« June 2020 - August 2020 September 2020 - Present

September 2020

  • Friday, September 4th Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 4, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    Professor Naoki Sakai’s Distinguished Lecture on “Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity” is the inaugural event for the JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 on “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics.” The respondent is Professor Takashi Fujitani from the University of Toronto.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________________

    Naoki Sakai teaches in the departments of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies and is a member of the graduate field of History at Cornell University. He has published in a number of languages in the fields of comparative literature, intellectual history, translation studies, the studies of racism and nationalism, and the histories of semiotic and literary multitude – speech, writing, corporeal expressions, calligraphic regimes, and phonographic traditions.

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). Much of his past and current research has centred on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Elizabeth Wijaya works at the intersection of cinema, philosophy, and area studies. She is especially interested in the material and symbolic entanglements between East Asia and Southeast Asia cinema. Her work emphasizes a multimethodological approach, which is attentive to media forms, ethnographic detail, material realities, archival practices, international networks, and interdisciplinary modes of theorization. For 2020-2021, she is the convenor of “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics,” JHI-UTM Seminar.


    Speakers

    Naoki Sakai
    Speaker
    Goldwin Smith Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

    Takashi Fujitani
    Respondent
    Professor, Department of History and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institue

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 10th Book launch for "Might Nature Be Canadian? Essays on Mutual Accommodation", by William A. Macdonald

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 10, 20209:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    To mark the publication of William A. Macdonald’s “Might Nature Be Canadian? Essays on Mutual Accommodation”, Trent University’s School for the Study of Canada, the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, and William A. Macdonald are sponsoring a webinar on mutual accommodation in both national and international affairs, featuring Martin Wolf, Thomas Mulcair, Margaret MacMillan, David Walmsley, and Shawn and Heather Atleo, with Heather Nicol and the Hon. Bill Graham.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 10th A City for All: Achieving More Inclusive Municipal Governance in Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 10, 20204:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Over the last several months, Toronto’s fissures and inequalities have been put on display. Protests against police brutality and anti-Black and anti-Indigenous racism have once again highlighted the systemic racism that undergirds many of the city’s key institutions, all while COVID-19 has disproportionately affected racialized residents.

    These events have sparked many important conversations about policy gaps, such as the need for more race-based data, and policy solutions, such as calls to defund the police. They have also underlined what Brittany Andrew-Amofah, Alexandra Flynn, and Patricia Wood have called “the democratic deficits in local decision-making” – the fact that, too often, those most affected by policy changes, most dependent on public services, or most vulnerable to abuse and racism, are those least heard when decisions get made.

    What changes need to be made to ensure all Torontonians are meaningfully engaged in the City’s decision making? How can the voices of racialized, newcomer, and Indigenous residents be firmly integrated into the City’s governance structures? On September 10, this panel will explore these questions and examine how Toronto can begin to address its divisions and build toward a more inclusive future.

    Speakers
    Heather Dorries is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto where she is cross-appointed to the Department of Geography and Planning and Centre for Indigenous Studies. Her research is focused on the relationship between urban planning and settler colonialism, as well as the application of Indigenous knowledge systems in planning contexts. She is currently revising her book manuscript Planning the End of the World: Indigenist Planning Theory and the Art of Refusal, and is co-editor of the collection Settler City Limits: Indigenous Resurgence and Settler Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West (University of Manitoba Press 2019).

    Anthony Morgan is a lawyer and the Manager of the City of Toronto’s Confronting Anti-Black Racism (CABR) Unit. The CABR Unit is responsible for the implementation of the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism. Prior to joining the City, Anthony was an Associate at Falconers LLP, specializing in the areas of civil, constitutional and criminal state accountability litigation. He has a special interest in anti-racist human rights advocacy, particularly in the area of anti-Black racism.

    Devika Shah is passionate about building a civic society that is grounded in diversity, equity, social and economic justice, and active democratic engagement. Her interdisciplinary background and experience in the non-profit sector has strengthened her commitment to advancing grassroots, community-led, multi-stakeholder solutions, which she views as the most powerful lever for achieving systems change. Devika is currently Executive Director of Social Planning Toronto and has held past positions with the World Wildlife Fund Canada, Pembina Institute, York University, and KCI Philanthropy.

    Patricia Wood is is Professor of Geography at York University and a co-founder of its City Institute. With Alexandra Flynn (Allard School of Law, UBC), she is conducting international comparative research into urban governance, and public consultation about the future of Toronto’s governance structures. She is the author of Citizenship, Activism and the City: the Invisible and the Impossible (Routledge 2017). She also writes an urban affairs column for Spacing.ca.

    Moderator:
    Brittany Andrew-Amofah is a public policy professional based in Toronto. She is currently the Senior Policy and Research Analyst at the Broadbent Institute, where she is responsible for assisting with setting the research and policy direction of the organization, and managing the Broadbent Institute’s Fellow Program. Prior to joining the Broadbent Institute, Brittany was on the policy team at the Maytree Foundation where her work focused on researching various poverty reduction strategies. She is also a former Program Manager at Harmony Movement, where she delivered diversity, equity and anti-racism training to students, educators and non-profits across Ontario.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th Book Launch – Private Governance and Public Authority

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab invites you to the launch of Stefan Renckens’ new book, Private Governance and Public Authority!

    At a time of significant concern about the sustainability of the global economy, businesses are eager to display responsible corporate practices. While rulemaking for these practices was once the prerogative of states, businesses and civil society actors are increasingly engaged in creating private rulemaking instruments, such as eco-labeling and certification schemes, to govern corporate behavior. When does a public authority intervene in such private governance and reassert the primacy of public policy? Renckens develops a new theory of public-private regulatory interactions and argues that when and how a public authority intervenes in private governance depends on the economic benefits to domestic producers that such intervention generates and the degree of fragmentation of private governance schemes. Drawing on European Union policymaking on organic agriculture, biofuels, fisheries, and fair trade, he exposes the political-economic conflicts between private and public rule makers and the strategic nature of regulating sustainability in a global economy.

    Opening remarks by Margaret Kohn, Professor, and Chair of the Department of Political Science in the University of Toronto at Scarborough

    Discussants:

    Graeme Auld, Professor, and Director of the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carlton University

    Jessica Green, Associate Professor, Political Science and School of the Environment at the University of Toronto

    Moderator: Matthew Hoffmann, Professor, Political Science and Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab at the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20202:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pan-Asian Seminar Series: The Political Life of Information

    Description

    “The Political Life of Information” series at the Asian Institute brings together scholars, activists, artists, and other practitioners to reflect on practices of surveillance, data visualization, population management and identification, news and journalism, and the social aspects of algorithms from a perspective based in Asia, but speaking to a broad audience interested in the political ramifications of media and information technology.

    As our inaugural event, Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance will consist of a panel of three experts who will speak about the socio-technical dimensions of digital spying and the contested sphere of privacy shaping contemporary activism and journalism in Asia. Speakers will focus on counter-surveillance work done at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, and how this research and public outreach has been engaged by privacy and free speech advocates.
    _______________________________

    Chinmayi Arun is a resident fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and an affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society at Harvard University. She has served on the faculties of two of the most highly regarded law schools in India from 2010 onwards, and was the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi. Chinmayi has been consultant to the Law Commission of India and member of the Indian government’s multi stakeholder advisory group for the India Internet Governance Forum in the past.

    Irene Poetranto is a Senior Researcher for The Citizen Lab and a Doctoral Student in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interest is on cybersecurity policy development in the Global South, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. She obtained her Master’s degree in Political Science and Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto, and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

    John Scott-Railton is a Senior Researcher at the Citizen Lab, University of Toronto. His work focuses on technological threats to civil society, including targeted malware operations and online disinformation. His greatest hits include a collaboration with colleague Bill Marczak that uncovered the first iPhone zero-day and remote jailbreak seen in the wild, as well as the use of NSO Group’s Pegasus spyware to human rights defenders, journalists, and opposition movements around the globe. Other investigations with Citizen Lab colleagues include the first report of ISIS-led malware operations, and China’s “Great Cannon,” the Government of China’s nation-scale DDoS attack. John has also investigated Russian and Iranian disinformation campaigns, and the manipulation of news aggregators such as Google News. John has been a fellow at Google Ideas and Jigsaw at Alphabet. He graduated with a University of Chicago and a Masters from the University of Michigan. He is completing a PhD at UCLA. Previously he founded The Voices Projects, collaborative information feeds that bypassed internet shutdowns in Libya and Egypt.


    Speakers

    Chinmayi Arun
    Speaker
    Resident Fellow of the Information Society Project, Yale Law School; affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society, Harvard University; the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance, National Law University Delhi

    Irene Poetranto
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    John Scott-Railton
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology (UTM)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Transnational Solidarities / Complicities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    “Transnational Solidarities/Complicities” is the second lecture for the Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics, JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________

    Nadine Chan, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University
    “Asynchronicity and the Time-Lagged Medium: Racializing Space-Time in the Colonial Documentaries of British Malaya.”

    Ryan A. Buyco, Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College
    “Navigating Asian Settler Colonialism: Okinawa-Hawai’i Connections through the Works of Laura Kina and Lee A. Tonouchi.”

    Cheryl Suzack, Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto
    “Indigenous-Feminist Political Imaginaries in Four Settler-Colonial Countries.”

    Jessica Harris, Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University
    “African-American Women and Love, Italian Style in 20th and 21st Century Media.”

    Moderator: Kun Huang, PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Speakers

    Nadine Chan
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University

    Ryan A. Buyco
    Speaker
    Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College

    Cheryl Suzack
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto

    Jessica Harris
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University

    Kun Huang
    Moderator
    PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 22nd Has the pandemic disrupted carbon lock-in?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 22, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab invites you to join the panel discussion in the first pre-symposium webinar on carbon-lock in during COVID
    About this Event
    Early optimism that the pandemic lockdowns would significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions and disrupt the world’s reliance on fossil energy has started to fade. Our panelists will discuss what impact the pandemic has had on carbon lock-in, what exactly has and has not changed, and whether these changes are likely to endure.

    Panelists:

    Samantha Gross, Director of Energy Security and Climate Initiative at Brookings
    Professor Jonas Nahm, Assistant Professor of Energy, Resources, and Environment at Johns Hopkins University
    Professor Piers Forster, Professor of Climate Physics at University of Leeds


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 23rd Engendering History: Gender, Sexuality, and Love in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 23, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Ashley Thompson suggests an engendering of history that bears “the potential to make history, literally and figuratively, insofar as it threatens or promises to upset established notions of the field” (2008:106). This panel takes up Thompson’s call to engender history and interrogates dominant conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love in modern Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. From texts to textiles, classrooms to forests, and wedding photos to state records, the papers focus on particular spaces and materials that vibrated with social and political intensities through the long period of the Cold War in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. The panel shows how materiality and spatiality were key aspects that shaped the ideological extremes that manifested in violence and unrest in Southeast Asia, and the panel begins its inquiries in the 1950s.

    Alexandra Dalferro – “Weaving Queer Pasts and Futures in Thailand”

    Chairat Polmuk – “Of Eros and the Forest: The Topography of Love in Lao Revolutionary Literature”

    Catriona Miller – “Sewing Patterns and Visions of Democracy: Khmer Women Organizing during Decolonization (1948 – 1952)”

    ___________________

    ALEXANDRA DALFERRO is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University. She is currently writing her dissertation about the politics and practices of sericulture and silk weaving in Surin, Thailand, and she pays particular attention to the sensory and affective dimensions of these processes. Her fieldwork was supported by the Wenner Gren Foundation and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program, and for the 2019-2020 academic year, she was a Mellon Graduate Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell. Alexandra likes to weave and to sew and to think about how craft and art intersect with daily life.

    CHAIRAT POLMUK teaches Southeast Asian languages and literature, cultural theory, and media studies at the Department of Thai, Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He received a PhD in Asian Literature, Religion, and Culture from Cornell in 2018. His doctoral project titled, “Atmospheric Archives: Post-Cold War Affect and the Buddhist Temporal Imagination in Southeast Asian Literature and Visual Culture,” received the 2018 Lauriston Sharp Prize for best dissertation.

    CATRIONA MILLER is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Her dissertation, Gendering the Cambodian State (1900 – 1970) utilizes transnational feminist methods to recast the political history of Cambodia during the transition from a French Protectorate to a neutral Buddhist nation-state. She conducted this research with generous funding from the NSEP Boren Fellowship and Center for Khmer Studies Fellowship.

    ARNIKA FUHRMANN is an interdisciplinary scholar of Southeast Asia, working at the intersections of the region’s aesthetic, religious, and political modernities. She is an associate professor of Asian Studies at Cornell University and the author of Ghostly Desires: Queer Sexuality and Vernacular Buddhism in Contemporary Thai Cinema (Duke University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Alexandra Dalferro
    Panelist
    Phd Candidate, Cornell University

    Chairat Polmuk
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Chulalongkorn University

    Catriona Miller
    Panelist
    PhD Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cornell University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Book Launch of On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 202012:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *Please RSVP to Grayson Lee at grayson.lee@utoronto.ca to receive the Zoom link*

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis features a set of ethnographic works from the peripheries of urban, regional, and transnational development in South Korea, and discusses the ways in which places can be studied in an increasingly globalized world. Engaging with the ideas of “core location,” a term coined by Baik Young-seo, and “Asia as method,” a concept with a century-old intellectual lineage in East Asia, the book explores relational understandings of place as a constellation of local and global forces and processes that interact and contradict with each other in particular ways. Each chapter also explores multiple modes of urban marginality and discusses how understanding them shapes the methods of academic praxis to further social justice causes and decolonialized scholarship. This book is the outcome of several years of interdisciplinary collaborations and dialogues among scholars based in geography, architecture, anthropology, and urban politics.

    On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis is available for purchase from the University of Toronto Press. Please use the following promocode: UTPLAUNCH10

    For any inquiries, please email Professor Jesook Song at jesook.song@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Hyun Ok Park
    Opening Remarks
    Sociology, York University

    Hyun Gyung Kim
    Discussant
    Institute of Korean Studies, Freie Universität Berlin

    Albert Park
    Discussant
    History, Claremont McKenna College

    Hyun Bang Shin
    Discussant
    Geography and Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science

    Alan Smart
    Discussant
    Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

    Jesook Song (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Laam Hae (co-editor)
    Speaker
    Politics, York University

    Sujin Eom (contributor)
    Speaker
    Geography, Dartmouth College

    Hyeseon Jeong (contributor)
    Speaker
    School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle and Migrant Workers Centre, Victorian Trades Hall Council, Australia

    You Jeong Oh (contributor)
    Speaker
    Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin

    Seo Young Park (contributor)
    Speaker
    Anthropology, Scripps College

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea and Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 25th Global and Diasporic Military Medicine in the Republic of China, 1946 - 1970

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 25, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This presentation argues that the global connections and medical culture forged by diasporic WWII medical personnel was central to the survival, growth, and centrality of military medicine in postwar China and Taiwan. Established in post-war Shanghai in 1946 from a military medical complex during World War II, the main military medical institution (National Defense Medical Center NDMC) faced existential threat when its primary source of financial and logistical support from the Chinese diaspora and American aid organizations shriveled up. As the only medical center to move from China to Taiwan in 1949, the NDMC faced an uncertain future on the island. In the mid-1950s, the NDMC’s personnel developed an elaborate Cold War vision of NDMC as a center for training anti-Communist Overseas Chinese students. This vision persuaded the U.S. government to financially support the NDMC in the mid-1950s, enabling the center to become one of the three leading medical colleges on the island today. The center’s philosophy of fusing medical therapy, training, and ideology played a unique role in shaping Taiwan’s exemplary universal health care system, and left an important legacy in its fight against SARS and COVID-19.
    ______________________

    WAYNE SOON (PhD Princeton) is an Assistant Professor of History at Vassar College. He researches on how international ideas and practices of medicine, institution-building, and diaspora have shaped Chinese East Asia’s interaction with its people and the world in the twentieth century. His forthcoming book, Global Medicine in China: a Diasporic History (Stanford University Press), tells the global health histories of Chinese East Asia through the lens of diasporic medical personnel. The book argues that the Overseas Chinese were central in introducing new practices of military medicine, blood banking, mobile medicine, and mass medical training to China and Taiwan. Universal care, practical medical education, and mobile medicine are all lasting legacies of this effort on both sides of the Taiwan Straits. Dr Soon’s published and forthcoming articles can be found in Twentieth Century China, Bulletin of the History of Medicine, American Journal of Chinese Studies, and East Asian Science, Technology and Society: An International Journal.

    SHELLY CHAN is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a historian of modern China and the Chinese diaspora and the author of Diaspora’s Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration. This recent book was published by Duke University Press in 2018 and shortlisted for the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) Humanities Book Prize. Chan’s new research focuses on the history of “homegoings” involving China, Taiwan, and the diaspora in the Cold War, as well as the historical geography of Nanyang (the South Seas) in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Chan received her Ph.D. from UC Santa Cruz and taught at the University of Victoria (2009-11) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2011-20) before returning this year to her Ph.D. alma mater as a faculty member.


    Speakers

    Wayne Soon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, Vassar College

    Shelly Chan
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of History, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 29th 2020 Presidential Debate Watch Party - First Presidential Debate: President Trump and Former Vice President Joe Biden

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 29, 20208:30PM - 10:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of the United States and Visiting Professor, Sam Tanenhaus, for a virtual watch party of the First 2020 Presidential Debate between President Trump and Former Vice President Joe Biden!

    DOORS OPEN AT 8:45PM, WITH DEBATE BEGINNING AT 9:00PM.

    The Centre for the Study of the United States is committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all participants at its webinars. As this debate is among the most contentious in recent history, opinions and sentiments may be intense. Please avoid any inappropriate language, harmful or threatening speech, or any other disruptive behaviour during the event. Regretfully, unacceptable conduct may lead to removal from the event and restrictions on participating in future Munk School webinars and events. Excitement, outrage, disappointment and amusement are all absolutely acceptable; rudeness, obscenity, and name calling are not. Please enjoy yourself, but please be civil.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Sam Tanenhaus
    Moderator
    Visiting Professor, Centre for the Study of the United States

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 30th The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, The Factory and The Future of the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 30, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    As discussed in his new book The Myth of Chinese Capitalism, Dexter Roberts will describe how surging income inequality, an unfair social welfare system, and rising social tensions block China’s continued economic rise with implications for companies and countries around the world. He will discuss how China is struggling to leave behind its “Factory to the World” growth model, and include its hundreds of millions of left-behind migrant workers into a more innovative, consumption-driven economy and why that means China may not become the superpower the world expects. He will also discuss how COVID-19 has exacerbated the already huge social disparities in China further complicating its ongoing economic transition and putting it at risk of falling into the middle income trap. And he will discuss how global supply chain diversification is affecting China and whether a change in U.S. presidents is likely to do anything to reduce the growing tensions between Washington and Beijing.
    ________________

    Dexter Tiff Roberts is an award-winning writer and speaker on China now serving as a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative and an adjunct instructor in political science at the University of Montana as well as a Fellow at the university’s Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center. Previously he was China bureau chief and Asia News Editor at Bloomberg Businessweek, based in Beijing for more than two decades. He has reported from all of China’s provinces and regions including Tibet and Xinjiang, covering the rise of companies and entrepreneurs, manufacturing and migrants, demography and civil society. He has also reported from North Korea, Mongolia and Cambodia, on China’s growing economic and political influence. Roberts’ first book, The Myth of Chinese Capitalism: The Worker, the Factory, and the Future of the World, was published by St. Martin’s Press in March 2020 and he created and now publishes a weekly newsletter called Trade War. He has a BA in Political Science from Stanford University and Master of International Affairs from Columbia University and studied Mandarin Chinese at Taiwan Normal University.


    Speakers

    Dexter Tiff Roberts
    Speaker
    Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council Asia Security Initiative; Adjunct Instructor in Political Science, University of Montana

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2020

  • Thursday, October 1st Book Launch "War: How Conflict Shaped Us" by Margaret MacMillan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    From the bestselling author of Paris 1919 comes a provocative view of war as an essential component of humanity and our history. Is peace an aberration?

    The instinct to fight may be innate in human nature, but war—organized violence—comes with organized society. War has shaped humanity’s history, its social and political institutions, its values and ideas. Our very language, our public spaces, our private memories, and some of our greatest cultural treasures reflect the glory and the misery of war. War is an uncomfortable and challenging subject not least because it brings out both the vilest and the noblest aspects of humanity.

    Margaret MacMillan looks at the ways in which war has influenced human society and how, in turn, changes in political organization, technology, or ideologies have affected how and why we fight. War: How Conflict Shaped Us explores such much-debated and controversial questions as: When did war first start? Does human nature doom us to fight one another? Why has war been described as the most organized of all human activities? Why are warriors almost always men? Is war ever within our control?

    Drawing on lessons from wars throughout the past, from classical history to the present day, MacMillan reveals the many faces of war—the way it has determined our past, our future, our views of the world, and our very conception of ourselves.

    Margaret MacMillan was educated at the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford. She was a member of Ryerson University’s History Department for 25 years, Provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto from 2002 to 2007 and Warden of St Antony’s College and Professor of International History, University of Oxford from 2007 to 2017. She is a Professor of History, University of Toronto, the Xerox Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 1st A Thousand Cuts: On Media, Policing, and Authoritarian Brutality

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 1, 20208:00PM - 10:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Following an online screening of Ramona Diaz’s film A Thousand Cuts (2020), please join us for a panel featuring Maria Ressa (Rappler), Jinee Lokaneeta (Drew University), Gina Dent (UCSC), moderated by Neferti Tadiar (Barnard College). A Thousand Cuts focuses on the current effects of Rodrigo Duterte’s infamous “war on drugs” and the shutting down of independent news outlets as well as the arrest, detention, threats and humiliation of journalists, including Maria Ressa. This post-screening panel focuses on policing, state violence, and how the media and ideological landscapes enable populism and authoritarianism across the Philippines, U.S. and India. The discussion also serves as the staging ground for transnational forms of creativity, solidarity, and resistance.


    Speakers

    Maria Angelita Ressa
    Speaker
    a Filipino-American journalist and author, best known for co-founding Rappler as its chief executive officer

    Jinee Lokaneeta
    Speaker
    Professor in Political Science and International Relations, Drew University

    Gina Dent
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Legal Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Neferti Xina M. Tadiar
    Moderator
    Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, Columbia University.


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Cornell Southeast Asia Program

    Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department, Barnard College

    Global Asias Faculty Collaborative, Rutgers University

    Rutgers Global

    UCLA Department of Asian American Studies

    UCLA Asian American Studies Center

    UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 2nd The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 202010:30AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Eurasia Initiative

    Description

    Professor Cameron’s talk examines a neglected episode of Stalinist social engineering, the Kazakh famine of 1930-33, which led to the death of more than 1.5 million people. She finds that through the most violent means the Kazakh famine created Soviet Kazakhstan and forged a new Kazakh national identity. More broadly, she argues that the case of the Kazakh famine overturns several assumptions about violence, modernization, and nation-making under Stalin.

    Sarah Cameron is associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan (Cornell, 2018), which has won four book awards and two honorable mentions.


    Speakers

    Prof. Sarah Cameron
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History - University of Maryland, College Park

    Prof. Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Acting Director, CERES



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 2nd 30 YEARS OF GERMAN UNITY AND CANADIAN PARTNERSHIP: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 2, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On October 3, 1990 the two Germanys were united again after having been divided for 28 years by barbed wires, landmines, fences and the Berlin Wall.
    As we reflect on 30 years of German unity, we are reminded of an era in which a peaceful revolution tore down the Berlin Wall and swept away the repressive East German regime. It was a time that sparked astonishingly rapid progress, as the member states of NATO and the Warsaw Pact engaged in negotiations on peace and security, disarmament, confidence building, and détente.
    German unity was made possible through the support of our allies; indeed, it could not have been achieved without those allies’ commitment to multilateralism and cooperation within a rules-based order. An often overlooked aspect of this transformation is the crucial role that Canada played in shoring up international support for a reunited Germany.

    Join us for an online event on Friday, 2 October, featuring former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney in conversation with Peter Mansbridge and a panel discussion with Senator Ratna Omidvar and political scientist Alexander Reisenbichler. Our distinguished speakers will look back on a time full of hope and promise – and look forward to how Canada and Germany jointly can make a difference in today’s more polarized world.

    Participants
    • The Right Honourable Brian Mulroney, PC CC QOC, former Prime Minister of Canada
    • Peter Mansbridge, OC, former Chief Correspondent, CBC News (Moderator)
    • The Honourable Ratna Omidvar, CM Oont, Independent Senator for Ontario
    • Alexander Reisenbichler, assistant professor of political science and research coordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES) at the Munk School, University of Toronto
    With remarks by
    • Michael Sabia, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    • Sabine Sparwasser, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Canada

    Peter Mansbridge is one of Canada’s most respected and recognizable figures. For five decades, including 30 years as anchor of CBC’s The National, Peter guided Canadians through the political, economic, and cultural events that have shaped the country.
    Known for his trademark voice and unflappable on-screen presence, Peter has received over a dozen national awards for broadcast excellence, including a lifetime achievement award from the Academy of Canadian Screen and Television, where his acceptance speech gave a passionate defence of good journalism and the principle it stands for: the truth.
    Away from the news desk, he has been recognized by leading universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, and, of course, Canada. He has received 13 honorary doctorates, has been a Fellow at Yale, has lectured at Oxford, and has just finished two terms as Chancellor of Mount Allison University. He is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal and is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Brian Mulroney became Canada’s eighteenth Prime Minister in 1984, after leading the Progressive Conservative party to the largest victory in Canadian history. Re-elected four years later, he became the first Canadian Prime Minister in 35 years to win successive majority governments.
    His tenure as Prime Minister was marked by the introduction of bold new initiatives such as the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Canada-US Acid Rain Treaty and the Canada-US Arctic Cooperation Agreement, a wave of privatizations, a low inflation policy, historic tax reform, extensive deregulation, and expenditure reduction policies that continue to be the basis of Canada’s impressive economic performance today.
    Prime Minister Mulroney served as Co-Chairman of the United Nations World Summit for Children, and his government played leading roles in the campaign against apartheid in South Africa, the creation of Le Sommet de la Francophonie, the Reunification of Germany, and the first Gulf War.
    He has been awarded the honor of Companion of the Order of Canada and has received the highest recognition from numerous governments for his leadership in vital matters affecting those nations. He has also been presented with honorary degrees and awards from universities and governments at home and abroad.
    Upon resigning, Mr. Mulroney rejoined the Montreal law firm of Norton Rose Fulbright as Senior Partner.

    Ratna Omidvar is an internationally recognized voice on migration, diversity and inclusion. In April 2016, Ms. Omidvar was appointed to the Senate of Canada as an independent Senator representing Ontario. As a member of the Senate’s Independent Senators Group, she holds a leadership position as Liaison.
    Senator Omidvar is a Councillor on the World Refugee Council, a Director at the Samara Centre for Democracy, and Chair Emerita for the Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council.
    Senator Omidvar was appointed to the Order of Ontario in 2005 and became a Member of the Order of Canada in 2011, with both honours recognizing her advocacy work on behalf of immigrants and devotion to reducing inequality in Canada. In 2014, Senator Omidvar received the Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in recognition of her contribution to the advancement of German-Canadian relations.

    Alexander Reisenbichler is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto and research coordinator of the Joint Initiative in German and European Studies (JIGES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. He will be a John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellow at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University in 2021–22. His work explores the politics of housing, financial, and labour markets in advanced economies, with regional specializations in Western Europe and the United States. His current research investigates the political economy of housing capitalism in the United States and Germany from a comparative, historical perspective. His work has appeared in Politics & Society, the Review of International Political Economy, West European Politics, and Foreign Affairs. Prof. Reisenbichler received his doctorate from The George Washington University and undergraduate degree from the University of Leipzig.

    Michael Sabia is the Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto. From March 2009 to January 2020, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec (CDPQ), where he oversaw the organization’s strategic direction and global growth.
    Before joining CDPQ, Mr. Sabia held numerous senior positions with BCE, including President and Chief Executive Officer, Executive Vice-President, and Chief Operating Officer as well as Chief Executive Officer of Bell Canada International. From 1993 to 1999, he occupied various roles with Canadian National Railway, including Chief Financial Officer. He spent the preceding decade working as a senior official in the Government of Canada, as the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet and in senior positions in the Department of Finance.
    Mr. Sabia earned a bachelor of arts in economics and politics from the University of Toronto and holds graduate degrees in economics and politics from Yale University.
    In April 2020, Mr. Sabia was appointed as Chair of the Board of the Canada Infrastructure Bank. He serves as a member of the Canadian government’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth. He is a trustee of the Foreign Policy Association of New York and a member of the Canada-Mexico Leadership Group and the Asia Business Leaders Advisory Council.
    Mr. Sabia was appointed to the board of the Mastercard Foundation in June 2020. He is committed to community involvement and recently co-chaired the capital campaigns of Université de Montréal, Polytechnique Montréal, and HEC Montréal. Mr. Sabia is an Officer of the Order of Canada.

    Sabine Sparwasser studied political science with a focus on foreign relations at the Institut d’études politiques in Paris following her studies of German, French, and English literature and linguistics at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. Before embarking on her diplomatic career, she worked as a freelance journalist for German television and was Research Assistant on European integration to Prof. Joseph Rovan in Paris.
    Sabine Sparwasser has been posted to the German EC Representation in Brussels as well as the German Embassies in London and San José. She also served as Consul General in Toronto. At the German Federal Foreign Office headquarters, she held various positions in the press, public relations, and political sections before assuming the role of Deputy Spokesperson. She later served as Director of the Middle East and Maghreb Division and as Head of the Foreign Service Academy. Before coming to Canada, she was Assistant Deputy Minister for Africa, Asia, Latin America, Near and Middle East as well as Germany’s Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    Sabine Sparwasser has been Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Canada since 2017. She is married to Gary Soroka, a former Canadian diplomat, and has two children.

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Embassy and Consulates of the Federal Republic of Germany in Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 6th Book Launch: Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping The Future, by John Stackhouse

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 6, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for a virtual discussion with Munk School Director, Michael Sabia, in conversation with John Stackhouse, on the release of his new book ‘Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping The Future.’

    A leading thinker on Canada’s place in the world contends that our country’s greatest untapped resource may be the three million Canadians who don’t live here.

    Entrepreneurs, educators, humanitarians: an entire province’s worth of Canadian citizens live outside Canada. Some will return, others won’t. But what they all share is the ability, and often the desire, to export Canadian values to a world sorely in need of them. And to act as ambassadors for Canada in industries and societies where diplomatic efforts find little traction. Surely a country with people as diverse as Canada’s ought to plug itself into every corner of the globe. We don’t, and sometimes not even when our expats are eager to help.

    Failing to put this desire to work, contends bestselling author and longtime foreign correspondent John Stackhouse, is a grave error for a small country whose voice is getting lost behind developing nations of rapidly increasing influence. The soft power we once boasted is getting softer, but we have an unparalleled resource, if we choose to use it. To ensure Canada’s place in the world, Stackhouse argues in Planet Canada, we need this exceptional province of expats and their special claim on the twenty-first century.

    Bio:

    As Senior Vice-President in the Office of the CEO at Royal Bank of Canada, John Stackhouse is adviser to the executive leadership team and board of directors on economic, political and social affairs, and a champion for the bank on public policy. Before joining RBC in January 2015, Stackhouse was editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail, and led the news organization through the launch of a paid website, mobile apps and a historic redesign of the newspaper. He was previously the Globe’s business editor, foreign editor and, for seven years, a foreign correspondent based in New Delhi, India. His reporting won five National Newspaper Awards. He is a senior fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto, and the C.D. Howe Institute, and serves on the boards of Saint Elizabeth Health Care and World Literacy Canada.


    Speakers

    John Stackhouse
    Speaker
    Author, Senior Vice-President, Office of the CEO, Royal Bank of Canada and Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Michael Sabia
    Moderator
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 6th IN CONVERSATION WITH MINISTER AUDREY TANG: Digital Democracy and a Global Pandemic: Lessons from Taiwan's COVID-19 Response

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 6, 20207:30PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Taiwan has been a global leader in managing the response to COVID-19. Join us as we welcome the Honorable Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s Digital Minister, to discuss her insights on the role of innovation and digital governance in addressing the global pandemic.

    Co-hosted by the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, the Rotman School of Management, the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, this conversation will be moderated by Professor Peter Loewen, the Munk School’s Associate Director, Global Engagement, with opening remarks by Professor Joseph Wong, Ralph and Roz Professorship of Innovation at the Munk School and U of T’s Vice President, International.

    This virtual event is sponsored by the David Peterson Program in Public Sector Leadership Lecture Series, which welcomes leading policy thinkers and practitioners across the public sector, politics, business, and the media to the University to examine pressing issues. The David Peterson Program in Public Sector Leadership was established through the extraordinary generosity of The Hon. David Peterson, former premier of Ontario, U of T Chancellor Emeritus and Faculty of Law alumnus, and Shelley Peterson.


    Speakers

    The Honourable Audrey Tang
    Taiwan's Digital Minister


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Rotman School of Management

    Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 7th 2020 Vice Presidential Debate Watch Party: Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 7, 20208:45PM - 10:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of the United States and Professor Alexandra Rahr for a virtual watch party of the Vice Presidential Debate between Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris!

    The Centre for the Study of the United States is committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all participants at its webinars. As this debate is among the most contentious in recent history, opinions and sentiments may be intense. Please avoid any inappropriate language, harmful or threatening speech, or any other disruptive behaviour during the event. Regretfully, unacceptable conduct may lead to removal from the event and restrictions on participating in future Munk School webinars and events. Excitement, outrage, disappointment and amusement are all absolutely acceptable; rudeness, obscenity, and name calling are not. Please enjoy yourself, but please be civil.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Alexandra Rahr
    Moderator
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 8th "The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan” - Book Talk by Tobias S. Harris

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 8, 20209:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Global Japan will be joined by Adam Liff, Director of the 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative at Indiana University’s Hamilton Lugar School, and invite Tobias S. Harris to introduce his new book, ‘The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan.’

    Book Description:
    Shinzō Abe entered politics burdened by high expectations: that he would change Japan. In 2007, seemingly overwhelmed, he resigned after only a year as prime minister. Yet, following five years of reinvention, he masterfully regained the premiership in 2012, and for almost eight years dominated Japanese democracy as no leader has done before.
    Abe inspired fierce loyalty among his followers, sidelining rivals with his ambitious economic programme and support for the security and armed forces. He staked a leadership role for Japan in a region being rapidly transformed by the rise of China and India, while carefully preserving an ironclad relationship with Trump’s America.
    ‘The Iconoclast’ tells the story of Abe’s meteoric rise and stunning fall, his remarkable comeback, and his unlikely emergence as a global statesman laying the groundwork for Japan’s survival in a turbulent century.

    Speaker Bio:
    Tobias Harris is an expert on Japanese politics, and the author of “The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan,” the first English-language biography of Japan’s longest-serving prime minister.

    From 2006-2007 Tobias worked on the staff of Keiichiro Asao, at that time a member of the upper house of the Japanese Diet and shadow foreign minister for the Democratic Party of Japan, for whom he conducted research on foreign policy and Japan’s relations with the United States. He earned an MPhil in International Relations from the University of Cambridge and a bachelor’s degree in Politics and History from Brandeis University. Tobias has also conducted graduate research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and, from 2011-2012, at the Institute for Social Science at the University of Tokyo as a Fulbright scholar.

    Tobias has written about Japanese politics for publications including the Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Affairs and regularly provides on-air analysis for CNBC, Bloomberg, and other networks. He was the Fellow for Economy, Trade, and Business at Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA from 2014-2020.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Tobias Harris
    Speaker
    Teneo Intelligence

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Adam Liff
    Moderator
    Director, 21st Century Japan Politics & Society Initiative (21JPSI), Indiana University Hamilton Lugar School of Global & International Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 14th Policymaking Under Uncertainty

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 14, 202010:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Policymaking is a challenging endeavor under the best of times, as politicians and bureaucrats seek to juggle the need for rapid and innovative interventions on the one hand with democratic accountability on the other. This trade-off, which can lead to conservative, short-term solutions, is exacerbated during periods of heightened uncertainty, moments when the possible outcomes themselves are unknown. This panel examines how policymakers adapt to extremely uncertain events, focusing on innovation, war, and the recent COVID-19 pandemic.


    Speakers

    Dan Breznitz
    Munk Chair of Innovation Studies; Co-Director, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto; Co-Director, CIFAR Program on Innovation, Equity & the Future of Prosperity

    Uri Gabai
    Co-General Manager, Start-Up Nation Central; and former Chief Strategy Officer, Israel Innovation Authority, Tel Aviv, Israel

    Darius Ornston
    Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Sylvia Schwaag Serger
    Deputy Vice Chancellor, and Professor of Research Politics at the School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Lund, Sweden



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 14th Municipal Finance and COVID-19 in Canada: What Comes Next?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 14, 20204:30PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on municipal finance in Canada. Across the country, increased expenditures and decreased revenues have resulted in large municipal deficits that, under provincial legislation, would need to be balanced in 2021 budgets. Municipalities with transit systems have been particularly hard hit by substantial drops in fare revenues.

    The recent announcement of federal and provincial funding for municipalities and transit providers will help address the short-term budget gaps. However, municipalities are predicting continued budget pressures in 2021, particularly if a second wave occurs and the economic recovery progresses slowly.

    This panel will examine the continued impact of COVID-19 on municipal finance. How are municipalities preparing for their 2021 budgets? What impacts are they anticipating from COVID-19? What steps are needed at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels to safeguard the fiscal health of municipalities?

    This is the first of two IMFG panels exploring the effects of COVID-19 on municipal finance. Details of the second panel will be announced in the coming weeks.


    Speakers

    Kala Harris
    Speaker
    Executive Director of the Government Finance Officers Association of British Columbia (GFOABC).

    Bill Hughes
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow at the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance and the chair of the ONE Joint Investment Board

    John Merkley
    Speaker
    Founder of Pacify Analytics and a policy analyst specializing in local government finance in British Columbia.

    Enid Slack
    Moderator
    Director of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG)

    Donna Herridge
    Speaker
    Executive Director of the Municipal Finance Officers’ Association of Ontario (MFOA).



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 15th European Conflicted Heritage: New Reflections on the Treaty of Trianon 100 Years in Perspective (1920-2020)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 15, 202011:00AM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Description

    The Treaty of Trianon was signed on June 4, 1920, formally ending World War I between the Allied forces and the Kingdom of Hungary. One hundred years later, the impact of the Treaty of Trianon is still being felt by Hungarian minorities and the Hungarian diaspora alike. This online event will discuss the political and social remembrance of the Treaty of Trianon over the past 100 years, the development of Hungarian foreign policy, the territorial rearrangement that shook a nation and the impact of the Treaty on new generations.

    Full program details are found on registration page via link above.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 15th 2020 PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE WATCH PARTY - FORMER VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN'S TOWN HALL

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 15, 20208:00PM - 10:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Due to the cancellation of the Second Presidential Debate, the Centre for the Study of the United States is hosting a virtual watch party of Former Vice President Joe Biden’s Town Hall! Join us at 8:00pm to tune into the event with Professor Ryan Hurl.

    Host/Moderator:
    Nicholas Sammond, Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto (Opening Remarks)
    Ryan Hurl, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    The Centre for the Study of the United States is committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all participants at its webinars. Please avoid any inappropriate language, harmful or threatening speech, or any other disruptive behaviour during the event. Regretfully, unacceptable conduct may lead to removal from the event and restrictions on participating in future Munk School webinars and events. Excitement, outrage, disappointment and amusement are all absolutely acceptable; rudeness, obscenity, and name calling are not. Please enjoy yourself, but please be civil.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ryan Hurl
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th The West & Transatlantic Relations in a Post-Pandemic Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Daniel and Elisabeth Damov Annual Lecture in European Affairs

    Description

    What do the pandemic and the 2020 US elections mean for the future of the transatlantic relationship? Can transatlantic relations be adapted to a new age? And might the US need Europe more than it thinks?

    This event is the second installment of the Daniel and Elisabeth Damov Annual Lecture in European Affairs and will be presented by Dr. Constanze Stelzenmüller of the Brookings Institution.


    Speakers

    Dr. Constanze Stelzenmüller
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow - Foreign Policy, Center on the United States and Europe, Brookings Institution

    Prof. Alexander Reisenbichler
    Moderator
    University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 16th Democracy and the Future of Belarus with Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 16, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, Zoom webinar
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    Series

    Eurasia Initiative

    Description

    Just over two months ago, on August 9, Belarus’s Aliaksandr Lukashenka declared victory in presidential elections that were widely decried as unfree and unfair. Since then, protestors have taken to the streets and the regime has begun a widespread crackdown. In the meantime, presidential candidate Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya, fearing for her safety, has fled to Lithuania. Massive pro-democracy mobilization continues across Belarus against one of Europe’s last dictatorships.

    This panel discussion will be recorded and made available following the event.


    Speakers

    Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya
    Keynote
    Belarusian opposition leader and human rights activist

    H.E. Linas Linkevičius
    Opening Remarks
    Foreign Minister of Lithuania

    Mark MacKinnon
    Panelist
    Senior International Correspondent, The Globe and Mail

    Prof. Lucan Way
    Panelist
    CERES, University of Toronto

    Hon. François-Philippe Champagne
    Opening Remarks
    Foreign Minister of Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 21st Japan and EU - Stepping Up Cooperation to save the Liberal World Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 21, 202010:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The rise of a more assertive China is causing concerns. So is Donald Trump’s policy of “America first” which puts further questions to the liberal world order. The US’s two main liberal partners have been made aware of the fact that multilateralism is no longer a priority for the US that has broken the Iran nuclear deal as well as the Paris climate agreement. Under these circumstances, Japan and EU got their act together and signed several agreements to step up strategic cooperation. This seminar will give a historic perspective on Japan-EU relations and follow the development until today. It will also reflect on the role of Canada in connection with this.

    Marie Söderberg is the Director of the European Institute of Japanese Studies and an adjunct professor of Stockholm School of Economics. She has a Ph.D. from Stockholm University in 1986. She has published on Europe-Japan relations, Japanese Influences in Asia, Japan-China, Japan-North Korea and Japan South Korea relations. A central focus of her research is Japanese foreign aid policy. She is the senior editor of the European Institute of Japanese Studies, East Asian Economics and Business Studies, a book series published by Routledge. She is also the Chairperson of EJARN’s (European Japan Advanced Research Network) executive committee.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Marie Söderberg
    Speaker
    Director of the European Institute of Japanese Studies and Adjunct Professor of Stockholm School of Economics

    Phillip Lipscy
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 21st Where is Decarbonization in the Recovery Plan?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 21, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    As countries scramble to put economic and social recovery plans in place, there is an opportunity for decarbonization and climate action to play a significant role. Are they? Our panelists will discuss how countries, and especially Canada, can avoid the mistakes of the last ‘green’ recovery following the 2008-2009 economic crisis and what needs to happen for recovery plans to help societies build back better.

    Panelists:

    Kyla Tienhaara, Professor at Queens University; Matthew Mendelsohn, Visiting Professor at Ryerson University, former Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet at the Government of Canada, and creator of First Policy Response: Canada’s Policy Community Response to Covid-19; and Priyanka Lloyd, Executive Director at Green Economy Canada.

    The webinar will be moderated by one of the Co-Directors at the Environmental Governance Lab.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd Race and Singapore Short Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    For JHI-UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series, Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics presents “Race and Singapore Short Cinema”, co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, Jackman Humanities Institute, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto and Objectifs.

    October 1-23, 2020 | The following film screenings are available for viewing via Objectifs Film Library: “Dahdi” by Kirsten Tan, “Timeless” by K. Rajagopal, “Last Trip Home” by Han Fengyu, “Not Working Today” by Tan Shijie. Link: https://objectifsfilmlibrary.uscreen.io/categories/mediating-race-reimagining-geopolitics-webinar.
    _____________________________

    Kirsten Tan is a New York-based Singaporean filmmaker whose debut feature Pop Aye premiered as the opening night film of Sundance Film Festival 2017 and was awarded a Special Jury Prize for screenwriting. It traveled to 50 film festivals around the world, picking up several accolades along the way. Her shorts have collectively received over ten international awards. She was accorded the Young Artist Award by the NAC Singapore and was nominated as a Singaporean of the Year by The Straits Times.

    Han Fengyu graduated with a diploma in Film, Sound and Video from Ngee Ann Polytechnic in 2014. His graduation short film Last Trip Home premiered at the 67th Cannes Film Festival in the Cinefondation category in 2014. Last Trip Home has also competed at the Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival, and the Singapore International Film Festival in 2014. It has won ‘The Best Fiction’ film at the 6th Singapore Short Film Awards in 2015.

    As a filmmaker, K.Rajagopal has won the Singapore International Film Festivalʼs Special Jury Prize for 3 consecutive years. I Can’t Sleep Tonight (1995), The Glare (1996) and Absence (1997) have been featured at international festivals around the world. Other works include Brother (1997), The New World (2008) and Timeless (2010), which won Best Cinematography and Best Editing at the Singapore Short Film Awards 2011. His short film was also part of the omnibus film 7 Letters (2015) which had its Asian premiere at the Busan Film Festival in 2015. He directed a segment in the LUCKY 7 film project with other six prominent Singaporean directors. He has also written and directed television films like Maddy, Two Mothers in a HDB Playground and Heartland. He also worked on stage for over ten years. He has collaborated with many notable theatre directors on projects such as Medea, Beauty World and Private Parts. A Yellow Bird is his first feature film and it premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016.

    Shijie Tan studied philosophy before pursuing filmmaking at New York University’s Tisch Asia School. His first school short, For Two, was In Competition for the Short Film Golden Lion at the 66th Venice Film Festival and was acclaimed by the International Film Guide as one of the Top 5 Singapore Films of the year. The Hole won 4 of the 5 awards it was nominated for at the Singapore Short Film Awards that year, including Best Film, Direction and Script. Not Working Today, his third short film, competed at the Clermont-Ferrand Short Film Festival and clinched Best Singapore Short Film at the 25th Singapore International Film Festival. It was also selected as one of fifty significant films in Singapore cinema history, showcased at the Cinematheque Francaise in Paris. His next work, The Lake, part of the omnibus feature Distance, was a cross-territory collaboration between Singapore, China, Taiwan and Thailand. It was selected as the Opening Film of the Golden Horse Film Festival in 2015, the premier festival for Chinese-language cinema. He is currently in development for a feature debut.

    Alfian Sa’at is the Resident Playwright of Wild Rice. His published works include three collections of poetry: ‘One Fierce Hour’, ‘A History of Amnesia’ and ‘The Invisible Manuscript’; a collection of short stories, ‘Corridor’; a collection of flash fiction, ‘Malay Sketches’; three collections of plays as well as the published play ‘Cooling Off Day’. In 2001, Alfian won the Golden Point Award for Poetry as well as the National Arts Council Young Artist Award for Literature. His plays and short stories have been translated into German, Swedish, Danish and Japanese.

    Sophia Siddique holds a PhD from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Her research interests include Singapore cultural studies, representations of trauma and memory in Cambodian, Indonesian, and Thai cinema, and genre (Asian Horror and Global Science Fiction). She has published in the Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, and the Journal of Chinese Cinemas. She co-edited Transnational Horror Cinema: Bodies of Excess and the Global Grotesque (Palgrave Macmillan 2016) with Raphael Raphael. Sophia Siddique is completing two manuscripts: Screening Singapore: Sensuous Citizenship Formations and the National (AUP) and Skin Matters: Horror Films and the Phenomenology of the Monstrous.

    Tan Eng Kiong is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of English, and Asian and Asian American Studies. He received his Ph.D. in Comparative and World Literature from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Rethinking Chineseness: Translational Sinophone Identities in the Nanyang Literary World. His essays have also appeared in publications such as Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, Sun Yat-Sen Journal of Humanities, Journal of Modern Chinese Literature, and Journal of Chinese Cinemas. He is currently working on two separate book projects tentatively titled Queer Homecoming in Sinophone Cultures: Translocal Remapping of Kinship, and Mandarinization and Its Impact on Sinophone Cultural Production: A Transcolonial Comparison of Ethnic China, Singapore and Taiwan.


    Speakers

    Kirsten Tan
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    K.Rajagopal
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    Tan Shijie
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    Alfian Sa'at
    Speaker
    Writer, poet, and playwright

    Sophia Siddique
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Film and Chair of Film, Vassar College

    Han Fengyu
    Speaker
    Filmmaker

    Tan Eng Kiong
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Stony Brook University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Objectifs

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 22nd 2020 PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE WATCH PARTY - THIRD PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE: PRESIDENT TRUMP AND FORMER VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 22, 20208:45PM - 10:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of the United States and Professor Ronald Pruessen for a virtual watch party of the Third Presidential Debate between President Trump and Former Vice President Joe Biden!

    The Centre for the Study of the United States is committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all participants at its webinars. As this debate is among the most contentious in recent history, opinions and sentiments may be intense. Please avoid any inappropriate language, harmful or threatening speech, or any other disruptive behaviour during the event. Regretfully, unacceptable conduct may lead to removal from the event and restrictions on participating in future Munk School webinars and events. Excitement, outrage, disappointment and amusement are all absolutely acceptable; rudeness, obscenity, and name calling are not. Please enjoy yourself, but please be civil.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Ronald Pruessen
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Who's Afraid of Constitutional Populism? Central Europe in the Broader European Context

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Making and Remaking Central Europe Lecture Series

    Description

    The rise of populism is a consequence of recent globally spreading economic and political crises and subsequent growing public distrust of technocracy and expert knowledge. Populist politics draws on public anger vis-a-vis growing economic insecurity and the general failure of anti-majoritarian institutions and their expertise to address issues of social justice and equality. However, populists mainly exploit the framework of constitutional democracy without dissolving and replacing it by a different political regime. Their politics thus remains subject of political contestations and opposition challenges in free elections. Nevertheless, some populists seized the opportunity to challenge this constitutional order and transformed into full-scale autocrats by reconstituting their power, such as the Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán who staged a coup during the Covid-19 pandemic crisis by eliminating parliament and granting himself power to indefinitely govern by decrees. Because Hungary is a member state of the EU, its legal and political transformation into constitutional autocracy represents a big constitutional question for the Union: “Can a dictatorial regime be a Member State of the EU?” This question needs to be addressed because of the rise of populism in other member states of the EU including countries of Central Europe. Ironically, some of them would not be able to pass the conditionality test if they applied for EU membership today.

    Jiří Přibáň is professor of law and Director of the Centre of Law and Society at Cardiff University. He graduated from Charles University in Prague (1989) where he was appointed professor of legal theory, philosophy and sociology in 2002. In 2006, he was appointed professor of law at Cardiff University. He was also visiting professor or scholar at European University Institute in Florence, New York University, UC Berkeley, University of San Francisco, University of Pretoria, The Flemish Academy in Brussels and University of New South Wales, Sydney. Jiří Přibáň has published extensively in the areas of social theory and sociology of law, legal philosophy, constitutional and European comparative law, and theory of human rights. He is an editor of the Journal of Law and Society and a regular contributor to the Czech and international media.

    Barbara J. Falk is Professor, Department of Defence Studies at the Canadian Forces College/Royal Military College of Canada, and author of The Dilemmas of Dissidence: Citizen Intellectuals and Philosopher Kings (2003) and Political Trials: Causes and Categories (2008). Her primary research interest is political trials, particularly in the persecution and prosecution of domestic dissent. She is currently writing a book on comparative political trials across the East-West divide during the early Cold War, examining the Rajk, Slánský, Dennis and Rosenberg trials. Prior to her academic career, she worked in the both the private and public sectors in human resources, labour relations and women’s issues. For more information, see: http://www.cfc.forces.gc.ca/136/277-eng.html.


    Speakers

    Jiří Přibáň
    Speaker
    Cardiff University

    Barbara J. Falk
    Commentator
    CERES, Canadian Forces College



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Pacific Transformation: The Korean War and Korean-Canadian Engagement since 1950

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 202010:00AM - 2:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    (Virtual) Symposium in commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Korean War

    Symposium program:

    10:00 am. Opening remarks and introduction
    Korean Embassy: Chang Keung Ryong, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea to Canada
    Bill Graham Center: Jack Cunningham, Program Coordinator of the Bill Graham Centre
    Centre for the Study of Korea: Yoonkyung Lee, Director of Centre for the Study of Korea and Associate Professor in Sociology

    10:20 am – 12:00 pm. Session 1. Chaired by Don Rickerd (Trinity College, U of T)
    Heonik Kwon (Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge): “Experiencing the Korean War”
    Andre Schmid (East Asian Studies, U of T): “The Global and Local Significance of the Korean War”
    Jack Cunningham (Bill Graham Center, U of T): “Canada’s Korean War”

    12:00 – 12:05 pm. Remarks by Mr. Bill Black, President of Korean War Veterans Association Ottawa Unit 7

    12:05 – 12:55 pm. Lunch break

    12:55 – 1:00 pm. Haegum Performance by Ms. Sosun Suh

    1:00 – 2:00 pm. Session 2. Chaired by Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology and CSK, U of T)
    Michelle Cho (East Asian Studies, U of T): “K-drama and global publics: Netflix and the case of Crash Landing on You”
    Dimitry Anastakis (Rotman School and History, U of T): “Canadian-South Korean trade relations in the 20th and 21stcenturies: Trading places”

    2:00 – 2:30 pm. Ambassadors’ address: Chang Keung Ryong (Ambassador the Republic of Korea to Canada): “Leveraging Korea-Canada relations in a post-COVID world”

    2:30 pm. Closing
    _________________________________

    Participant bios and presentation abstracts:

    HEONIK KWON is Senior Research Fellow in Social Science and Professor of Social Anthropology at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. He has authored several prize-winning books on the Vietnam War and Cold War social histories, including his new book, After the Korean War: An Intimate History (Cambridge University Press2020).

    “Experiencing the Korean War”: What constitutes “experience” in the experience of war continues to be a subject of debate in the social and cultural studies of modern warfare, especially with reference to the 1914-1918 war, a foundational episode of modern Europe and in the history of decolonization. In this talk, I will extend this debate to the theatre of the Korean War, a pivotal episode of modern Koreas and in the history of the postcolonial Cold War. The focus will be on the non-combatant experience of the 1950-1953 war and on the collusion and collision between traditional and modern political subjectivities in the constitution of this historical experience.

    ANDRE SCHMID is an Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Studies where he has taught Korean and East Asian history for over 20 years. He is the author of Korea Between Empire, 1895-1919 (Columbia University Press 2002) and is currently working on a book about the postwar cultural and socio-economic origins of North Korea.

    “The Local and Global Significance of the Korean War”: This talk examines the Korean War as a multitude of conflicts working at different, inter-related levels, whether in local spaces around the world or defined in term of its global significance. Moving from 1950s Toronto to the war-torn Korean countryside to the racial politics of global Cold War formations, the presentation weaves together narratives of the war that are not combined in our usual histories of what in Korea is called the 6.25 war.

    JACK CUNNINGHAM has a PhD in History from the University of Toronto, where he is Program Coordinator of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. He has edited volumes on the recent conflict in Afghanistan and the invasion of Iraq, and is a former editor of International Journal.

    “Canada’s Korean War”: In 1950, Korea was peripheral to Canadian strategic and economic interests. But Communist aggression in Asia raised the spectre of the same in Europe, as well as fears that the United States would be diverted from European security concerns by the sideshow in Korea. At the same time, Korea was a test case for the United Nations and for collective security. As a result, Canada made a substantial contribution to the UN effort in Korea, while trying to balance displays of alliance solidarity with diplomatic efforts to ensure the war neither grew too wide nor lasted too long. At the same time, fears of Soviet aggression in Europe following the attack on South Korea triggered a massive rearmament effort in Canada, focused on Europe, which would ensure that defense remained the ranking demand on the public into the 1960s.

    MICHELLE CHO is Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Culture at the University of Toronto. She has published on Asian cinemas and Korean wave television, video, and pop music in such venues as Cinema Journal, the International Journal of Communication, the Korean Popular Culture Reader, and Asian Video Cultures. She is currently at work on a book about gender, media, and fandom in Korean-wave popular cultures.

    “K-drama and global publics: Netflix and the case of Crash Landing on You”: North American television, as we know it, has transformed in the last two decades, away from network television mainly produced in the form of sitcoms, police procedurals, and medical or courtroom dramas, towards serial narratives, with continuous storylines developed across episodes. Alongside this shift towards serial narrative, the notion of “quality television” has changed the way we evaluate TV content, from intentionally mindless entertainment to innovative cultural works. These shifts have been fortuitous for the rise in popularity of Korean television shows in Canada, since Korean narrative television has long been formatted as stand-alone, complete series, with clearly defined beginnings and endings. This talk will focus on the 2019-2020 series Crash Landing on You (Sarangŭipulshich’ak, tvN), a hit, fantasy drama set in a fictionalized North Korea, to discuss the characteristics of Korean television serials that account for their intense binge-ability, and to contextualize the place of Korean television content in our increasingly global media landscape.

    DIMITRY ANASTAKIS is the LR Wilson/RJ Currie Chair in Canadian Business History at the Rotman School of Management and in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. A scholar of postwar Canadian business and the economy, his current research projects include finishing a book about the Bricklin SV-1, a car produced in Canada in the 1970s, and embarking on a major research project on postwar Canadian neoliberalism and free trade as part of the SSHRC Partnership Grant, “Deindustrialization and the Politics of Our Time.” As Wilson/Currie Chair, Professor Anastakis’s mandate is to advance the study of Canadian business history at the University of Toronto and in Canada and beyond. He is Chair of the Canadian Business History Association – l’association canadienne pour l’histoire des affaires (CBHA/ACHA), oversees the Business History Reading Group at the University of Toronto, and is general editor of the Themes in Business and Society series from the University of Toronto Press.

    Canadian-South Korean Trade Relations in the 20th and 21st Centuries: Trading Places: The history of Canada’s trade relations with the Republic of Korea stretch back much further than the 2014 Canada-Korea Free Trade Agreement (CKFTA) and include important developments such as the establishment of Hyundai’s short-lived Canadian manufacturing facilities in the 1980s. While trade between the two countries has evolved relatively amicably since the emergence of Korea as a major economic power starting in the 1960s, the nature of the relationship has been marked some important flashpoints, including the 2014 free trade agreement. Indeed, this presentation will focus on some of the key issues that have led to and emanated from this historic trade pact between the two countries—the first FTA signed by Canada with an Asian country.

    H.E. CHANG KEUNG RYONG was appointed Ambassador the Republic of Korea to Canada in June 2020.The Ambassador holds a B.A. in Political Science and Diplomacy from Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea (1980); an M.A. in International Relations from Fairleigh Dickinson University, New Jersey, USA (1984); and a Ph.D. in Political Science from McGill University, Montreal, Canada (1996). He taught political science and international relations at Kwangju Women’s University in Gwangju, Korea (1999-2018). During his tenure at KWU, he held a Visiting Professor Fellowship at McGill University (2014-2015). Ambassador Chang left academia to become a Research Advisor at the Institute for National Security Strategy (2018-2020) while also serving as the Chairman of the International Cooperation Standing Committee for the 19th National Unification Advisory Council. He has received various awards, including the prestigious Korean Presidential Citation (2001). Ambassador Chang is married to SUH Yong Suk. They have two sons.

    “Leveraging Korea-Canada relations in a post-COVID world”: Seventy years ago, Canada participated in the Korean War (1950-1953). A decade later, Korea and Canada established formal diplomatic relations in 1963. Since then, Korea’s rapid development, democratic evolution, and growing regional and international interests have enhanced cooperation – politically, economically and culturally – between Korea and Canada. The landmark Korea-Canada Free Trade Agreement, which entered force on January 1, 2015, fostered new avenues of collaboration and innovation, as well as enhancing people-to-people exchanges between the two countries. Now, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose significant challenges for the international community, Korea and Canada have been working closely together to exchange information and best practices; and both countries continue to coordinate closely in response to the virus’s impact on the global economy. With an outlook towards the future, Ambassador Chang will lay out his priorities and prospects for Korea-Canada relations in the upcoming years; including issues of enhancing bilateral security cooperation for improving inter-Korean relations and peace on Korean Peninsula, deepening economic cooperation – particularly in field of AI, and expanding people-to-people exchanges with an emphasis on deepening cultural diplomacy.

    DONALD S. RICKERD did his undergraduate work at Queen’s University and St. Andrews University in Scotland and obtained his MA degree in Modern History from Balliol College, Oxford University. He graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School and practiced with Fasken and Co. in Toronto. He served as Registrar and Secretary of the Senate of York University and was an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Administrative Studies. Subsequently he was appointed President of the Donner Canadian Foundation in Toronto and the W.H. Donner Foundation of New York. Mr. Rickerd also served for a number of years as President of the Max Bell Foundation. He is a Research Fellow at the Asian Institute of the Munk School of Global Affairs and a Senior Fellow at Massey College at the University of Toronto. Mr. Rickerd has visited the DPRK on four occasions, most recently in October 2014.

    YOONKYUNG LEE is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism. She earned her Ph.D. in political science from Duke University and was associate professor in Sociology at SUNY-Binghamton (2006-2016) before joining U of T. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

    Embassy of the Republic of Korea to Canada


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    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Information Management and Authoritarian Legitimation in “The Direct Line with Vladimir Putin”

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 202012:00PM - 1:30PMExternal Event, Online event
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    Series

    Eurasia Initiative

    Description

    Professor Chapman’s talk examines the Kremlin’s use of nominally-democratic communication strategies to reinforce Russia’s non-democratic regime. Using a detailed case study of the popular “Direct Line with Vladimir Putin” broadcast, she finds that these strategies mitigate information problems and increase regime support—though not without consequences.

    Hannah Chapman is the Karen and Adeed Dawisha Assistant Professor of Political Science at Miami University. Her research examines information manipulation and public opinion in Russia and the former Soviet Union.


    Speakers

    Prof. Hannah Chapman
    Speaker
    Miami University

    Prof. Ed Schatz
    Moderator
    University of Toronto



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    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 23rd Is U.S. Democracy Eroding? The State of American Self-Government in 2020

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 23, 20202:00PM - 3:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Agenda 2020: Making Sense of the American Election

    Description

    Drawing from expert and public surveys conducted by Bright Line Watch, a group he co-founded, Nyhan will present new research on the state of American democracy and assess the extent to which the country is suffering from erosion in its performance on key democratic principles and norms.

    Speaker:
    Brendan Nyhan is a Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College whose research focuses on misperceptions about politics and health care. He has been named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and a Belfer Fellow by the Anti-Defamation League and is a co-founder of Bright Line Watch, a non-partisan group monitoring the state of American democracy, and a contributor to The Upshot at The New York Times. Nyhan received his Ph.D. from Duke University and previously served as Professor of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. He also co-authored All the President’s Spin, a New York Times bestseller, and served as a media critic for Columbia Journalism Review.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 26th Global Check-Up: How Has COVID-19 Affected Municipal Fiscal Health?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 26, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Many Canadian municipalities have taken hits to their budgets due to the COVID-19 pandemic. But what has the effect been on municipalities around the world? Have municipalities in different countries fared better than others? What accounts for any differences? What needs to be done to ensure municipalities bounce back?

    On October 26, this webinar will explore the above questions through a discussion with experts that have worked in Latin America, Africa, Europe, and North America. This is the second of two events exploring the effects of COVID-19 on municipal finance. For more information on the first event, visit https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/imfg/


    Speakers

    Astrid Haas
    Speaker
    Policy Director at the International Growth Centre

    Andrés Muñoz
    Speaker
    Fiscal and Municipal Management, Inter-American Development Bank

    Enid Slack
    Moderator
    Director of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG)

    Isabelle Chatry
    Speaker
    Senior Policy Analyst at the OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities.

    Howard Chernick
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus of Economics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 27th Care is on the ballot: Why COVID-19 should push American voters to pay greater attention to the care economy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 27, 202012:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Presented by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences of Canada, the Big Thinking lecture series is committed to bringing big ideas in the humanities and social sciences to new audiences – creating opportunities for researchers to challenge and inspire policy makers, citizens, academics, students and community members on the critical questions of our time.

    The next Big Thinking lecture is happening on Tuesday, October 27, 12:00 – 1:00 pm ET. This lecture by Rachel Brickner, moderated by Ito Peng and entitled “Care is on the ballot: Why COVID-19 should push American voters to pay greater attention to the care economy,” will show how the dilemmas about reopening schools offer insights into the importance of taking the care economy seriously this election – and the implications for how Americans provide and receive care if voters do not.

    Learn more about the event and register: http://www.ideas-idees.ca/events/big-thinking

    Speakers

    Rachel Brickner
    Speaker
    Professor of Politics, Acadia University

    Ito Peng,
    Moderator
    Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    External Booking


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 27th Book Launch: Forgotten Values: The World Bank and Environmental Partnerships, by Teresa Kramarz

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 27, 20202:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships have become an increasingly common form of global governance. Partnerships, usually between international organizations (IOs) or state agencies and such private actors as NGOs, businesses, and academic institutions, have even been promoted as the gold standard of good governance—participatory, innovative, and well-funded. And yet these partnerships often fail to live up to the values that motivated their establishment. In this book, Teresa Kramarz examines this gap between promise and performance by analyzing partnerships in biodiversity conservation initiatives launched by the World Bank.


    Speakers

    Teresa Kramarz
    Speaker
    Director, Munk One Program; Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab; Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science

    Steven Bernstein
    Panelist
    Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Distinguished Professor of Global Environmental and Sustainability Governance, Department of Political Science

    Matthew Hoffmann
    Moderator
    Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab; Professor, Department of Political Science

    Michael Sabia
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 28th Will Belarus Become a Democracy?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 28, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Eurasia Initiative

    Description

    Recent events in Belarus are a reflection of deep changes transforming the East European space – changes that caught many by surprise, but will undoubtedly have significant regional and global implications and are yet to be understood.

    A panel of Belarusian and Canadian experts will explore unfiltered perspectives on what’s happening in the country, what potential scenarios may transpire and what that means for Belarus, Canada and the world in a virtual roundtable.

    Dr. Zina J. Gimpelevich is a Professor Emerita at the University of Waterloo, Canada. Born in Minsk, Biełaruś, she came to Canada in 1979. Gimpelevich earned her Ph.D. in Slavic Studies from the University of Ottawa (1987). She worked for the Department of External Affairs and the University of Ottawa, teaching Russian language and culture (1980-1990). Her research interests are Biełarusian and Russian languages, literature, and culture. She has published seven books (the last received award from CAS and Taylor & Francis, 2019), thirteen book chapters, and over eighty articles. Gimpelevich co-authored one textbook and has given over eighty presentations at professional conferences. Zina Gimpelevich has been one of the three founding members of the Canadian Relief Fund for the Children of Chernobyl in Biełaruś (together with its first President, Mme Joanna Survilla [President of the Biełarusian Government in Exile] and Mrs. Paulina Smith-Paškievič). She was the first Vice-president of this national organization. Gimpelevich served as the President of the Canadian Institute of Arts and Sciences (BINiM, Canada 2002-2017) and its Vice-President (2017-2020). ZG served as the President and the Past – President of the Canadian Association of Slavists (CAS, 2008-2014) and was its Honorary President (2017-18). She is also the Honorary life- time member of the Biełarusian Writers’ Union (2017-) and other organizations. Zina Gimpelevich is active in the North American Biełarusian community. One of her dreams is to see her native country follow the example of her adoptive country, Canada, and to become democratic, prosperous, and free.

    Valentina Holubeva is a regular active participant in Belarusian protests with a first-hand perspective on what’s happening in the country. She is a former Minsk State Linguistic University instructor and a corporate trainer also serving as Board Member of the Belarusian National Association of Teachers of English and Admin of Teaching English in Belarus Facebook Group. Valentina is a strong Advocate of learner centered learning, technology-driven methods of teaching English and cross-cultural studies. These new approaches in cross-cultural communication and pedagogy shape her vision of democracy-building in Belarus, equality and international cooperation. Having taught pre-service and in-service teachers at Minsk State Linguistic University for twenty years, now Valentina runs international professional development projects for teachers of Belarus in cooperation with Gallery Teaches and the Institute of IT and Business Administration. She has presented at a number of international conferences for teachers, worked as interpreter for international organizations, such as the World Bank, UNESCO, Council of Europe, ICOM and others, which helped her develop a global perspective on the developments in various fields.

    Andrei Kazakevich is the Director of the Institute of Political Studies “Palitychnaya sphera” (Political Sphere) in Minsk. His research interests include Belarus’s foreign policy, the development of political institutions and the political history of Belarus and Eastern Europe.
    Andrei graduated from the Department of Political Science of the Law Faculty of the Belarusian State University and received a PhD in Political Science in Lithuania (his thesis dealt with the judicial power in the Republic of Belarus). He is Co-founder and Editor-in-Сhief of the “Palitychnaya sphera” and Belarusian Political Science Review journals, Senior Research Fellow at Vytautas Magnus University (Lithuania) and Chairman of the Organizing Committee of the International Congress of Belarusian Studies.

    Igor Leshchenya was the first senior diplomat to declare solidarity with protesters in Belarus. Previously the ambassador of Belarus to Slovakia, he was relieved of the post of Ambassador in August 2020.Mr. Leshchenya joined the diplomatic service in 1991 as an Attaché of the Embassy of the USSR. As soon as the Republic of Belarus became independent, Mr. Leshchenya continued his diplomatic career as a Head of Asia and Africa Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Belarus. In 2002, he negotiated with the OSCE on the presence of this organization in Belarus and on December 30, 2002 (on behalf of the government of Belarus) he signed a Memorandum on the OSCE office in Minsk.From 2002 to 2006, Mr. Leshchenya was working as an Assistant to the President of the Republic of Belarus (issues of foreign policy and foreign economic relations). During his very successful diplomatic career, Mr. Leshchenya served his country as an Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Belarus in the Arab Republic of Egypt; the State of Israel; and the Slovak Republic. He also initiated the popular movement “I am a Citizen”.


    Speakers

    Andrei Kazakevich
    Panelist
    Director, Institute of Political Studies “Palitychnaya sphera”

    Igor Leshchenya
    Panelist
    Former Ambassador of Belarus to Slovakia

    Valentina Holubeva
    Panelist
    Board Member of the Belarusian National Association of Teachers of English (BelNATE)

    Edward Schatz
    Opening Remarks
    Acting Director, CERES, University of Toronto

    Robert Austin
    Moderator
    Associate Director, CERES, University of Toronto

    Zina Gimpelevich
    Panelist
    Professor Emerita of Germanic and Slavic Studies, University of Waterloo

    Lucan Way
    Panelist
    CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 28th Queer Of Color Analysis and Critique - Re-imagining and Redefining Education in Times of COVID and Anti-Blackness

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 28, 20205:30PM - 7:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Queer Of Color Analysis in Education Research Institute (QOCAERI)’s primary goal is to bring together researchers whose substantive knowledge, theoretical insight, and methodological expertise can be assembled in ways that build upon and reach beyond familiar modes of thinking concerning conundrums or problems related to LGBTQI+ issues in formal, non-formal and informal education. In this 1.5-hour webinar six BIPOC scholars based in the United States who mobilize queer of colour analysis and critique in their work will discuss how they are re-imagining and redefining education in times of COVID and anti-Blackness.

    Panel 1 (5:40-6:15pm): Cindy Cruz, Ed Brockenbrough and Roland Coloma will consider how trauma, stigma, violence and mourning haunt our everyday lives, including the streets, schools and transnational networks that are the sites of education.

    Panel 2 (6:20-6:55pm): Steve Mobley Jr., Kia Darling Hammond and Vijay Kanagala will highlight how queer of colour communities are forging new ways of thinking and enacting healing, resilience, resistance and thriving in the midst of unprecedent pandemic- and anti-Black racism-related death.

    Event organized by CSUS Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow (2019-2020), Prof. Lance McCready


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 29th MGA/MBA Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 29, 202012:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Learn more about the combined MGA/MBA program with representatives from both the Munk School and Rotman.

    Join us via the Zoom link below:

    Topic: MGA/MBA Information Session
    Time: Oct 29, 2020 12:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

    Join Zoom Meeting
    https://zoom.us/j/92959904175?pwd=ekI1ZldpOWtmNU9mbzYxZVhvZzhpZz09

    Meeting ID: 929 5990 4175
    Passcode: 937804
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    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 29th Open House: Master's in European & Russian Affairs Program

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 29, 20203:00PM - 4:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for an online open house for prospective students to learn more about our two-year master’s degree in European & Russian Affairs.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 29th Repression and Protest in Contemporary China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 29, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    The struggle between state agents and grassroots activists is central to politics everywhere. Is this dynamic any different in China? How have state repression and grassroots activism evolved and varied across localities in China, the world’s most powerful authoritarian state? Dan Mattingly (Yale) on his new book, “The Art of Political Control in China” and Juan Wang (McGill) on environmental protestors in China. Sida Liu (Toronto) provides commentary on the “cat and mouse” game between repressive agents and protestors.
    ___________________

    Daniel Mattingly is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Yale University. His current research looks at how the military, protest, and nationalism shape Chinese politics. His first book, The Art of Political Control in China, was published by Cambridge in 2020.

    Juan Wang is an Associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. Her research interests include contentious politics, and law and politics, with a country focus of China. Her works have appeared in a number of academic journals, including the China Quarterly, Modern China, the Journal of Contemporary China, Asian Journal of Law and Society, Problems of Post Communism, and Crime, Law, and Social Change. Her first book, entitled The Sinews of State Power: The Rise and Demise of the Cohesive Local State in China (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017), focuses on the intergovernmental relationship among China’s county, township, and village levels of government in explaining the persistence of collective resistance in rural areas.

    Sida Liu is Associate Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Toronto. His research interests include the sociology of law, organizations and professions, criminal justice, globalization, and social theory, with a geographical focus on the Greater China Region. Professor Liu has conducted extensive empirical research on China’s legal reform and legal profession, including the globalization of corporate law firms, the political mobilization of criminal defense lawyers, the feminization of judges, and the career mobility of law practitioners. One of his current research projects examines influence of colonialism and authoritarianism on the professions in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Liu is the author of three books in Chinese and English, most recently, Criminal Defense in China: The Politics of Lawyers at Work (with Terence C. Halliday, Cambridge University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Daniel Mattingly
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, Yale University

    Juan Wang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Political Science, McGill University

    Sida Liu
    Discussant
    Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, University of Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 30th Trump's Surge over the Blue Wall

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 30, 20202:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online
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    Series

    Agenda 2020: Making Sense of the American Election

    Description

    How did Donald Trump win the 2016 “Blue Wall” states—Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania—that made him president? Was it former Obama voters switching to the Republicans? Or a surge of people who didn’t vote in 2012? Or abstentions by usual Democratic voters? The calculation is not easy, primarily because surveys are seriously misleading about turnout while voter files provide no information about the voters’ choice of candidate. We show how to use those two data sources, along with actual vote returns, to resolve ongoing debates about how Trump won. Then we discuss the implications for the 2020 presidential election.

    Bio: Chris Achen is the Roger Williams Straus Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Princeton University. His primary research interests are public opinion, elections, and the realities of democratic politics, along with the statistical challenges that arise from those fields. He is the author or co-author of six books, including Democracy for Realists (with Larry Bartels) in 2016. He has also published many articles. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the National Science Foundation, and Princeton’s Center for the Study of Democratic Politics. He was the founding president of the Political Methodology Society, and he received the first career achievement award from The Political Methodology Section of The American Political Science Association in 2007. He has served on the top social science board at the National Science Foundation, and he was the chair of the national Council for the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) from 2013-2015. He is also the recipient of an award from the University of Michigan for lifetime achievement in training graduate students and a student-initiated award from Princeton University for graduate student mentoring.


    Speakers

    Chris Achen
    Speaker
    Roger Williams Straus Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Princeton University

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of PEARL, Professor in the Department of Political Science & Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2020

  • Monday, November 2nd In Conversation with China's Ambassador to Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 2, 20202:30PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    His Excellency, Ambassador Cong Peiwu, will join Michael Sabia, Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, to discuss the past, present and future of China-Canada relations.


    Speakers

    His Excellency Cong Peiwu
    Speaker
    Ambassador of the People's Republic of China in Canada

    Michael Sabia
    Speaker
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Professor Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Associate Director, Global Engagement, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 4th Poetic Refuge: Migration and the Films of Phuttiphong Aroonpheng

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    “Poetic Refuge: Migration and the Films of Phuttiphong Aroonpheng.” is the fourth seminar for the Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics, JHI-UTM Seminar 2020-2021, co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, the UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto, the Toronto Film and Media Seminar and Objectifs.

    * Screenings details for Manta Ray will be provided on Oct 31st to the first 100 registrants based in Canada.

    * The film “Ferris Wheel” can be screened for free until November 4th here: https://objectifsfilmlibrary.uscreen.io/programs/ferris_wheel_

    Both films will be available from Oct 31st to Nov 4th.


    Speakers

    Selmin Kara
    Organizer
    Associate Professor of Film and New Media, OCAD University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Organizer
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

    Jacques Bertrand
    Panelist
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Ishita Tiwary
    Panelist
    Horizon Post Doctoral Fellow at the Mel Hoppenheim school of Cinema, Concordia University

    Mai Meksawan
    Panelist
    Producer of Manta Ray

    Ornwara Tritrakarn
    Moderator
    Graduate student, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto

    Toronto Film and Media Seminar

    Objectifs


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 4th Undermining the Gates: Immigration Law Enforcement and Corruption at the United States Borders in the Early Twentieth Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 4, 20203:30PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Between 1875 and 1924, the US Congress enacted major immigration laws designed to exclude or limit a growing list of so-called “undesirables” from immigrating to and remaining in the United States. Efforts to restrict migration met with determined resistance from aspiring migrants and facilitating immigration outside the law became a highly lucrative transnational business during the era of exclusion. This talk examines how some immigration officials helped to fuel and profited from the business of illegal immigration and how the Bureau of Immigration responded internally and publicly when confronted with evidence that its own officers were undermining the very laws that they had sworn to enforce.

    Speaker Bio:
    Lauren Catterson is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. She earned a Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours in History at the University of Western Australia, and Master of Arts in History at the University of Toronto. Her doctoral dissertation research focuses on misconduct and corruption complaints filed against US immigration service personnel in the early twentieth century, examining the extent to which allegations of official wrongdoing jeopardised the reputation and credibility of the nascent US immigration bureaucracy and helped to define and redefine the limits on individual officers’ discretionary authority. She holds a Jackman Junior Fellowship from the Jackman Humanities Institute, and is one of the winners of this year’s CSUS Graduate Research grants.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Lauren Catterson
    Speaker
    PhD candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Alexandra Rahr
    Moderator
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 5th MIA/MGA Dual Degree Program Info Session with Hertie School of Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 5, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for a virtual information session on the MIA/MGA Dual Degree Program with the Hertie School of Governance. Representatives from both Munk School and Hertie will be on hand to answer questions about the program.

    Please register to receive the Zoom link before the event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 5th “Drawn Apart: Rebecca Wanzo and Lauren McLeod Cramer in Conversation About 'The Content of Our Caricature'”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 5, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online
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    Description

    Definitively addressing the problem with debates about “good” and “bad” black representation, The Content of Our Caricature: African American Comic Art and Political Belonging (New York University Press, 2020) explains what happens when Black cartoonists revisit and reanimate the archive of the racial grotesque. Black comics and cartoons that appeared in black newspapers at the beginning of the twentieth century, underground comix independently produced and distributed in the 1970s and today’s big-budget film adaptations of superhero comics share complex imaginings of the political potential and limitations of caricature. Wanzo’s book reads the work of a rarely acknowledged lineage of Black cartoonists alongside comic and cartoon figures of American citizenship—images of the romantic revolutionary, the soldier and the child. Black comics recall the ways blackness is rendered incommensurable with American citizenship when it shares the frame with these idealized tropes and, instead of abandoning this history of representation, they leverage its elasticity. As a result, using horror and humor, Black cartoonists visualize critiques of American visual culture that are not bound by time, space, or medium.

    In conversation about The Content of Our Caricature will be author Dr. Rebecca Wanzo, Chair and Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Affiliate Professor of American Culture Studies at Washington University in St. Louis and Dr. Lauren McLeod Cramer, Assistant Professor in the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Rebecca Wanzo
    Chair and Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Affiliate Professor of American Culture Studies at Washington University in St. Louis

    Lauren McLeod Cramer
    Assistant Professor in the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 6th Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 20209:00AM - 10:30AMExternal Event, Online Event
    Friday, November 6, 20206:00PM - 8:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Morning Session | 9:00 – 10:30 am EST

    9:00-9:10am Welcome remark by Hyun-Ok Park (York)

    9:10-9:20am Introduction to the Symposium: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    9:20-10:30am Keynote Speech
    Chair: Yewon Lee (George Washington University)
    Discussant: Laam Hae (York University)

    Hyun Bang Shin (LSE) “Whither Progressive Urban Futures? Critical Reflections on the Politics of Temporality in Asia”
    _______________________________

    Evening Session | 6:00 – 8:45 pm EST

    6:00-7:15pm Panel 1: The Making of the Speculative City: Past and Present
    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Hyun Bang Shin (LSE)

    Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto) “Juxtaposing Biopolitics with Speculative Urbanisms: The Development of Private Welfare/Health Institutions in South Korea”

    Seung-Cheol Lee (Seoul National University) “Seeing Like a Community Entrepreneur: The Capitalization of ‘Community’ in Seoul’s Community Building Project (maul mandulgi)”

    7:15-7:30pm Break

    7:30-8:45pm Panel 2: The Unmaking of the Speculative City
    Chair: Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Jesook Song (U of Toronto)

    Laam Hae (York) “Toward a Dialectical Vision of Planetary Urbanization: Ecological Pro-Greenbelt Movements against the Construction State in Korea”

    Yewon Lee (George Washington University) “Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space”

    Symposium Participant Bios:

    Hae Yeon Choo is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She is an author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016), a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses at American military camptown clubs. Her current research examines the politics of land ownership in contemporary South Korea, delving into macro-level political contestations over land rights, together with the narratives of people who pursue class mobility through real estate speculation. She has also translated Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider and Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

    Laam Hae is an Associate Professor in the department of Politics at York University. Her research areas are urban political economy, neoliberal urbanism and urban social movements. She is the author of The Gentrification of Nightlife and the Right to the City: Regulating Spaces of Social Dancing in New York (2012, Routledge), and co-edited On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (2019, University of Toronto Press). She is currently developing a research project that examines the spatiality of social reproduction and gender inequality in South Korea.

    Hyun-Chul Kim is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto. Her research interests include the varied degree of confined, segregated spaces in East Asian regions, from nursing homes to prisons, considering urban constructions, intimacy, and disability. She is writing her dissertation tentatively titled “Between Communal ‘Village’ and an Atomized ‘Home’: Blurring the boundaries of community organization movement and segregated-confined welfare spaces of South Korea in 1950s-1960s”.

    Seung Cheol Lee received his PhD from Columbia University in 2018 and is now an assistant professor of anthropology at Seoul National University. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on a book manuscript that examines how the ethicality and sociality of gift-giving are grafted onto neoliberal market rationality in the social economy sector in South Korea.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Korean Studies at George Washington University. As a political and labor sociologist and urban ethnographer, Yewon is broadly interested in how speculative real estate interests increasingly dictate the shape and character of urban landscapes and how, in response, ordinary people organize everyday space and practice politics of dissent. Her dissertation, Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: The Untold Gentrification Story of Tenant Shopkeepers’ Displacement and Resistance in Seoul, examines how tenant shopkeepers, who are often labeled as either micro-entrepreneurs or petit bourgeoisie and overlooked as workers, are emerging as agents of social change. She sheds light on the fascinating case of tenant shopkeepers in Seoul organizing to expose the precarity of their livelihoods and, along the way, finding their collective voice as workers.

    Yoonkyung Lee is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism with a regional focus on East Asia. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Hyun Ok Park teaches sociology and the director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University. With archival and ethnographic research, her research investigates global capitalism in colonial, industrial, and financial forms, democracy, socialism, and post-socialist transition. She is the author of Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution in Manchuria (Duke University Press, 2005). Her latest book is The Capitalist Unconscious: From Korean Unification to Transnational Korea (Columbia University Press, 2015). She is completing a book manuscript, “A Sublime Disaster: The Sewŏl Ferry Incident and the Politics of the Living Dead.”

    Hyun Bang Shin is Professor of Geography and Urban Studies and Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre at LSE. His research centres on the critical analysis of the political economic dynamics of urbanisation with particular attention to cities in Asian countries such as China, South Korea, Malaysia, Vietnam, and Singapore. His research themes include speculative urbanisation; the politics of redevelopment; displacement; gentrification; housing; the right to the city; mega-events as urban spectacles; mega-projects. He has published widely in major international journals and contributed to numerous books on the above themes. His books include Global Gentrifications: Uneven Development and Displacement (Policy Press, 2015); Planetary Gentrification (Polity Press, 2016); Anti Gentrification: What is to be Done (Dongnyok, 2017); Neoliberal Urbanism, Contested Cities and Housing in Asia (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019).

    Jesook Song is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on contemporary urban transformation and welfare issues, including homelessness, youth unemployment, single women’s housing, mental health in South Korea. She is author of South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society (Duke University Press, 2009) and Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea (SUNY Press, 2014), On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (University of Toronto Press 2019, co-edited with Laam Hae).

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto).
    This event is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies. It is co-presented by the Centre for the Study of Korea (University of Toronto). It is co-sponsored by School of Cities (University of Toronto).

    Sponsors

    School of Cities, University of Toronto

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 6th What Would Václav Havel Say? A Conversation between Dr. Petr Buriánek and Prof. Barbara J. Falk

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 6, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Making and Remaking Central Europe Lecture Series

    Description

    Together with Dr. Buriánek, who spent eight years as an adviser to Czech President Václav Havel, Professor Falk will facilitate a conversation examining the importance of Havel’s thoughts on civil society not only for the transition from Communism but also for democratic stability. How have Havel’s values still resonate throughout Central and Eastern Europe and in what ways? And how does remembrance of Havel fit into the “politics” of memory in the Czech Republic today?

    Petr Buriánek is currently Consul General of the Czech Republic in Toronto. With a doctorate in history from Charles University in Prague, Dr. Buriánek has had a distinguished diplomatic career, having served with the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs in several ambassadorial roles – including Croatia, Italy and Malta – as well as holding regional advisory portfolios within the Ministry’s Prague offices. Prior to entering the world of diplomacy, he served in the Office of the President of the Czech Republic as Adviser to then President Václav Havel between 1994 and 2002.

    Barbara J. Falk is Professor, Department of Defence Studies at the Canadian Forces College/Royal Military College of Canada, and author of The Dilemmas of Dissidence: Citizen Intellectuals and Philosopher Kings (2003) and Political Trials: Causes and Categories (2008). Her primary research interest is political trials, particularly in the persecution and prosecution of domestic dissent. She is currently writing a book on comparative political trials across the East-West divide during the early Cold War, examining the Rajk, Slánský, Dennis and Rosenberg trials. Prior to her academic career, she worked in the both the private and public sectors in human resources, labour relations and women’s issues. For more information, see: http://www.cfc.forces.gc.ca/136/277-eng.html.


    Speakers

    Dr. Petr Buriánek
    Consul General of the Czech Republic to Toronto, former adviser to Václav Havel

    Prof. Barbara J. Falk
    Fellow, CERES; Professor, Canadian Forces College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of the Czech Republic in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 7th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Graduate Programs Virtual Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 7, 202010:00AM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join us to learn more about the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy’s gradaute programs.

    Master of Public Policy (MPP) Information Session 10:00am-12:00pm EST

    Master of Global Affairs (MGA) Information Session 12:00-2:00pm EST

    Please register to receive Zoom links via email.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 9th Canada’s Innovation Imperative

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 9, 20203:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online
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    Description

    Innovation contributes to regional and national prosperity and is a well-established economic concept. To succeed in building capacity and strength in this technical realm, government policies must be deliberate, systematic and rooted in expertise. Data shows that Canada missed the shift from the tangible to intangible economy. Moving forward, how can we make sure Canada builds competitive advantage through policy that leverages innovation for tomorrow’s economy?

    Jim Balsillie’s career is unique in Canadian business. He is the former Chairman and co-CEO of Research In Motion (BlackBerry), a technology company he scaled from an idea to $20 billion in sales globally. Mr. Balsillie’s private investment office includes global and domestic technology investments and was part of the consortium that recently purchased the Canadian space technology leader MDA.
    He is the co-founder of the Institute for New Economic Thinking in New York, the Council of Canadian Innovators based in Toronto, the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Waterloo, the Centre for Digital Rights; and, the CIO Strategy Council. He currently chairs the boards of CCI, CIGI, and co-Chairs CIOSC. He is also the founder of the Balsillie School of International Affairs and the Arctic Research Foundation; a member of the Board of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Advisory Board of the Stockholm Resilience Centre; an Honorary Captain of the Royal Canadian Navy and an Advisor to Canada School of Public Policy.
    Mr. Balsillie was the only Canadian ever appointed to US Business Council and was the private sector representative on the UN Secretary General’s High Panel for Sustainability. His awards include: several honorary degrees, Mobile World Congress Lifetime Achievement Award, India’s Priyadarshni Academy Global Award, Canadian Business Hall of Fame, Time Magazine’s World’s 100 Most Influential People and three times Barron’s list of “World’s Top CEOs.”

    Dan Breznitz, is a Professor and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies, in the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy with a cross-appointment in the Department of Political Science of the University of Toronto. Where he is also the Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab. In addition, he is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research where he co-founded and co-directs the program on Innovation, Equity and the Future of Prosperity. Professor Breznitz is known worldwide as an expert on rapid-innovation-based industries and their globalization, as well as for his pioneering research on the distributional impact of innovation policies. He has been a member of several boards, as well as serving an advisor on science, technology, and innovation policies to multinational corporations, governments, and international organizations.

    Meagan Simpson is the Associate Editor for BetaKit. A tech writer who is proud to showcase the Canadian tech scene, Meagan graduated from Carleton University’s Journalism program. Previously, she worked at IT World Canada, and has freelanced as a political reporter on Parliament Hill, a sports reporter in Ottawa, and a number of smaller community publications.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Jim Balsillie
    Speaker
    Retired Chairman and Co-CEO of RIM, Chair of the Council of Canadian Innovators

    Dan Breznitz
    Speaker
    Professor, Munk Chair of Innovation Studies, Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Meagan Simpson
    Moderator
    Associate Editor for BetaKit



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 10th Book Launch: RESET: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society, by Ronald J. Deibert

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 10, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    **Note this event has beeen rescheduled from October 22, 2020**

    On November 10, Ronald J. Deibert, renowned technology and security expert, will discuss the disturbing influence and impact of the internet on politics, the economy, the environment, and humanity.

    In his new book ‘Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society’, Deibert will explore how the expansion of society towards a system of surveillance capitalism has created and exacerbated social and political afflictions. The book (and 2020 Massey Lecture series), investigate personal data surveillance, how social media platforms are insidiously designed to hijack our attention, how social media has created fertile ground for authoritarian practices to take root, the often overlooked negative environmental impacts of social media, and, finally, what can be done to address these maladies.


    Speakers

    Ronald J. Deibert
    Speaker
    Director of the Citizen Lab; Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto 2020 CBC Massey Lecturer

    Ziya Tong
    Moderator
    Award winning broadcaster and author of The Reality Bubble

    Michael Sabia
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 10th The Rise of Independent Voters amid Political Polarization

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 10, 20202:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    American politics are plagued with polarization: Democrats and Republicans appear further apart ideologically and, more troublingly, they seem to personally dislike and distrust one another at unprecedented rates. Yet, meanwhile, a growing proportion of Americans don’t identify with either party at all, instead preferring to call themselves independent. What does this mean for how Americans think about politics and how can it help to explain the outcomes of recent Presidential Elections in the USA?

    Samara Klar is an Associate Professor at the University of Arizona School of Government and Public Policy. She studies how individuals’ personal identities and social surroundings influence their political attitudes and behavior. Her book, Independent Politics, (co-authored with Yanna Krupnikov) was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016 and her research appears in lots of different journals in political science, including the American Journal of Political Science, The Journal of Politics, Political Psychology, Public Opinion Quarterly, and many others. This work has received several different awards from the American Political Science Association, the Midwest Political Science Association, and the American Association for Public Opinion Research. She founded the website www.WomenAlsoKnowStuff.com, which promotes work by women in political science and she has provided expert consulting on public opinion and political communication.


    Speakers

    Samara Klar
    Speaker
    Associate Professor at the University of Arizona School of Government and Public Policy

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of PEARL, Professor in the Department of Political Science & Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 11th Religion and Education in Greece and in the Broader European Context

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 11, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    The place of religion in Greece’s public education system has been the focal point for intense debate in the last decade. The debate has seen contributions from a broad range of actors, including parents of students in the Greek public-school system, Greek political parties across the spectrum, the Orthodox Church of Greece, two especially vocal unions of theologians, the Greek Supreme Administrative Court, and the European Court of Human Rights. This lecture addresses the various relevant claims, concerns and actions of each of these actors and teases out ways in which the debate over religious education in Greece reveals perennial problems in the relationship between religion and national identity in the Greek context, and between church and state.

    Effie Fokas is a Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP) and a Research Associate of the London School of Economics Hellenic Observatory. She was Principal Investigator of the European Research Council-funded project on grassroots impact of European Court of Human Rights religious freedoms case law (Grassrootsmobilise), based at ELIAMEP. Her publications include Islam in Europe: Diversity, Identity and Influence, co-edited with Aziz Al-Azmeh; Religious America, Secular Europe?, coauthored with Peter Berger and Grace Davie; The European Court of Human Rights and Minority Religions, co-edited with James T. Richardson; and over 50 articles and book chapters exploring religion at the intersection with politics, law, human rights, nationalism, and European identity.


    Speakers

    Dr. Effie Fokas
    Speaker
    Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP)

    Prof. Phil Triadafilopoulos
    Opening Remarks
    CERES, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th – Thursday, November 19th November 12 - 19 Reel Asian Film Screening: A.K.A. Don Bonus

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 13, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 14, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 15, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 16, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 17, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 18, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 19, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    * Screening Dates: November 12 – 19, 2020
    * Register above for FREE screening
    * Related Event: A.K.A Don Bonus Masterclass – November 17, 6:30 – 8:30 PM (Scroll down for details; by registering for the screening, you are also getting access to the masterclass and vice versa)

    USA | 1995 | 65 min | English | Archive Presentation | Documentary

    Cambodian-born Sokly “Don Bonus” Ny takes a Hi8 camcorder into his final year of high school in the San Francisco Bay Area, documenting intersecting events happening at school, at home, and amongst friends and family. Filmed and released in 1995, the film can be seen as a forerunner of the now-popular diary or vlog documentary format, featuring raw footage and voiceover from Don Bonus.

    Although made in the 1990s, the beats of the film are familiar and still relevant, moving through issues of low-income housing, gang violence, academic struggle, and family fractures, while also featuring communal celebration, youthful camaraderie and intimate family life. These scenes are simultaneously casual and intentional, recontextualized and given resonance through Don Bonus’ frank, teenage monologic reflections.

    A.K.A Don Bonus highlights how the stories that came before us, although constructed from their time and space, can continue to speak powerfully into our present. – Jasmine Gui
    _____________________

    CAST: Sokly Ny

    Recognitions
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Berlin International Film Festival, 1996
    San Francisco Film Festival, 1995

    AWARDS
    National Emmy Award, 1996
    Golden Gate Award, San Francisco Film Festival, 1995

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Spencer Nakasako has over three decades of experience as an independent filmmaker and is the founder of the groundbreaking Media Lab at the Vietnamese Youth Development Center in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District. Nakasako is a member of the Writers Guild of America, and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
    ____________________

    RELATED EVENT: A.K.A. Don Bonus Masterclass
    DATE: November 17, 6:30 – 8:30 PM

    Deep dive into this critical archival film with director Spencer Nakasako, Reel Asian, and the Asian Institute! This masterclass will explore the narrative construction of A.K.A Don Bonus, methods of production, the vlog-style documentary format, and contextualize the film in its era but also situate it in ongoing contemporary conversations.

    SPEAKERS:
    Spencer Nakasako • Director

    Spencer Nakasako has over three decades of experience as an independent filmmaker. He won a National Emmy Award for a.k.a. Don Bonus, the video diary of a Cambodian refugee teenager that aired on the PBS series P.O.V. and screened at the Berlin International Film Festival. Kelly Loves Tony, a video diary about a Iu Mien refugee teenage couple growing up too fast in Oakland, California, also aired on P.O.V. His third film in his trilogy about Southeast Asian youth, Refugee, aired on the PBS series Independent Lens, and garnered major awards at the Hawaii International Film Festival and Hamptons Film Festival. Nakasako is the founder of the ground-breaking Media Lab at the Vietnamese Youth Development Center in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District where he collaborated with youth from the neighborhood on filmmaking for 17 years.

    Miko Revereza • Filmmaker

    Miko Revereza is a filmmaker raised in California and currently residing between several countries. His upbringing as an undocumented immigrant in the United States informs his relationship with moving images. DROGA! (2014), DISINTEGRATION 93-96 (2017), No data plan (2018) and Distancing (2019) have widely screened at festivals such as Locarno Film Festival, International Film Festival Rotterdam, NYFF Projections and Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Art of the Real. Aside from these films, Revereza produces expanded cinema, direct animation, performance, criticism and publishing including works such as Biometrics (2018), Live Cinema (2019-2020) and Towards a Stateless Cinema (2019). Revereza is listed as Filmmaker Magazine’s 2018 25 New Faces of Independent Cinema, a 2019 Flaherty Seminar featured filmmaker and MFA graduate at Bard College Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts. He is a 2021 recipient of the Vilcek Foundation Prize for Creative Promise in Filmmaking.

    MODERATOR:
    Aram Siu Wai Collier • Head of Programming, Reel Asian

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He has a background in documentary, editing the award-winning feature documentary Refugee and directing/editing the short doc Who I Became. His subsequent dramatic and experimental film work has played festivals in the United States, Canada, Japan, and China. From 2011-2014, his omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown toured Canada, Asia, and the United States. In 2017, he wrote, directed, edited, and produced the feature film Stand Up Man, which had its World premiere at the Atlantic Film Festival and its International Premiere at the Hawaii International Film Festival. Most recently Aram directed and edited the award-winning short documentary A Sweet & Sour Christmas for CBC. He is currently the Head of Programming at the Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival and teaches Media Production at Humber College.

    Registration for Masterclass: https://www.reelasian.com/festival-events/aka-donbonus-masterclass/
    ***Ticket Registration for the A.K.A Don Bonus Masterclass includes access to the A.K.A Don Bonus film.

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Toronto International Reel Asian Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th – Thursday, November 19th November 12 - 19 Reel Asian Film Screening: Labyrinth of Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Friday, November 13, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Saturday, November 14, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Sunday, November 15, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Monday, November 16, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Tuesday, November 17, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Wednesday, November 18, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Thursday, November 19, 202010:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Japan | 2019 | 179 min | Japanese with English subtitles | Closed Captions, Drama, Fantasy

    In the port town of Onomichi, Japan, the only movie theatre is bidding goodbye to its local audiences. The owners organize a nightlong screening devoted to historical Japanese war films. Noriko, a teenager who regularly helps in the theatre, walks toward the stage and astonishes the audience as suddenly, she mystically projects herself into an old musical. Film buff Mario, film-history nerd Hosuke, and aspiring yakuza Shigeru are also warped into the cinema screen in sequences that represent the second Sino-Japanese War, Boshin War and Hiroshima bombing. The four embark on an immersive, surreal and vicious cycle of damnation and salvation in the face of war’s savagery.

    Nobuhiko Obayashi’s swan song Labyrinth of Cinema dives into the senselessness of wars, wrapped in cinematic oddities. His abstracted reconstruction of Japan’s darkest events points out that movies, though a fabrication of reality, epitomize suffering as universal truth.

    – Rolando Basmayor
    ________________________

    CAST:
    Rei Yoshida
    Yoshihiko Hosoda
    Hirona Yamazaki
    Riko Narumi

    Recognitions:
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Tokyo International Film Festival, 2019
    International Film Festival Rotterdam, 2020
    Fantasia International Film Festival, 2020

    Director Bio:
    Nobuhiko Obayashi 大林 宣彦

    Nobuhiko Obayashi (9 January 1938 – 10 April 2020) was a Japanese director, screenwriter, and editor of films and television advertisements. He began his filmmaking career as a pioneer of Japanese experimental films before transitioning to directing more mainstream media, and his resulting filmography as a director spanned almost 60 years

    _________________________

    RELATED EVENT: Live Online Discussion With Special Guests
    DATE: November 18, 6:30 PM

    Unpack the layers of this film with our special guests Rob Buscher of Philly Asian American Film Festival and Daisuke Miyao of University of California San Diego. ASL interpretation will be made available thanks to Toronto Sign Language Interpreter Services. Ticket holders can watch on the CineSend Reel Asian portal.

    GUEST SPEAKERS:

    ROB BUSCHER
    Board Chair of the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival

    Rob Buscher is a film and media specialist, educator, arts administrator, and published author who has worked in non profit arts organizations for over a decade. Buscherʼs expertise is Japanese and Asian American & Pacific Islander Cinema although he has worked as a professional film programmer, critic, and lecturer across a variety of fields. He currently lectures at University of Pennsylvania, and is a contributing writer at Pacific Citizen and Broad Street Review. Buscher also serves as President of the Philadelphia Chapter of civil rights group Japanese American Citizens League and chairs the editorial board of Pacific Citizen, the organization’s national newspaper.

    DAISUKE MIYAO
    Professor in Department of Literature, University of California at San Diego

    Considering cinema to be a transnational cultural form from the beginning of its history and simultaneously to be a national entity, formed by specific discourses on nationalism and modernization, Daisuke Miyao has been conducting research on film history. His interdisciplinary training in cinema studies, East Asian studies, and American studies, combined with his bicultural background, living and studying both in Japanese and North American academia, made it possible for him to recognize that the study of film could benefit from cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 12th Exploring Life Post-COVID

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 12, 20201:30PM - 2:20PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Bank of Canada Senior Deputy Governor Carolyn A Wilkins outlines how the COVID-19 crisis has damaged economic potential and discusses what will be needed to thrive in the post-pandemic world.

    Welcome remarks by Michael Sabia, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Moderated by Peter Loewen, Associate Director of Global Engagement, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and Professor, Department of Political Science and the Munk School

    Please register to receive the event link. A link will be sent to participants closer to the event date.

    To submit questions in advance, please email events.munk@utoronto.ca


    Speakers

    Carolyn A. Wilkins
    Speaker
    Senior Deputy Governor, Bank of Canada

    Michael Sabia
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Shauna Brail
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Institute for Management & Innovation, University of Toronto Mississauga & Senior Associate, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 16th Explaining the 2020 U.S. Election

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 16, 20202:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online
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    Series

    Agenda 2020: Making Sense of the American Election

    Description

    The tumultuous presidency of Donald Trump is at an end. What helped Joe Biden defeat him, and what does the 2020 election portend for the future of American politics?

    John Sides is Professor of Political Science and William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair at Vanderbilt University. He studies political behavior in American and comparative politics.
    He is an author of Identity Crisis: The 2016 Presidential Campaign and The Battle for the Meaning of America, The Gamble: Choice and Chance in the 2012 Election and Campaigns and Election: Rules, Reality, Strategy, Choice.
    He has published articles in various scholarly journals, including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, and Journal of Politics.
    He helped found and serves as Publisher of The Monkey Cage, a site about political science and politics at the Washington Post. He has also written for such outlets as FiveThirtyEight, the Boston Review, Bloomberg View, CNN, the Los Angeles Times, and the New York Times. He also serves as Research Advisor to the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group.
    He received his B.A. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He previously taught at the University of Texas-Austin and George Washington University.


    Speakers

    John Sides
    Speaker
    Professor and William R. Kenan, Jr. Chair in the Department of Political Science at Vanderbilt University

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of PEARL, Professor in the Department of Political Science & Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 16th Post-US Election Panel

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 16, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join Prof. Tom Nichols of the US Naval War College, and Prof. Robert Bothwell of the University of Toronto, for a discussion of the US election results and their implications.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 16th Re-examining the Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 16, 20207:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Global Migration Lab Student Research Initiative

    Description

    In light of the recent migrant crisis in Central America and along the southern US border, it is valuable to re-examine the obstacles which the Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA) has created with respect to those seeking refuge from violence and horror in Central America. Bringing together experts in law, government, and public policy, the Global Migration Lab Student Research Initiative will explore the ongoing questions surrounding the STCA. What is the current legal situation? What is the current political situation? What does the future hold and what are the consequences?

    Craig Damian Smith earned his Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Smith is currently a Senior Research Associate at the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University. His research focuses on migration, displacement, European foreign policy, and refugee integration.

    Chris Alexander is the former Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship under the Stephen Harper government from 2013 to 2015. Chris Alexander also served as Member of Parliament for Ajax-Pickering from 2011 to 2015 and was also Canada’s Ambassador to Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005.

    Heather McPherson has 25 years of experience in building strong communities locally, nationally, and internationally. Most recently, she was Executive Director of an organization representing Alberta not-for-profit organizations that work on issues relating to poverty reduction, human rights, environmental protection, and gender equality. She has a Master of Education from the University of Alberta and has taught around the world.

    Robert Falconer is a Research Associate with the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary. His work focuses on immigration and refugee policy, with a particular focus on reforming policies related to the Canadian asylum system. His other research interests include the retention of newcomers in rural Canada and the influence of domestic and foreign policy on immigrant interest in moving to Canada.

    Prasanna Balasundaram is a staff lawyer for Downtown Legal Services and supervises the Refugee and Immigration division and academic appeals cases in the University Affairs division. He has a special interest in judicial reviews of decisions by the Immigration and Refugee Board and administrative issues that engage constitutional rights. Prasanna is counsel for two of the individual applicants in the judicial review of the STCA, which was heard in November 2019.


    Speakers

    Dr. Craig Damian Smith
    Moderator
    Senior Research Associate, Ryerson University; Research Associate, Global Migration Lab

    Chris Alexander
    Speaker
    former Minister of Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship; former MP for Ajax-Pickering

    Heather McPherson
    Speaker
    MP for Edmonton Strathcona, NDP Critic for Human Rights

    Robert Falconer
    Speaker
    Research Associate, School of Public Policy, University of Calgary

    Prasanna Balasundaram
    Speaker
    Staff lawyer, Refugee and Immigration division, Downtown Legal Services


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 17th Police Surveillance Technology and the Transformation of Public Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 17, 202010:30AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    What does the rise of far-reaching, invasive police surveillance technologies with unprecedented capabilities mean for how we can act, speak, and relate to each other in public spaces? Join three research fellows from the Citizen Lab in discussing how their projects shed light on this increasingly critical issue at the intersection of race, surveillance, free expression, privacy, and power.

    Bria Mathis will discuss her research into the Public Oversight of Surveillance Technology (POST) Act in New York City, bringing additional perspective rooted in community organizing and civic engagement. Todd Whitney will discuss free expression and cultural implications arising from targeted surveillance of Black artists through police surveillance of rappers’ social media activities, for use as evidence in criminal investigations. Cynthia Khoo will discuss findings from her recent landmark report, co-authored with Citizen Lab fellow Kate Robertson and Yolanda Song at the International Human Rights Program, “To Surveil and Predict: A Human Rights Analysis of Algorithmic Policing in Canada,” which analyzes the constitutional and human rights impacts of predictive policing and algorithmic surveillance.

    This panel will be moderated by Dr. Anne-Marie Livingstone, a researcher and postdoctoral scholar within the R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, at the Munk School. She is also the co-author of #MTLSansProfilage, a report on police racial profiling in Montreal.


    Speakers

    Cynthia Khoo
    Speaker
    Citizen Lab Fellow

    Bría Mathis
    Speaker
    Citizen Lab Fellow

    Todd Whitney
    Speaker
    Citizen Lab Fellow

    Dr. Anne-Marie Livingstone
    Moderator
    Postdoctoral scholar, R.F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies, Munk School


    Main Sponsor

    Citizen Lab


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 17th The Fall of Hong Kong: A Tragedy in Five Acts

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 17, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    East Asia Seminar Series

    Description

    This talk will draw on material in the speaker’s recent book, Vigil:Hong Kong on the Brink, while also dealing with events that have happened since he finished making the last corrections to the proofs of it almost exactly a year before the day this presentation will be made. The quintet of key moments in Hong Kong history addressed (the five “acts” in the title) will be the period around the time of the following events: the 1997 Handover, the 2014 Umbrella Movement, series of lesser known but important events in late 2015 and 2016, the 2019 protest surge, and the 2020 actions associated with imposing of the new National Security Law.

    ______________________

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom is the Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine, where he also holds courtesy appointments in Law and Literary Journalism. His most recent books are Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink (Columbia Global Reports, 2020) and, as co-author with Maura Elizabeth Cunningham, China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford, third edition, 2018). He often contributes to newspapers (the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, etc.), literary reviews (such as the TLS, Mekong Review, and LARB), and magazines (e.g., The Nation and Dissent). He served as Editor of the Journal of Asian Studies from 2008 until 2019; he was an adviser to the Hong Kong International Literary Festival; he has consulted on documentary films about the Tiananmen protests and the Umbrella Movement; and he has edited or co-edited books on topics ranging from gender in China’s past and present to human rights and revolutions.

    Sebastian Veg is a Professor of intellectual history of modern and contemporary China at EHESS (School of Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences), Paris and an Honorary Professor at the University of Hong Kong. His most recent books are Minjian: The Rise of China’s Grassroots Intellectuals (Columbia UP, 2019) and Sunflowers and Umbrellas: Social Movements, Expressive Practices and Political Culture in Taiwan and Hong Kong (co-edited with Thomas Gold, 2020).


    Speakers

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom
    Speaker
    Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California, Irvine

    Sebastian Veg
    Discussant
    Professor of Intellectual History of 20th century China, School of Advanced Studies in Social Sciences (EHESS), Paris

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Director, East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 19th F. Ross Johnson Virtual Colloquium on Precarity "Lives on the Edge"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 19, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us at the Centre for the Study of the United States for the F. Ross Johnson Virtual Colloquium on Precarity. “Lives on the Edge” is about the different forms precarity takes – a social, political and economic balancing act disproportionately experienced by members of already marginalized and disadvantaged groups. We will be welcoming five guest speakers who will give talks on the following topics:

    “Home Care Fault Lines: Tensions and Alliances across Flexibility and Security”
    Cynthia Cranford, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Precarious employment scholarship shows how flexible labour markets generate growing insecurity for workers and rising profits for employers, since legislation, and many unions, take the Fordist factory and its ‘standard’ (full-time, permanent) employment relationship as the norm. We know much less about the flexibility-security trade off when claims for flexibility come not from profit motives but from social service needs of citizens. This presentation uncovers flexibility-security tensions within personal support services – which provides help with intimate daily activities like bathing, eating and housework – based on the forthcoming book Home Care Fault Lines: Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances. Home Care Fault Lines analyzes the multiple dynamics that exacerbate or mitigate tension between workers’ claims for security in work and employment and elderly and disabled people’s need for flexibility in service delivery and excavates the potential for flexible care and secure work. Based on interviews with over 300 people it includes the vantage points of workers, service users, labour and disability activists, employers and state officials to compare four state-funded programs in California and Ontario, together covering assistance to adults with physical disabilities and elderly people, to people across and within class, racial and gender lines and inside and outside of families. This presentation compares a California case with two Ontario cases to illustrate the importance of analyzing flexibility and security at both the labour market and more intimate labour process levels, of conceptualizing tensions between home care users and workers based on their claims for flexibility and security at both levels, and of placing tensions within the social organization of work. This analysis confirms the labour market flexibility-security trade off highlighted in precarious employment scholarship and extends it to consider flexibility-security tensions in intimate labour processes. It underscores the need for collective representation and organizations that recognize tensions and support compromises in the labour process, as well as labour market intermediaries and adequate state funding, in order to support both flexible care and secure work.

    Bio:
    Cynthia Cranford is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research analyzes the nexus of gender, labor and migration through in-depth case studies and broader analyses of precarious work in the U.S. and Canada. Her book Home Care Fault Lines: Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances was published with Cornell University’s ILR Press June 2020. Cranford is also the co-author of Self-employed Workers Organize: Law, Policy and Unions (McGill-Queens University Press) and her work appears in academic journals such as Work, Employment and Society, Social Problems, Relations Industrielles, Labor Studies Journal, Just Labour, Gender & Society, Critical Sociology, the American Sociological Review and in several edited volumes.

    “Administrative burden, precarity, and public policy”
    Pamela Herd, Professor of Public Policy, Georgetown University

    This talk will focus on how conservatives are employing administrative burdens as a mechanism to weaken social welfare policies. In short, conservatives are using the administrative state to undermine policies they’d like to dismantle, but have been able to do so via legislative change. Administrative burdens are the learning, compliance, and psychological costs that people encounter when to trying to access, and stay on, critical social welfare supports. In short, they are the administrative barriers that preclude access to programs for which people should otherwise be eligible. I will detail how these newly constructed burdens, in programs ranging from Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance to the Social Security Disability programs and Medicare, will increase health and economic precarity among poor Americans, with disproportionate impacts on women and black Americans.

    Bio:
    Pamela Herd’s research focuses on inequality and how it intersects with health, aging, and policy. She is also an expert in survey research and biodemographic methods. She is currently the Chair of the Board of Overseers for the General Social Survey, a board member for the Population Association of American, and a standing member of a National Institutes for Health review panel for the Social and Population Sciences. She has received grant awards for her work from the National Institutes for Health, National Institutes on Aging, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and AARP. Her work has appeared in journals such as the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Gender & Society, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her recent book Administrative Burden: Policymaking by other Means was reviewed in the New York Review of Books.

    “The Great Balancing Act: Households, Debt, and Economic Insecurity”
    Michelle Maroto, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Alberta

    Many households in the United States regularly engage in balancing acts. Each month, they try to figure out how to cover their bills on often limited incomes, while worrying what might happen if an unexpected expense comes up. This situation is not uncommon. Due in part to the rise of nonstandard employment and declining social safety nets, balancing finances is much more precarious for households these days. What happens when households are no longer able to keep up this balancing act? How do households respond to economic insecurity? In answering such questions, this talk draws on data from the U.S. Survey of Consumer Finances to examine varying experiences of economic insecurity and households’ strategies for managing economic insecurity with a special emphasis on the influence of household debt levels.

    Bio:
    Michelle Maroto is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Alberta. Her recent projects address the many dimensions of wealth inequality, the role of household structure in determining economic security, and labor market outcomes for people with different types of disabilities. She is currently embarking on a large-scale mixed methods project that will bring together secondary data, multiple online surveys, and in-depth interviews to provide a better understanding of the complicated dynamics behind social class in Canada.

    “Feeding the Crisis: Welfare Precarity in the 21st Century United States”
    Maggie Dickinson, Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Guttman Community College – CUNY

    Since the Turn of the 21st Century, the food safety net in the United States has expanded dramatically, contradicting the conventional wisdom that welfare programs have been continually cut back since the 1980’s. Food assistance, including federal programs like SNAP (formerly food stamps) and emergency food programs like soup kitchens and food pantries, have become the leading edge of the response to poverty and growing economic insecurity. Food assistance, as it is currently structured, offers a modicum of care to low wage workers, excludes people on the margins of the formal labor force, and entrenches long standing beliefs about the role of charity and the state in addressing human needs. By creating distinctions between a so-called ‘deserving’ working poor and a stigmatized and excluded reserve army of labor, the food safety net is feeding the broader economic crisis experienced by working class people today. And yet, paying close attention to the political insights of hungry people points to the ways the current welfare state in the U.S. could be transformed to end hunger and precarity.

    Bio:
    Maggie Dickinson is an assistant professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Guttman Community College – CUNY. Her first book, Feeding the Crisis: Care and Abandonment in America’s Food Safety Net, is published by the University of California Press. As a cultural anthropologist, her research is broadly concerned with food systems, the welfare state, inequality and the politics of redistribution.

    “Race, Inequality, and Mobility: The Role of Violence”
    Trevon D. Logan, Professor of Economics and Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, The Ohio State University

    Violence plays a large role in historical inequality. This talk will highlight the role that violence has played in resource theft from Black Americans and from the persistence of inequality politically and economically in the US today.

    Bio: Dr. Trevon D. Logan graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He went on to receive two master’s degrees demography and economics and his doctoral degree in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Logan is an internationally recognized scholar in economic demography, economic history and applied microeconomics. His current research focuses on historical health patterns, racial discrimination, political economy, mortality, morbidity, and racial disparities in health. His award-winning research has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, the Economist, NBC, Bloomberg, CNN, and other major media outlets.

    Co-organized by:
    Shari Eli, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Toronto
    David Pettinicchio, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto
    Edward Sammons, Assistant Professor of Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Maggie Dickinson
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Guttman Community College – CUNY

    Cynthia Cranford
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Pamela Herd
    Speaker
    Professor of Public Policy, Georgetown University

    Michelle Maroto
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Alberta

    Trevon D. Logan
    Speaker
    Professor of Economics, The Ohio State University

    Shari Eli
    Organizer
    Associate Professor of Economics, University of Toronto

    David Pettinicchio
    Organizer
    Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Edward Sammons
    Organizer
    Assistant Professor of Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 19th – Thursday, November 26th Resilience and Disaster: The Global South During COVID-19

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 19, 20203:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Monday, November 23, 20203:00PM - 6:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
    Thursday, November 26, 202010:00AM - 1:00PMExternal Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Re: Locations Symposium 2020

    COVID-19 is a public health crisis occurring on a global scale. It has caused widespread suffering and disruption, and in the process, it has exacerbated existing inequalities; strengthened networks of solidarity; birthed new crises; devastated economies, altered politics at local, national, and international levels; and, more. In these ways, the virus is a disaster that has given rise to complex and uncertain transformations, but it has also led to a great display of resiliency, with different states, communities, and individuals adapting to and resisting this disaster. The global spread has laid bare the need for critical engagement with cross-disciplinary, cross-national, and cross-cultural dialogues.

    SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

    November 19: Migration, Care Work, and Solidarity

    2:50 PM- 3:00 PM Co-Chairs Introduction

    3:00 PM | Keynote Address: Dr. Tungohan

    COVID-19, Immigration, & Care Work: Thinking Through the Implications of COVID-19 on the Lives of Asian Migrants

    3:45 – 5:45 PM | Panel 1

    John Paul Catungal | Mediating Contagion: Asian International Students in Canada during COVID

    Md. Zarif Rahman, Saifuddin Ahmed & Mahabuba Islam Meem | Fatalistic Views and Its Impact on Combating COVID-19: Bangladesh Context

    Joy Saade | The Beirut Explosion and Covid-19: Crisis relief and community reactions during Lebanon’s collapse

    Yuriko Cowper-Smith, Dr. Yvonne Smith & Tyler Valiquette | Displaced and in the dark: Protecting LGBTQI+ asylum-seekers during a pandemic

    5:45 – 6:15 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS
    _________________________________________

    November 23 | Media, Security, and Communications

    2:50 PM- 3:00 PM Co-Chairs Introduction

    3:00 PM | Keynote Address: Dr. Ong

    3:45 – 5:25 PM | Panel 2

    Gabrielle Lim, Irene Poetranto & Justin Law | Securitizing COVID-19 in the Philippines: Outcomes and Risks

    Anmol Dutta | Coro(Na)tional Solidarity Amidst the Covid-19 Pandemic in India

    Richard Atimniraye Nyelade | The Racial and Olfactory Origin of Social Distancing

    Isurika Sevwandi | COVID-19 Disaster Prevention Mechanism undertaken by Sri Lanka: SWOT Analysis

    5:25 – 6:00 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS
    _________________________________________

    November 26: Public Health and the Global South

    9:50 PM- 10:00 AM Co-Chairs Introduction

    10:00 AM | Keynote Address: Dr. Lasco

    Medical Populism in the Global South

    11:14AM – 12:15PM | Panel 3

    Ritapriya Nandy | India during Pandemic: The Curious Case of Witch-hunting

    Faizan Malik | Covid-19, Necropolitics, and Marginalized Experiences During a Global Pandemic

    Mufassir Rashid | ‘Corona Effect’ on South Asian Politics: Diminishing Geopolitics and the inception of Geo-economics

    Adrian Khan | Migration and Social Isolation during the Global Pandemic: Uncertainty, advocacy, and resilience

    12:15 – 12:45 Q&A SESSION AND CLOSING REMARKS


    Speakers

    Dr. Ethel Tungohan
    Canada Research Chair in Canadian Migration Policy, Impacts and Activism; Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics, York University

    Dr. ​Jonathan Corpus Ong
    Associate Professor of Global Digital Media, University of Massachusetts - Amherst

    Dr. Gideon Lasco
    Physician and medical anthropologist; Senior Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of the Philippines Diliman; Research Fellow, Development Studies Program, Ateneo de Manila University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Department of Anthropology

    Department of Political Science

    Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 19th 9th Annual IMFG Toronto City Manager's Address: If Not Now When? A Whole of Government Approach to Recovery

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 19, 20204:30PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    COVID-19 has challenged the City of Toronto and municipal governments across the country like never before. The City has adapted to respond to the increased and profound needs of Toronto’s residents, businesses, and neighbourhoods, especially those most impacted by the pandemic – racialized, Indigenous, and equity-seeking communities. To protect lives and livelihoods it has worked closely and effectively across governments including with other cities in the region, institutions, and community partners.

    To successfully recover and renew our city, the City cannot do it all and it cannot do it alone. Responding to COVID-19 has demonstrated how effective governments can be when they prioritize collaboration and the well-being of all Canadians. A “whole of governments” approach will continue to be critical as we lay the foundation for a shared recovery amidst the ongoing uncertainty and challenges the pandemic presents. Collaboration is critical to achieve shared success of governments, communities, agencies, academic institutions and the private sector.

    What does Toronto and the region need to recover from COVID-19 and build back stronger? How can we build on recent successes and continue to address and overcome the constraints and barriers that have historically limited effective intergovernmental and intersectoral collaboration? What will partnership look like across the GTHA?

    Toronto’s City Manager Chris Murray will share his thoughts on the learnings of the last several months and what he sees as the way forward.

    Speaker
    Chris Murray is City Manager of the City of Toronto.
    Moderator
    Jan De Silva is President and CEO of the Toronto Region Board of Trade.


    Speakers

    Chris Murray
    City Manager, City of Toronto

    Jan De Silva
    President & CEO, Toronto Region Board of Trade



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th “Geoeconomic Strategy in the Asia-Pacific” – In conversation with Saori N. Katada

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 202010:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Global Japan will be welcoming Professor Saori N. Katada from the University of Southern California, to introduce her new book, ‘Japan’s New Regional Reality – Geoeconomic Strategy in the Asia-Pacific.’

    Book Description:
    Since the mid-1990s, Japan’s regional economic strategy has transformed. Once characterized by bilateralism, informality, and neomercantilism, Japanese policy has shifted to a new liberal strategy emphasizing regional institution building and rule setting. As two major global powers, China and the United States, wrestle over economic advantages, Japan currently occupies a pivotal position capable of tipping the geoeconomic balance in the region.

    Japan’s New Regional Reality offers a comprehensive analysis of Japan’s geoeconomic strategy that reveals the country’s role in shaping regional economic order in the Asia-Pacific. Saori N. Katada explains Japanese foreign economic policy in light of both international and domestic dynamics. She points out the hurdles to implementing a state-led liberal strategy, detailing how domestic political and institutional changes have been much slower and stickier than the changing regional economics. Katada highlights state-market relations and shows how big businesses have responded to the country’s interventionist policies. The book covers a wide range of economic issues including trade, investment, finance, currency, and foreign aid. Japan’s New Regional Reality is a meticulously researched study of the dynamics that have contributed to economic and political realities in the Asia-Pacific today, with significant implications for future regional trends. (Columbia University Press)

    Bio:
    Saori N. Katada is Professor of Political Science and International Relations Department at University of Southern California. Her new book Japan’s New Regional Reality: Geoeconomic Strategy in the Asia-Pacific was published by Columbia University Press in July 2020. She is also a co-author of two recent books: The BRICS and Collective Financial Statecraft (Oxford University Press, 2017), and Taming Japan’s Deflation: The Debate over Unconventional Monetary Policy (Cornell University Press, 2018). She has her Ph.D. is from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Political Science), and her B.A. from Hitotsubashi University (Tokyo). Before joining USC, she served as a researcher at the World Bank in Washington D.C., and as International Program officer at the UNDP in Mexico City.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Saori N. Katada
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science and International Relations Department, University of Southern California

    Phillip Lipscy
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th Water sharing in the Himalayas: How do the India-China border skirmishes affect the future of transboundary water cooperation on South Asian rivers?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The recent border skirmishes between India and China have brought to the surface the growing prospect of transboundary water conflict as an emerging flashpoint in the Himalayas. While India has bilateral water sharing treaties with all its neighbours in South Asia, the last decade has highlighted the challenge of encouraging and including China as an important stakeholder within transboundary water governance in the region. However, a disputed land border between the Asian giants, new rounds of skirmishes between their respective armies and the reluctance of both countries to move beyond bilateral approaches on water sharing has stymied transboundary cooperation on all major river basins in Himalayan South Asia. Our panel of water experts will examine the impact of recent developments on the prospects for peace based on current water cooperation; as well as the future of transboundary water agreements in the larger South Asian region.
    ______________________________

    ZAFAR ADEEL is Professor of Professional Practice at the School of Resource and Environmental Management and Executive Director of the Pacific Water Research Centre, Simon Fraser University, Canada. Adeel is interested in environmental policy formulation and governance in its broadest sense. His current research interests lie at the intersection of water security with the international development agenda, particularly the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). He serves as the Series Editor for a book series by Springer: “Water Security in a New World.” He also serves on the editorial boards of Sustainability Science (Springer) and New Water Policy and Practice Journal (PSO). He has served with the United Nations for over 18 years with progressively increasing responsibilities in the international development and research environment. This includes a 10-year tenure as the Director of United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH) in Hamilton, Canada. Adeel has helped develop networks of scientists in countries with water challenges, particularly those in Africa, Middle East and Asia.

    NIMMI KURIAN is Professor at the Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi and Faculty Advisor, India China Institute, The New School, New York. She was Fellow (2008-2010) and India Academic Representative (2010-2015), India China Institute, The New School, New York. Her research interests include Asian borderlands, comparative regionalism and subregionalism, Indian foreign policy, constituent diplomacy and transboundary water governance. She is one of the contributors to the India Country Report as part of the Bangladesh China India Myanmar Economic Corridor (BCIM EC) Joint Study Group, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India. She is also part of the Asian Borderlands Research Initiative, a network of scholars interested in the reconfiguration of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of borderlands.

    DAVID MICHEL a Senior Researcher with SIPRI’s Environment of Peace 2022 initiative. His work explores the cooperative opportunities and potential security risks posed by mounting pressures on the world’s shared natural resources, and the possibilities for collective institutions to meet global environmental challenges. Prior to joining SIPRI in May 2020 he served as Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Climate and Security, Senior Manager in the Transboundary Water Management Department with the Stockholm International Water Institute, and as Director of the Environmental Security Program at the Stimson Center. He has advised the US Department of State and the National Intelligence Council on transboundary water governance, food security, and climate policy issues, and held fellowships with the Geneva Centre for Security Policy and the United States Institute of Peace.

    BHARAT PUNJABI is a Research Fellow at the Global Cities Institute at the University of Toronto. He has taught courses in economic geography, political ecology, water management, Asian urbanization, and the political economy of development at institutions such as the University of Western Ontario, the University of Toronto and the University of Guelph. His research has been funded by the International Development Research Centre, the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute and other organizations. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water policy, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. This work is based on his dissertation and current field research in large mega regions in India. Dr. Punjabi is also a visiting fellow at the Indian Council for Research in International Economic Relations (ICRIER) in New Delhi.


    Speakers

    Zafar Adeel
    Panelist
    Professor of Professional Practice, School of Resource and Environmental Management and Executive Director, Pacific Water Research Centre, Simon Fraser University, Canada

    Nimmi Kurian
    Panelist
    Professor, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India

    David Michel
    Panelist
    Senior Researcher, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Stockholm, Sweden

    Bharat Punjabi
    Moderator
    Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute and Lecturer, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 20th Authoritarian Legacies, Citizens, and Protest: Lessons from the Taegeukgi Rally in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 20, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Supporters of South Korean authoritarian successor party have organized a movement called the Taegeukgi Rally. This movement started in late 2016 to oppose the impeachment of then President, Park Geun-hye. Then, the movement transformed into anti-government protest after the formation of the new administration by President Moon Jae-in. This movement is puzzling in many ways and the literature on mass mobilization does not provide a good explanation about the movement’s timing, demographic composition, and protest agendas. This study suggests an alternative explanation to understand the mobilization. By conducting in-depth interviews with 25 rally participants, this study finds that the collective identity of participants that was shaped in the authoritarian period motivates certain individuals to participate in the rally.

    Myunghee Lee is a visiting fellow at the University of Missouri and a non-resident research fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia. She earned her Ph.D in Political Science at the University of Missouri. She is the recipient of the 2020 David M. Wood Excellence in Political Science Research Award. Her research focuses on protest, democratization, and state violence. Her research appears in International Security and Politics & Gender.

    *Zoom Details*

    Join Zoom Meeting
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    Meeting ID: 816 1694 9449
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    Speakers

    Myunghee Lee
    Visiting fellow at the University of Missouri and a non-resident research fellow at the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 23rd The Emperor's New Road: China and the Project of the Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 23, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Taking readers on a journey to China’s projects in Asia, Europe, and Africa, Jonathan E. Hillman reveals in a new book how the Belt and Road Initiative, Xi Jinping’s signature foreign policy vision, is unfolding on the ground.


    Speakers

    Jonathan Hillman
    Senior Fellow, Economics Program, and Director, Reconnecting Asia Project, The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), Washington DC



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 24th What does a just transition look like in a time of pandemic?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 24, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab invites you to join the panel discussion for the third webinar on just transition amidst the pandemic.

    The pandemic has exposed the impact that everyday inequality has on vulnerable communities, and their limited capacities to respond to major shocks in terrifying detail. Our panelists will discuss how a just transition to a low carbon future can address these inequalities to make decarbonization a sustainable process that enhances justice, equity, and anti-racism.


    Speakers

    Donna Ashamock
    Community Organizer and Steering Committee Member at Indigenous Climate Action.

    Nadége Compaoré
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    John Cartwright
    President of the Toronto & York Region Labour Council



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 25th David Miller in conversation: Solved: How the World's Great Cities are Fixing the Climate Crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 25, 202012:30PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online
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    Description

    In his recently published book, Solved: How the World’s Great Cities Are Fixing the Climate Crisis, David Miller argues that cities are taking action on climate change because they can – and because they must. Taking cues from progressive cities around the world, including Los Angeles, New York, Toronto, Oslo, Shenzhen, and Sydney, this book is a summons to every city to make small but significant changes that can drastically reduce our carbon footprint. As much a “how to” guide for policymakers as a work for concerned citizens, Solved aims to inspire hope through its clear and factual analysis of what can be done – now, today – to mitigate our harmful emissions and pave the way to a 1.5-degree world.

    Join the School of Cities and the Environmental Governance Lab for a conversation with David Miller about leading global cities and creating a more sustainable planet.


    Speakers

    David Miller
    Speaker
    Author and Director, C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group

    Matti Siemiatycki
    Speaker
    Interim Director, School of Cities

    Teresa Kramarz
    Opening Remarks
    Co-Director Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School

    Soukayna Remmal
    Speaker
    Recent Graduate Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and School of Cities Fellow


    Sponsors

    School of Cities, University of Toronto

    Environmental Governance Lab, Munk School


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 25th After Trump?: implications for US allies

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 25, 20204:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Agenda 2020: Making Sense of the American Election

    Description

    Between the soaring COVID case count in the US and its economic costs, deep loyalty for Trump in the Republican base and deep partisan polarisation exposed by the election, what will be the points of policy change and continuity in US? While President-elect Biden promises to restore alliances and multilateralism as pillars of US foreign policy, what should close allies such as Australia and Canada reasonably expect from the new administration.

    Professor Simon Jackman commenced as Chief Executive Officer of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney in April 2016. Born and raised in Australia, he went to the U.S. for post-graduate study, which became a 27 year stay in the US, including twenty years as Professor of Political Science and Statistics at Stanford University. Jackman’s research interests are in elections and public opinion, with a long publishing career spanning work on both the United States and Australia. In 2016 and 2017, Jackman served as an expert witness helping to secure the first successful legal challenges to partisan gerrymandering in the United States in decades. As leader of the US Studies Centre he oversees the Centre’s research on US politics, foreign policy and defence, and trade investment, ensuring the Centre’s analysis of America provides insight for Australian policymakers, scholars, the media and the public.


    Speakers

    Simon Jackman
    Speaker
    Professor, Chief Executive Officer of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Director of PEARL, Professor in the Department of Political Science & Munk School


    Sponsors

    PEARL (Policy, Elections & Representation Lab), Munk School

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 26th MGA Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 26, 20209:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Learn more about the Master of Global Affairs program.

    Please register to be sent the Zoom link for the event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 27th The Indian Economy at the Crossroads: Towards Reform or Further Stagnation?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 27, 202010:00AM - 12:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    The Indian economy, one of the largest in the world, is set to contract significantly this year. Our panel of experts will discuss policy measures adopted by the Indian government to tackle the economic downturn as a result of the devastating effects of COVID 19 pandemic in the country. The panel will also discuss short and medium run scenarios for the Indian economy highlighting the interdependence between democratic institutions, economic growth and welfare. Finally, the panelists will also discuss India’s regional and international economic relations in the context of the present crisis in globalization and the country’s border impasse with China.


    Speakers

    Dr. Sanjay Reddy
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Economics, New School University, New York, USA

    Dr. Lekha Chakraborty
    Panelist
    Professor, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy (NIPFP), New Delhi, India and Research Associate, Bard College, NY, USA

    Dr. Saon Ray
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Indian Council of International Economic Relations (ICRIER), New Delhi, India

    Dr. Bharat Punjabi
    Moderator
    Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute and Lecturer, Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Dr. John Harriss
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Canada


    Sponsors

    Canadian International Council - Toronto Branch

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 27th The "Skeleton in the Closet": Unveiling Submerged Histories in Contemporary Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Which histories of Asia are remembered and which are forgotten? The process of remembering is selective, such that certain histories are granted the status of truth and highlighted in public dialogue, while others are forgotten or deliberately swept under the rug. This event seeks to unearth some examples of the latter to underscore the histories of marginalized groups and their lived experiences. In order to do so we are delighted to be joined by two experts:
    Dr. Takashi Fujitani will discuss the issue of comfort women and how it ties into the transnational cover-up of Japanese war and colonial crimes.
    Dr. Jessica Soedirgo will focus her discussion on the little known Ahmadiyah minority in Indonesia and why its members are being discriminated against today.

    After their respective talks we will have a 45 minute Q&A session to address any queries and to facilitate dialogue between the speakers and audience members.

    TAKASHI FUJITANI is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). Much of his past and current research has centered on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues. He is the author of Splendid Monarchy (UC Press, 1996; Japanese version, NHK Books, 1994; Korean translation, Yeesan Press, 2003) and Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Koreans in WWII (UC Press, 2011; Japanese version forthcoming from Iwanami Shoten); co-editor of Perilous Memories: The Asia Pacific War(s) (Duke U. Press, 2001); and editor of the series Asia Pacific Modern (UC Press).

    JESSICA SOEDIRGO is a postdoctoral fellow in the Asian Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Studies, Georgetown University. She will be starting as an Assistant Professor at the University of Amsterdam in April 2021. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto. Her research is motivated by an interest in ethnic and religious conflict, with a regional focus on Southeast Asia. She primarily uses qualitative methods, grounded in extensive fieldwork. Her book project, The Threat of Small Things: Patterns of Repression and Mobilization Against Micro-Sized Groups in Indonesia, asks why very small groups become targets of state repression and mobilization despite their economic and political insignificance. Her work has been published in Citizenship Studies, Southeast Asia Research, Qualitative and Multi-Method Research, and PS: Political Science and Politics.


    Speakers

    Deep Leekha
    Moderator
    President of the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union at the Asian Institute

    Takashi Fujitani
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jessica Soedirgo
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Studies, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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