting Scholar in The Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia at NYU. Her article “Compliant Subjects? How the Tatars in Crimea Resist Russian Occupation” just came out in Communist and Post-communist Studies journal.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, CERES Faculty Member

    Mariia Shynkarenko
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate in Politics Department at the New School; International Visiting Graduate Student, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, CERES


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 20th Book Launch - Ice War Diplomat: Hockey Meets Cold War Politics at the 1972 Summit Series by Gary J. Smith

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 20, 20224:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    About Ice War Diplomat:

    Tasked with finding common ground and building friendships between the world’s two largest countries and arctic neighbours, a young Canadian diplomat finds himself on his first overseas assignment in Moscow, the Soviet capital. It’s the early 1970s and a Cold War between capitalism and communism, the West and the East, is simmering—while the ice rink is just starting to heat up. Trained in Russian and deployed by Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau’s détente policy, Smith opts for sports diplomacy, throwing off his embassy black tie dress code and donning the blue and white sweater of the Moscow Maple Leafs.

    Armed with cases of Molson, Smith sets forth into Russian beer league hockey. A vodka-infused encounter with the influential Izvestia journalist “The Snowman” leads him into the murky world of Soviet hockey officialdom, the KGB and the decision that USSR “amateurs” were finally ready to play Canadian professionals in an eight-game Friendship Series of the best versus the best.

    Trusted by each side with unparalleled access to officials, coaches and players on both teams, Smith portrays this unique and epic hockey series that has come to transcend time, becoming a symbol of the unity and clarity that sports can offer. Discover amazing and surprising events: a motorcycle joyride around the Kremlin with the Canadian prime minister; a secret visit to a Soviet hospital by a blood-coughing Phil Esposito; an argument with Bobby Orr about Team Canada’s behaviour; and an invitation in 2017 from Russia to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the series in Moscow.

    The 1972 Canadian-Soviet Hockey Series has gone down in history as a pivotal political event, changing the course of two nations and the world of hockey—learn the fascinating story and more in this book, perfect for history and sports fans alike.

    About Gary J. Smith:

    Gary J. Smith was a diplomat at the Canadian embassy in Moscow from 1971 to 1974. He was instrumental in making the 1972 Canadian-Soviet Hockey Series happen—and keeping it from falling apart. Smith lives in Perth, ON.

    Note from the author: February 25, 2022

    “Hockey has been a diplomatic bridge between Canada and Russia dating back fifty years to the storied Summit Series of 1972. At that time, and following the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau used hockey as a form of common ground with the Soviet Union to reduce the risk of conventional and nuclear war. Forty-five years later President Putin himself embraced that series and told players from Team Canada in 2017 that “the series had improved relations with Canada and he would like to follow up on it.” Now with Vladimir Putin’s brutal invasion of Ukraine, we will have to wait and see whether the hockey bridge can—or should—sustain, once again, the weight of Russian tanks.” —Gary J. Smith


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 21st – Friday, April 22nd 2022 Reach Symposium: Resilient Together: Pathways for Sustainable Development

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 21, 20229:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    Friday, April 22, 20229:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2022 Reach Symposium Event Details

    Day 1 – Thursday, April 21, 2022, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

    Day 2 – Friday, April 22, 2022, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM ET

    Persisting global shocks – such as the coronavirus pandemic, populism, and racial injustice – continue to exacerbate inequality and further marginalize the hardest-to-reach populations, those living in extreme poverty, the administratively invisible and geographically remote.

    The pandemic threatened to break global systems, yet we have remained resilient — as individuals, as organizations, and in our commitment to making the world a more just, equitable and ultimately flourishing place. Resilience, in some instances, has been about staying true to original goals and pathways to achieve them; resilience, in other cases, has been about adapting and discovering new and innovative pathways.

    This year’s symposium is more important than ever. The task before us now is to apply what we’ve learned to our shared goal: the achievement of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

    Reach research uncovers insights about society’s margins to understand the story of human resilience, studying the mechanisms that help hard-to-reach communities prepare for and endure inevitable shocks. We investigate how organizations pivot in the face of challenges and remain steadfast in their commitment to reaching the hardest-to-reach.


    Speakers

    Meric Gertler
    President, University of Toronto

    Lynne Innes
    President and CEO, Weeneebayko Area Health Authority

    Michael Froman
    Vice Chairman and President, Strategic Growth, Mastercard

    Homer Tien
    President and CEO, Ornge

    Dr. Claire Melamed
    CEO, Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

    Joseph Wong
    Founder, Reach Alliance; Roz & Ralph Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Vice-President, International, University of Toronto

    Dr. Danil Mikhailov
    Executive Director, data.org

    Desta Lakew
    Group Director of Partnerships and External Affairs, Amref Health Africa

    Claudia Hepburn
    CEO, Windmill Microlending

    Arturo Franco
    Senior Vice President Thought Leadership, Mastercard Center of Inclusive Growth

    Sue Szabo
    Director-General, Innovative and Climate Finance Bureau, Global Affairs Canada

    Kristen Chenier
    Director, Policy, Infectious Diseases and Pandemic, Global Affairs Canada

    Angela Min Yi Hou
    Policy Analyst, Government of Canada

    Neal Myrick
    Global Head, Tableau Foundation

    Virginia Wilson
    CEO, Shared Values Initiative Hong Kong

    Jessamy Bagenal
    Senior Medical Editor, The Lancet

    Verónica Arroyo
    Digital ID Policy Lead, Access Now

    Alexandra Lambropoulos
    Researcher, Reach Alliance

    Mduduzi Mhlanga
    Project Officer, Canadian Council for Youth Prosperity

    Perri Termine
    Program Coordinator, Continuing and Professional Learning, OISE, University of Toronto

    Marisa Terán
    Chief Marketing Director, Travelers with Cause

    Eric Jackson
    Incoming Analyst, Future of Canada Centre, Deloitte

    Jasmine Ali
    Business Analyst, McKinsey & Company

    Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr
    Mayor, Freetown, Sierra Leone

    Hui Wen Zheng
    Associate, Boston Consulting Group



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 21st Effecting and Affecting Emotion: When Words are not Innocent

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 21, 202210:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Commenting on the suggestiveness of the particle “khalu” (for sure) that appears as the penultimate word in a verse in Kalidas’s famous play, Abhijnana Shakuntalam, David Schulman says: “In a world of continually compounded resonances such as that embodied in a good Sanskrit verse, no word, indeed no syllable, is likely to be entirely innocent.” Taking this aspect of language in which the impishness of words, the capacity for curved speech makes relations fraught with dangers I attempt to put some theories of Austin’s notions of the perlocutionary in conversation with the way the curse appears in Sanskrit grammar and poetics with special reference to Valmiki and Panini. The overarching question here is whether passion is added to language from the outside or is it integral to the experience of language?

    SPEAKER’S BIO:

    Veena Das is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor at the Department ofAnthropology at Johns Hopkins University. Her most recent books are Textures of the Ordinary: Doing Anthropology after Wittgenstein (2020); Voix de l’ordinarie (2022) Slum Acts (2022) and act-edited volume Words and Worlds: A Lexicon for DarkTimes. Das is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of British Academy and has received honorary doctorates from the Universitiesof Chicago, Edinburgh, Durham, and Bern.

    This event is the keynote presentation in the Centre for South Asian Studies Graduate Symposium. Please find the full details on the Symposium and register for the panels at https://csasgradsymposium2022.eventbrite.ca


    Speakers

    Veena Das
    Keynote
    Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 21st Who Owns History? Elgin’s loot and the case for returning plundered treasure. A discussion with Geoffrey Robertson QC

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 21, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Hellenic Heritage Foundation Annual Lecture

    Description

    Geoffrey Robertson QC is founder and head of Doughty Street Chambers, the UK’s leading human rights legal practice. His books include Crimes Against Humanity (a textbook on the development of human rights law); The Tyrannicide Brief (the story of how Cromwell’s lawyers mounted the trial of Charles I); an acclaimed memoir, The Justice Game; Mullahs without Mercy; Stephen Ward Was Innocent, OK; and Rather His Own Man. In 2011, he received the Award for Distinction in International Law and Affairs from the New York State Bar Association.
    The biggest question in the world of art and culture concerns the return of property taken without consent. Throughout history, conquerors or colonial masters have taken artefacts from subjugated peoples, who now want them returned from museums and private collections in Europe and the USA.

    The controversy rages on over the Elgin Marbles, and has been given immediacy by figures, such as France’s President Emmanuel Macron, who says he will order French museums to return hundreds of artworks acquired by force or fraud in Africa, and by British opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn, who has pledged that a Labour government would return the Elgin Marbles to Greece. Elsewhere, there is a debate in Belgium about whether the Africa Museum, newly opened with 120,000 items acquired mainly by armed forces in the Congo, should close.

    Although there is an international convention dated 1970 that deals with the restoration of artefacts stolen since that time, there is no agreement on the rules of law or ethics which should govern the fate of objects forcefully or lawlessly acquired in previous centuries.

    Who Owns History? delves into the crucial debate over the Elgin Marbles, but also offers a system for the return of cultural property based on human rights law principles that are being developed by the courts. It is not a legal text, but rather an examination of how the past can be experienced by everyone, as well as by the people of the country.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Phil Triadafilopoulos
    Chair
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto

    Geoffrey Robertson QC
    Speaker
    founder and head of Doughty Street Chambers, the UK’s leading human rights legal practice


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    The Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    The Hellenic Studies Initiative at CERES


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 21st Archipelago of Resettlement: Vietnamese Refugee Settlers and Decolonization across Guam and Israel-Palestine

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 21, 20223:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    ABOUT THE BOOK:

    What happens when refugees encounter Indigenous sovereignty struggles in the countries of their resettlement?

    From April to November 1975, the US military processed over 112,000 Vietnamese refugees on the unincorporated territory of Guam; from 1977 to 1979, the State of Israel granted asylum and citizenship to 366 non-Jewish Vietnamese refugees. Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi analyzes these two cases to theorize what she calls the refugee settler condition: the fraught positionality of refugee subjects whose resettlement in a settler colonial state is predicated on the unjust dispossession of an Indigenous population. This groundbreaking book explores two forms of critical geography: first, archipelagos of empire, examining how the Vietnam War is linked to the US military buildup in Guam and unwavering support of Israel, and second, corresponding archipelagos of trans-Indigenous resistance, tracing how Chamorro decolonization efforts and Palestinian liberation struggles are connected through the Vietnamese refugee figure. Considering distinct yet overlapping modalities of refugee and Indigenous displacement, Gandhi offers tools for imagining emergent forms of decolonial solidarity between refugee settlers and Indigenous peoples.

    PARTICIPANTS’ BIOS:

    Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi is an assistant professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of Archipelago of Resettlement: Vietnamese Refugee Settlers and Decolonization across Guam and Israel-Palestine (University of California Press, 2022).

    Helga Tawil-Souri is an Associate Professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at NYU. Helga’s work deals with spatiality, technology, and politics in the Middle East, with a particular focus on contemporary life in Palestine-Israel.

    Professor Sarah Ihmoud is a sociocultural anthropologist who works at the intersection of anthropology and feminist studies. Her current ethnographic research in Jerusalem focuses on militarization, state violence and Palestinian feminist politics. She also writes about the politics of sexual violence and feminist approaches to activist research in anthropology. In addition to her research, Dr. Ihmoud is invested in building collaborative Black, Indigenous and women of color feminist praxes in and outside of the academy geared towards expanding visions of liberation and decolonial futures.

    Thy Phu is a Professor of Media Studies at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. She is coeditor of Feeling Photography, also published by Duke University Press, and Refugee States: Critical Refugee Studies in Canada. She is also author of Picturing Model Citizens: Civility in Asian American Visual Culture.


    Speakers

    Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Sarah Ihmoud
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, College of the Holy Cross

    Thy Phu
    Discussant
    Professor of Media Studies, Dept. of Arts, Culture, and Media, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Helga Tawil-Souri
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Dept. of Media, Culture, and Communication and the Dept. of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, NYU

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor of History and Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Hearing Palestine at the Institute of Islamic Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Institute of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 22nd Artificial Intelligence vs. Natural Stupidity: Myths of Technology and the Realities of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 22, 20222:00PM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us on April 22 as panelists discuss the contrast between popular expectations for future war involving cyber, drones, and AI and how they contrast with the ugly realities revealed in Ukraine. Technologies are prominent in the war, of course, but in different ways. Instead of cyberwar we see intensive and effective propaganda. Instead of killer robots we see global media and logistics networks mobilized to support Ukraine. Instead of secret espionage advantages we see intelligence being revealed publicly, before and during the war. And instead of a lightning fast battle, we are seeing a grim war of attrition.


    Speakers

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, School of Cybersecurity and Privacy and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Janice Stein
    Speaker
    Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Department of Political Science and founding Director, Munk School; Advisory Board member, Schwartz Reisman Institute

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor and Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Associate Director, Schwartz Reisman Institute


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Afairs & Public Policy

    Schwartz Reisman Institute for Technology and Society, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 25th Preserving the Gareth Jones Papers at the University of Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 25, 202210:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Dr. Lubomyr Luciuk
    Speaker
    Lubomyr Luciuk is a professor of political geography at the Royal Military College of Canada, a Fellow of the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto, and a member of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association

    Rob Phillips
    Speaker
    Archivist, Welsh Political Archive at the National Library of Wales

    Loryl MacDonald
    Speaker
    Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections, and Director of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Moderator
    Head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre, co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 25th Engaging for the love of place? The role of place attachment in academics’ regional engagement efforts

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 25, 202210:00AM - 11:30AM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The third mission of universities is often conceived as a regional one, encompassing contributions to regional development and engagement with regional actors. Yet, universities are increasingly global institutions with internationally mobile faculty. This raises the question of how the embeddedness of academics in their regions shapes engagement at the regional scale. Using survey data of 625 faculty members at seven universities, we investigate the role of place attachment and informal social networks in shaping academics’ regional engagement efforts. The findings indicate that academics with a strong sense of local attachment and extensive social networks engage more with local partners.

    Rune Dahl Fitjar is Pro-rector for Innovation and Society at the University of Stavanger and Professor of Innovation Studies at the University of Stavanger Business School. He is affiliated with the Centre for Innovation Research. His research deals with different aspects of regions, in recent years mostly related to regional innovation.


    Speakers

    Rune Dahl Fitjar
    Pro-rector for Innovation and Society at the University of Stavanger and Professor of Innovation Studies at the University of Stavanger Business School, Norway


    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Centre for Euopean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 25th The Russian Invasion of Ukraine and Russian Domestic Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 25, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Russian invasion has sparked unprecedented sanctions against Russia that have motivated the departure of many Western companies and that are projected to cause a contraction of as much as 15% in 2022. Simultaneously, the Russian army has experienced an extremely high casualty rate. What impact are such developments likely to have on authoritarian durability in Russia? Four experts on Russian politics, mass protest and civil military relations will discuss the impact of the invasion on Russian domestic politics.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, University of Toronto

    Adam Casey
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow at the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies at the University of Michigan

    Graeme Robertson
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Director of the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies

    Kathryn E. Stoner
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Daniel Treisman
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science, University of California, Los Angeles


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 26th A New Engagement: Incorporating Newcomers into GTA Planning Processes

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 26, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) welcomes over a third of all immigrants and refugees within Canada. In response, local governments in the region are adapting their engagement processes to incorporate newcomers into municipal decision-making. While planning practitioners in the GTA are taking innovative steps to design more inclusive methods of engagement, they continue to confront significant barriers. Local governments need to extend additional resources to support planners as they seek to implement culturally-sensitive public participation and revitalize their governance structures to best serve the interests of their diverse communities.

    On April 26, IMFG Graduate Fellow Shervin Ghaem-Maghami will examine how selected municipalities in the GTA are engaging immigrants in planning decisions, and how such public participation activities can be improved to most meaningfully draw upon the strengths and adapt to the needs of newcomer communities.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Shervin Ghaem-Maghami
    He is the recipient of the 2021–22 Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. He is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 27th Is Russia’s Disinformation War Working?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 27, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Marta Dyczok is Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University, Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and Adjunct Professor at the National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. She has published five books, including Ukraine’s Euromaidan. Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016) Ukraine Twenty Years After Independence: Assessments, Perspectives, Challenges (co-edited with Giovanna Brogi, 2015), Media, Democracy and Freedom. The Post-Communist Experience (co-edited with Oxana Gaman-Golutvina, 2009), articles in various journals including The Russian Journal of Communication (2014), Demokratizatsiya (2014), and regularly provides media commentary. Her doctorate is from Oxford University and she researches mass media, memory, migration, and history.

    Shelby Grossman is a research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory. She was previously an assistant professor of political science at the University of Memphis. Dr. Grossman’s primary research interests are in comparative politics and sub-Saharan Africa. Her research has been published in Comparative Political Studies, PS: Political Science and Politics, World Development, and World Politics. Dr. Grossman was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law from 2016-17. She earned her PhD in Government from Harvard University in 2016.

    Yevhen Fedchenko is director of the Mohyla School of Journalism at National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kiev, Ukraine and co-founder and chief editor for stopfake.org. He has spent almost 20 years within the media industry, covering international stories for different types of media. He was co-founder of Digital Future of Journalism programme for journalists and Digital Media for Universities Internet journalism curriculum development programme. He teaches courses in international news and factual programming. His main interests are digital journalism and innovations, journalism education in transitional societies, news standards, propaganda and weaponisation of information, coverage of international politics in media. He has contributed to RFE/RL, BBC, NPR, Public Radio International, Radio Canada International, CBC, Mashable, SKY and more.In 2010-2011 Yevhen Fedchenko was Fulbright visiting professor at USC Annenberg in Los Angeles, USA.

    Volodymyr Yermolenko, PhD, is a Ukrainian philosopher, journalist and book writer. He works as analytics director at Internews Ukraine, a chief editor at UkraineWorld.org and a senior lecturer at Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. He holds a doctor of political studies degree from EHESS, France, and PhD in philosophy from Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Ukraine. He received Sheveliov Prize for best Ukrainian essays book in 2018, Petro Mohyla Prize in 2021, and Book of the Year prize in several nominations in 2018 and 2015.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Shelby Grossman
    Speaker
    Research scholar at the Stanford Internet Observatory and co-editor of the Journal of Online Trust and Safety

    Marta Dyczok
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History and Political Science, Western University

    Yevhen Fedchenko
    Speaker
    Director of the Mohyla School of Journalism at National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kiev, Ukraine and co-founder and chief editor for stopfake.org

    Volodymyr Yermolenko
    Speaker
    Ukrainian philosopher, journalist, and writer; analytics director at Interviews Ukraine and chief editor of UkraineWorld.org; Associate Professor at Kyiv Mohyla Academy

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Euopean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 27th Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 27, 20224:30PM - 5:15PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us on April 27 at 4:30pm ET for the keynote lecture of the Munk School’s inaugural Fellows Symposium on the Reality and Risks of AI featuring Stuart Russell, Professor of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley, holder of the Smith-Zadeh Chair in Engineering, and Director of the Center for Human-Compatible AI.

    In his lecture, Professor Russell will survey recent and expected developments in AI and their implications — some enormously positive, while others, such as the development of autonomous weapons and the replacement of humans in economic roles, may be negative. Beyond these, one must expect that AI capabilities will eventually exceed those of humans across a range of real-world-decision making scenarios. Should this be a cause for concern, as Alan Turing, Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, and others have suggested? And, if so, what can we do about it? While some in the mainstream AI community dismiss the issue, Professor Russell will argue that the problem is real and that the technical aspects of it are solvable if we replace current definitions of AI with a version based on provable benefit to humans. This, in turn, raises a host of questions with which the social sciences and humanities have wrestled for centuries.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Stuart Russell
    Speaker
    Professor of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley, holder of the Smith-Zadeh Chair in Engineering, and Director of the Center for Human-Compatible AI

    Rudyard Griffiths
    Welcome Remarks
    Chair of the Munk Debates



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2022

  • Tuesday, May 3rd – Wednesday, May 4th Navigating Information and Race in the Era of COVID-19

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 3, 20229:00AM - 5:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, May 4, 20229:00AM - 5:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    This symposium advances multidisciplinary, transcultural and transnational understandings of how disinformation affects Canada’s vulnerable groups, including marginalized, minority, and indigenous communities, when accurate and bias-free health and anti-racism messages on the Internet become more critical than ever during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019 to 2022. It consists of featured papers, panel presentations, roundtable discussion, open forum and a focus group meeting to discuss the conclusions and recommendations for future direction. The participants include senior scholars, emerging academics, graduate and undergraduate students, as well as community and business leaders whose work leads them to focus on cross-cultural encounters, information movements across borders, processes of displacement and historical change. In addition to Toronto-based participants, presenters and audience can attend the symposium nationally and globally through virtual conferencing technology.

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM: https://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Navigating-information-and-race-program.pdf

    This symposium is generously supported by: York University Libraries, Osgoode Hall Law School, York Centre for Asian Research, Canadian Studies Program and Asian Institute at the University of Toronto, and Justin Poy Agency.

    The symposium is organized by Jack Leong, Norda Bell, Kalina Grewal, Thumeka Mgwigwi and Sharon Wang from York University.

    Sponsors

    York University

    Co-Sponsors

    York University Libraries

    Osgoode Hall Law School

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Canadian Studies Program, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 4th The Avoidable War: The Dangers of a Catastrophic Conflict between the US and Xi Jinping's China

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 4, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The relationship between the U.S. and China has reverberating consequences around the world. The ties between the two superpowers rests on a seismic fault—of cultural misunderstanding, historical grievance, and ideological incompatibility.

    The Asia Society Policy Institute’s (ASPI) Avoidable War project has culminated in the publication of a book on U.S.-China relations by Asia Society and ASPI President Kevin Rudd, titled The Avoidable War: The Dangers of a Catastrophic Conflict between the US and Xi Jinping’s China. The work demystifies the actions of both sides, explaining and translating them for the benefit of the other. Geopolitical disaster is still avoidable, but only if these two giants can find a way to coexist without betraying their core interests through what Rudd calls “managed strategic competition.” Should they fail, down that path lies the possibility of a war that could rewrite the future of both countries, and the world.

    Join us virtually, for the Toronto launch of The Avoidable War and a discussion on U.S.-China relations. John Baird, Senior Advisor at Bennett Jones LLP and former Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Government of Canada will moderate a conversation with Kevin Rudd on the book and the broader implications of the U.S.-China relationship. Peter Loewen, Director of the Munk School, will deliver opening remarks.


    Speakers

    The Hon. Kevin Rudd AC
    Speaker
    26th Prime Minister of Australia, President & CEO, Asia Society, President, Asia Society Policy Institute

    The Hon. John Baird PC
    Moderator
    Senior Advisor at Bennett Jones LLP and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Government of Canada

    Peter Loewen
    Opening Remarks
    Professor and Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 5th Hubris of Mars: Great Power Miscalculation and the Russo-Ukrainian War

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 5, 202210:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    A great power’s hubris is an expressive use of violence that seeks to prove the unworthiness of a target and, simultaneously, ignores both the limits imposed by the IR structure and the realities of the operational theater of war. Such behavior often translates into unilateralism, wanton destruction, bombastic proclamations, and status concerns. Ivan Gomza compares the Russian tactics and political aims during the first phase of the Russo-Ukrainian war with historical cases of the Crassus’ Parthian campaign, the French war in Indochina, and the U.S. invasion of Iraq. His analysis attributes the Roman, French, US, and Russian underperformance to a combination of greater powers’ hubristic attitude and smaller nations’ flexibility.

    Ivan Gomza is Head of Public Policy and Governance Department at Kyiv School of Economics. He holds his Ph.D. in political science. Dr. Gomza was a fellow of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in 2013, the Fulbright Faculty Development Program in 2016-2017, and Petrach Ukrainian Studies Fellowship in 2022. His scholarly interests comprise democratization, authoritarian regimes, contentious politics, and good governance. Dr. Gomza had his articles published in international academic journals and sits on Communist and Post-Communist Studies journal editorial board. He also authored two books, his most recent title being Republic of Decadent Days: Ideology of French Integral Nationalism under the Third Republic (2021).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ivan Gomza
    Speaker
    Head of Public Policy and Governance Department at Kyiv School of Economics

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, CERES. University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 6th Russia's Invasion of Ukraine: The Political, Military and Cyber Dimensions

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 6, 202211:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Boardroom, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON and Online via Zoom
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    Description

    This expert panel discussion examines the military, political and cyber dimensions of Russia’s war against Ukraine. What explains Moscow’s actions, how has Ukraine been able to resist its aggression, and why has cyber conflict fallen short of expectations? Based on this discussion, the panel will then offer some forward-looking analysis of how the conflict is evolving, how Ukraine could win, and examine the geopolitical consequences of different plausible conflict outcomes (or lack thereof).

    Unable to join the in-person audience? Join us online via Zoom: https://bit.ly/3vnWcPe


    Speakers

    Mykola Bielieskov
    Research Fellow, National Institute for Strategic Studies under President of Ukraine

    Seva Gunitsky
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Centre for European, Russia and Eurasian Studies, Munk School

    Nadiya Kostyuk
    Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy and School of Cybersecurity and Privacy, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Lennart Maschmeyer
    Senior Researcher, ETH Zurich, Center for Security Studies

    Lucan Way
    Professor, Department of Political Science and co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at the Centre for European, Russia and Eurasian Studies, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 10th The American War in Afghanistan: A Conversation with the 2022 Lionel Gelber Prize Winner

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 10, 202210:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us on May 10 for a conversation with ​​the 2022 Lionel Gelber Prize winner, Carter Malkasian.

    His Lionel Gelber Prize–winning book, “The American War in Afghanistan: A History,” is an account of America’s longest war. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of the country and its people, Carter Malkasian helps us to make sense of the complex political, military and societal forces that shaped the conflict over two decades. The American War in Afghanistan provides a truly comprehensive and compelling history of the U.S. intervention, from the early days of “Operation Enduring Freedom” to the Taliban’s resurgence as the U.S. forces pulled out of the country.

    The Lionel Gelber Prize is awarded annually to the world’s best non-fiction book in English on foreign affairs that seeks to deepen public debate on significant international issues. The prize is presented by the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, in partnership with Foreign Policy Magazine.


    Speakers

    Janine di Giovanni
    Moderator
    Columnist, Foreign Policy and Juror, The Lionel Gelber Prize

    Janice Stein
    Speaker
    Founding Director, Munk School and Jury Chair, The Lionel Gelber Prize

    Carter Malkasian
    Speaker
    Author, The American War in Afghanistan: A History



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 10th Will Ukraine Join the EU?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 10, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Klaus Brummer holds the chair of International Relations at the Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany. He served as co-editor-in-chief of the journal “Foreign Policy Analysis” (2018-2020) and was president of the Foreign Policy Analysis section of the International Studies Association (2015-2016). As guest lecturer/professor, he has taught at Duke University, the University of Edinburgh, the University of Strasbourg, the University of Helsinki, and the Autonomous University of Barcelona. His main research interests include: leadership profiling, domestic drivers of foreign policy, European integration, and foreign policy making in non-Western contexts. He has published in peer-reviewed journals such as Acta Politica, British Journal of Politics and International Relations, German Politics, Foreign Policy Analysis, Government and Opposition, International Affairs, International Politics, International Studies Review, and Journal of European Public Policy, and is co-editor of Foreign Policy Analysis Beyond North America (Lynne Rienner, 2015) and Foreign Policy as Public Policy? (Manchester University Press, 2019). In 2021-2022, Klaus Brummer has been the Hannah Arendt Visiting Chair for German and European Studies at CERES.

    Oleksandr Sushko is an Executive Director of the International Renaissance Foundation since January 2018, (Open Society Network) based in Kyiv, Ukraine. Prior to that he worked as a Research Director of the Institute for Euro-Atlantic Cooperation (2006-2017), and Director of the Center for Peace, Conversion and Foreign Policy of Ukraine (2000-2006). Since January 2011, he has served as Chairman of the Board of the International Renaissance Foundation (IRF), Ukraine . Oleksandr Sushko was a first Co-Chair of the EU-Ukraine Civil Society Platform (2015-2016) – the bilateral insitution established within the frames of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement to facilitate civil society cooperation and policy impact. Areas of expertise: Ukraine, EU, Civil Society.

    Professor Milada Anna Vachudova (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) specializes in European politics, political change in postcommunist Europe, the European Union and the impact of international actors on domestic politics. Her recent articles explore the trajectories of European states amidst strengthening ethnopopulism and democratic backsliding – and how these changes are impacting party systems and the European Union. She is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is also part of the core team of the Chapel Hill Expert Survey (CHES) on the positions of political parties across Europe. She served as the Chair of the Curriculum in Global Studies at UNC from 2014 to 2019. Her book, Europe Undivided: Democracy, Leverage and Integration After Communism (Oxford University Press) was awarded the Stein Rokkan Prize for Comparative Social Science Research.

    Kataryna Wolczuk (Professor of East European Politics, Centre for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies at the University of Birmingham) specialises in East European politics. Currently she is researching relations between the EU and the post-Soviet countries within the framework of the European Neighbourhood Policy and the Eastern Partnership. She is also conducting research on Russia’s role in the ‘shared neighbourhood’ and any potential impact for EU’s role and policies in the post-Soviet space. Previously she studied the dynamics of state-building in Ukraine, as well as the conception of nationhood and national identity in Central and Eastern Europe. Professor Wolczuk contributed to numerous policy-related initiatives and cooperated with and advised a number of UK governmental bodies, international organisations and think-tanks on East European politics, the consequences of EU enlargement and the relations between the EU and its eastern neighbours. She has extensive media experience, including TV and radio interviews, as well as publications in the British and international press.

    Lucan Way’s research focuses on democratization and authoritarianism in the former Soviet Union and the developing world. His most recent book (with Steven Levitsky), Social Revolution and Authoritarian Durability in the Modern World (forthcoming Princeton University Press) provides a comparative historical explanation of the extraordinary durability of autocracies born of violent social revolution. Professor Way’s solo authored book, Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (Johns Hopkins, 2015), examines the sources of political competition in the former Soviet Union. His book, Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (with Steven Levitsky), was published in 2010 by Cambridge University Press. Way’s work on competitive authoritarianism has been cited thousands of times and helped stimulate new and wide-ranging research into the dynamics of hybrid democratic-authoritarian rule.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oleksandr Sushko
    Speaker
    Executive Director of International Renaissance Foundation

    Klaus Brummer
    Speaker
    The Chair of International Relations at the Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Germany; the 2021-2022 Hannah Arendt Visiting Chair for German and European Studies at CERES.

    Milada Vachudova
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Kataryna Wolczuk
    Speaker
    Professor of East European Politics, University of Birmingham

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science. Co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine at CERES, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 10th How the Built Environment Affects Public Trust in Canadian Municipalities

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 10, 20224:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of strong neighbourhoods, where people can rely on one another. Support can mean delivering groceries to older people living by themselves or simply checking on each other’s health. These scenarios, among others, show that interpersonal trust is a central component of a strong community.

    On May 10, IMFG Graduate Fellow Fernando Calderón Figueroa will explore the relationship between trust and the built environment of neighbourhoods across Canadian municipalities. First, he will use data from Statistics Canada’s General Social Survey to show that trust is spatially concentrated — in other words, that people with similar levels of trust towards others tend to be in proximity to one another. Second, he will argue that the spatial composition of cities — measured through people’s proximity to amenities like libraries, parks, and schools — is positively correlated with trust, and that a having a lot of amenities in close proximity to each other promotes the kind of recurrent casual encounters that lead to higher levels of trust.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Fernando Calderón Figueroa
    Fernando Calderón Figueroa is the recipient of the Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance and a PhD candidate at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 10th G7 Strengthening Security and Sustainability: German and Canadian Contributions

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 10, 20225:00PM - 6:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    What have Germany and Canada done at home and in the G7, and what can they do in the G7 now, to strengthen national and human security and ecological sustainability, in mutually supportive ways?

    To attend the event in-person, please register at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/g7-strengthening-security-sustainability-german-canadian-contributions-tickets-333280048597

    Agenda

    • Welcome remarks by John Kirton, G7 Research Group; Ambassador Sabine Sparwasser, German Embassy; Norbert Eschborn, Konrad Adenauer Stiftung
    • Videomessage: Minister of State at the Federal Foreign Office Tobias Lindner (tbc)
    • Opening/keynote remarks: the Honourable Bill Graham, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History
    • Interventions and discussion
    – Stefan Mair, director, German Institute for International and Security Affairs, and executive chair, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik
    – Vincent Rigby, former National Security and Intelligence Advisor to the prime minister of Canada
    – Michael Mehling, deputy director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a professor at the University of Strathclyde Law School, Glasgow
    – Ella Kokotsis, co-author, Reconfiguring the Global Governance of Climate Change and The Global Governance of Climate Change: G7, G20 and UN Leadership
    • Q&A with audience
    • Closing remarks: Thomas Schultze, Consul General of Germany to Toronto

    Biographies

    Bill Graham

    The Honourable Bill Graham was member of Parliament for Toronto Centre-Rosedale, then Toronto Centre, from 1993 to 2007. Prior to entering politics, he practised law with the firm Fasken Martineau and taught in the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. For six years he chaired of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and subsequently served as minister of foreign affairs from 2002 to 2004 and minister of national defence from 2004 to 2006. In 2006, he was leader of the Opposition and interim leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. He is currently chancellor of Trinity College in the University of Toronto and a member of The Bill Graham Centre Advisory Board.

    Ella Kokotsis

    Ella Kokotsis is co-author of Reconfiguring the Global Governance of Climate Change (2022), as well as The Global Governance of Climate Change: G7, G20 and UN Leadership (2015). She is also director of accountability for the G7 Research Group and the G20 Research Group based at the University of Toronto. An expert on summit accountability and compliance, she has consulted with the Canadian government’s National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy, the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations on their African development agenda, with the Russian government on global health issues in the lead-up to the 2006 St. Petersburg Summit, and with the Government of Canada on numerous summit-related issues during the 2010 Canadian G8 and G20 Summits. Her scholarly methodology for assessing compliance continues as the basis for the annual accountability reports produced by the G7 and G20 Research Groups. She is also author of Keeping International Commitments: Compliance, Credibility and the G7 Summits, as well as many articles and chapters.

    Stefan Mair

    Stefan Mair is the director of the German Institute for International and Security Affairs and executive chair of the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP). His areas of expertise include foreign and security policy challenges of Germany and the EU, geopolitical and geo-economic dynamics, and trade and foreign economic policy. He served on the executive board of the Federation of German Industries from 2010 to 2020 and held various positions at the SWP from 1992 to 2010.

    Michael Mehling

    Michael Mehling is deputy director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a professor at the University of Strathclyde Law School in Glasgow. His work focuses on climate policy design and implementation at the domestic and international level, including its intersections with environmental, energy, financial market and trade policy. He is a founding board member, inter alia, of the Blockchain & Climate Institute in London, the Ecologic Institute in Washington DC and the European Roundtable on Climate Change and Sustainable Transition in Brussels, as well as the founding editor of Carbon & Climate Law Review. He is a partner with Ecologic Institute in Berlin, a member of the advisory boards of the International Policy Coalition for Sustainable Growth at the US Chamber of Commerce and the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility, a policy advisor of the Center for Climate and Trade at the Climate Leadership Council, an associate researcher with the Energy Policy Research Group at the University of Cambridge, a manager of the Konrad-von-Moltke Fund, and a member of the World Commission on Environmental Law. Previously, he was a member of the board of directors of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources – United States (IUCN-US) and co-chair of the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition Scientific Committee.

    Vincent Rigby

    Vincent Rigby is a senior fellow with the Norman Patterson School of Internal Affairs at Carleton University and a non-resident senior advisor with the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC. He has more than 30 years of experience in public service. Most recently, he was appointed National Security and Intelligence Advisor to the prime minister of Canada in January 2020. He retired in September 2021. He was previously associate deputy minister of foreign affairs at Global Affairs Canada (2019–2020), associate deputy minister of Public Safety Canada (2017–2019), assistant deputy minister of strategic policy at Global Affairs Canada (2013–2017), and vice president of the Strategic Policy and Performance Branch of the former Canadian International Development Agency (2010–2013). From 2008 to 2010, he was the executive director of the International Assessment Secretariat and the lead official on Afghanistan intelligence at the Privy Council Office. In 14 years at the Department of National Defence, he held a number of positions, including assistant deputy minister (policy), director general of policy planning, director of policy development, and director of arms and proliferation control policy.

    Julia Kulik

    Julia Kulik is director of research for the G7 Research Group, G20 Research Group, BRICS Research Group and Global Health Diplomacy Program, based at Trinity College at the University of Toronto. She has researched and written on G7, G20 and BRICS performance particularly on the issues of gender equality, global health and regional security. She has co-authored various publications entitled “Achieving Gender Equality through G7 and G20 Governance,” “Generating Global Health Governance through BRICS Summitry’’ in Contemporary Politics and “Connecting Climate Change and Health through Global Summitry” in World Medical and Health Policy. She has attended numerous G7 and G20 summits and delivered papers on various topics of global governance at pre-summit conferences since 2009. She has provided strategic advice to G7 and G20 engagement groups, including the W20 and the U7+ Alliance. Julia leads the groups’ work on gender equality and summit performance.

    Sponsors

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada

    Konrad Adenauer Foundation

    Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 17th “Making Culture” to “Cultural Making”: Unpacking Immigrant Entrepreneurship and Cultural Entrepreneurship in Norway

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 17, 202211:00AM - 12:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Traditionally, immigrants have been found to demonstrate higher entrepreneurial drive than non-immigrant populations, which has spurred an increase in international scholarly attention to this theme. Studies on immigrant entrepreneurship have tackled a variety of related topics, such as the uncovering of entrepreneurial intentions, opportunity recognition, and the role of diaspora networks. Cultural entrepreneurship has emerged along these lines, centering on the role of culture and heritage in entrepreneurial ventures. Concomitantly, interest has grown in investigating cultural entrepreneurship from the prism of culture-making—deploying culture towards making culture, and thus altering frames of reference. But despite the boom in research on these matters internationally, as well as more than 25% of all entrepreneurs in Norway are immigrants, it remains a rather limited research field in the country. This talk offers critical reflections on this angle and highlights fruitful pathways for future research. The aim herein is to tackle the topic of cultural entrepreneurship, by advancing knowledge on the role cultural entrepreneurship may play in encouraging greater equitability and mutual understanding among communities in multicultural societies.

    About our Speaker:

    Marte C. W. Solheim carries out research on diversity and innovation, combining insights from organizational theory, innovation studies and economic geography. She is particularly interested in understanding how innovation is inspired when a variety of diverse knowledge intersect, and the contextual factors affecting this association. Solheim has studied the nexus between various forms of diversity and different types of innovation and has particularly focused on the role of foreign-born workers and innovation & export, experience-based and educational diversity and innovation, and diversity management.

    Solheim is actively engaged in the public debate on migration, diversity and innovation-related issues in Norway and is invited to speak at national diversity conferences as well as to national policy makers, political spheres and other institutions. She has been involved in several national and international research and consultancy projects as lead, member and as expert advisor. Solheim is Regional Studies Association (RSA) Ambassador to Norway, member of the prestigious Academy of Young Researchers in Norway. She is on the steering committee of Smart Cities at the University of Stavanger, and currently supervising PhD Candidate Xiangyu Quan on Smart Cities, Innovation and Policy and Alina Meloyan on Universities and Regional Development.


    Speakers

    Marte C.W. Solheim
    Associate Professor and Head of the Stavanger Centre for Innovation Research, UiS Business School, Norway


    Co-Sponsors

    Nordic Studies Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Innovation Policy Lab


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 17th Russia-Ukraine War and the Law: War Crimes, Legal Accountability, and Other Campaigns on the Legal Front

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 17, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Since Russia’s 2022 invasion of Ukraine began, the law has become its own front, full of maneuvers, counter-attacks, and campaigns. Genocide, martial law, sanctions, the crime of aggression against a sovereign state, war crimes against civilians: the law has proven a tool that Ukrainian authorities have wielded in creative and complicated ways. This panel of experts considers legal aspects of Russia’s war on Ukraine, from martial law to a Putin war crimes tribunal, considering both international and domestic legal doctrines, and thinking about innovations and experiments as well as limitations and risks of “campaigns” on the legal front.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ron Levi
    Chair
    Professor of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Sociology; Distinguished Professor of Global Justice; Director, Global Justice Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Monica Eppinger
    Speaker
    Associate Professor; Co-Director, Center for International and Comparative Law, Center for International and Comparative Law, Saint Louis University

    Mykola Hnatovsky
    Speaker
    Professor, International Law Department at Kyiv Shevchenko University, First Vice-President of the Ukrainian Association of International Law, Judge to the European Court of Human Rights in respect of Ukraine

    Alex Whiting
    Speaker
    Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School, former Investigations Coordinator at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague

    Evgeny Finkel
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University

    Oleksandr Merezhko
    Speaker
    Ukrainian MP, Head of the Committee on Foreign Policy and Interparliamentary Cooperation


    Sponsors

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    the Center for International and Comparative Law, Saint Louis University School of Law


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 18th The Fate of Intermarium as an Alternate Regional Framework after Russia's Invasion of Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 18, 202211:00AM - 1:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Small states have tended to seek collective security arrangements, especially in times and regions where larger powers have sought to exercise influence. During the interwar period, the idea of Intermarium – conceptualised as a zone of states stretching from the Baltic to the Black Seas – was promoted in certain circles, particularly in Poland. The idea was revived again as a possible regional development trajectory by some conservatives and liberals in the 2000s. It can be seen as an inspiration for the Three Seas Initiative and the Chinese-backed “17+1” forum as complementary, or even alternate regional cooperation and stability frameworks. Far right groups have also embraced Intermarium, but as an alternative to the influence of Brussels and Moscow in the region. Given the recent geopolitical upheavals following Russia’s war of aggression in Ukraine, this presentation asks whether the Intermarium idea has definitively lost its contemporary relevance.

    Matthew Kott is a researcher based at the Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies (IRES) at Uppsala University in Sweden. He is a historian mainly specialising on contemporary Latvia, but with broader interests in political and intellectual history wider Baltic–Nordic region. His most recent publication is the anthology, Defining Latvia: Recent Explorations in History, Culture, and Politics, co-edited with Siobhán Hearne and Michael Loader (CEU Press, 2022), wherein he also has a contribution examining far-right entryism in post-Soviet Latvian politics. Among his noteworthy previous work is the monograph Himmlers Norge: nordmenn I det storgermanske prosjekt, with Terje Emberland (Aschehoug, 2012), which established a new interpretation of the role of Norwegians in the imagination of the SS and their foreseen place in Nazi-controlled Europe. He is the editor of Journal of Baltic Studies.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Matthew Kott
    Speaker
    Researcher, the Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies (IRES), Uppsala University in Sweden

    Andres Kasekamp
    Chair
    Elmar Tampõld Chair of Estonian Studies, Professor of History, UofT


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Nordic Studies Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 18th Taiwan, the United States, and the Hidden History of the Cold War in Asia: Divided Allies

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 18, 20223:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    This presentation explores the challenges which faced the United States and Taiwanese alliance during the Cold War, addressing a wide range of events and influences of the period between the 1950s and 1970s. Tackling seven main topics to outline the fluctuations of the U.S.–Taiwan relationship, Dr. Lin’s new book highlights the impact of the mainland counteroffensive, the offshore islands, Tibet, Taiwan’s secret operations in Asia, Taiwan’s Soviet and nuclear gambits, Chinese representation in the United Nations, and the Vietnam War. Utilizing multinational archival research, particularly the newly available materials from Taiwan and the United States, to reevaluate Taiwan’s foreign policy during the Cold War, revealing a pragmatic and opportunistic foreign policy disguised in nationalistic rhetoric. Moreover, this study represents a departure from previous scholarship, emphasizing the dictatorial and incompetent nature of the Chinese Nationalist regime, to provide fresh insights into the nature of U.S.–Taiwan relations.

    SPEAKER’S BIO:

    Hsiao-ting Lin is curator of the Modern China and Taiwan collection and research fellow at the Hoover Institution. His academic interests include border strategies and defenses in modern China, political institutions and the bureaucratic system of the Chinese Nationalist Party, and US-Taiwan military and political relations during the Cold War. He has published extensively, including Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan (Harvard University Press, 2016); Modern China’s Ethnic Frontiers: A Journey to the West (Routledge, 2011); Tibet and Nationalist China’s Frontier: Intrigues and Ethnopolitics, 1928–49 (UBC Press, 2006), Taiwan, the United States, and the Hidden History of the Cold War in Asia: Divided Allies (Routledge, 2022); and over a hundred journal articles, book chapters, edited volumes, reviews, and opinion pieces.


    Speakers

    Hsiao-ting Lin
    Speaker
    Curator of the Modern China and Taiwan collection, and Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    Yiching Wu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 18th Japan, the Indo-Pacific and Lessons for North America: Economic Security, Interdependence and Supply Chain Resilience

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 18, 20227:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    As Canada and the United States develop new Indo-Pacific and economic security strategies, Japan serves as a useful model. Japan now has a Cabinet Minister specifically responsible for economic security as Japan addresses the economic fallout and supply chain disruptions due to US-China tensions, global decoupling, COVID and the war in Ukraine. To build resilience, Japanese companies are proactively diversifying their supply chains beyond China. How will these trends play out in the post-pandemic era, and what are the implications for North America? Join experts Dr. Kazuto Suzuki (GraSPP, University of Tokyo) & Dr. Ulrike Schaede (University of California San Diego) for this discussion, moderated by APF Canada Distinguished Fellow Deanna Horton.

    — Speaker Bios —
    Ulrike Schaede is Professor of Japanese Business at the University of California San Diego, School of Global Policy and Strategy. She is the Director of JFIT (Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology) where she organizes a weekly “Japan Zoominar” on current issues on Japan. She works on Japan’s changing corporate strategies, including business culture, change management, employment practices, and global manufacturing and innovation under the digital transformation. She has written extensively on Japanese business organization, and is the author of The Business Reinvention of Japan: How to Make Sense of the New Japan (Stanford University Press, 2020) and co-author of The Digital Transformation and Japan’s Political Economy (Cambridge University Press, 2022). She holds a PhD in Japan Studies and Economics from Marburg University, Germany, and has been invited to visiting professor and scholar positions at UC Berkeley, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, Hitotsubashi University and the research institutes of The Bank of Japan, the Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of the Economy, Trade and Industry, and the Development Bank of Japan.

    Kazuto Suzuki is Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Tokyo, Japan, and senior fellow of Asia Pacific Initiative (API), the independent policy thinktank. He graduated Department of International Relations, Ritsumeikan University, and received Ph.D. from Sussex European Institute, University of Sussex, England. He has worked in the Fondation pour la recherche stratégique in Paris, France as assistant researcher and the Associate Professor at the University of Tsukuba from 2000 to 2008 and served as Professor of International Politics at Hokkaido University until 2020. He served as an expert in the Panel of Experts for Iranian Sanction Committee under the United Nations Security Council from 2013 to July 2015. He currently serves as the President of Japan Association of International Security and Trade. His research focuses on the conjunction of science/technology and international relations; subjects including space policy, non-proliferation, export control and sanctions. His recent work includes Space and International Politics (2011, in Japanese, awarded Suntory Prize for Social Sciences and Humanities), Policy Logics and Institutions of European Space Collaboration (2003) and many others.

    Deanna Horton is a Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, focusing on interactive mapping projects (https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/canasiafootprint/ ) and related research along Canada-US and Canada-Asia relations.
    Ms. Horton is also affiliated with the Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, DC, the Asia-Pacific Foundation, the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. She sat on the Board of Trustees of the Royal Ontario Museum 2017-2020.
    In her previous foreign service career, she served as Ambassador of Canada to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (2008-10) and subsequently as Minister (Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs) at the Canadian Embassy, Washington.
    Deanna Horton was born in Toronto. She studied at McGill University (Hons BA); Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (MA International Affairs); Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (Diploma in International Studies); US State Dept Foreign Service Institute in Yokohama. She speaks French, Japanese and German.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ulrike Schaede
    Speaker
    Professor of Japanese Business at the University of California San Diego, School of Global Policy and Strategy

    Kazuto Suzuki
    Speaker
    Professor of Science and Technology Policy at the Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Tokyo

    Deanna Horton
    Moderator
    Senior Fellow at Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and Distinguished Fellow of APF Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 19th Women in Crime: Female Convicts in the Late 19th Century Habsburg Galicia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 19, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Dr Cherchovych’s study will address women’s criminal experience, in particular so called female crimes – infanticide, child abandonment, abortions, which were examined by Lviv Regional Court (Sąd Krajowy Lwowa) during 1865-1905. Who the convicted women were, what life experiences they shared? How did they shape their crimes into stories and what these stories meant? How they talked about their guilt and how in such stories they found a place for their own victimity? For the majority of the accused their act was not the only way out but just one of the chosen options. Why did they choose it? Dr. Cherchovych intends to show how often women who by default were denied the opportunity to choose, according to widely spread perception about mandatory natural women crime conditionality and potential deviancy of women, were able to take advantage of that judgement. The question of Can the Subaltern Speak? (by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak) in regards to the late 19th century Eastern Galician society would have a rather positive answer. As analyzed cases confirmed, the quality of accused woman self-defence in a court had played one of the most important roles in her sentence: the scale of the judgment given by a court had been directly correlated with a woman’s will or unwillingness to speak for herself, to create her own story. Not the education was the most important here (the majority of the accused were illiterate), but rather the very possibility to create her own self-narration which plot would have to go beyond personal life of the accused as vividly as possible covering her surroundings, many others whose social practices this woman had absorbed and had been reproducing.

    Ivanna Cherchovych is a historian and anthropologist, a Research Fellow at the Department of Social Anthropology of Ethnology Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, a member of Ukrainian Association for the Study of Women’s History. She obtained her academic degree “kandydat nauk” (Ph.D. equivalent) from Ivan Krypyakevych Institute of Ukrainian Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in November 2014. Her dissertation was dedicated to everyday life of women from Ukrainian upper class in the late 19th century Habsburg Galicia. She was a visiting research fellow at Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe in Marburg (2017) and German Historical Institute in Warsaw (2019). Her current research focuses on the women’s criminal experience in 19th century Habsburg Galicia. She is currently a researcher hosted by the Jacyk Program.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ivanna Cherchovych
    Speaker
    Research Fellow at the Department of Social Anthropology of Ethnology Institute of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; short-term Jacyk researcher

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 19th The Future of Money

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 19, 20224:00PM - 5:30PMExternal Event, Koerner Hall, The Royal Conservatory of Music, 273 Bloor St W, Toronto, ON M5S 1V6
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    Description

    Money has built society. As a technology for holding and exchanging value, money has evolved over millennia and is therefore fit-for-purpose. Money is the universal incentive-mechanism that holds society together like glue. But money is changing rapidly. This change introduces opportunities to reinvent currency and commerce at a foundational level. This change also offers society the chance to reorganize relationships around common projects. It offers new capabilities for the evolving role of banking in the consumer value-chain. It proposes a new vision for liquidity as a tool to manage growth, stability, and prosperity. It presents the promise of greater economic inclusion across the world. Change also presents peril. It risks undermining centuries of great sacrifice to build the society of today, imperfect as it is; always a work-in-progress. The importance of this topic begs a broad discussion across the public arena. The event seeks to host that conversation. The Future of Money is... now.

    Use PROMO CODE FOM22 at checkout to receive a compimentary ticket.


    Speakers

    Max Bardon
    Head of Worldwide Payments, Amazon

    Edward Kholodenko
    CEO & Founder, Questrade

    Jaime Leverton
    CEO, Hut 8

    Neil McLaughlin
    Group Head, Personal & Commercial Banking, Royal Bank of Canada

    Peter Loewen
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Afairs & Public Policy

    Amazon

    Hut 8

    Questrade

    Royal Bank of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 25th Building a Residential Property Tax from Scratch: The Irish Story

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 25, 20224:30PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Ireland’s centuries-old residential property tax was abolished in 1978. Although new versions of the tax followed, only to be terminated a short time later, by the beginning of the 21st century Ireland was an outlier in the developed world in not having a recurrent tax on residential properties. After many commissions and reports, much debate, political opposition and popular resistance, not to mention the role of the international financial community in the form of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), a new local property tax was introduced in 2013. The design, administration and implementation of the Local Property Tax (LPT) was made more challenging by economic circumstances of the time that included the 2008 financial crisis, a property crash, the bank guarantee, an international bailout and years of austerity.

    On May 25, IMFG Visiting Scholar Gerard Turley will present on the story of Ireland’s new residential property tax, covering the background and country context, design features, implementation, and reform lessons.

    This event is both in-person at the Campbell Conference Centre and on Zoom.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Gerard Turley
    Speaker
    Dr. Gerard Turley is an economist and lecturer based at the National University of Ireland Galway, and manages the www.localauthorityfinances.com website.

    Enid Slack
    Moderator
    Dr. Enid Slack is the director of IMFG and one of Canada's foremost experts in municipal finance.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 31st Germany’s Role in Russia-Ukraine War

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 31, 20221:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Sebastian Harnisch is Professor for International Relations and Foreign Policy at the Institute for Political Science of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences at Heidelberg University, and member of the Board of Directors of the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA). His main research areas include comparative foreign and security policy, international relations theories, cybersecurity, non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and climate change policy issues. Sebastian Harnisch holds degrees in history and political science from Trier University and was a research fellow at the Japan Center for International Exchange (Tokyo, 1996), Columbia University (New York, 1996), and Yonsei University (Seoul, 1996-1997), as well as Heidelberg’s Center of Excellency, the Marsilius-Kolleg (2012-2013). He has taught at Trier University (2003-2006) and the Federal Armed Forces University in Munich (2006-2007), and was visiting professor at Beijing Foreign Studies University (2011), Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (2013), and China Foreign Affairs University (2018). Sebastian Harnisch is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Foreign Policy Analysis journal, as well as co-¬editor of the series Foreign Policy and International Order (Nomos Verl.) and the Oxford Research Encyclopedia for Foreign Policy Analysis (Oxford University Press). He has published numerous books, volumes, and articles in renowned journals.

    Kai Oppermann is Professor of International Politics at the Chemnitz University of Technology. He has previously held positions at the University of Sussex, King’s College London and the University of Cologne. His research centres on the domestic sources of European integration and foreign policy, with a focus on transatlantic relations and British and German and foreign policy. Kai won a Marie Curie Fellowship for a research project on EU referendums and worked as a specialist advisor to the House of Lords External Affairs Sub-Committee in the UK. His work has been published in international peer-reviewed journals such as European Journal of International Relations, West European Politics, Foreign Policy Analysis, Journal of European Public Policy and British Journal of Politics and International Relations. Kai is a co-editor at German Politics and an associate editor of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Foreign Policy Analysis (2018). He regularly gives media interviews on topics related to German and British foreign policy and transatlantic relations.

    Dr. Iryna Solonenko is Senior Fellow at Berlin-based think-tank Center for Liberal Modernity. Since 2012 she has been based in Berlin and served as an expert/consultant for numerous organisations in Germany, the EU and Ukraine. From May 2015 to February 2021 she was associate fellow at DGAP. Since 2012, she has been working on a research project at the European University Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder), addressing state-business relations in hybrid regimes with a focus on the political role of Ukrainian oligarchs. Between 2000 and 2012, she worked with the Open Society Foundations in Ukraine as the director of the European Program and as a project manager for the EastWest Institute in Kyiv. Dr. Iryna Solonenko holds degrees in international relations, European studies, public administration, and history from the Birmigham University, UK; Central European University, Budapest; National Academy of Public Administration, Kyiv; and National University Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Kyiv. Dr. Solonenko is the author of a number of academic, policy, and media publications. She has served on advisory councils with Ukrainian public authorities, has shared her expertise with EU institutions, and has been a board member or expert with such organizations as Kyiv Dialogue, DiXi Group, the Bertelsmann Transformation Index, the Eastern Partnership Index and Varieties of Democracy. Her most recent article “Ukraine’s Fight Is also a Fight for the West’s Future“ was published in the Internationale Politik Querterly, Issue #2, April 2022 – https://ip-quarterly.com/en/ukraines-fight-also-fight-wests-future

    Randall Hansen is Director of the Munk School’s Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, as well as the Global Migration Lab. He is Full Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration. He served as Interim Director of the Munk School from 2017 to 2020. Hansen works on immigration and citizenship, demography and population policy and the effects of war on civilians. His published works include Disobeying Hitler: German Resistance after Operation Valkyrie (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), Sterilized by the State: Eugenics, Race and the Population Scare in 20th Century North America (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014), Fire and Fury: the Allied Bombing of Germany (Penguin, 2009), and Citizenship and Immigration in Post-War Britain (Oxford University Press, 2000).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; Director, Global Migration Lab; Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Sebastian Harnisch
    Speaker
    Professor of International Relations and Foreign Policy at the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences of the University of Heidelberg

    Kai Oppermann
    Speaker
    Professor for International Politics, TU Chemnitz, Germany

    Iryna Solonenko
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Zentrum Liberale Moderne (Center for Liberal Modernity)


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Joint Initiative for German and European Studies

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2022

  • Wednesday, June 1st Are Russian Sanctions Working? How Can They Be Strengthened?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, June 1, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    After Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Western countries imposed unprecedent sanctions against the Russian Federation. What impact have these sanctions had so far on the Russian economy and its capacity to prosecute the war? What more can Western democracies to do to strengthen these measures?


    Speakers

    Her Excellency Yulia Kovaliv
    Panelist
    Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada

    Michael McFaul
    Panelist
    Director, of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University and former U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation

    Tymofiy Mylovanaov
    Panelist
    President of the Kyiv School of Economics, former Minister of Economic Development, Trade and Agriculture of Ukraine

    Nataliia Shapoval
    Panelist
    Chairman of the KSE Institute and Vice President for Policy Research at the Kyiv School of Economics

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Mark Manger
    Panelist
    Associate Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, June 2nd Identifying the People: Populism and its Alternative

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 2, 20224:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Populism is both an unavoidably blurred and an essentially contested concept. Peter Kraus argues that both for political and analytical purposes, the key criterion for distinguishing between “progressive” and “regressive” projects that address the crisis of democracy by invoking the people is how peoplehood is articulated in the process of collective mobilization. Differences between monist and pluralist strategies are of particular relevance in the context of the intense current debates on how to address issues of diversity and political integration on both sides of the Atlantic. To substantiate this point, Kraus brings into focus two recent empirical examples of non-populist approaches to articulating the people: Catalan sovereignism and the Turkish-Kurdish HDP.


    Speakers

    Peter Kraus
    Professor of Political Science and Head of the Institute for Canadian Studies at the University of Augsburg Joan Coromines Visiting Professor in Catalan Studies at the University of Chicago



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 7th Russia’s War in Ukraine: View from Finland and Sweden

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 7, 202211:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Vladimir Gel’man is Professor of Russian Politics in the University of Helsinki. His books include Authoritarian Russia: Analyzing Post-Soviet Regime Changes (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015) and Authoritarian Modernization in Russia: Ideas, Institutions, and Policies (Routledge, 2017). He also authored scholarly articles in Europe-Asia Studies, Post-Soviet Affairs, International Political Science Review, East European Politics, and other journals.

    Dr. Arkady Moshes is Program Director for the EU Eastern Neighborhood and Russia research program. He is also a member of the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia) at George Washington University. He received his Ph.D in history of international relations from the Russian Academy of Sciences (1992). Before moving to Finland in 2002, he had been since 1988 working in the Institute of Europe in Moscow. From 2008 to 2015 he was an Associate Fellow of the Russia and Eurasia Program at Chatham House. Since 2017 he has been a member of EU-Russia Expert Network (EUREN). He has been a visiting scholar at the Danish Institute of International Affairs (2002) and the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at Elliott School of International Relations, George Washington University (2016), a Public Policy Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (2007) and a regular guest lecturer at the NATO Defence College (2005-10, 2013-15) and Geneva Center for Security Policy (1998-2021). His areas of expertise include Russian foreign policy, European-Russian relations as well as internal and foreign policy of Ukraine and Belarus.

    Fredrik Löjdquist is Director of the Stockholm Centre for Eastern European Studies (SCEEUS), an independent institute constituted and financed by the Swedish Government, with its organisational domicile at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs. He is a former Swedish diplomat, with previous missions such as special envoy and ambassador for the Swedish Presidency of the EU in Georgia 2009, ambassador to the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) 2012–2017, and most recently, Sweden’s first ambassador and special envoy for hybrid threats based in Stockholm 2018–2021. He has also been on diplomatic missions in Vilnius, Moscow and Vienna, represented Sweden in the OSCE Structured Dialog on European safety 2017–2021, and been a member of the steering board of the European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats, located in Helsinki.

    Martin Kragh is deputy director of the Stockholm Center for Eastern European Studies at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs, and associate professor at the Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Uppsala University. He defended his PhD at the Stockholm School of Economics in 2009, and specializes in the economic and political development of Russia and the EU’s eastern neighbourhood. His research interests include economic history, political economy, foreign affairs and Nordic-Russian relations.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Nordic Studies Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, June 9th In Conversation with the Hon. Jean Charest

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 9, 202211:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, In-person and Online Event
    Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School
    1 Devonshire Place, Toronto ON
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    Description

    In recent years, Canada has been left out of important strategic defence agreements involving Australia, the U.K., and the U.S. to counter the disruption and increasing aggression from China. With the ongoing war in Ukraine, Canada must strengthen its military defence capabilities to better support its allies and bolster domestic security and sovereignty in our North. Join the Hon. Jean Charest, Conservative Party of Canada leadership candidate, to learn more about his campaign’s proposed defence and security commitments.

    Unable to join in person? Register for the live stream here: https://bit.ly/munkschool_jeancharest


    Speakers

    The Honourable Jean Charest
    Speaker
    Conservative Party of Canada leadership candidate

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor and Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, June 10th How Can Ukraine Achieve Long Term Security?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 10, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Volodymyr Dubovyk is an Associate Professor, Department of International Relations and Director of the Center for International Studies, Odesa I. I. Mechnikov National University (Ukraine). V. Dubovyk has conducted research at the Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (1997, 2006-2007), at the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland (2002), taught at the University of Washington (Seattle) in 2013 and at St. Edwards university/University of Texas (Austin) in 2016-17. He is the co-author of “Ukraine and European Security” (Macmillan, 1999) and has published numerous articles on US-Ukraine relations, regional and international security, and Ukraine’s foreign policy. Areas of expertise: Ukraine, Transatlantic Relations, U.S., Black Sea security.

    Olexiy Haran is Professor of Comparative Politics at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy (UKMA). In 1991-93, he was Dean and organizer of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the re-born Kyiv Mohyla Academy. Since 2002, he has served as Founding Director of the UKMA School for Policy Analysis, and since 2015 as Research Director at the Democratic Initiatives Foundation, a leading Ukrainian analytical and sociological think tank. He is the co-editor of Constructing a Political Nation: Changes in the Attitudes of Ukrainians during the War in the Donbas (2017), Ukraine in Europe: Questions and Answers (2009), Russia and Ukraine: Ten Years of Transformation (Moscow 2003) and several other books. His latest book is From Brezhnev to Zelensky: Dilemmas of Ukrainian Political Scientist (20121). He is also a frequent commentator in Ukrainian and international media. In winter 2013-2014, Prof. Haran was a member of the Council of ‘Maidan’ movement. In 2014-2016 he spent several weeks at the frontline near Mariupol, Luhansk, Avdiivka, and the Donetsk airport. He has been a member of Public Council under Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine for 15 years.

    Currently working on projects related to security sector governance and reforms, Rosaria Puglisi is an expert on countries of Eastern Europe, the South Caucasus and Central Asia. She worked and lived in the region for the best part of the last 25 years, engaged, in both advisory and leadership roles, with international organizations like the European Union, the Council of Europe and NATO. With a background in political affairs, security policy and crisis management, Rosaria has worked first-hand in all the protracted post-Soviet conflicts and been involved in related international conflict prevention and resolution efforts. She holds a PhD from the University of Glasgow on relations between Russia and Ukraine and has written on the Ukrainian security sector after the 2013-14 Maidan.

    Dr Kateryna Zarembo is a social sciences scholar. She has been an associate fellow at the New Europe Center (Kyiv, Ukraine) since 2019. Since 2016 she has been teaching at the double-degree “German and European Studies” Master program, administered jointly by the National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla” Academy (Ukraine) and Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany). In 2017-2019 she held the position of a deputy director for research at the New Europe Center. In 2010-2017 she worked at the Institute of World Policy (Kyiv, Ukraine).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Rosaria Puglisi
    Speaker
    Independent Scholar

    Olexiy Haran
    Speaker
    Professor of Political Science at the National University "Kyiv-Mohyla Academy", Research Director, Democratic Initiatives Foundation

    Volodymyr Dubovyk
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of International Relations, Mechnikov National University, Odesa, Ukraine

    Kateryna Zarembo
    Speaker
    An associate fellow at the New Europe Center (Kyiv, Ukraine)


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 14th Does the Russian opposition have a Ukrainian problem?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 14, 202211:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Laura Beers is Professor at Department of History, American University, Washington, DC. Her research focuses on modern Britain. She is particularly interested in the ways in which politics both influences and is shaped by cultural and social life, and in the role of the mass media in modern society. Her most recent book, Red Ellen: The Life of Ellen Wilkinson, Socialist, Feminist, Internationalist, a history of Britain’s second female cabinet minister, was awarded the 2017 Stansky award for best book published in the field of modern British history. She is also the author of Your Britain: Media and the Making of the Labour Party, as well as several journal articles and book chapters, and co-edited, with Dr. Geraint Thomas, Brave New World: Imperial and Democratic Nation-Building in Britain between the Wars. She is currently editing the final volume of the new Cambridge History of Britain, covering the period from 1900 through to the present day.

    Gulnaz Sharafutdinova is Professor of Russian Politics, King’s College London. She has recently published The Red Mirror: Putin’s Leadership and Russia’s Insecure Identity (Oxford University Press, 2020) that explores issues of authoritarian legitimation in Russia relying on social identity theory. She currently works on a book The Afterlife of the Soviet Man: Rethinking Homo Sovieticus and conducts research on digital technologies of governance and vaccine hesitancy in the context of authoritarian regimes. Gulnaz holds a PhD from the George Washington University, and speaks fluent Russian, Tatar and English. Gulnaz was born in Tatarstan, Russia, and still keeps tight connections to her homeland.

    Ivan Gomza is Head of Public Policy and Governance Department at Kyiv School of Economics. He holds his Ph.D. in political science. Dr. Gomza was a fellow of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) in 2013, the Fulbright Faculty Development Program in 2016-2017, and Petrach Ukrainian Studies Fellowship in 2022. His scholarly interests comprise democratization, authoritarian regimes, contentious politics, and good governance. Dr. Gomza had his articles published in international academic journals and sits on Communist and Post-Communist Studies journal editorial board. He also authored two books, his most recent title being Republic of Decadent Days: Ideology of French Integral Nationalism under the Third Republic (2021).

    Jan Matti Dollbaum is a postdoctoral researcher at Bremen University, specialising in activism and civil society in Russia. He is also an Associated Junior Fellow at the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (Institute for Advanced Study, HWK) and an affiliated researcher at the Research Centre for East European Studies at the University of Bremen. He is a co-author of Navalny: Putin’s Nemesis, Russia’s Future? (2021).

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Gulnaz Sharafutdinova
    Speaker
    Professor of Russian Politics, King’s College London

    Ivan Gomza
    Speaker
    Head of Public Policy and Governance Department at Kyiv School of Economics

    Jan Matti Dollbaum
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral research fellow at the Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy (SOCIUM) at the University of Bremen

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, CERES, University of Toronto

    Laura Beers
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of History, American University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 20th Ukrainian Cities under Siege: Looking to the Past to Understand the Present

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 20, 202212:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Maria Avdeeva, Research Director at the European Expert Association and security analyst. She focuses on disinformation, information operations, and threats to democracy. Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine she has been documenting Russian war crimes and reporting from the ground on the situation in the besieged city of Kharkiv.

    Nejra Nuna Čengić is a Marie Curie Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Graz, Centre for Southeast European Studies. She holds a PhD in the Anthropology of Everyday Life from AMEU-ISH Ljubljana, Slovenia. Her research interests and work focus on precarious work, gender, memory(-ies), storytelling and war violence. She made a significant contribution to the establishment of the Gender Studies Programme at the University of Sarajevo, where she gained most of her working experience. Her current research project deals with domestic paid female care work.

    Mychailo Wynnyckyj is Associate Professor at the National University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” (Sociology Department and Business School), and is the university’s Academic Development Officer. Until recently he served as Head of the Secretariat of Ukraine’s National Agency for Higher Education Quality Assurance, and prior to that as Advisor to three of Ukraine’s Ministers of Education (2015-2019). Originally from Canada, Mychailo has lived permanently in Kyiv for almost two decades. He was awarded a PhD in 2004 from the University of Cambridge (U.K.). His book “Ukraine’s Maidan, Russia’s War: A Chronicle and Analysis of the Revolution of Dignity” was published in 2019.

    Alexander Watson is Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has written three books and many articles on the First World War, both on its combat operations and on its wider societal impact as a ‘total war’. His most recent major work is The Fortress: The Siege of Przemyśl and the Making of Europe’s Bloodlands (New York: Basic Books, 2020), which explores the Imperial Russian Army’s invasion of what today is western Ukraine and southern Poland and recounts the story of the longest siege of the First World War. Alex’s books have won the U.S. Society for Military History’s Distinguished Book Award (twice), the British Army Military Book of the Year Award, the Fraenkel Prize, the Wolfson History Prize and the Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History.

    Sergii Pakhomenko is Associate Professor of the Department of Political Science and International Relations of Mariupol State University. Sergii’s recent positions include the academic coordinator of the Erasmus+ project “Rethinking Regional Studios: Baltic-Black Sea Communication” and the head of the Center of Baltic-Black Sea Studies of Mariupol State University. Among recent publications are articles “Between History and Propaganda: Estonia and Latvia in Russian Historical Narratives”, “Russian-Ukrainian War in Donbas: History as a Tool of Propaganda,” and in a number of foreign specialized publications – “Securitization of Memory During the Pandemic: Cases of Russia and Latvia,” “Memory Policy in Latvia and Ukraine,” and others. In 2017, Sergii was a recipient of the Ivan Vyhovsky Award from the Institute of Eastern Europe of the University of Warsaw.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Maria Avdeeva
    Speaker
    Research Director at the European Expert Association

    Nejra Čengić
    Speaker
    Marie Curie Postdoctoral fellow at the University of Graz, Centre for Southeast European Studies

    Serhii Parkhomenko
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and International Relations, Mariupol State University

    Alexander Watson
    Speaker
    Professor of History, University of London

    Mychailo Wynnyckyj
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, Kyiv-Mohyla Academy

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, Head of the Petro Jacyk Central and East European Resource Centre, University of Toronto Libraries


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, June 22nd LIVE VIDEO ADDRESS AND Q&A: H.E. VOLODYMYR ZELENSKYY, PRESIDENT OF UKRAINE

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, June 22, 202210:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    H.E. Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the President of Ukraine, will address a student audience at the University of Toronto via a live video link.

    At a June 22 event hosted by U of T President Meric Gertler and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, President Zelenskyy is expected to discuss how Canada – and Canadian universities in particular – can support Ukraine’s fight for survival as Russia’s invasion of the eastern European country nears its fourth month.

    The livstream will be available on the Munk School’s YouTube Channel.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    President Volodymyr Zelenskyy
    Speaker
    President of Ukraine

    The Hon. Chrystia Freeland
    Introduction
    Deputy Prime Minister of Canada

    President Meric Gertler
    Opening Remarks
    President of University of Toronto

    Professor Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Sponsors

    University of Toronto

    Munk School of Global Afairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 28th The Russo-Ukrainian War: Where Things Stand. A Conversation with Professors Maria Popova and Oxana Shevel

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 28, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Professor Shevel’s research and teaching focus on the post-Communist region surrounding Russia, and issues such as nation- and state-building, the politics of citizenship and migration, memory and religious politics, and challenges to democratization in the post-Soviet region. She is the author of Migration, Refugee Policy, and State Building in Postcommunist Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2011), which examines how the politics of national identity and strategies of the UNHCR shape refugee admission policies in the post-Communist region, leading countries to be more or less receptive to refugees. The book won the American Association of Ukrainian Studies (AAUS) 2012 book prize. Professor Shevel’s current research projects examine the sources of citizenship policies in the post-Communist states; church-state relations in Ukraine; the origins of separatist conflict in Donbas; and memory politics in post-Soviet Ukraine. Her research has appeared in a variety of journals, including Comparative Politics, Current History, East European Politics and Societies, Europe-Asia Studies, Geopolitics, Nationality Papers, Post-Soviet Affairs, Political Science Quarterly, Slavic Review and in edited volumes.

    Maria Popova is Jean Monnet Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. Her work explores the intersection of politics and law in the post-Communist region, specifically the rule of law, judicial reform, political corruption, populist parties, and legal repression of dissent. Prof Popova’s book, Politicized Justice in Emerging Democracies (Cambridge UP, 2012), won the American Association for Ukrainian Studies prize for best book in the fields of Ukrainian history, politics, language, literature and culture. Her recent projects include work on post-Maidan judicial reform, the politics of corruption prosecutions in Eastern Europe, and the effects of conspiracy theories on democratic backsliding. Some of her research is broadly interdisciplinary and has appeared in volumes edited by historians, sociologists, and legal scholars. Prof. Popova holds a BA in Government and Spanish from Dartmouth College, and an MA and PhD in Government from Harvard University.

    Way’s research focuses on democratization and authoritarianism in the former Soviet Union and the developing world. His most recent book (with Steven Levitsky), Social Revolution and Authoritarian Durability in the Modern World (forthcoming Princeton University Press) provides a comparative historical explanation of the extraordinary durability of autocracies born of violent social revolution. Professor Way’s solo authored book, Pluralism by Default: Weak Autocrats and the Rise of Competitive Politics (Johns Hopkins, 2015), examines the sources of political competition in the former Soviet Union. His book, Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (with Steven Levitsky), was published in 2010 by Cambridge University Press. Way’s work on competitive authoritarianism has been cited thousands of times and helped stimulate new and wide-ranging research into the dynamics of hybrid democratic-authoritarian rule.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Maria Popova
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Jean Monnet Chair, McGill

    Oxana Shevel
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Tufts University

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, co-Director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, CERES


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


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