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May 2018

  • Tuesday, May 1st Oil Palm Capital: A Feminist Ecology Lens on Mobile Labour and Accelerated Dispossession in Indonesia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Rebecca Elmhist is a leading feminist political ecologist and human geographer with two decades of research and teaching experience on struggles over environmental governance, migration and social justice in the global South. Her work explores new ways to rethink feminist political ecology by linking theories associated with material feminism to empirical work on mobility, environmental change and gender in Southeast Asia.

    All are welcome!

    This event is presented as part of the Ecologies on the Edge programme by the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, and the York Centre for Asian Research and the Graduate Programme in Geography at York University.

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/171064526946881

    More information: ycar@yorku.ca

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Rebecca Elmhirst
    University of Brighton


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Graduate Programme in Geography at York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 1st Patronal Politics and Business Autonomy in Post-Maidan Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 1, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Ukrainian big business has preserved its influence in post-Maidan politics despite the political turbulence and changes in the institutional setting of Ukraine’s political regime. Recent studies demonstrate that the core of Ukrainian big business has remained stable and that their strategies to exert political influence have stayed on largely unchanged. Still, it does not mean that the model of business-state relations remained static.
    In this talk Dr. Melnykovska will re-examine the system of patronal politics in post-Maidan Ukraine. She will seek to answer several questions: How has Ukrainian big business adjusted its ties to the main political actors within the revised polity and dynamic political processes? How has the balance of power in the state-business relations evolved? And finally, what system of patronal politics has been established? In particular, Dr. Melnykovska will demonstrate how Ukrainian companies exploited the mobility of their capital and offshore vehicles to strengthen their profits and protect their assets and in result increased their autonomy through breaking down the monopoly of the state as the only enabler of rent-seeking and protector of property rights. Also, the legitimation strategies of Ukrainian big business as an additional source of business autonomy will be discussed. The talk will end with several innovative policy recommendations for the Western governments regarding the current reform efforts in Ukraine to root out patronal politics and corruption associated with it.

    Inna Melnykovska is an Assistant Professor at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary the Smith Richardson Foundation’s Strategy and Policy Fellow at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University. She is completing a book titled: Global Money, Local Politics: Big Business, Capital Mobility and the Transformation of Crony Capitalism in Eurasia. Inna Melnykovska will be a Petro Jacyk Visiting Professor at CERES in April-June 2018.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Inna Melnykovska
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Political Science, Central European University

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 1st Book Launch - Creating Opportunities: A Volunteer's Memoir

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 1, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Vivian and David Campbelll Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place
    (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Note this event has been relocated to the Campbell Conference Facility at the Munk School of Global Affairs,1 Devonshire Place.

    Join author Chris Snyder for a fascinating trip through time and place, enriched with advice for those who’ve found meaning—or would like to find meaning—in volunteering. This “how-to” guide will inspire, inform and entertain as Chris takes us on a tour through the streets of Bombay, rural Malawi and high-powered boardrooms to tell us why he thinks there is much more good in the world than bad.
    Chris has won numerous awards for his volunteer work spanning 70 years, including the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers.

    Tuesday, May 1, 2018
    5:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M.
    Refreshments will be served

    Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Boardroom, 315 Bloor Street West
    Toronto, Ontario

    To RSVP, please reply to mary@hilborn.com

    or call Mary at Civil Sector Press (416) 267-1287

    Learn more about the website here or at the launch event


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 2nd A new take on Palestine/Israel: The violence of bureaucracy, and the potential of justice

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 2, 201811:00AM - 1:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Palestine/Israel is often described in a sequence of battles or ‘clashes’ regarding ideology, land, violence, economy and international relations. In the media and beyond, these overshadow the everyday experiences of structural or bureaucratic violence. Through a visual tour and narrative presentation, Nadia Abu-Zahra shares her work (completed with Adah Kay) chronicling how millions of Palestinians have been denationalized through the bureaucratic tools of census, population registration, blacklisting and a discriminatory legal framework. Based on first-hand accounts and extensive fieldwork, the presentation shows how identity documents continue to be used as a means of coercion, extortion, humiliation and informant recruitment. The violence of bureaucracy, however, is resisted by Palestinians, Israelis and internationals who refuse to be displaced and divided, to be bound by movement restrictions, and to accept the structural injustice of ‘systematic oppression’ (a term used in international law).

    Biography:
    Dr. Nadia Abu-Zahra is Associate Professor of International Development and Global Studies and a member of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa. She also serves on the Reconciliation Committee of the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. She was previously based at the University of Oxford, and has worked on projects for Oxfam, UNICEF, the European Union, the Open Society Foundation, and Global Affairs Canada. As co-Director of Community Mobilization in Crisis — a project to extend higher education to host and refugee communities through blended/distance learning — her collective efforts have garnered several awards.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Nadia Abu-Zahra
    Associate Professor, International Development and Global Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Ottawa


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dept of Geography and Planning


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 2nd How Postcolonial is Post-Western IR? Understanding the International Politics of Russia and Central Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 2, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Scholars of International Relations have called for the creation of a post-Western IR that reflects the global and local contexts of the declining power and legitimacy of the West. Based on interviews with Russian and Central Asian political, economic, and cultural elites, the talk explores the emergence in a particular region of a new global politics of a post-Western type. In this context, a post-Western international politics is emerging with a postcolonial aspect but without the substantive mimicry and hybrid spaces characteristic of established postcolonial relations.

    Contact

    Ed Schatz


    Speakers

    John Heathershaw
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, University of Exeter

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Associate Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 2nd The Death of Democracy: Author Benjamin Carter Hett In-Conversation

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 2, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Boardoom
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Join author Benjamin Carter Hett for a lecture and Q&A with Professor Randall Hansen on his new book, Death of Democracy.

    About the Book:
    Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time.

    To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany’s leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler’s hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship.

    About the Author
    Benjamin Carter Hett is a Canadian historian and the author of three previous books: Burning the Reichstag, Crossing Hitler, which was the winner of the 2007 Fraenkel Prize from the Wiener Library in London, and Death in the Tiergarten. He is a professor of history at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and holds a PhD in history from Harvard University and a law degree from the University of Toronto. He grew up in Edmonton, Alberta, and now lives in New York City. His books have been translated into German, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Slovenian, and Chinese.


    Speakers

    Benjamin Carter Hett
    Speaker
    Department of History, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York

    Professor Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 3rd Does local government autonomy promote fiscal sustainability? Lessons from Illinois’ home rule municipalities

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 3, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Every year, IMFG awards two fellowships to graduate students at the University of Toronto who are undertaking doctoral or master’s level work in areas related to municipal finance and governance. Come learn more about the research for one of this year’s fellowship winners.

    Illinois’ home rule municipalities enjoy some of the broadest discretionary authority of any local government in North America. According to Illinois’ 1970 Constitution, local officials in these jurisdictions are permitted to “exercise any power and perform any function pertaining to [their] government and affairs,” subject only to expressed limitations. This contrasts sharply with their non-home rule counterparts whose powers are limited to those expressly granted by state statute.

    What are the consequences of home rule authority on fiscal sustainability? What lessons does this hold for Canadian municipalities? On May 3, IMFG Graduate Fellow Matthew Walshe will address these questions by analyzing the experience of over 50 cities and villages that adopted home rule within the past two decades.

    Speaker Matthew Walshe is the recipient of IMFG’s Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. He is a doctoral student in economics. He holds a bachelor’s degree in economics and a master’s degree in economics and finance, both from the University of Alberta.

    Seating is limited for the event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Matthew Walshe
    IMFG Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 4th (RE)THINKING DIVERSITY & COMPARISON

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 4, 201810:00AM - 4:00PMAnthropology Building, AP246
    19 Russell Street
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    Series

    Osaka University & University of Toronto Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Please join us for a joint graduate student workshop between Osaka University’s RESPECT program, the Asian Institute and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. This workshop puts Japanese conceptions of kyosei (coexistence) in conversation with forms of Canadian multiculturalism. We aim to consider how conceptions of living with or managing difference might learn from each other, revealing occlusions, invisibilities, and the ways that particular histories shape these contemporary conceptions. We ask: On what grounds do we begin to compare these forms of diversity? What similarities, incommensurabilities, connections or divergences emerge, and what do they tell us about our own presumptions of living with, and understanding, difference?

    Organizers: Brenton Buchanan, Bronwyn Frey, Nicholas Feinig & Johanna Pokorny

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Osaka University’s RESPECT program

    Department of Anthropology


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 7th Kim Thúy Talks About Her Novel “Vi”

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 7, 20185:30PM - 7:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Kim Thúy reads from her novel Vi followed by audience Q&A.
    CBC News describes Vi as “exploring the lives, loves and struggles of Vietnamese refugees as they reinvent themselves in new lands.”
    Citation for quote: http://www.cbc.ca/books/vi-1.4480676

    4:00-5:00: Book signing and reception. The book “Vi” will be available for sale and the author will sign copies. Light refreshments will be served.
    5:00-5:30: Break
    5:30-7:30: Presentation by Kim Thuy

    Bio:
    Born in Saigon in 1968, KIM THÚY left Vietnam with the boat people at the age of ten and settled with her family in Quebec. A graduate in translation and law, she has worked as a seamstress, interpreter, lawyer, restaurant owner, and commentator on radio and television. She lives in Montreal and devotes herself to writing.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kim Thúy
    Governor General’s Award-Winning Vietnamese Canadian Author


    Co-Sponsors

    Center for South East Asian Studies

    Asian Canadian Studies

    Asian Canadian Writers Workshop

    Department of French

    Vietnamese Canadian Students Association

    Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library

    Departmet of English

    Penguin Random House Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 9th War Zones in the Bazaar: Markets, Volatility and Global Security A Seminar for Students and Faculty with Aisha Ahmad

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place, Toronto ON
    (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    War Zones in the Bazaar: Markets, Volatility and Global Security
    A Seminar for Students and Faculty with Aisha Ahmad
    ,
    Co-Director, Initiative in Islam and Global Affairs,
    Munk School of Global Affairs
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science

    Moderated by Ritu Birla,
    Director, Initiative in Global Governance, Economy and Society
    Munk School of Global Affairs
    Associate Professor, Department of History

    Response by Dr. Joseph McQuade,
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow,
    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    In what ways would the analysis of contemporary global security shift if we began by inhabiting markets rather than identifying imperatives of state? This seminar, grounded in readings on Pakistan, Afghanistan and India, will consider this question with Aisha Ahmad, political scientist, expert on political economy of civil war and international security policy, and author of Jihad and Co: Black Markets and Islamist Power (Oxford, 2017). Moderated by Ritu Birla, an historian of capitalism, speculative finance and market governance, the session will address informal and formal economies to analyze volatility—financial and political. Dr. Joseph McQuade, SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Asian Institute, and specialist on the category of the terrorist and its deployment by the postcolonial state in South Asia, will respond.

    May 9, 2018
    2-4pm
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility,
    South House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 3K7

    Coffee/tea and snacks at a reception to follow

    Please RSVP to GGES Director by May 2, 2018.
    Access information to a password protected website with preparatory readings from Professor Ahmad’s Jihad and Co. and short supplementary readings on the bazaar speculation and market governance, will be sent to you along with confirmation of your place.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 9th The European Union – A Resurgent Power?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 9, 20186:30PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    NOTE: Interest in this event is very strong. As a free event, seating is provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Overflow spaces will be provided to accommodate audience members beyond the capacity of the main conference room.

    A live webcast of this event will be available starting at 6:30 p.m. at: https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/Live/438.aspx

    Join us on Europe Day for a discussion of the past, present, and future of the European Union featuring a panel of distinguished international experts.

    Introductory remarks by H.E. Peteris Ustubs, European Union Ambassador to Canada

    Panel moderated by Prof. Carolina de Miguel Moyer, University of Toronto

    Ambassador Peteris Ustubs began his posting as the European Union’s top diplomat in Canada in September 2017. Prior to his arrival in Canada, he served as Americas Senior Advisor in the Cabinet of Federica Mogherini, High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice-President of the European Commission. Ambassador Ustubs has held senior positions with the European External Action Service (EEAS), including as Director for West and Central Africa. Prior to that, he was Deputy Head of Cabinet of Andris Piebalgs, former European Commissioner for Development. Ambassador Ustubs joined the Latvian diplomatic service in 1993 and served as the Representative of Latvia to the Political and Security Committee of the EU, the Foreign Policy Advisor to the Prime Minister and Under-Secretary of State – Political Director of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

    H.E. Ferdinando Nelli Feroci is President of the Istituto Affari Internazionali (IAI). A diplomat from 1972 to 2013, he was Permanent Representative of Italy to the European Union in Brussels (2008-13), Chief of Staff to the Minister (2006-08) and Director General for European Integration (2004-06) at the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Previously, he served in New York at the United Nations, in Algiers, Paris and Beijing. He also served as Diplomatic Counsellor of the Vice President of the Italian Council of Ministers (1998). In June 2014 he was appointed to the post of European Commissioner in the Commission chaired by Manuel Barroso to replace Antonio Tajani, a position he held until the end of the mandate of the Commission on November 1, 2014. Formerly a Fellow at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University (1985-86), and Visiting Professor at the Istituto Universitario Orientale of Naples (1989), he is currently a professor at the School of Government of LUISS, Rome. He is the author of many articles and essays on international relations, European affairs and political affairs.

    Dr. Daniela Schwarzer is Director of the German Council on Foreign Relations. She previously was an executive team member of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, serving as GMF’s senior director of research and heading GMF’s Berlin office as well as its Europe program. Prior to this she spent eight years at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP), where she led the research group on European integration from 2008 to 2013. During this time she advised Poland and France during their respective EU Council presidencies, served as a consultant to the Centre d’Analyse Stratégique for the French prime minister, and was a member of the “Europe” working group of the Whitebook Commission on Foreign and European Policy. Before joining SWP, she worked as an opinion page editor and France correspondent for Financial Times Deutschland.She has held a senior research professorship at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC/Bologna since 2014 and was a Fritz Thyssen Fellow at Harvard University’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs in 2012–13. She taught for several years at the Hertie School of Governance and has lectured at the Collège d’Europe in Bruges, the Institute of European Studies of Macau, and the Universität Salzburg. In addition, she serves on the advisory boards of the European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) and the Jacques Delors Institute in Paris and is a non-executive board member of BNP Paribas.

    Szabolcs Takács is the State Secretary for European Union Affairs at the Prime Minister’s Office of Hungary. The State Secretary comprehensively supervises the European Union issues in the Hungarian Government. He represents Hungary in the General Affairs Council. Prior to this position, he served as the Deputy State Secretary for Security Policy (Political Director) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. He also served as the Deputy State Secretary for Global Affairs between 2012 and 2013, and as Director General of the Asia-Pacific Department between 2011 and 2012. Between 2005 and 2009 he was the Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Hungary in Doha, Qatar and prior to that worked at the Department of Asia-Pacific since joining the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 2002. He specializes in the Western-Balkan and Asia-Pacific regions. From 2015 to 2016 he chaired the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA), an organization of 31 countries.

    Ambassador Theodoros N. Sotiropoulos served in the Greek Ministry of Foreign Affairs since 1977, most recently as Permanent Representative of Greece to the European Union from 2009 to 2014. His numerous other roles have including posts in Bulgaria, Germany, Canada (as Consul General in Toronto from 1989 to 1993), and as Ambassador to Austria and Permanent Representative to the International Organizations in Vienna from 2003 to 2007.

    Sponsors

    European Union Consulates General

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Munk School of Global Affairs


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 9th ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH OPENING CEREMONY

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 9, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMMetro Hall
    55 John Street
    Toronto, ON M5V 3C6
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    Description

    Featured talks by Chinese Canadian Legend Award Recipients The photo exhibition will be on “Diversity – Fusion – Unity” with about 80 photographs by members of the Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto (CCPST), including special exhibits of photographs by Dr. Neville Poy, CCPST Honourary Advisor Mr Stephen Siu, CCPST President Mr Edwin Ho, and international award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Mr. Justin Poy, CFACI Honourary Patron
    Topic: “The challenge of Canadian Asian Media in 2018”
    Local Canadian ethnic media in Asian communities was thriving in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Why? Because these were some of the only ways that immigrants could keep in touch with news from home and stay in touch with their community. Local TV stations would broadcast older shows but still satisfied the masses, local movie houses would screen films that were launched a year ago back home, but many here hadn’t seen them yet. Then the internet happened, followed by social media and now streaming media. How has this affected local media businesses as they attempt to find relevance and provide value to local Canadian immigrants from Asia? Can print, local radio and TV and website survive? And if so, which ones have the advantage?

    Mr. Stephen Siu, Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto
    Topic: “The Fusion of Cultures in Chinese Architecture”
    A talk with slide show of pictures recently taken by Stephen Siu in Shanghai, Nanjing and Ningbo on architectural heritage and modern structures, and the history and stories behind. With China’s booming economy and infrastructure programs, the migration to urban areas has increased. New architectural structures rise up over old neighbourhoods. The blend of heritage and contemporary architecture influenced by both eastern and western cultures is ever-present in these cities which have historically enjoyed the fusion of cultures.
    The speaker will also discuss the disappearing alleys (hutongs), once the lifeblood of Beijing, against the backdrop of the high-rise glamour of the modern capital city, with photographs provided by award-winning photographer Mr Tam Kam Chiu.

    Plus:
    Dr. Lien Chao & Philip Chan on “Canada 150 Unity in Diversity Workshops in Toronto Schools”

    Co-Organizers: Asian Heritage Month-Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Chinese Canadian Photography Society of Toronto; WE Artists’ Group; Social Services Network Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Mr. Justin Poy
    CFACI Honourary Patron

    Mr. Stephen Siu
    Honourary Advisor, Chinese Canadian Photographic Society of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 10th ROM Daytime: Migration Stories: Pathways to Canada and Indonesian Migrant Women

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 10, 201811:00AM - 1:30PMRoyal Ontario Museum
    Lecture held in the Eaton Theatre
    Level 1B
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    Series

    ROM Daytime

    Description

    Discover ground breaking research and fascinating advances in art, culture, and nature as our experts share their cutting edge work in this engaging series of daytime lectures.

    Join Professor Rachel Silvey as she examines the emotional vocabularies and imagined geographies of gendered piety that are deployed in attempts to mobilize, direct, and discipline women’s transnational labor migration. Her in-depth work is based on interviews with migrant recruiters, state officials, and migrants in West Java, as well as data collected by migrant rights activists, and explores the articulations of women’s virtue as a key dimension of the moral geographies of Indonesian women’s overseas migration.

    Rachel Silvey is Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute and Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning. She is a Faculty Affiliate in CDTS, WGSI, and the Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a dual B.A. from the University of California at Santa Cruz in Environmental Studies and Southeast Asian Studies.
    Professor Silvey is best known for her research on women’s labour and migration in Indonesia. She has published widely in the fields of migration studies, cultural and political geography, gender studies, and critical development. Her major funded research projects have focused on migration, gender, social networks, and economic development in Indonesia; immigration and employment among Southeast Asian-Americans; migration and marginalization in Bangladesh and Indonesia; and religion, rights and Indonesian migrant women workers in Saudi Arabia.

    NOTE: This lecture replaces the talk originally scheduled by Lisa Mar

    Free with Museum Admission

    11:00 am – 12:00 pm Lecture in Eaton Theatre
    12:00 pm – 1:15 pm Coffee, Tea & Treats in Theatre Rotunda

    Note: Assistive listening devices and American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation are available on request. ASL interpretation requires three weeks advance notice. Please email programs@rom.on.ca to request the service.

    Contact

    Royal Ontario Museum
    (416) 586-5797


    Speakers

    Rachel Silvey
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Royal Ontario Museum

    Bishop White Committee


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 10th Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 10, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library
    8th floor, Robarts Library
    130 St. George St
    Toronto, ON
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies

    Description

    The York Centre for Asian Research and the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library are co-presenting the Second Bernard H.K. Luk Memorial Lecture in Hong Kong Studies, titled “Hong Kong and the Gold Mountain Dream” on Thursday, May 10th, 2018 at 4-6PM. This seminar will take place at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library (8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George St, Toronto).

    We are pleased to announce that Professor Elizabeth Sinn from the University of Hong Kong and author of Pacific Crossing: California Gold, Chinese Migration, and the Making of Hong Kong will be the keynote speaker for this event. Professor Sinn will be speaking on Hong Kong as an “in-between place” during Chinese migration to California for various opportunities in the latter part of the 19th century. The concept of “in-between places” during migratory periods can also offer a new paradigm for migration studies, which typically only focus on the sending or receiving countries.

    Other notable speakers and participants for the event include:

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy, Chancellor Emerita at the U of T and retired Senator of Canada
    Miss Florence Tsang, Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office (Toronto)
    Professor Abidin Kusno, Director at the York Centre for Asian Research
    Mr. Larry Alford, Chief Librarian at the University of Toronto Libraries
    Professor Lisa Mar, Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies at the U of T

    This event is free of charge and light refreshments will be provided.

    For additional information, please visit

    Please RSVP before May 3rd by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    Professor Elizabeth Sinn
    Keynote
    University of Hong Kong

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Speaker
    Chancellor Emerita, U of T Retired Senator of Canada

    Miss Florence Tsang
    Speaker
    Deputy Director at the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, Toronto

    Professor Abidin Kusno
    Speaker
    Director, York Centre for Asian Research

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Speaker
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

    Professor Lisa Mar
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Chair, Chinese Canadian Studies, U of T


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs

    The York Centre for Asian Research

    Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 11th Past Present and Future of the Political Left in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 11, 20183:30PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Korea has a long and proud history of the socialist/Communist political radicalism, dating back to the colonial age (1910-45) when the dual (class and national) oppression created the conditions under which the Communists came to constitute one of the most influential ideological sectors of the national movement by the mid-1920s. Koreans were also prominent in the Communist parties and movements in China, Japan and the Soviet Far East (until their forced deportation from there in 1937). Under the anti-Communist dictatorships of the 1950-70s, South Korean Left mostly struggled in the underground to survive; however, it underwent a spectacular revival in the 1980s in the wake of South Korea’s high-speed industrialization, spearheading the struggle for both national liberation (vis-à-vis US hegemony over South Korea) and social justice. Today, however, the left-nationalist passions of the 1980s are largely seen as a thing of the past, while South Korea’s working class is on defensive, struggling against fragmentation under the conditions of the neo-liberal regime. What will be the way forward for the South Korean Left in an increasingly multi-ethnic, globalized neo-liberal society? The past, present and the possible futures of the South Korean Left are to be dealt with in this presentation.

    Bio: Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja) is professor of Korean and East Asian Studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University. His research focuses on the history of modern ideas in Korea. He is the author of Social Darwinism and Nationalism in Korea: the Beginnings (Brill, 2010) as well as Modern Korea and its Others: Perceptions of the Neighbouring Countries and Korean Modernity (Routledge, 2015). He also recently co-edited Buddhist Modernities – Re-inventing Tradition in the Globalizing Modern World (Routledge, 2017) and Military Chaplaincy in an Era of Religious Pluralism (Oxford University Press, 2017).

    This event is presented as part of the Transformative Politics in the Transnational Korea series at the York Centre for Asian Research with support from the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.


    Speakers

    Vladimir Tikhonov (Pak Noja)
    Professor of Korean and East Asian Studies at the Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Oslo University


    Sponsors

    York Centre for Asian Research

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Hope 21


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, May 14th The Not So Popular Aspect of the Indus Civilization: A Biomolecular and Microscopic Study of a Rural Settlement from Kachchh in Gujarat, India.

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, May 14, 201812:00PM - 1:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Insitute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The Harappan or the Indus Valley Civilization, which flourished in South Asia during the 3rd millennium BCE., is not only about large cities, vast expansion and the production and international trade of shiny Harappan-style crafts. The culture-historical thinking that has long influenced the researchers involved with the Indus Civilization has often failed to acknowledge the existence of varied regional economies, and symbiotic relationships between the rural and urban population that helped the Indus civilization to sustain and maintain its glory. The glorious aspect of the Indus Civilization is known to almost everyone interested in ancient civilizations, but how the local regional populations and micro-cultures within the broad umbrella of the Indus Civilizations have sustained themselves and maintained a harmonic interaction with the so-called elite urban population is an aspect of the Indus Civilization which is still poorly known. A number of recent studies influenced by ‘bottom-up’ models have started to focus on the rural settlements in order to understand the changes in the environment and the sustainability of the Indus Civilization, but, only a very few have looked into the economy and adaptation to the regional environment of these rural settlements. My study is one of these very few attempts that attempt to understand the rural economy, regional interaction, and environmental adaptation of a peripheral region of the Indus Civilization.

    In order to decipher the rural lifestyle during the Indus Age, this study had to depend on a number of proxy methods, the application of these methods to the Indus is still in its infancy. For example, through studying the stable isotopes from the tooth enamel of domesticated animals from the rural settlement of Kotada Bhadli, we have tried to understand how the residents of this settlement treated their animals, and to what extent this was dependent on the regional climate and availability of fodder. Through looking into the lipid residues of the foods that were cooked, stored and served in ceramic vessels, we have tried to evaluate how the residents of this settlement have exploited their domesticated animals and other resources available in the vicinity of the settlement. Kotada Bhadli completely lacked any indication of trade-oriented craft activities, but a huge deposition of fine ash at this settlement tells a different story of human activities involving fire. To understand the kind of human activities that may have produced such a huge amount of ash, we studied the phytoliths from the ash to determine the nature of the things that were burnt. The information these proxies reveal to us is interesting and quite different from what we already know in general about the Indus Civilization.

    Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty is an upper year PhD student in the Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto. He completed his Master’s in Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, Deccan College Post-graduate and Research Institute, Pune, India. He specializes in the Indus Valley Civilization, and the focus of his PhD research is the understanding of lifeways in one of the peripheries of the Indus Civilization, including the employment of isotopic and residue analyses, and other archaeological science methods. He has participated in a number of excavations in India and in Europe, where he incorporated photogrammetry and 3D imaging with other established excavation methods. He has presented his research in conferences held in India, the U.S. and Canada, and has published two papers in peer reviewed archaeological journals, and two chapters in edited volumes.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty
    PhD Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Mississaug


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 16th Are You Serious? The Governance of Metropolitan Sydney

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 16, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    IMFG is delighted to welcome Visiting Scholar Graham Sansom to the Institute this spring. Graham is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) in Australia, with a long career in local and state government. As part of his visit, he will be speaking at an IMFG seminar on May 16th about some of his research.

    Sydney is Australia’s largest metropolis with 5 million people, growing towards 7-8 million by mid-century. It faces serious challenges of infrastructure and service provision, environmental management, and spatial inequality.

    Sydney’s metropolitan governance lacks focus. The State government of New South Wales has constitutional authority and dominates planning, infrastructure, and services. But power is dispersed among ten or more ministers. While a Greater Sydney Commission was established in 2015, there is little sign it can effect meaningful coordination. Local government is divided among 34 councils, playing only a minor role at the metropolitan scale. The federal government provides financial support and could exert more influence. It recently fostered a ‘City Deal’ for Western Sydney linked to building a second Sydney airport.

    So far, Sydney has muddled through, and currently State revenues from asset sales and a property boom are funding high profile infrastructure projects. But without more coherent governance, can Sydney’s luck hold? What lessons might large cities in Canada and beyond draw from Sydney’s performance?

    Speaker

    Graham Sansom is a Visiting Scholar at IMFG. He was the inaugural Director of the Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government, based at the University of Technology Sydney. Previously he had a long career in local and state government, and as a consultant to all levels of government across Australia.

    Seating is limited for the event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Graham Sansom
    IMFG Visiting Scholar



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 16th China and North Korea: Friends Without Benefits

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the weeks leading up to the historic meeting between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, China is feeling sidelined. What does Beijing want from Pyongyang? How does China’s interest in North Korea differ from that of the United States? And what might Beijing do to ensure North Korea remains within China’s sphere of influence?

    Isaac Stone Fish is a journalist and a senior fellow at the Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations in New York City; an on-air contributor to CBSN, and an international affairs analyst for PRI’s The World. Previously he served as Foreign Policy Magazine’s Asia Editor: he managed coverage of the region, and wrote about the politics, economics, and international affairs of China, Japan, and North Korea. A fluent Mandarin speaker and formerly a Beijing correspondent for Newsweek, Stone Fish spent seven years living in China prior to joining Foreign Policy. He has traveled widely in the region and in the country, visiting every Chinese province, autonomous region, and municipality.

    His views on international affairs have been widely quoted, including in MSNBC, ABC, NPR, CBS, CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, Slate, The Guardian, the BBC, the Sydney Morning Herald, Talking Points Memo, and Al-Jazeera, among others; and in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese media. Besides publishing in Foreign Policy, Stone Fish’s articles have also appeared in The New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Slate, The New Republic, Politico Magazine, The Daily Beast, Time, and the Los Angeles Times. While in Beijing, he served on the board of the Foreign Correspondent’s Club of China, and, when the sky wasn’t the color of glue, was an avid runner.

    Stone Fish is a graduate of Columbia University, where he studied Chinese literature. He is also a Truman National Security Project fellow, a non-resident senior fellow at the University of Nottingham’s China Policy Institute, and an alumnus of the World Economic Forum Global Shaper’s program.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Andre Schmid
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of East Asian Studies Collaborative Master's Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies, Asian Institute

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute

    Isaac Stone Fish
    Speaker
    Journalist and a senior fellow at the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations in New York City


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 17th "Tell them we’re human" What Canada and the world can do about the Rohingya crisis

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 17, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Bob Rae, Prime Minister’s Special Envoy to Myanmar, discusses his report on the humanitarian crisis in Bangladesh and Myanmar. Rae engaged in extensive research, travel and meetings with key interlocutors from October 2017 to March 2018 to assess the violent events of August 2017 and afterward that led more than 671,000 Rohingya to flee their homes in Rakhine State, Myanmar, and seek refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.

    His report focuses on four themes: the need to combine principle and pragmatism in responding to the serious humanitarian crisis in both Myanmar and Bangladesh; the ongoing political challenges in Myanmar; the strong signals that crimes against humanity were committed in the forcible and violent displacement of more than 671,000 Rohingya from Rakhine State in Myanmar; and the clear need for more effective coordination of both domestic and international efforts.*

    Jacques Bertrand, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Specialization in CESEAS, will chair and discuss the report. He is leading a new collaborative project on ethnic minorities and decentralisation in Myanmar, funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). This project follows a previous, four-year research initiative on federalism, democratization and ethnic minorities in Myanmar, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

    *-Text adapted from:
    http://international.gc.ca/world-monde/issues_development-enjeux_developpement/response_conflict-reponse_conflits/crisis-crises/rep_sem-rap_esm.aspx?lang=eng#a3

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    The Honourable Bob Rae
    Speaker
    Prime Minister’s Special Envoy to Myanmar

    Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Jacques Bertrand
    Chair
    Director, Collaborative Master's Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
    Professor of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 17th Crimea after the Annexation: Repressions against Crimean Tatars and Other Human Rights Violations

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 17, 20183:00PM - 5:30PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre
    15 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opening Remarks:

    Mr. Andriy Shevchenko, Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada

    Chair: Professor Victor Ostapchuk (Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, University of Toronto)

    Speakers:

    Professor Paul Robert Magocsi (the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto): Crimea and Crimean Tatars: the Historical Context

    Mr. Akhtem Chyigoz (Deputy Chairman of the Milli Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People): Struggle of the Crimean Tatar people and other citizens of Ukraine for their Motherland and territorial integrity of Ukraine in the time of military occupation by the Russian Federation

    Professor John Packer (Neuberger-Jesin Professor of International Conflict Resolution in the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa): State Responsibility for Human Rights in Crimea

    BIOS OF PARTICIPANTS

    Paul Robert Magocsi is professor of history and political science at the University of Toronto, where since 1980 he also holds the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies. He completed his education at Rutgers University (B.A. 1966; M.A. 1967), Princeton University (M.A. 1969; Ph.D. 1972), and Harvard University (Society of Fellows 1976). He is a member of the Harvard University Society of Fellows (1976). Professor Magocsi has taught at Harvard University, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Prešov University in Slovakia, and on five occasions was historian-in-residence at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle, Germany. In 1996 he was appointed a permanent fellow of the Royal Society of Canada—Canadian Academies of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences, and has been awarded honorary degrees from Prešov University in Slovakia (doctor honoris causa, 2013) and from Kamianets-Podilskyi National University in Ukraine (pochesnyi profesor, 2015). Interested in the history of nationalism, in particular among ethnic groups living in border areas. Has published in the fields of history, sociolinguistics, bibliography, cartography and immigration studies.

    Chiygoz Akhtem Seytullayovych is Deputy Chairman of the Milli Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People. His work experience in the Mejlis started from the position of Chairman of the local Mejlis of the Tenistoye village of Bakhchisarai district. Since his election in 2002, during 16 years he governed the Bakhchisarai regional Mejlis, one of the most active regulatory body of self-government of the Crimean Tatars in Crimea. In 2008, Chiygoz was elected as a Deputy Chairman of the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People. After the deportation of Mustafa Dzhemilev and Refat Chubarov, during the annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation, A. Chiygoz took an active pro-Ukrainian position among the Crimean Tatars and citizens of Ukraine of other nationalities in Crimea. On January 29, 2015, he was arrested and until 26.10.2017 was kept in Investigation Isolator of the Simferopol city (AR of Crimea) on a charge of violating Part 1. Art. 212 of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation “Organization of Mass Riots”. A.Chiygoz was charged with so-called organization of mass riots at a rally on February 26, 2014 in Simferopol, which in a fact was held to support the territorial integrity of Ukraine and to prevent the adoption of a separatistic decision by the Verkhovna Rada of Crimea. On September 11, 2017, the Kremlin-controlled Supreme Court of Crimea sentenced him to eight years of imprisonment. The international human rights organization “AmnestyInternational” awarded Akhtem Chiygoz the status of a political prisoner, as well as the status of a “Prisoner of conscience.”

    John Packer is Neuberger-Jesin Professor of International Conflict Resolution in the Faculty of Law and Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa. He previously taught at the Fletcher School (Tufts University) and the University of Essex, held Fellowships at Cambridge and Harvard Universities, and has lectured at academic and professional institutions around the world. Over his 30-year career, he was an inter-governmental official for 20 years (UNHCR, ILO, OHCHR, UNDPA, OSCE) and has advised numerous governments, communities and other actors in over fifty countries. Before coming to the University of Ottawa in 2014, he was the Constitutions Expert on the UN’s Standby Team of Mediation Experts. The focus of his research and practice is at the inter-section of human rights (including minority rights) and security, notably conflict prevention and quiet diplomacy, international mediation, transitional arrangements, and institutional developments at domestic and multilateral levels. From 1995-2004 Professor Packer was Senior Legal Adviser then first Director in the Office of the High Commissioner on National Minorities of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe during which he was actively engaged with Ukraine including Crimea. A specific focus of his work was negotiation and adoption of elements of the 1996 Constitution of Ukraine and of the 1998 Constitution of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea including specific accommodations for the Crimean Tatars; he also assisted in negotiating arrangements for the facilitated return of Crimean Tatars to their homeland and conferral of Ukrainian nationality.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Canadian Association of Crimean Tatars

    Embassy of Ukraine in Canada

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 17th Canada and the Human Rights of LGBTI People Globally

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 17, 20187:00PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Join us on May 17th, International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia for a special event.

    Invited speakers:

    Hon. Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Government of Canada

    Kees van Baar, International Human Rights Ambassador, Kingdom of the Netherlands

    Fabrice Houdart, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

    Co-hosted by the Dignity Network, Egale, the Embassy of the Netherlands and the Munk School of Global Affairs, our panel will discuss the role of Canada today in the international movement for human rights of sexual and gender minorities.

    This event is a Pride Toronto Official Affiliate Event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 22nd Harney Lecture: Social norms, politics and targeted opposition to Muslim newcomers in Norway. Evidence from a list experiment

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 22, 201811:00AM - 1:00PMDepartment of Sociology, Room 240
    University of Toronto
    725 Spadina Avenue
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    Description

    Strong opposition to Muslim immigration is at the intersection of marginal political discourse and the mainstream in Europe and elsewhere. As a defining issue in a variety of recent events (e.g., populist electoral success in the Netherlands, Germany and Austria), support for targeted opposition to Muslim newcomers has been attributed material concerns and recent refugee flows. In contrast to this approach, this work focuses on how anti-immigrant sentiment is selectively revealed, offering a new perspective on the role of social norms in shaping political discourse. By way of a survey experiment in Norway, we measure the gap between what people express and the beliefs they hold anonymously, assessing how supporters of distinct political parties accept/reject social norms about overtly articulated intolerance.

    Our main findings reproduce some of the findings in previous survey-based studies, but we also obtain two surprising results, both worrying. First, supporters of populist-right Progress Party not only exhibit low levels of tolerance, but they also reject social norm of tolerance toward minorities. Second, supporters of the mainstream centre-right Conservative party, generally considered to be much closer to the centre-left that to populist right when it comes to ethnic intolerance, turn out to be significantly more intolerant after social desirability bias is accounted for. Thus, our result indicate clear left-right divisions in intolerance, also among supporters of mainstream political parties. Implications for broader survey-based research on social norms and ethnic intolerance in Western Europe and North America are discussed.

    In addition to presentation and discussion of empirical results, the guest lecture shall also include a brief presentation of list experiments as means to reduce and measure social desirability bias in survey-based research on sensitive issues.

    Speaker bio:
    Zan Strabac is a sociologist and professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), in Trondheim, Norway. His main research interests are: ethnic relations, majoritarian attitudes, international labour migrations and quantitative research methods. He has published articles in leading journals in sociology and migration studies, such as The Journal of Ethnic and Racial Studies, The Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, The Sociological Quarterly and The Social Science Research.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Zan Strabac
    Professor, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 22nd ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH CONCERT AND ARTS SHOWCASE

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 22, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FESTIVAL 2018
    PRESENTED BY CANADIAN FOUNDATION FOR ASIAN CULTURE (CENTRAL ONTARIO) INC.

    Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada
    Asian Heritage Month Concert and Arts Showcase

    MASTER OF CEREMONY: Vania Chan

    OPENING ADDRESS: Mr. Justin Poy, Honorary Patron, Asian Heritage Month‐‐CFACI

    “GOLDEN FISH FROM THE MONKIEST KING” BY ALICE PING YEE HO
    Vania Chan, soprano| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| text by Marjorie Chan
    Alice Ping Yee Ho’s New Opera with Canadian Children’s Opera THE MONKIEST KING will open on May 26th.
    We are honoured to have a beautiful preview of this new opera.

    “JOURNEY TO THE WEST”
    Chi‐Ping Dance Group | Dancers of Chinese Collective Arts Association

    The Chinese Legend Dance Drama “Journey to the West” depicts the Monk “Tang Sanzang” with his disciples: Monkey King, Pigsy and Sand travel through disasters, fight demons and overcome obstacles during their journey to the West. Finally, they are able to obtain the Buddist Scriptures.
    Four parts of this short dance drama:

    1. Flower Valley – baby monkeys and monkey King
    2. Pigsy and Sand followed Tang as disciples to travel to the West.
    3. Fight demons – In Spider Cave
    4. Finale

    CANASIAN FUSION—Theme Song of the Virtual Museum of Asian Canadian cultural Heritage (VMACCH) BY DAVID KEANE
    Photographs by Tam Kam Chiu and Stephen Siu| Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano| Chan Ka Nin, guitar

    SHOWCASE OF WORKS FROM THE CANADA 150 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS
    Slideshow prepared by Philip Chan and Linda Lai.

    “from line” by Daryl Jamieson
    Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano
    Chan Ka Nin, guitar

    “PAST AND PRESENT” by Chan Ka Nin
    Mushtari Afroz, dancer| Aba Amuquandoh, theatre actor| Vania Chan, soprano| Stephen Tam, flute| Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp| Alice Ho, piano| Chan Ka Nin, guitar| text by Mark Brownell.

    TEN TEN DUO (Japanese music)
    Kiyoshi Nagata, taiko | Aki Takahashi, shamisen, vocal

    SHOWCASE OF WORKS FROM STORYTELLING AND FILM WORKSHOPS
    Video “Halloween PSA” by “Samantha’s Group”
    Poem by Erma Pandeling
    “Haru no Umi” by Michio Miyagi, arranged by Josef Molnar
    Teresa Suen-Campbell, harp | Stephen Tam, flute
    Facilitators | Lien Chao, Arlene Chan

    “”Emerged: যখন বসন্ত এলো”–A KATHAK BANDI Celebration of Spring” by Mushtari Afroz
    CONCEPT, CHOREOGRAPHY & DANCE
    Mushtari Afroz
    MUSIC
    Hindustani Vocal – Shirshendu Mukherjee
    Tabla – Ahilan Kathirgamathamby
    GRAPHIC DESIGN
    Swathika Anandan
    AUDIO/VIDEO
    Dewan Karim & John Martin

    RECEPTION FOLLOWS (sponsored by Mr. Justin Poy)

    Tuesday May 22, 2018, 7 pm (Please be seated by 6.45 pm)

    Innis College Town Hall, University of Toronto, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Map at http://townhall.innis.utoronto.ca/contact/ (St. George Stn)

    Co-organizers
    Asian Heritage Month—Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, York University; Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library, Social Services Network; York Centre for Asian Research, York University; Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
    Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Acknowledgements
    Mr. Justin Poy for sponsoring the Reception
    Steinway Piano sponsored by Steinway Piano Gallery, Toronto

    FREE ADMISSION

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, May 24th The reality of sub-national taxation in conflict-affected states: The incidence and implications of informal taxation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, May 24, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Every year, IMFG awards two fellowships to graduate students at the University of Toronto who are undertaking doctoral or master’s level work in areas related to municipal finance and governance. Come learn more about the research for one of this year’s fellowship winners.

    Taxation is at the centre of the relationship between state and society. In conflict-affected countries, it can be especially critical to rebuilding infrastructure and ensuring sustainable peace and development. When policymakers and international donors approach the task of rebuilding fiscal systems, they often do so with a narrow conception of tax reform in mind – one that is often based on the experience of developed countries.

    The reality in many contexts is critically different. Informal taxes and means of financing public goods often dominate at the local level, while the role of non-state actors in supporting or competing with state finances is fundamental to the success of outcomes. Building on over five years of field research in Sierra Leone, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Somalia, this presentation will demonstrate the significance of informal and non-state taxation, explore the implications for formal state and institution building, and consider options for how formal and informal institutions may work together to achieve more sustainable sub-national revenue collection outcomes.

    Speaker Vanessa van den Boogaard is the recipient of the 2017-2018 IMFG Graduate Fellowship in Municipal Finance and Governance. She is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. She holds a Master of Global Affairs and has worked for the Institute of Development Studies, the Open Society Foundations, the Danish Refugee Council, the International Centre for Tax and Development, and the World Bank. She has led multi-method research projects in Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, and Somalia, and currently serves as an Advisor to the Tax and Gender Program at the Institute of Development Studies and as a Junior Fellow at Massey College.

    Seating is limited for the event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Vanessa van den Boogaard
    2017-2018 IMFG Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 25th The Greening of Global International Society: Global Environmental Politics meets the English School

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 25, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Join us for a special presentation by Professor Robert Falkner, Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs
    on the

    The Greening of Global International Society: Global Environmental Politics meets the English School

    Biography

    Robert Falkner was educated at Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich and the University of Oxford. He is an Associate Professor of International Relations and the Research Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE. Previously, he held lectureships at the universities of Oxford, Kent and Essex. In 2006-07, he was a visiting scholar at Harvard University. At LSE, he serves as the Academic Director of the TRIUM Global Executive MBA, an alliance between LSE, NYU Stern School of Business and HEC Paris. He is also an Associate Fellow of Chatham House, the London-based foreign affairs think tank.

    His research specializes in global environmental politics and international political economy, with a particular focus on climate policy and the role of business in international relations. He has published widely in these areas, including The Handbook of Global Climate and Environment Policy (edited, 2016) and Business Power and Conflict in International Environmental Politics (2008). His recent paper ‘The Emergence of Environmental Stewardship as a Primary Institution of Global International Society’ (co-authored with Barry Buzan, published in European Journal of International Relations) won the 2018 ISA English School Section’s Outstanding Research Paper Award.


    Speakers

    Dr. Robert Falkner

    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    Research Director, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment

    Associate Professor, International Relations, London School of Economics

    Professor Randall Hansen
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 25th Prime Minister of the Republic of Estonia Address: Acting Digital – New Technologies and Statehood: The Estonian Case

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 25, 20183:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs is pleased to welcome Jüri Ratas, Prime Minister of Estonia for a special address.

    Estonia has transformed itself from a small, developing EU nation to a global leader in the digitalisation of society, including government services. Estonians can conduct all aspects of their everyday lives online – from voting to signing legal documents, accessing medical records to seeing who accesses their documents online. The Estonian government has opened an e-residency program, allowing entrepreneurs around the world to establish new businesses in the country.

    While holding the rotating presidency of the Council of the European Union in 2017, Estonia championed the creation of a European digital single market. In 2007, Estonia was the first nation in history to be targeted by state sponsored cyber-attacks that affected public and private services. From that experience, Estonia has built robust cyber defences and has been a pioneer on these issues internationally, including establishing the NATO Cooperative Centre of Excellence for Cyber Defence in Tallinn.

    Biography
    Prime Minister Jüri Ratas
    was born on 2 July 1978 in Tallinn. He holds a bachelor’s degree in law from the University of Tartu and a master’s degree in economics from the Tallinn University of Technology.

    Ratas was first elected to the Tallinn City Council in 2005 and served as Mayor of Tallinn from 2005 to 2007. From 2007 to 2016 he was the Deputy Speaker of the Estonian Parliament. After being elected leader of the Estonian Centre Party in 2016, he formed a coalition government. As Prime Minister, he chaired the rotating presidency of the Council of the European Union during the second half of 2017.

    Ratas is married and has three children. Basketball is his favourite pastime and from 2012 to 2016 he was the President of the Estonian Basketball Association.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, May 25th Baroness Falkner of Margravine - Future Directions for the EU post-Brexit

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, May 25, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Series

    Munk School Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Future Directions for the EU post-Brexit

    Baroness Kishwer Falkner of Margravine
    Member, House of Lords
    Visiting Professor, King’s College, London, UK
    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs

    The act of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union has thrown the internal constitution of the UK into disarray. The balance between the executive and parliament when in a form of coalition government is always difficult but the balance of powers between the two houses of parliament has also ruptured, with consequences for the future. Baroness Falkner joins us at the Munk School, to discuss future directions for the EU post-Brexit, as part of our Distinguished Lecture Series.

    Biography:
    Kishwer Falkner entered the Lords in 2004 and served on the Liberal Democrat front bench till 2010. From 2010-15 she chaired the Liberal Democrats Parliamentary Committee on Foreign Affairs. She has served on several other senior committees of the Lords, including the Constitution Committee, the Joint Committee on Human Rights and several EU committees. She was appointed Chairwoman of the EU Sub-Committee on Economic and Financial Affairs in 2015, and has led this cross-party committee’s pivotal work on the EU and Brexit over the last two years.

    Kishwer is currently Visiting Professor at King’s College and was Chancellor of Northampton University from 2008-16. Kishwer has held Fellowships at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford (2010), and at the Institute of Politics, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2006). She also served as a member of the Prime Minister’s Taskforce on Tackling Muslim Extremism which was established in the aftermath of the London bombings in July 2005.

    Kishwer’s academic background is in International Relations, obtaining degrees from the London School of Economics and the University of Kent.


    Speakers

    Baroness Kishwer Falkner of Margravine
    Speaker
    Member, House of Lords
    Visiting Professor, King’s College, London, UK
    Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Professor Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Sunday, May 27th Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada | Film Festival

    DateTimeLocation
    Sunday, May 27, 20181:30PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    FREE ADMISSION:
    Asian Heritage Month–Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc., Social Services Network in partnership with Reelworld Film Festival present:

    ASIAN HERITAGE MONTH FILM FESTIVAL
    CANADA 150 | Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada

    Asian Heritage Month-Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.
    In partnership with Reelworld Film Festival (www.reelworld.ca)
    Programmed by Tonya Williams, Executive and Creative Director, Reelworld Film Festival

    SHORT FILM FUSION
    Canada 150|Unity in Diversity: Fusion of Communities in Canada
    Short Films made by Students from Toronto Catholic District School Board and Toronto District School Board in Celebration of Canada 150

    INTRODUCTION BY REELWORLD CHAIR OF THE BOARD MOE JIWAN

    SHORT FILM SHOWCASE
    Audience Q&A moderated by Reelworld Chair Moe Jiwan with filmmakers Simu Liu, Lulu Wei, Supinder Wraich and Farid Yazdani

    1. Meeting Mommy| Director Tricia Lee
    Zoe can only see her Mom once a year on her birthday. On the day that she turns six, Zoe has some hard questions for her father to answer.
    Director: Tricia Lee- Director of award-winning films SILENT RETREAT (Best Canadian Feature -Toronto After Dark) and CLEAN BREAK (Best Drama Feature – Atlanta Horror Film Festival), Tricia has just completed her third feature BLOOD HUNTERS. Http://www.reelworld.ca/meeting-mommy

    2. Silver | Director Simu Liu

    During the vampire outbreak, millions either lost their lives or were turned. The world erupted into chaos. Then, a ray of hope – scientists were able to synthesize a blood substitute without the addictive and maddening qualities of human blood. The synthetic blood was mass-produced and distributed amongst the vampire population. Thus, vampires and humans came to co-exist together.

    3. A Bicycle Lesson | Director: Renuka Jeyapalan |Starring: Supinder Wraich

    A dramatic short film focusing on the relationship between a 2nd generation daughter and her mother. When a young woman teaches her mother how to ride a bicycle she discovers a secret that has the potential to mend their fractured relationship.
    Renuka Jeyapalan is a Toronto-based filmmaker and a graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Director’s Lab. Her short film Big Girl premiered at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival and has screened at over thirty-five film festivals around the world. In 2010, Renuka was awarded the Kodak New Vision Mentorship Award by Women in Film and Television-Toronto and was mentored by director Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight, Thirteen). Renuka recently wrote and directed the short film Arranged for TMN, Movie Central, and the Harold Greenberg Fund and is currently developing her first feature film, How to go to a Wedding Alone with Gearshift Films.
    Supinder Wraich is an actress and filmmaker born in Chandigarh, India and raised in Toronto, Canada. She is a graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Actor’s conservatory, holds a BA in Communications from Ottawa University and is also a Sheridan College, Advanced Film & Television program alumni. Wraich plays the lead in the CTV Emmy Award winning series “Guidestones,” for which she earned a Canadian Screen Award. She has also appeared in numerous film and television productions including: Hunter’s Moon, Textuality, CBC’s “The Border,” CTV’s “Degrassi: The Next Generation” and “Saving Hope,” CBC’s “Combat Hospital,” Global’s “Rookie Blue,” BBC’s “Copper,” Syfy’s “Haven,” CW’s “Backpackers,” Comedy’s “The Beaverton,” Syfy’s “Incorporated,” and FX’s “The Strain.”

    4. P6HUT | Web format, Supinder Wraich (director, writer), Matt Power (producer), Ontario, partner: Reelworld Film Festival
    One of projects selected under the Telefilm Canada and the Talent Fund Talent Fund-supported Micro-Budget Production Program.
    It’s the Hipster ‘Legally Blonde’ meets the Sopranos... P6HUT is a good girl gone bad story with a South Asian Female Anti-Hero at its center. Ashamed of her cultural heritage SURPREET DEOL aka ‘SURI’, a 27-year-old Indo-Canadian/ Instagram ‘It girl’, who has successfully separated herself from her roots is forced to return to Brampton/‘BrownTown’ after her father mysteriously disappears.
    Uncovering his involvement as the head of a cross-border drug cartel Suri is forced to replace her father as the interim leader. In doing so, she begins embracing the culture she thought she escaped and her inner bad girl.

    5. There’s no place like this place, Anyplace | Filmmaker selected to participate in the Doc Accelerator Emerging Filmmaker lab. 2018 Doc Accelerator Fellows Supported by Netflix.
    Director: Lulu Wei | Toronto, Ontario (https://www.hotdocs.ca/i/accelerator)
    A filmmaker sets out to document the redevelopment of the historic Honest Ed’s block she calls home, as a way to pay homage to its cultural heritage, and to understand the problems of development and gentrification in Toronto—problems that end up hitting closer to home than expected.
    This is a feature documentary about the redevelopment of the historic Honest Ed’s and Mirvish Village block. In
    Toronto at the intersection of two main streets, Bloor and Bathurst, sits the iconic Toronto landmark Honest Ed’s. In 2013, Honest Ed’s and the surrounding buildings that comprise Mirvish Village were sold to be redeveloped into luxury rental towers.

    6. Day Players| Up for Best Short at Canadian Comedy Awards, a Day Players is a short film created and produced by Farid Yazdani
    Day Players is about six amateur actors taking the world’s most bizarre acting class together. Think Community meets Inside the Actor’s Studio. Day Players takes place in the modern day, real world. However, it’s showcased through an over produced hyper-reality. Juxtaposing the melodrama is a postmodern sensibility, which is supported by cutaway gags, flashbacks, and pop culture references.
    Audience Q&A moderated by Reelworld Chair Moe Jiwan with filmmakers Simu Liu, Lulu Wei, Supinder Wraich and Farid Yazdani

    FEATURE FILM: FINDING SAMUEL LOWE: FROM HARLEM TO CHINA
    Introduction:

    Moe Jiwan will introduce Keith Lowe who will introduce the Feature Film Finding Samuel Lowe
    Moderated conversation
    Q&A with Keith Lowe and Jeanette Kong moderated by Reelworld Chair of the Board Moe Jiwan

    Feature Length Film: Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China
    Director: Jeanette Kong
    An Afro-Chinese-Jamaican Harlem family seeks their Chinese grandfather who was forever separated from their mother – his 3-year-old half-Chinese, half-Jamaican daughter – in 1920. Samuel Lowe returned to China in 1933 with a Chinese wife and 6 children. After a 91-year separation, his Black Chinese grandchildren journey to China where they find Samuel Lowe’s 300 Chinese descendants and the entire clan in reunited. The film takes viewers to Harlem, Toronto, Martha’s Vineyard, three cities in Jamaica and two cities in China to see these families of different races become One.

    Jeanette Kong is a documentary filmmaker from Jamaica based in Toronto, Canada. She has more than 17 years of media experience in Canadian television formerly at TVO and as an independent producer and director.She specializes in short-form videos and documentaries including Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China, The Chiney Shop and Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son.

    Kong directed and produced Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China in 2012 for Jamaican-American media entrepreneur Paula Williams Madison. The feature-length documentary traces Madison’s search for her Chinese grandfather. It was shortlisted for Best Diaspora Documentary at the Africa Movie Academy Awards 2014 and has screened at the Reelworld Film Festival, Pan African Film Festival, the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival, the UrbanWorld Film Festival, the San Diego Black Film Festival, the Honolulu African-American Film Festival, and the Garifuna Film Festival, among others. In 2015, the ReelWorld Film Festival selected Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China as its Opening Night Gala film. The film won both the ReelWorld Film Festival 2015’s ReelChoice Audience Award and ReelWorld Film Festival 2015’s Markham ReelChoice Audience Award.

    In 2011, Kong taught Journalism in the Media Foundation Program at Humber College. She has a Master of Arts in Media Production from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Journalism degree from Carleton University.

    Closing remarks – Reelworld

    Organizers: Asian Heritage Month–Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc., Social Services Network in partnership with Reelworld Film Festival Co-Organizers: Asian Heritage Month—Canadian Foundation for Asian Culture (Central Ontario) Inc.; Reelworld Film Festival; Richard Charles Lee Canada Hong Kong Library, University of Toronto; Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairrs, University of Toronto; Social Services Network

    Asian Heritage Month Festival is partially funded by the Government of Canada through the Department of Canadian Heritage and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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June 2018

  • Friday, June 1st Creating New Worlds: Multilingualism, Visual Arts, the Poetic Imagination

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, June 1, 20189:00AM - 6:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Tamil Studies Conference in Memory of Chelva Kanaganayakam

    Description

    This conference explores the role of creativity across literary and visual media in Tamil worlds. Our current situation is one that is profoundly shaped by dynamics of translation across worlds and languages, as Prof. Kanaganayakam argued through his work and life. In this context, how might we open the larger history of Tamil aesthetics from a perspective that values multiplicity as foundational to creativity itself? How are hybrid pasts recruited to speak to questions of endurance and resistance in the present? Spanning over a millennium of artistic production and aesthetic reflections, from ancient India to contemporary Sri Lanka, the research presented here will address these questions and focus on modalities of creative practice that engage with multiplicities, internal and external, as the grounds upon which new worlds in Tamil are made.

    Coffee, Pastries, and Welcome: 9:00-9:45 am
    Welcome Remarks 9:45-10:00 am

    Session 1: Multilingualism in Tamil Literary Worlds, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

    Anne Monius (Harvard University)
    Multilingualism in the Tamil Grammatical Tradition

    Giovanni Ciotti (Universität Hamburg)
    On the Use of the Linguistic Label ‘Maṇipravālam’ in Some Palm-leaf Manuscripts from Tamil Nadu

    Manasicha Akepiyapornchai (Cornell University)
    Vedāntadeśika’s Multilingualism: Tamil and Sanskrit Verses in the Maṇipravāḷam Rahasyatrayasāram

    Suganya Anandakichenin (École Française d’Êxtreme Orient, Pondicherry)
    Juggling with Two Languages: The Techniques of Explanation and Interpretation in Aḻakiya Maṇavāḷa Cīyar’s Paṉṉīrāyirappaṭi Commentary on the Tiruvāymoḻi.

    12:00-1:00 pm Lunch

    Session 2: Multilingualism in Tamil Literary Worlds, 1:00-2:30 pm

    Krissy Roghan (University of Toronto)
    Charting Courses of Tamiḻ Pulamai in Colonial South India

    Christoph Emmrich (University of Toronto)
    Tamil Jainism and the Multilingual Jain

    Srilata Raman (University of Toronto)
    Discussant

    2:30 -3:00 break

    Session 3: Art as World Making, 3:00-4:30 pm

    S. Jeyasankar (Vipulananda Institute of Aesthetic Studies, Batticaloa)
    Scarecrows: Activist Art of the People and By the People

    Vasuki Jeyasankar (Artist, Batticaloa)
    Art for Social Change: Experiences of a Feminist Artist

    Nedra Rodrigo (York University)
    Panel Chair and Discussion Facilitator

    4:30-5:00 tea break and remarks

    Session 4: Embodiment, Territoriality, Translation and Culture, 5:00-6:30 pm

    P. Ahilan (University of Jaffna)
    Embodiment: Territories and territorialities of the poetry of 1980’s Jaffna

    Geetha Sukumaran (York University)
    Saramakavikal: Ahilan’s poetry and its Translation

    Nergis Canefe (York University)
    Panel Chair and Discussion Facilitator

    Conference Organizers: Darshan Ambalavanar, Francis Cody, Christoph Emmrich, Srilata Raman
    With Special Support from: Kirubhalini Giruparajah, Neerajah Vignarajah, Bhavani Raman, Kuruparan Selvarajah

    Event Announcement

     

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 11th Excluding the 'Unfit' from Procreation: Politics of Negative Eugenics in Global Perspective, 1900-1950

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 11, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The lecture will focus on then-modern politics of negative eugenics during the first half of the twentieth century. This policy implemented different means of excluding the so-called genetically ‘unfit’ from procreation, e.g. by means of marriage prohibition or sterilization. The lecture will discuss the political cases of the USA, Scandinavia and Germany in a global perspective.

    Dr. Michael Schwartz is Senior Fellow at the Institute for Contemporary History Munich-Berlin and Professor for Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Munster. Among his main subjects of research are the history of eugenics, global ethnic ‘cleansing’ and the history of sexuality between 1965 and 2000.


    Speakers

    Dr. Michael Schwartz
    Institute for Contemporary History Munich-Berlin


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 11th The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks In China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 11, 20185:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    How can think tanks contribute to policy-making and intellectual exchange in an authoritarian state? Join author, Dr. Cheng Li, for a timely and compelling discussion on the growing role of think tanks in Xi Jinping’s China.

    Dr. Cheng Li is director of the John L. Thornton China Center and a senior fellow in the Foreign Policyprogram at Brookings. He is also a director of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. Li focuses on the transformation of political leaders, generational change and technological development in China.
    Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985 he came to the United States, where he received a master’s in Asian studies from the University of California, Berkeley and a doctorate in political science from Princeton University. From 1993 to 1995, he worked in China as a fellow sponsored by the Institute of Current World Affairs in the U.S., observing grassroots changes in his native country. Based on this experience, he published a nationally acclaimed book, “Rediscovering China: Dynamics and Dilemmas of Reform” (1997).
    Li is also the author or the editor of numerous books, including “China’s Leaders: The New Generation” (2001), “Bridging Minds Across the Pacific: The Sino-U.S. Educational Exchange 1978-2003” (2005), “China’s Changing Political Landscape: Prospects for Democracy” (2008), “China’s Emerging Middle Class: Beyond Economic Transformation” (2010), “The Road to Zhongnanhai: High-Level Leadership Groups on the Eve of the 18th Party Congress” (in Chinese, 2012), “The Political Mapping of China’s Tobacco Industry and Anti-Smoking Campaign” (2012), “China’s Political Development: Chinese and American Perspectives” (2014), “Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership” (2016), and “The Power of Ideas: The Rising Influence of Thinkers and Think Tanks in China”. He is currently completing a book manuscript with the working title “Middle Class Shanghai: Pioneering China’s Global Integration.” He is the principal editor of the Thornton Center Chinese Thinkers Series published by the Brookings Institution Press.

    “The Power of Ideas” will be available for sale and author will be available for signing.

    Event webcast video

    Watch a video of this event.

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr.Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director of the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings Institution

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute Professor, Department of Geography

    Diana Fu
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science


    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 12th Pathways to Freedom: Struggles and Challenges for LGTBIQ Refugees Globally

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 12, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    Part of Pride Toronto’s 2018 Human Rights Programming, this panel discussion will explore the current struggles and challenges that LGBTIQ refugees have around the world. The panel will explore issues in two particular parts of the world – Egypt and East Africa, and the challenges that LGBTIQ people from these regions face in finding safety. The panel will also discuss current policy issues and how Canada and the global community can better support the migration of LGBTIQ refugees to safety.

    Panelists:

    Ahmed Alaa Hussein, Egyptian LGBTI activist

    Erycom Desire KIziot, Ugandan LGBTI activist

    Kimahli Powell, Executive Director, Rainbow Railroad

    Contact

    Pride Toronto


    Speakers

    Ahmed Alaa Hussei
    Egyptian LGBTI activist

    Kimahli Powell
    Executive Director, Rainbow Railroad

    Erycom Desire Kizito
    Ugandan LGBTI activist



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, June 14th Is Municipal Cooperation a Silver Bullet? Experience from Australia, Brazil, and Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, June 14, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Municipal cooperation on planning and service delivery is often advanced as a means to strengthen local government and address fragmented governance in metropolitan and other regions. If municipalities could work together, we could improve efficiency, lower service delivery costs, achieve better outcomes, and provide an alternative to municipal mergers. But, is municipal cooperation a panacea, or is it just a convenient solution to address some immediate problems?

    On June 14, the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) and the Forum of Federations will convene a panel describing how municipal cooperation is used in three countries – Australia, Brazil, and Canada – and evaluate how well it works.

    Speakers

    Constantino Cronemberger Mendes, Country Director (Brazil), Forum of Federations
    Graham Sansom, Visiting Scholar, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance
    Zachary Spicer, Visiting Researcher, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance
    Rupak Chattopadhyay, President and CEO, Forum of Federations (Moderator)

    This event is co-sponsored by the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance and the Forum of Federations.

    Seating is limited for the event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Rupak Chattopadhyay
    President and CEO, Forum of Federations

    Constantino Cronemberger Mendes
    Country Director (Brazil), Forum of Federations

    Graham Sansom
    Visiting Scholar, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Zachary Spicer
    Visiting Researcher, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance


    Main Sponsor

    Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance

    Co-Sponsors

    Forum of Federations


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, June 18th Multiracial and Multiethnic Youth Negotiating Identity in Spain: Mixedness, Choices and Constraints

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, June 18, 201812:00PM - 2:00PM023N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The recent growth of mixed unions between immigrants and natives in Spain has brought about a significant increase in the number of mixed-race and multiethnic individuals in the country, particularly in Catalonia, a region that has reached a level of “super-diversity” and ethnocultural “mixedness” that compares with that of traditional countries of immigration. However, little research has been conducted on the identity processes of these multiracial children and youth, specifically regarding their experiences of social inclusion/exclusion. Drawing on data from various recent and ongoing research projects conducted in Spain by the Research Group on Immigration, Mixedness, and Social Cohesion (INMIX), this lecture aims to clarify the relationship between mixed couples/descendants and social integration. After outlining the context of immigration and mixedness in Spain from a demographic point of view, this presentation will offer research results on mixed-race/multiethnic youth in Catalonia, focusing on identity, sense of belonging, and experiences of discrimination. Within this discussion, concepts and discourses of “nation” and “national identity” in the Catalan and Spanish context will also be explored. The lecture attempts to highlight the socially transformative value of mixedness, while warning about the persistence of racialized divisiveness that hinders social inclusion and cohesion.

    About the Speaker:
    Dan Rodríguez-García is Serra Hunter Associate Professor of Social and Cultural Anthropology and Director of the Research Group on Immigration, Mixedness, and Social Cohesion (INMIX) at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain. He was the Guest Editor for The ANNALS’ 2015 Special Issue “Intermarriage and Integration Revisited: International Experiences and Cross-disciplinary Approaches” and is currently guest editing a Special Issue for the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies on multiracial and multiethnic individuals. He is the PI of the funded R&D project “Social Relations and Identity Processes of Children of Mixed Unions: Mixedness, Between Inclusion and Social Constraints (MIXED_YOUTH).”

    Email: dan.rodriguez@uab.es
    Webpage: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dan_Rodriguez-Garcia


    Speakers

    Dan Rodríguez-García
    Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, June 20th G7 Charlevoix Summit Wrap Up

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, June 20, 20185:30PM - 7:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    What actually happened at the Charlevoix Summit, hosted by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on June 8-9? Were there any achievements? Were there any failures? How well did Canada do in fulfilling its agenda of investing in growth that works for everyone; preparing for jobs of the future; advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment; working together on climate change, oceans and clean energy; and building a more peaceful and secure world? Get a full picture — beyond what gets reported in the press — from Ella Kokotsis, John Kirton and other members of the G7 Research Group, based on their experience at the summit and their analysis of the documents produced there. Free copies of “G7 Canada: The 2018 Charlevoix Summit” will be available (it can also be downloaded at http://bit.ly/G7Charlevoix2018).

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Ella Kokotsis
    G7 Research Group

    John Kirton
    Co-Founder and Director, G7 Research Group Founder and Co-Director, G20 Research Group Interim Director, International Relations Program


    Main Sponsor

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Sponsors

    G7 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, June 26th Mind the Funding Gap: Transit Financing in Los Angeles County and Metro Vancouver

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, June 26, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Across North American cities, the demand for better public transit is pervasive, yet many local governments lack the sufficient revenue tools to finance the construction of new infrastructure. To resolve this dilemma, some localities have turned to citizens directly, proposing temporary earmarked sales tax increases as a way to finance capital-intensive projects. Why have some communities been more receptive to this funding model than others?

    On June 26, IMFG’s 2017-2018 Postdoctoral Fellow Matthew Lesch will discuss a new study examining the experiences of Los Angeles County (2008) and Metro Vancouver (2015) with public transit referenda. The findings offer important lessons for other municipalities looking to invest in their public transportation systems.

    Speaker

    Matthew Lesch is the 2017-2018 Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance. His research specializes in the study of comparative public policy. His main research interests include fiscal policy, taxation, environmental policy, policy learning and cognition, policy feedback effects, and policy diffusion.

    Seating is limited for the event, and registration is required. Register for this event

    Contact

    Elisa Tate
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Matthew Lesch
    2017-2018 IMFG Postdoctoral Fellow



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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July 2018

  • Monday, July 16th Rethinking Class and Labour through the Works of Hagen Koo

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, July 16, 20189:30AM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM

    9:30-10:00am – Coffee

    10:00-10:10am – Opening Remarks: Yoonkyung Lee (University of Toronto)

    10:10-11:30am – Keynote Speaker: Hagen Koo (University of Hawaii), Rethinking Working Class Formation in South Korea, followed by Q & A

    11:30am-12:45pm – Lunch Reception

    12:45-2:30pm – Panel Presentations

    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (University of Toronto)

    Panel Speakers:
    Jennifer Chun (University of Toronto), Religion, Ritual and Spaces of Worker Protest in South Korea
    Veda Hyunjin Kim (University of Massachusetts-Amherst), Hagen Koo’s Korean Workers and Marxism in the Third World
    Namhee Lee (UCLA), The Democratic Transition, Working-Class Identities, and the Current State of Research
    Hwa-Jen Liu (National Taiwan University), Comparisons as Conversations
    Gay Seidman (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Honouring Hagen Koo: Looking Back, Looking Forward

    KEYNOTE: HAGEN KOO
    Rethinking Working Class Formation in South Korea
    South Korea has experienced one of the world’s most interesting and dynamic working-class movements during the past half century. Hagen Koo, author of the award-winning book, Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation (Cornell University Press, 2001), discusses the distinctive aspects of this movement and examines their broad theoretical implications, from a retrospective perspective.

    Hagen Koo is emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Born in Korea, he received his BA in Korea and worked as a journalist before coming to America. He started his graduate program at the University of British Columbia but completed his Ph.D. degree at Northwestern University. He published extensively on the political economy of development in East Asia and social transformation in South Korea during the period of rapid industrialization. His major work includes State and Society in Contemporary Korea (1993), and Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation (2001), which received a book award from the American Sociological Association and has been translated into several languages. He continues to work on the issues of inequality and changing class relations and is now completing a book on the demise of the middle class in South Korea in the neoliberal era. Currently, he is a visiting scholar at Free University of Berlin.

    PANELIST PRESENTATIONS:
    JENNIFER CHUN
    Religion, Ritual and Spaces of Worker Protest in South Korea
    This talk revisits Hagen Koo’s classic insights about the role of religious actors in supporting grassroots labour struggles in South Korea. In particular, I discuss the ongoing visibility of religious actors and religiously-inflected spectacles in the landscapes of worker protest, particularly for laid-off workers and workers in precarious jobs. Why do religious leaders continue to play such visible solidarity roles in the struggles of striking workers? How do ritualized protest acts, such as “prayer protests” and Buddhist prostration rituals, shape the aesthetic and ideological spaces of public protest?

    Jennifer Jihye Chun is Associate Professor in the Asian American Studies Department and the International Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles and Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto Scarborough. She has published widely on the changing world of work and politics, focusing on the intersections of gender, race, class and migration. She is the author of the award-winning book Organizing at the Margins: The Symbolic Politics of Labor in South Korea and the United States (Cornell University Press, 2009) and has recently co-edited a double special issue in Critical Sociology (2018) entitled, “Care Work in Transition: Transnational Circuits of Gender, Migration and Care.” She is currently writing a book monograph on space and public cultures of protest in South Korea.

    VEDA HYUNJIN KIM
    Hagen Koo’s Korean Workers and Marxism in the Third World
    I base my talk on a critical theory of imperialist capitalism and Hagen Koo’s (2001) book, Korean Workers. I argue that we can re-read our dear book of Koo, Korean Workers to re-calibrate our intellectual endeavour to pursue the programme of Third World Marxism in studies on Northeast and Southeast Asia. The South Korean political economy has been subjugated by the West—as the Asian Financial Crisis and subsequent neoliberal policy imposition starkly demonstrate—and the South Korean state’s foreign affairs are reliant on US-empire. In consequence, the South Korean social sector became Manichaean in a hegemonic/ambivalent manner (as opposed to the violent/absolute one in Fanon’s theory) and hence people’s lifestyles were creolised. I present two precariatisation experiences. Specifically, I examine SsangYong Motors’ laid-off workers and Daechuri displaced farmers, which starkly display 1) forced social changes resulting from the exertion of imperial power, 2) social isolation of the grievance groups, and 3) united resistance against power by partaking in counterpublic formation. The narrative structures in my presentation of two precariats’ resistances and class formation processes in Korean Workers are commensurate. Korean Workers is a keystone of Third World Marxism, if we take the following principles: Marxist perspective (in whatever variant), global perspective, and the close scrutiny of people’s responses.

    Veda Hyunjin Kim bodily learnt about the dialectics between the imperialism and colonised lives, while he resided in UK as a poor coloured folk. He earned an MA degree from the University of Chicago and now studies for a doctoral degree in University of Massachusetts Amherst. His current concentration is on democratisation dynamics in the context of post-WWII neo-imperialism and Marxist democratization theories.

    NAMHEE LEE
    The Democratic Transition, Working-Class Identities, and the Current State of Research
    Abstract: One of the key arguments in Hagen Koo’s pathbreaking Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation is that Korean working-class formation has been closely associated with broader socio-political processes, particularly with the democratic movement of the 1970s and the 1980s. Given the deeply transformed sociopolitical reality of South Korea since the late 1980s—the democratic transition, the collapse of the “actually existing socialism,” the global neoliberalism and the institutionalization of market and labour flexibility, and the influx of migrant workers from the 1990s, among others—what is at stake in the formation of working-class identities? What is the current state of research; in particular, how has the “cultural turn” in the field engaged with, expanded, or limited our understanding of the shifting grounds of and re-formatting working-class identities in South Korea?

    Namhee Lee is associate professor of modern Korean history at UCLA and her publications include The Making of Minjung: Democracy and the Politics of Representation in South Korea (Cornell University Press, 2007). She is currently working on a book about social memory of the 1980s in the context of the persistence of the cold war in Korea as well as the global context of neoliberalism.

    HWA-JEN LIU
    Comparisons as Conversations
    Abstract: Based on Koo’s “condensed industrialization” thesis and its negative consequence imposed on organized labour, I was inspired to further explore different types of damages that condensed industrialization has had on labour and environment and the subsequent solidification of social powers countering and moderating such damages. Through the double comparisons of Korea and Taiwan, of labour and environmental movements, I conclude that, though these two movements may seem diagonally opposite, each has certain strengths that complement the other and hence the making of a labour-environment alliance is a worthy endeavor in the new millennium.

    Current project: I’m currently working on a “polluters” project. This project compiles a list of polluting corporations from historical records, and surveys their unions’ various responses and actions in environmental disputes. I will select specific pollution cases and interview workers involved in an attempt to understand how the act of pollution itself changed workers’ standing in their communities.

    Hwa-Jen Liu teaches sociology at National Taiwan University. She specializes in social movements, late industrialization, and comparative methods and is the author of Leverage of the Weak: Labor and Environmental Movements in Taiwan and South Korea (the University of Minnesota Press, 2015).

    GAY SEIDMAN
    Honouring Hagen Koo: Looking Back, Looking Forward
    Like many researchers who focus on labour movements in the global South, I have long turned to Professor Koo’s work for insight into the dynamics of South Korea’s labour movement. My remarks will highlight some of the lessons I have taken from his work, and some of the questions his work raises for broader discussions of labour dynamics in the twenty-first century going forward.

    Gay Seidman is the Martindale Bascom Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Focusing mainly on labour and social movements in the global South, her books include Manufacturing Militance (Univ. of California Press, 1994) and Beyond the Boycott (Russell Sage 2007). Her current work explores refugee experiences in Cape Town’s divided labour market.


    Speakers

    Hagen Koo
    Keynote
    Emeritus Professor of Sociology, University of Hawaii

    Jennifer Chun
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies Department and the International Institute, University of California Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Veda Hyunjin Kim
    Speaker
    University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Hwa-Jen Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, National Taiwan University

    Gay Seidman
    Speaker
    Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Namhee Lee
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Modern Korean History, UCLA


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, July 16th Civil Society and Asia’s Labor Migration Regimes

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, July 16, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since the 1970s, there has been an enormous expansion of temporary labor migration within Asia. Some foreign workers are highly skilled, highly mobile expatriates looking to expand their professional horizons. Millions of others, however, are employed on limited-term contracts in a diverse range of blue-collar occupations, in the service sector, or as para-professionals in industries like healthcare. This army of skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled temporary labor migrants—who are overwhelmingly South or Southeast Asian—plays a vital role in the economic systems of the wealthier countries in the region. They work in factories, on construction sites and plantations, and staff restaurants and hospitals. They also keep house and care for the aged and the very young.

    The marginality of many foreign workers in the wealthier labor markets of the region is in large part defined by the uncertainty of their migration status. But migration status is not the only determinant of marginality: temporary labor migrants’ capacity to access the protections available to citizens may also be limited by their labor market position, which in turn determines their access to the host country’s industrial relations system, and by the presence or absence of strong local voices on their behalf.

    This paper analyzes the role of civil society in challenging the labor migration regimes of seven Asian destination countries. In doing so, it distinguishes between non-governmental organizations (NGOs), which have long been the leading force in activism on behalf of temporary labor migrants, and labor unions, which have traditionally rejected the presence of foreign workers but which have faced increasing pressure to support them. The paper argues that the particular history of labor migration flows in each of these countries and the particular ways in which the migration and employment relations axes within each of these destination countries influences the forms migrant labor activism takes and its likelihood of success.

    Bionote
    Professor Michele Ford is Director of the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia. She also holds an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship. Michele’s research, which focuses Southeast Asian labour movements, labour migration and trade union aid, has been supported by several Australian Research Council grants. Michele is the author of From Migrant to Worker: The Global Unions and Labor Migration in Asia (Cornell ILR Press, in press) and Workers and Intellectuals: NGOs, Trade Unions and the Indonesian Labour Movement (NUS/Hawaii/KITLV 2009). She is also editor of Social Activism in Southeast Asia (Routledge 2013) and the co-editor of several volumes including Beyond Oligarchy: Wealth, Power, and Contemporary Indonesian Politics (Cornell SEAP 2014).

    Contact

    Mayumi Yamaguchi
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Professor Michele Ford
    Speaker
    Director, Sydney Southeast Asia Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia

    Dr. Wayne Palmer
    Chair
    Lecturer, Department of International Relations, Bina Nusantara University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, July 18th From Qingdao to Johannesburg: China-Russia cooperation and international summitry in an age of uncertainty

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, July 18, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    We are honored to welcome Chinese Ambassador to Canada Lu Shaye, and the Charge d’Affaires of the Russian Embassy Mr. Vladimir Proskuryakov to this panel event, along with Professor Andrew Cooper, Associate Senior Fellow at the Centre for Global Cooperation Research.

    In light of the recent international G7 and Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summits, which brought to surface a period of global uncertainty, this event will focus on the topic of China-Russia cooperation in global governance leading into the 10th annual BRICS Summit taking place in Johannesburg on July 25th-27th, 2018. Several important questions will be addressed at the event, in relation to recent world events whose full impacts have yet to be realized. What is the role of the BRICS in this age of increasing uncertainty? How will China and Russia approach the BRICS 2018 Johannesburg Summit? How will these countries address their shared security agenda over the denuclearization of North Korea? How can the BRICS build upon the agenda and accomplishments of the SCO Qingdao Summit?


    Speakers

    Ambassador Lu Shaye
    Embassy of the People's Republic of China in Canada

    Professor Andrew Cooper
    Associate Senior Fellow, Centre for Global Cooperation Research

    Vladimir Proskuryakov
    Charge d'Affaires, Embassy of the Russian Federation in Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    G7 and G20 Research Groups

    BRICS Research Group


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