« May 2019 - July 2019 August 2019 - Present

August 2019

  • Thursday, August 8th Growing Religious Conservatism in Indonesian Higher Education: The Case of Bandung

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, August 8, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    While scientific inquiry is often expected to be free from ideological interference, religiosity has become a feature in Indonesian higher education. In this paper, we explore the formation of scholars’ identity in terms of religious orientation. We show that many student groups in Indonesia have made it a mission to raise religious consciousness and experiences on campus. Over the last 20 years, there are significant tensions between managing students’ exposure to religiously conservative efforts, maintaining religious tolerance, and balancing these elements with religious freedom and association. These questions are important because they determine the kinds of identities and organizational forms that students contribute to nation-building projects.

    Teti A. Argo is a Professor of Urban and Regional Planning at Bandung Institute of Technology – Indonesia. Her research on religious conservatism in universities is a part of a larger research dedicated to looking at the role of higher education and nation building.

    Frans A. Prasetyo holds a masters degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia. He is currently a fellow at the University of Toronto.


    Speakers

    Teti A. Argo
    Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

    Frans A. Prasetyo
    Fellow, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2019

  • Tuesday, September 3rd Interviews

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 3, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM260S, South House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Tuesday, September 3, 20191:30PM - 5:00PM260S, South House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 9th "Life Adapts to the Situation": Survival Strategies of Polish Society, 1939-45

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 9, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the German occupation, to a large part of the Polish people, everyday struggle for existence was more challenging than participation in resistance and armed conflict. The lecture will analyze and categorize strategies of survival that, according to contemporary definitions, form systems of values, which identify existing threats and provide survival mechanisms. The scope of the lecture will be limited to the Polish intelligentsia mostly in the German-occupied General Government, with limited focus on the Polish areas incorporated directly into the Reich.


    Speakers

    Jerzy Kochanowski
    Speaker
    Professor, University of Warsaw

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Konstanty Reynert Chair in Polish Studies

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 16th Repositioning the Lusatian Sorbs in Post-reunification Germany: Demands, Support, and Migration

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 16, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Sorbs of Lusatia are a Slavic minority community which has traditionally lived in parts of present-day Saxony and Brandenburg in Germany. Their identity is primarily expressed through the use of Upper and Lower Sorbian, West Slavic languages currently spoken by approximately 20,000 people in total. It is also reflected in these individuals’ self-identification as Sorbs, as members of the Sorbian society, who cultivate and receive Sorbian culture, wear Sorbian costumes, attend Sorbian religious services or participate in the teaching of Sorbian.

    In my talk, I will discuss a number of factors that play a role in the maintenance of the Sorbian identity. These include the political representation of Sorbian interests on the state level, education (from preschools to elementary and high schools), higher education and research, religion, media (magazines, newspapers, radio, television, internet) and cultural institutions (music ensembles, book publishers, museums, theaters).
    I will also explore the conditions necessary for the maintenance of the Sorbian language, culture and identity. Above all, and as history has shown, the state must be able to create policies which promote a minority-friendly atmosphere. Every citizen living in a bilingual territory is deserving of support. However, from the more contemporary perspective, the efforts for the continued existence of the Sorbian people can only succeed if their own initiatives, the tolerance and support of these initiatives from all citizens, and initiatives favoring government intervention work in cooperation with one another.

    The Sorbs’ own efforts will be able to develop only to the degree that they are accepted by the German population, as the minority is always dependent on the goodwill of the majority. The specific situation of the Sorbs as an ethnic group lacking a “home country” in which they would be the majority is accompanied by the fact that, to date, no adequate answers to many fundamental questions have been found.


    Speakers

    Timo Meškank
    Institute for Sorbian Studies, University of Leipzig


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 17th Book Launch: Canada on the United Nations Security Council: A Small Power on a Large Stage, by Adam Chapnick

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 17, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    As the twentieth century ended, Canada was completing its sixth term on the United Nations Security Council, more terms than all but three other non-permanent members. A decade later, Ottawa’s attempt to return to the council was dramatically rejected by its global peers, leaving Canadians – and international observers – shocked and disappointed. Drawing from more than twenty archival libraries and more than eighty interviews with experts and practitioners, Canada on the United Nations Security Council tells the story of that defeat and what it means for future campaigns, describing and analyzing Canada’s attempts since 1946, both successful and unsuccessful, to gain a seat as a non-permanent member. It also reveals that while the Canadian commitment to the United Nations itself has always been strong, Ottawa’s attitude towards the Security Council, and to service upon it, has been much less consistent. Nonetheless, the benefits of council membership have consistently equaled or outweighed the costs of participation. Impeccably researched and clearly written, Canada on the United Nations Security Council is the definitive history of the Canadian experience on the world’s most powerful stage.

    Light refreshments served.


    Speakers

    Adam Chapnick

    Bob Rae



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 17th APSIA Graduate School Fair

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 17, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    APSIA fairs can help you take the next step in your career!

    Meet admissions officers from APSIA member schools. Discuss admissions requirements, curricula, financial aid packages, joint degree programs, and career opportunities. Collect application information.

    List of Exhibitors:

    Carleton University Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
    Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs
    George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs
    Georgetown University Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
    The Graduate Institute, Geneva Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
    Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government
    IE University School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
    National University of Singapore Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
    Princeton University Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
    Sciences Po Paris School of International Affairs
    Syracuse University The Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs
    Texas A&M University Bush School of Government & Public Service
    Tufts University The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
    University of California, San Diego School of Global Policy and Strategy
    University of Denver Josef Korbel School of International Studies
    University of Maryland School of Public Policy
    University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
    University of Southern California Master of Public Diplomacy
    University of Toronto Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Tips for Success

    There isn’t a dress code, but most people opt for business casual.
    Bring business cards if you have them. You can provide these instead of filling out information request cards.
    Make sure you have a bag to carry the materials you collect from the exhibitors

    Sponsors

    APSIA


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 18th Four Faultlines of the Indian Republic

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 18, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Institute and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Click here to watch the webcast.

    India is an ancient civilization but a new nation. As a political experiment it is very much a work in progress. This lecture will provide a brief political history of India since Independence before discussing four key challenges facing the Republic in 2019; these are (1) inter-religious disharmony; (2) environmental abuse; (3) institutional decay; (4) the cult of personality.

    Dr. Ramachandra Guha is a historian and biographer based in Bengaluru. His books include a pioneering environmental history, The Unquiet Woods (University of California Press, 1989), and an award-winning social history of cricket, A Corner of a Foreign Field (Picador, 2002), which was chosen by The Guardian as one of the ten best books on cricket ever written. India after Gandhi (Macmillan/Ecco Press, 2007; revised edition, 2017) was chosen as a book of the year by the Economist, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal, and as a book of the decade in the Times of London and The Hindu.

    Dr. Guha’s most recent work is a two volume biography of Mahatma Gandhi. The first volume, Gandhi Before India (Knopf, 2014), was chosen as a notable book of the year by the New York Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. The second volume, Gandhi: The Years That Changed the World (Knopf, 2018, was chosen as a notable book of the year by the New York Times and The Economist.

    Dr. Guha’s awards include the Leopold-Hidy Prize of the American Society of Environmental History, the Daily Telegraph/Cricket Society prize, the Malcolm Adiseshiah Award for excellence in social science research, the Ramnath Goenka Prize for excellence in journalism, the Sahitya Akademi Award, and the Fukuoka Prize for contributions to Asian studies.

    This lecture is also presented as a part of Hopper Lecture in International Development.


    Speakers

    Dr. Ramachandra Guha
    Speaker
    Historian and biographer; Distinguished Fellow, Asian Institute and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Randall Hansen
    Opening Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks and Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 19th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Alan Harding: Metropolitan Governance: Future Necessity or Misplaced Dream?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 19, 20195:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Click here to watch the webcast.

    Experts from multiple disciplines have argued in principle for the benefits of metropolitan governance, but how has it played out in practice? On September 19, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance Visiting Scholar, Alan Harding, will address this question by drawing on his experience as Chief Economic Adviser to the Greater Manchester Combined Authority as well as his many years of academic research on metropolitan governance.

    In his presentation, Professor Harding will assess the arguments produced in favour of metropolitan governance, the extent to which real-world reforms have been driven by these arguments, the barriers that stand in the way of “rational” reform, and how Greater Manchester’s experience with metropolitan governance points to ways of overcoming at least some of those barriers. He will end by speculating on whether metropolitan governance is an idea whose time has come or a diversion from the real challenges facing decision-makers in a complex, interconnected world.

    Seating is limited for this event, and registration is required.

    This event is part of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series.

    About the Speaker
    Alan Harding is Chief Economic Adviser at the Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) and a visiting Professor at the Manchester Institute of Innovation Research in the Alliance Manchester Business School. He oversees the analytical work that supports GMCA’s research and intelligence, strategy development and evaluation efforts. Most recently, he was centrally involved in the production of the Greater Manchester Independent Prosperity Review, a major collaborative initiative with leading academic experts designed to provide the evidence base for one of the UK’s first modern local industrial strategies. Previously, Alan spent 30 years in academia leading specialist research Institutes and Centres in the north of England, focusing on urban-regional development, policy, and governance. He is best known for his role in re-establishing the importance of the city-region as a scale for policy design and delivery in England.

    About the Moderator
    Shirley Hoy has had a lengthy public service career including serving as Toronto’s City Manager from 2001 to 2008 and working as an Assistant Deputy Minister in three Ontario ministries. She held various policy and planning-related positions in the former Metro Toronto government, including with the Department of Community Services, as General Manager and Corporate Secretary at Exhibition Place and as Executive Director in the Metro Chairman’s office. Ms. Hoy also served as Commissioner of Community and Neighbourhood Services, where she provided leadership on many major services ranging from social assistance, homes for the aged, housing and support, public health, and parks and recreation. Following her term as Toronto City Manager, she served 5 years as the CEO of the Toronto Lands Corporation.


    Speakers

    Professor Alan Harding
    Speaker
    Chief Economic Adviser, Greater Manchester Combined Authority, Manchester, UK Visiting Professor, Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, Alliance Manchester Business School, Manchester, UK Visiting Scholar, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Shirley Hoy
    Moderator
    Senior Advisor, StrategyCorp



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th Justice in an Age of Global Politics: The case of Unit 731 Medical Atrocities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 201910:00AM - 12:00PMRobarts Library, Blackburn Room (4th floor), 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Unit 731 was the codename for the Japanese Imperial Army’s biochemical warfare experimentation center located in China during the Asia-Pacific War. As a part of the forgotten history of WWII in Asia, and often characterized as the “Auschwitz of the East,” Unit 731 was the site of countless medical atrocities including human experimentation and field experimentation of biochemical weapons. Unlike in postwar Germany, perpetrators escaped legal punishment in post-war trials. This panel will discuss crucial issues surrounding the history of Unit 731, the American government’s cover-up of Unit 731 war crimes after the war, and how politics and justice interacted to shape war memory during the Cold War and beyond.

    Programme:

    1. Historical Overview of Unit 731: History and the Human Experience
    Professor Yang Yanjun, Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    2. The Tokyo Trials and Medical Atrocities: Unit 731’s Postwar (In)Justice
    Professor Gong Zhiwei, Shanghai Jiaotong University, War Trials and World Peace Research Center

    3. Verification in Japan on “War and Medical Ethics”: Aiming for No More Unit 731
    Professor Nishiyama, Shiga University of Medicine, Japan

    4. Politics of Memory: Unit 731 at the Margins of Historical Memory
    Professor Takashi Fujitani, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Q & A session moderated by Sachiyo Tsukamoto

    Closing Remarks
    Looking to the Future: The Role of Education
    Gen-Ling Chang, ALPHA Education


    Speakers

    Professor Rachel Silvey
    Opening Remarks
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute

    Professor Takashi Fujitani
    Panelist
    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Professor Yang Yanjun
    Panelist
    Director, Unit 731 Research Center in Harbin, China

    Dr. Gong Zhiwei
    Panelist
    Shanghai Jiaotong University, China

    Professor Katsuo Nishiyama
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan


    Sponsors

    ALPHA Education

    Harbin Academy of Social Sciences, Unit 731 Research Center

    Robarts Library, University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th Literature, the Human, and Governmentality: Between Ideas and Experience

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This talk is interested in how Korean literary and cultural critics have defined the idea of literature and what roles the idea serves in their larger arguments about the human being and history. It focuses in particular on mid-century Korea, from the late Japanese colonial period until the 1950s. The intention behind this periodization is to recognize both continuity and discontinuity between “before and after liberation,” particularly in relation to concepts of the human and their intersection with imperial, colonial, and national politics. Through texts by Paek Ch’ŏl, Ch’oe Chaesŏ, Sŏ Insik, and An Hamgwang, published in the Japanese empire, South Korea, and North Korea, I will discuss how and why these critics conceived of literature as the most important mediation between transcendental concepts, including moral and political ideas, and the everyday experiences of modernity. This situating of literature between ideas and experience was connected to the figure of the human, the “empirico-transcendental doublet” of modernity (Foucault), and thereby to modes of governmentality between Japanese empire, US and Soviet occupation, and the Korean national population. This talk comes out of a current book project, a collection of translations titled Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism.

    Travis Workman is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He is the author of Imperial Genus: The Formation and Limits of the Human in Modern Korea and Japan (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016). He has published articles in journals such as PMLA and positions and book chapters in volumes such as The Korean Popular Culture Reader and Rediscovering Korean Cinema. He is currently working on a collection of translations, Humanism, Empire, and Nation: Korean Literary and Cultural Criticism and a book manuscript, Political Moods: Melodrama and the Cold War in Korean Film.


    Speakers

    Travis Workman
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

    Michelle Cho
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th Half a century of Swedish school reforms: trying to reform society through schools

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Inger Enkvist is professor em. of Spanish and Latin-American literature at Lund University, Sweden and also a well-know author of books on education published mainly in Spanish and Swedish. She has some 40 books published and more than 200 articles. In Spanish she has written on the Peruvian-Spanish writer Mario Vargas Llosa and the Spanish writer Juan Goytisolo. She has published on Spanish philosophers and Latin-American Icons. In education, she has published books on the Swedish education reforms and books on international comparison in education. Her current research focuses on new trends in teacher education and how to reform teacher education in Sweden.

    Sweden introduced the “comprehensive school” in 1962. Obligatory school up to the age of 16 was to lead to social harmony and equality, and there was to be no specific learning targets to be acquired in order to graduate. Reforms in 1969 and in 1976 put still more emphasis on a social and caring approach. In 1985, the teacher education was changed in order to prepare teachers for the new role that teachers were to adopt.This basic model was not changed in the 90s, but the 90s also saw a radical decentralization and the introduction of a kind of charter schools plus a new type of curriculum. In 2001 there was a reform that introduced a teacher education based on the basic equality between different kinds of teachers. A number of reforms 2010-2011 introduced some changes but did not touch the basic model neither for schools nor for teacher education.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Inger Enkvist
    Lund University, Sweden


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    CERLL/OISE, University of Toronto

    CIDEC/OISE, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 20th War in the Backyard: What Everyday Life in Eastern Ukraine Looks Like

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    For nearly five years, the Minsk Agreements have been successful in sustaining violence in Ukraine at a low level. The public awareness of the conflict in which nothing really happens has also been steadily going down. And, when invoked, the war in Ukraine is usually discussed solely in geopolitical or military terms.

    Missing from this picture are six million people who live in the war zone in eastern Ukraine. Still dealing with the trauma of direct violence in 2014-2015, they are currently exposed to indirect consequences of war. Disrupted infrastructure, restrictions on movement, diseases, lack of access to basic services, unemployment, and shadow economy – these are the everyday realities of life in the vicinity of the war in Ukraine. At the same time, these factors shape a unique local culture of resilience. People come up with creative strategies of traveling, safety, parenting, entrepreneurship, and mutual assistance.

    Alisa Sopova is a journalist from Donetsk and currently an MA candidate in Regional Studies (Russia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia) program at Harvard University. Previously news editor for Donbass, the biggest newspaper in Donetsk Region of Ukraine, since 2014 she has been extensively covering the military conflict in the area for a number of media including the New York Times, Time magazine, and the Guardian. Alisa has joined Harvard as a first Nieman fellow from Ukraine and stayed to continue her research of everyday coping strategies employed by residents in the frontline communities.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Alisa Sopova
    Speaker
    MA candidate in Regional Studies (Russia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia) program, Harvard University

    Lucan Way
    Chair
    Petro Jacyk Program Co-Director, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Euopean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 26th Transformative Student Research at the Asian Institute

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 26, 201912:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Featuring presentations from the Asian Institute’s 2018-19 RICHARD CHARLES LEE INSIGHTS THROUGH ASIA CHALLENGE (ITAC) & BIG IDEAS COMPETITION: EXPLORING GLOBAL TAIWAN Student Research Awardees

    Event Program

    12:00-1:15PM
    Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) Presentations

    Yujuan (Emmy) Fu, Ethics, Society & Law; Literature & Critical Theory
    Jennifer Han, Peace, Conflict & Justice and Political Science
    Sites of (Un)belonging: Spaces/Faces of Honjok Youth in Seoul, South Korea

    Amrita Kumar-Ratta, MGA, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning
    Shades of Brown Girl: The Many Colours of Transnational South Asian Femininity

    Katie Kwang, Psychology; Economics
    Benita Leong, History; Political Science (UTM)
    Hui Wen Zheng, Contemporary Asian Studies; Peace, Conflict, and Justice
    Moving in and moving out: understanding the effects of social exclusion on the mental health of rural-urban migrants in Shenzhen

    Zixian Liu, PhD Candidate, Department of History
    Rural Land Marketization, the Displacement of the Urban Poor and the Neoliberalizing Developmental State in Beijing

    Habiba Maher
    Aliza Rahman
    Asian Modest Fashion in the Museum Space

    Minh Anh (Mia) Nguyen, Contemporary Asian Studies; Political Science
    Unwanted Children

    Man (Angela) Xu, Sociology Department
    The Invisible Hand of South-South Globalization: A Study of Chinese Migrants in Tehran

    1:15-1:45PM
    Lunch Break

    1:45-3:00PM
    Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan Presentations

    Adam Zivokinovic (“Zivo”) – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    Ji Chen (Tony) Yin – Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    The Referendum

    Anson Au, Department of Sociology; Department of Chinese Literature (Joint Appointment), National Sun Yat-Sen University
    The Everyday Politics of LGBTQ Minorities in Taiwan: Discrimination, Legalization, and Community

    Sabrina Teng-io Chung, PhD, East Asian Studies
    Exhibiting In-Justices: Human Rights Discourses in Taiwan’s Recent Redress Efforts

    Yiwei Jin, MA student, Department of Political Science
    Hsieh-Piao and the Politics of Personalization in Taiwan

    Niki C Yang, Criminology
    Celina B. Servanez, Criminology and Sociolegal Studies (graduate department)
    Sohrab Naderi, Political Science and Criminology
    Anti-Death Penalty Efforts in Taiwan

    3:00-4:00PM
    Reception

    About the Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC)
    The Richard Charles Lee Insights through Asia Challenge (ITAC) is an interdisciplinary experiential learning program at the Asian Institute that offers students the opportunity for an academically rooted, life-changing field research experience in Asia. On the vanguard of supporting the University’s wider goals of internationalization, redesigning undergraduate teaching, and increasing student mobility, ITAC supports students through the complete trajectory of their research, providing workshops on proposal writing, project management, research methods, ethical research practices, and data analysis as well as direct mentoring. Encouraging students to produce their research in various forms ranging from policy reports to documentary films or something else entirely, ITAC is open to undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines, across all three UofT campuses. Out of approximately 100 applications, five to seven research teams are awarded annually by an academic jury. More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/rcl-itac/

    About the Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan
    The Big Ideas Competition: Exploring Global Taiwan is a student research competition, which supports selected undergraduate and graduate student teams to conduct their outstanding research and creative projects in Taiwan. The Competition provides opportunities for student experience in Taiwan by combining research on issues connected to Taiwanese culture/society with travel, taking classroom learning into the field in order to develop academic research skills and self-confidence. The program is enthusiastically interdisciplinary, encouraging student-researchers across the humanities, social sciences, and sciences to collaborate with complementary skills and knowledge bases.

    Throughout the winter, awarded teams collectively participated in workshops on project management, research methods, ethical research practices, data analysis, and safety abroad. Teams work closely with an academic mentor and Asian Institute staff, rigorously developing their research projects before departing for field research in the summer semester. Spending up to a month immersed in local cultures, developing cultural fluencies, and conducting research, students return to write up final reports and produce their projects in the late summer.
    More info: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/global-taiwan-studies-program-big-ideas-competition/

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 30th Buddhism, Politics and Law in a Changing Southern Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 30, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Over the last ten years, Buddhist monks and activist organisations have played an increasingly visible role in South and Southeast Asia. While not an entirely new phenomenon, this new upsurge appears to have unique and alarming features. These include a growing climate of violence, the increasing use of law and policy in the exclusion of Muslim minorities and the spread of social media and other technologies alternately used to mobilise, educate, communicate and incite. This ‘new Buddhicization’ of political life comes at a time of renewed or continued autocratic and populist tendencies in the politics of Theravada majority countries. Scholars have responded to these trends, but largely without addressing them holistically, institutionally and comparatively.

    This interactive and conversation-oriented workshop—led by scholars with expertise in Buddhism, politics and law in Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand respectively—aims to map out a path forward for researching the ‘new Buddhicization’ of public life in the region. This research programme would seek to identify new patterns, processes and problems that ought to be the focus of scholarship, moving beyond investigations into the motivations and activities of individual monks or groups to ask broader comparative questions about the structural conditions that enable or accelerate the processes described above. We invite colleagues with related interests and expertise to provide feedback on this programme in its early stages.

    For example, how are the current dynamics different from previous moments of politicised Buddhism in the region? What trends or patterns can be found in the countries’ legal, political and social systems and how have Buddhist actors worked to influence institutional changes? What historical factors—premodern, colonial, postcolonial, etc.— seem relevant or determinative? What features of Buddhist ecclesiastical organisation and governance enable or discourage the rise of groups like Ma Ba Tha or Bodu Bala Sena? Under what conditions have Buddhist pressure groups been particularly successful (or not) across the Bay of Bengal? Are there key features of Buddhist political philosophy or tropes of Buddhist literature that appear prominently in the speeches given by prominent monks? What new methodologies will be important in considering these new trends? What gaps exist in currently available data that would enable more robust comparisons and analysis over time? What blind spots have been left by existing scholarship?

    Tomas Larsson is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of St John’s College. Tomas has a PhD in Government from Cornell University. He is the author of Land and Loyalty: Security and the Development of Property Rights in Thailand, published by Cornell University Press in 2012. In recent years his research has increasingly focused on religion and politics, and especially on various aspects of state regulation of Buddhism in Southeast Asia, resulting in a number of publications in journals such as International Political Science Review, Modern Asian Studies, and Journal of Law and Religion.

    Benjamin Schonthal is Associate Professor of Buddhism and Asian Religions at the University of Otago in New Zealand, where he is also Associate Dean (International) for the Humanities Division. He received his Ph.D. in the field of History of Religions at the University of Chicago, where his dissertation received the 2013 Law & Society Association Dissertation Award. Ben’s work examines the intersections of religion, law and politics in late-colonial and contemporary Southern Asia, with a particular focus on Buddhism and law in Sri Lanka. His research appears in The Journal of Asian Studies, Modern Asian Studies, the International Journal of Constitutional Law, Journal of the American Academy of Religions and other places. Ben is the author of Buddhism, Politics and the Limits of Law, appeared with Cambridge University Press in 2016. His current research project, supported by the Royal Society of New Zealand, looks at the interactions of state law and Buddhist monastic law in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Southern Asia.

    Matthew J. Walton is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he was the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar. Matt’s first book, Buddhism, Politics, and Political Thought in Myanmar, was published in 2016 by Cambridge University Press. His articles on Buddhism, ethnicity, politics and political thought in Myanmar have appeared in Politics & Religion, Journal of Burma Studies, Journal of Contemporary Asia, Journal of Contemporary Buddhism, Buddhism, Law & Society, and Asian Survey. Matt was P-I for an ESRC-funded 2-year research project entitled “Understanding ‘Buddhist nationalism’ in Myanmar” and was a co-founder of the Myanmar Media and Society project and of the Burma/Myanmar blog Tea Circle.


    Speakers

    Tomas Larsson
    Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge

    Benjamin Schonthal
    Associate Professor, Buddhism and Asian Religions, University of Otago in New Zealand

    Matthew J. Walton
    Assistant Professor, Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 30th Panel Discussion: Historical Atlas of Central Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 30, 20197:00PM - 9:00PMSt. Vladimir Institute
    620 Spadina Avenue
    (Spadina and Harbord)
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    Description

    Panel discussion on the revised and expanded third edition of Historical Atlas of Central Europe by Prof. Paul Robert Magocsi

    Paul Robert Magocsi is professor of history and political science at the University of Toronto, where since 1980, he has held the John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies.

    Professor Magocsi is a permanent fellow of the Royal Society of Canada—Canadian Academies of Arts, Humanities, and Sciences, and has been awarded honorary degrees from Prešov University in Slovakia (doctor honoris causa, 2013) and from Kamianets-Podilskyi National University in Ukraine (pochesnyi profesor, 2015).


    Speakers

    Paul Robert Magocsi
    Keynote
    John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    Rev. Peter Galadza
    Moderator
    Kule Family Professor of Liturgy at the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies

    Robert Austin
    Panelist
    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Gregor Kranjc
    Panelist
    Brock University

    Piotr Wrobel
    Panelist
    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2019

  • Tuesday, October 1st Hunting the Snark (Lewis Carrol). The Politics of Brexit

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 1, 20194:30PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2016, the UK voted by a majority of 52 per cent to leave the European Union. ‘Brexit’ the Prime Minister declared, ‘means Brexit’. Three years later the project is still not defined and no form of it has succeeded in getting through Parliament. The resulting political turmoil has pushed the largely unwritten constitution to its limits and may break up the United Kingdom itself. Brexit comes in several, incompatible, versions, from hyper-globalism to national protectionism. It is predicated on the return to a unitary nation-state, an English concept that contradicts the vision of the UK (especially since 1999) as a plurinational, post-sovereign union.

    About the Speaker
    Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the universities of Aberdeen and Edinburgh and Director of the Centre on Constitutional Change (CCC). He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. In 1981 he gained the title of incorporated linguist (Institute of Linguists) and speaks English, French, Spanish and Italian. Michael is a fellow of the British Academy, Royal Society of Edinburgh, Academy of Social Sciences and European Academy and has taught in universities in Scotland, England, Canada, the USA, France and Spain and at the European University Institute in Italy. Among his publications since 2000 are Plurinational Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2001); The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013) and (edited) Debating Scotland. Issues of Independence and Union in the 2014 Referendum (Oxford University Press in 2017). With Donatella della Porta, he edited Methods and Approaches in the Social Sciences (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and with David McCrone he edited The Crisis of Social Democracy in Europe (Edinburgh University Press, He is currently leading a major project on the UK constitution and Brexit and preparing a monograph on constitutional accommodation in the UK and Ireland for Oxford University Press.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Michael Keating
    Speaker
    Professor of Politics, Director, Centre on Constitutional Change, University of Aberdeen

    Grace Skogstad
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 2nd U of T – JSPS Forum 2019: Forging Research Collaborations with Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 2, 20191:30PM - 5:00PMHart House – Music Room, University of Toronto,
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3
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    Description

    The goal of this forum is to raise the awareness of science and research excellence in Japan by celebrating successful research collaborations between the two countries and increasing interest among U of T faculty and government partners. The forum will also serve as an opportunity to bring current and potential industry partners and facilitate engagement in collaborative research, as well as raise awareness of funding opportunities available through JSPS, NSERC and MITACS.

    October 2, 2019
    1:30 – 4 PM with reception from 4 – 5PM
    Hart House (Music Room)
    University of Toronto
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3

    RSVP by September 20, 2019 to tak.koguchi@utoronto.ca

    PROGRAM

    Opening Remarks (1:30 – 1:40 PM):
    • Professor Ted Sargent, Vice President, International, University of Toronto
    • Consul General Takako Ito, Consul General of Japan in Toronto
    • Kohji Hirata, Director of JSPS Washington Office

    Research Funding (1:40 – 2:10 PM):
    • Learn about funding opportunities for research with/in Japan with representatives from JSPS, MITACS, NSERC

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan (2:10 – 2:40 PM):
    • Professor Phillip Lipscy, Director of CSGJ presents on the Centre’s vision for collaborating with Japan

    Panel Discussion on Research Collaborations with Japan (2:40 – 3:50 PM):
    • Discussion with U of T faculty on collaborating with Japan. Panelists include:
    • Professor Charles Boone (Molecular Genetics)
    • Professor Wai Tung Ng (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
    • Professor Andre Sorensen (Human Geography)

    Moderated by Professor Chris Yip, Dean of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

    Closing Remarks (3:50 – 4 PM)

    Reception (4 – 5 PM)

    For more information, please visit this link.

    Sponsors

    Office of the Vice-President, International, University of Toronto

    Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 3rd Minds under Siege: Diaries of the Leningrad Blockade

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 3, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Drawing on 125 unpublished diaries from the Soviet archives, this lecture offers an intimate look at the Leningrad Blockade, one of the longest and deadliest sieges in history. The talk examines how Leningraders trapped inside the city came to intellectual grips with extreme starvation and isolation. In the process of contemplating the meaning of their suffering, they placed themselves, their city, and the Soviet experience under a critical microscope.

     

    Alexis Peri received her PhD in history from the University of California Berkeley, and is an Associate Professor of History at Boston University. The War Within: Diaries from the Siege of Leningrad, the book upon which the talk is based, was published by Harvard University Press in 2017 and won the Pushkin Book Prize, the University of Southern California Book Prize in Literary and Cultural Studies, and the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Book Prize for Cultural Studies. She is working on a new book project about Soviet and American pen-friendships during WWII and the Cold War. It is entitled Dear Unknown Friend: Soviet and American Women Discovered the Power of the Personal.


    Speakers

    Alexis Peri
    Boston University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 4th Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Jelena Subotic (PhD, Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007) is Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University in Atlanta, USA. She is the author of two books: Hijacked Justice: Dealing with the Past in the Balkans (Cornell University Press, 2009, Serbian translation 2010) and Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism (Cornell University Press, forthcoming, 2019). Professor Subotic is the author of more than twenty scholarly articles on international relations theory, memory politics, national identity, human rights, and the politics of the Western Balkans.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jelena Subotic
    Professor of Political Science, Georgia State University, Atlanta



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    Speaker
    King’s College London

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 7th The 7th Annual Frank W. Woods Lecture - Conflict, Inequality and Redistribution

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 7, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This lecture addresses an age-old question in political economy: does government spending on welfare ensure peace? This question was at the heart of the European Welfare State model of the early 20th century, and remains relevant today in face of rising inequalities and political conflict. Despite a longstanding historical relationship between peace, democracy and the welfare state, few empirical studies to date have analyzed the causal effect of social policies in preventing or reducing political violence, or the type of policies that may be used to mitigate social conflicts and prevent their escalation into widespread violence.

    We make use of a panel of 12 Latin American countries over the period between 1970 and 2010 to show that government welfare spending has led to substantial reductions in political conflict across the region. This effect is more pronounced when associated with reductions in inequality and increasing social and institutional trust. Similar results are obtained for India, the world’s largest democracy, using panel data collected between 1970 and 2011. This body of evidence suggests that, similarly to Europe at the turn of the 20th century, the implementation of adequate welfare programmes may have an important role to play in the establishment and maintenance of peace and stability in many other parts of the world.

    Speaker

    Professor Patricia Justino is a development economist who works at the interface between Development Economics and Political Science. She is a leading international expert on political violence and development and the co-founder and co-director of the Households in Conflict Network. She is currently a Senior Research Fellow at UNU-WIDER and Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) in Brighton, UK (on leave). Professor Justino’s research focuses on the relationship between political violence, institutional transformation, governance and development outcomes. She has led major research programmes funded by the European Commission, the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID). She is currently PI in a ESRC large grant on the relationship between inequality, social trust and governance outcomes.

    Professor Justino’s research has been published in leading international journals such as the Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Peace Research, and the World Bank Economic Review and is the lead author of A Micro-Level Perspective on the Dynamics of Conflict, Violence and Development (Oxford University Press). She has held several advisory positions in major international organisations, including Action Aid, DFID, FAO, UNDP, UNESCO, UNICEF, UN Women, USAID, and the World Bank. She was the director of the MICROCON research programme and deputy director of the TAMNEAC Initial Training Network. Professor Justino holds a MPhil in Economics from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in Economics from the University of London. She has held visiting positions at Harvard University (2007-2009) and the European University Institute, among others.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Professor Patricia Justino
    Senior Research Fellow, UNU-WIDER Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 8th Asian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Coinciding with the current Canadian Federal Election season, the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) is pleased to host a panel discussion on Asian-Canadian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics. The event focuses on examining Asian representation in Canadian Electoral Politics, exploring the unique sociopolitical conditions that candidates, politicians, and public servants who identify as of Asian-descent experience when navigating Canadian electoral politics.

    Topics of discussion will range from the public perception of Asian-Canadian political leaders in Canada, specific sociopolitical experiences and hurdles that candidates encounter when running for office, and projected shifts in voting behaviour as a result of demographic changes in Canada (i.e. influx of newcomers).

    SPEAKERS:
    Professor Ludovic Rheault
    Ludovic Rheault is Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to his appointment as faculty, he joined an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Toronto as a postdoctoral fellow in 2014. He also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Riverside. Prof. Rheault obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Montreal in 2013.

    Professor Rheault’s research interests focus on areas of the Canadian government, and applications of statistical methods to examine public opinions and policy-related questions. As a member of the French-Canadian minority, he will provide examples illustrating the challenges involved with cultural diversity in Canadian federal politics. In addition, Professor Rheault will provide statistical Canadian electoral insights on the topic.

    Kuo Yin
    Kuo Yin began her career in Canadian politics as a constituency assistant for the Member of Parliament in Toronto. She later held the position of parliamentary assistant at the House of Commons in Ottawa. Prior working in federal politics, Yin studied, worked and lived in Edmonton, Washington D.C and Oxford. According to Yin, “What makes me feel powerful as an Asian woman in Canadian politics is that I was given a variety of opportunities on different platforms to lead this country towards the direction where Canadians want to be.”

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi
    Tenzin Chogkyi was born in Tibet and raised in India. She came to Toronto 15 years ago to study filmmaking. Prior to joining politics, Tenzin worked for the Canadian Oscar nominee, Deepa Mehta.

    Over the past 4 years, Tenzin has served as the Community Liaison for MP Arif Virani at the Parkdale-High Park riding. Parkdale is home to the largest Tibetan community outside of India. In addition to her active role at the office, she is also the coordinator for Parliamentary Friends of Tibet Canada Friendship group.


    Speakers

    Ludovic Rheault

    Kuo Yin

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 9th Academic Januses: GPU-NKVD Secret Informants at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (1920s–1930s)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 9, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2015 the decommunization laws in Ukraine gave open access to the GPU-NKVD-KGB archives, and historians immediately seized the opportunity to study new types of secret police documents which had been inaccessible earlier. Among them were the almost unknown dela-formulyary, i.e. surveillance files on the Ukrainian scholars who worked at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in the 1920s–1930s.
    These files were prepared for many years and contained all information about researchers and their milieu. They consisted of several types of documents – track records, questionnaires, characteristics, references, secret police supervisory materials, copies of testimonies of the detainees, copies of opened and inspected correspondence, as well as numerous “bulletins” and “informational messages” from the secret informants.

    Despite the fact that there are practically no official archival materials on secret informants (their personal files were either obliterated or moved to Russia), it is very likely that their names can be identified. In her talk Oksana Yurkova will present her analysis of the surveillance files and discuss the problem of secret informants among Ukrainian scholars in the 1920s–1930s. Also she will present her research on deciphering of the academic secret informants’ nicknames.

    Dr. Oksana Yurkova is a Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, in Kyiv, Ukraine.
    She studies Ukrainian historiography of the 20th century, especially focusing on the interwar period (1920s–1930s), the Ukrainian historian Mykhailo Hrushevsky and his Kyiv historical school, as well as the activity of Ukrainian historical institutions of that period; iconography; anthropology of academic life; electronic information resources. In 2015, she initiated the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives which collects and presents all printed and archival materials dealing with this famous historian and political figure (http://hrushevsky.nbuv.gov.ua/ ).
    In 2019 the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies awarded her the Kolasky Visiting Research Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Law, Education, and Library Sciences 2019–2020. In Toronto she works on the project “Canadian Sources for the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives.” For more details see her web-page http://resource.history.org.ua/person/0000512

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oksana Yurkova
    Speaker
    Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Head, Petro Jacyk Resource Centre, Co-director, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th Plotting against Hitler: What Is New About the Military Resistance 75 Years Later?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20191:00PM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the failed coup d’état against Hitler on 20 July 1944, there has been a considerable surge of publications on the topic. Some such books, at times by amateur historians, have focused on the personality of Stauffenberg, the mastermind behind the conspiracy and the man who planted the bomb. Was he driven by religious and ethical motives, by his allegiance to the circle around esoteric author Stefan George, or was he motivated by purely military considerations?

    Winfried Heinemann argues that, in the same way the political resistance was influenced by Weimar-era thought, so too were the military conspirators shaped by their experience in the Reichswehr (Army of the Weimar Republic). He will place the revolt in the context of the Third Reich’s polycratic structures, and explain how that in turn prevented the postwar West German Bundeswehr (Federal Armed Forces) from identifying too easily with the conspirators.

    Winfried Heinemann was born in Dortmund and studied history and English language at Bochum University and King’s College, London. From 1983 to 2018, he served as an officer in the German Army. Since 1986, he was attached to the German Armed Forces ‘ Centre for Military History in Freiburg, later in Potsdam. After taking his PhD with a thesis on the early diplomatic history of NATO, he went on to direct the East German Military History branch, then the departments for research and for historical education. He retired as the Chief of Staff and Deputy Commander of the Centre.

    Gavin Wiens (commentator) completed his PhD in the Department of History at the University of Toronto in 2019. His dissertation argued that the German army remained a decentralized, contingent-based institution between the Wars of Unification and the end of the First World War and that the distribution of military power among Germany’s lesser kings, grand dukes, and princes played a crucial role in legitimizing and perpetuating monarchical rule during a period of rapid economic and social change. He has published essays on the composition and operations of the German army during the First World War and he has held grants and fellowships from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Central European History Society, the German Historical Institute, Washington, DC, and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. His current research focuses on the activities of German military attachés and advisors in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and South America between the Napoleonic Wars and the end of the Cold War.

    This event is co-financed by the DAAD with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office (AA).


    Speakers

    Prof. Col. Winfried Heinemann
    Speaker
    German Armed Forces Centre for Military History

    Gavin Wiens
    Commentator
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th The dark night of love in the Indian tradition

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture

    Description

    This talk focuses on the dark nights of desire, on the difficulties and ordeals lovers have to face and overcome in the pursuit of fulfilment, and also on the tricks that their ingenuity manages to invent in order to escape detection, which sometimes can lead to disgrace or even death. Indian literature covers both illicit and marital love with great nuance. It ranges from problems to do with secrecy to problems of marital privacy in a crowded extended family situation. The differences between literary representations and visual representations of love stories will also be dealt with.

    Dr. Fabrizia Baldissera teaches Sanskrit Language and Literature at University of Florence. She lectures abroad extensively. Her interests are kāvya, satire, Goddess worship, dance, Indian alchemy and Arthaśāstra. Her books include The Narmamālā of Kṣemendra; Śāradātilakabhāṇa; L’universo di Kāma; King and Devī and Emotions in Indian Dramas and Dances.


    Speakers

    Fabrizia Baldissera
    Speaker
    Sanskrit Language and Literature, University of Florence

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Instituto Italiano di Cultura Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 11th Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 11, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will be based on my newly published book Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War (University of Washington Press). The book examines the life of the Sri Lankan Tamil community in the time of war and migration before the war was ended in 2009. Three decades of war in Sri Lanka ended in 2009, but the prolonged violence during the war devastated the Sri Lankan Tamil community, leading to a serious disruption of ordinary life and mass migrations to escape the violence of the state and of Tamil militants. Jaffna Tamils are now widely dispersed across the world – predominantly in Canada, continental Europe, UK, Australia and India. In the book I have focused on marriage processes (arrangements of transnational marriages), transit places where the actual marriage performance takes place, figures (e.g. marriage brokers, photographers) who facilitate marriages, visual documents (e.g. wedding photos), and laws, in order to understand how Sri Lankan Tamils, who have been dispersed across spaces, rebuilt and shaped their fragmented lives and communities through these documents/figures/ spaces/zones. This study suggests that those fragmented communities were rekindled by ‘in-betweens’ associated with the marriage process, actors like wedding photographers or marriage brokers, legal corpuses, and transit places. The practices, ceremonies, and performances during the marriage process hold an imagined and lived future/s, entangled with past and present. This book deals with temporalities, documents, relatedness and political violence.

    Sidharthan Maunaguru is currently an assistant professor in anthropology at Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies at National University of Singapore. His research interests cover the areas of marriage, migration, religion, diaspora, politics, conscience, ethics, and law. He was awarded a Newton Fellowship by British Academia and Royal Society which was held at University of Edinburgh before he joined NUS. Maunaguru’s work is placed within the South Asian regions and beyond, it often includes multi-site fieldwork and intersects with anthropology, history and philosophy. He has published in Modern Asian Studies, Comparative Studies on Society and History, Religion and Society and Contributions to Indian Sociology. Maunaguru’s book titled Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War is published in 2019 with University of Washington Press, and another of his article is forthcoming in Current Anthropology.

    Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Sidharthan Maunaguru
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Tamil Worlds Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 16th Religion, Immigration and Settlement

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 16, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Canada has been praised globally for the outcomes of its settlement and integration policies. Religion is often a factor influencing the initial arrival of migrants, and their transition to life in Canada. What ideas, principles, and beliefs motivate those involved with faith-based settlement organizations? What role do religious communities play in supporting the process of settlement and integration? Are there ways in which they inhibit the process of social integration, or reinforce social divisions? What can secular and faith-based organizations involved in the settlement of recent immigrants learn from each other? How should the academic study of the settlement and integration of immigrants take account of the role played by religion in this process?

    Panel Discussion:

    Anne Woolger, Founding Director, Matthew House

    Bayan Khatib, Executive Director, Syrian Canadian Foundation

    Neda Farahmandpour, Manager, Toronto North Local Immigration Partnership, JVS Toronto

    This seminar series is organized in partnership by the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy with the Baha’i Community of Canada and the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Baha’i Community of Canada

    University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMEast Asian Studies Lounge, 14th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Mari Yoshihara will speak about her new book, Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro, which interweaves the history of Leonard Bernstein’s transformation from an American icon to a world maestro with an intimate story of his relationships with two Japanese individuals: Amano Kazuko, a loyal fan who began writing letters to Bernstein in 1947, and Kunihiko Hashimoto, a young man who fell deeply in love with Bernstein in 1979 and later became his business representative. During the period in which these two relationships unfolded, Japan’s place in the world and its relationship vis-à-vis the United States changed dramatically, which in turn shaped Bernstein’s connection to the country. Yoshihara will trace the making of a global Bernstein amidst the shifting change of classical music that made this American celebrity turn increasingly to Europe and Japan.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).

    *Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro will be available for purchase at the venue.

    Location
    The lounge is located on the 14th floor of the Robarts Library. Take the P4 elevator from the 2nd floor of Robarts to the 14th floor. On exiting the elevator, head LEFT and follow signs to EAS.


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Speaker
    American Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th The Refugium in Eurasian History and its Spatiality

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room
    2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    The term refugium—yet to be properly defined—has been used by scholars to denote areas where safety from enemies owing to remoteness or difficulty of access provided long-term security that allowed for polity-formation (no connection to refugium as a medieval village fortification). Often a degree of sacredness is said to have been ascribed to refugia by their possessors. Examples of refugia on the Eurasian steppe: north of the Göbi Desert for the Asiatic Huns (Hiung-nu), Rouran (“Avars”), and Gök Türks; Yeti-su/Semirechye (Lake Balkash basin) for the West Türk Qaganate; Blue Forest on the Samara River (Ukraine) for Qipchaqs/Polovtsians; Burqan Qaldun Mountain for the Mongols of Chinggis Khan. Other possible refugia: the lower Dnieper River below its rapids (Zaporozhia) where the genesis of Ukrainian cossackdom occurred; Scandinavia (“Scandza Island”) for the Goths; Gerrhus for the Scythians. This seminar will survey the sources and spaces, query the reality of refugia as opposed to simple refuges, and explore aspects of spatiality.

     

    Sponsored by the Departments of History and of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations and by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Speakers

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto.


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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