« June 2018 - August 2018 September 2018 - Present

September 2018

  • Tuesday, September 4th Indology During National Socialist Times - A German Perspective

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 4, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The history of German Indology during NS times has been part of many historical narratives, mostly because it seemed obvious to trace the Nazi idea of an Aryan race back to German Indologists. But the approach had its drawbacks: the focus was on two German Indologists with NS leanings, while the history of others and especially Jewish Indologists in Germany was never studied. It has also proved quite detrimental that the discussion of these topics has often been caught in the political crossfire. All this seemed to leave not enough space for carving out a way in which German Indologists might live with their past. In this talk Jürgen Hanneder shall try to formulate such a perspective and demonstrate that if we look more closely and use more of the rich archival sources, a differentiated picture emerges.

    Biography:

    Prof. Dr. Jürgen Hanneder has studied Indology, Tibetology and Comparative Religion in various German Universities, then continued in Oxford and Marburg with his PhD, and worked as an assistant professor and in academic projects in Bonn, Halle, and Freiburg. In 2007, he succeeded to the chair of Indology in Marburg in 2007. His main fields of research lie within the Sanskrit literature of Kashmir, which is also a focus of many Indological projects in Marburg, but he is also interested in the history of Indology.

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Dr. Jurgen Hanneder
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Indology and Tibetology, Marburg University

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 6th Sarah Igo: Sex, Science, and Secrets in the Sixties

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 6, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMVictoria College, Room 323
    73 Queen’s Park Crescent
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    Sarah Igo: Sex, Science, and Secrets in the Sixties

    My talk, based on my recently published book, The Known Citizen, focuses on a moment when ideas in the United States about privacy and social research were evolving in tandem. I examine shifting sensibilities about confidentiality and consent in the 1960s and 1970s through the case of Laud Humphreys, a sociologist who conducted a path-breaking ethnographic study of gay male sex in public restrooms. Humphreys was initially applauded for the boldness of his research. Soon enough, however, he would be roundly condemned for invading the private lives of his unwitting subjects. The reaction to Humphreys’ Tearoom Tradereveals fresh skepticism about the “right to know” in an era of unprecedented federal funding and prestige for social science. It also highlights newfound concerns by the later sixties about the shrinking space for unmonitored action in the modern U.S.—even for behavior that offended dominant norms, was legally punishable, and officially shunned.

    For more info: http://hps.utoronto.ca/sarah-igo-sex-secrets-and-social-research-in-the-sixties/


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 13th – Friday, September 14th Interdisciplinary Simmel: A Conference

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 13, 20182:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Friday, September 14, 20189:00AM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Thursday September 13

    2:00 Opening Remarks: Willi Goetschel and Dan Silver

    2:15 Omar Lizardo, Simmel’s dialectic of content and form in recent work in cultural sociology

    3:00 Thomas Kemple, Simmel’s Sense of Modernity: Adventures in Time and Space

    3:45 Coffee Break

    4:15 Natàlia Cantó Milà, Simmel’s Sociology of Relations

    5:00 Elizabeth Goodstein, Simmel’s Phenomenology of Disciplinarity

    Friday September 14

    9:15 John McCole, Georg Simmel: Deconstructing the Self and Recovering Authentic Individuality

    10:00 Oliver Simons, Georg Simmel’s Theory of Form

    10:45 Coffee Break

    11:00 Daniel Silver and Milos Brocic, Three Conceptions of Form in Simmel’s Sociology

    11:45 Willi Goetschel, Form and Relation: Difference and Alterity in Simmel

    12:30 Open Discussion

    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service)

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    Department of Philisophy, University of Toronto

    Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto

    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 13th Book Launch: The Age of Eisenhower

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 13, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    William I. Hitchcock is the William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has written or edited six books on the international, diplomatic and military history of the 20th Century, in particular the era of the world wars and the cold war.

    He received his B.A. degree from Kenyon College in 1986, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1994. His book The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe (Free Press, 2008), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, a winner of the George Louis Beer Prize, and a Financial Times bestseller.
    His most recent book is the New York Times bestseller, The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World in the 1950s
    He lives in Charlottesville with his wife, Elizabeth Varon, who is a historian of the US Civil War.

    Books for sale and signing. Refreshments provided.


    Speakers

    William I. Hitchcock
    William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virg



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 14th Goliath's Advantage: Why Big Firms are Getting Bigger and What that Means For Wages, Productivity, and Inequality

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 14, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Throughout the global economy, big companies are getting bigger. They’re more productive, more profitable, and they pay better. The people lucky enough to work at these companies are doing relatively well. Those who work for the competition aren’t. Policymakers have taken notice. Competition policy is seeing renewed interest and “monopoly” is suddenly on the tip of every columnist’s tongue. However, new research shows that big firms have gotten bigger not so much because of permissive antitrust enforcement, but because these firms have developed highly effective proprietary digital technologies. Indeed, firms–predominately large firms–are investing nearly as much in proprietary software as they invest in new physical capital. This trend has let large firms increasingly dominate their industries, slowed productivity growth, and contributed to unequal and stagnant wages.

    James Bessen, an economist, serves as Executive Director of the Technology & Policy Research Initiative at Boston University School of Law. Mr. Bessen has done research on whether patents promote innovation, why innovators share new knowledge, and how technology affects jobs, skills, and wages. With Michael J. Meurer, Bessen wrote Patent Failure (Princeton University Press, 2008), highlighting the problems caused by poorly defined property rights. His research first documented the large economic damage caused by patent trolls and showed the link between information technology and job growth. His latest book, Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth (Yale University Press, 2015), looks at history to understand how new technologies affect wages and skills today. Bessen’s work has been widely cited in the press as well as by the White House, the U.S. Supreme Court, judges at the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Federal Trade Commission. In 1983, Bessen developed the first commercially successful “what-you-see-is-what- you-get” PC publishing program, founding a company that delivered PC-based publishing systems to high-end commercial publishers.




    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    James Bessen
    Executive Director of the Technology & Policy Research Initiative at Boston University School of Law



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 14th Professor Ronald F. Inglehart - The Silent Revolution in Reverse: The Rise of Trump and the Authoritarian Populist Parties

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 14, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    Victoria University in the University of Toronto
    93 Charles Street W
    Toronto, ON M5S 2C7
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    Series

    Munk Environics Lecture

    Description

    Ronald F. Inglehart is the Lowenstein Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan. Author of over 300 publications, he holds honorary doctorates from Uppsala University, Sweden, the Free University of Brussels, Belgium, and the University of Lueneburg, Germany. Inglehart helped found the Euro-Barometer surveys and is founding president of the World Values Survey Association, which has surveyed representative national samples of the publics of 105 countries containing over 90 percent of the world’s population. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. In 2011, Inglehart won the Johan Skytte prize in Political Science, often considered the highest prize awarded in the field.

    Professor Ingleharts’ recently published book, Cultural Evolution: People’s Motivations are Changing, and Reshaping the World, argues that people’s values and behavior are shaped by the degree to which survival is secure; it was precarious for most of history, which encouraged heavy emphasis on group solidarity, rejection of outsiders, and obedience to strong leaders. For under extreme scarcity, xenophobia is realistic: if there is just enough land to support one tribe and another tribe tries to claim it, survival may literally be a choice between Us and Them. Conversely, high levels of existential security encourage openness to change, diversity and new ideas. The unprecedented prosperity and security of the postwar era brought cultural change, the environmentalist movement, and the spread of democracy. But in recent decades, diminishing job security and rising inequality have led to an authoritarian reaction. Evidence from more than 100 countries demonstrates that people’s motivations and behavior reflect the extent to which they take survival for granted—and that modernization changes them in roughly predictable ways. This book explains the rise of environmentalist parties, gender equality, and same-sex marriage... and the current reaction producing Trump, Brexit, and France’s National Front, through a new, empirically-tested version of modernization theory.

    “This book is the product of an extremely ambitious project—ambitious in terms of the broad scope of the various aspects of society that its theoretical insights purport to explain, but also in terms of the range of the social science disciplines that are swept up and integrated into this “evolutionary modernization theory.” One could even regard this enterprise as striving towards what would be the equivalent of “unified field theory” in physics. What Chutzpah! And what a burden of proof such an ambitious enterprise would face. Remarkably, Inglehart succeeds in this demanding task, the ultimate product of which I regard as one of the most important works in the social sciences in decades”.

    –Richard Gunther, Ohio State University

    “Cultural Evolution culminates a remarkably productive half century’s exploration of cultural change by Ronald Inglehart. This renowned scholar now extends the reach of his theory to global history, while honing his concepts to dissect, for example, the emergence of rightwing populism and LGBTQ activism. This is Inglehart at his most ambitious and most astute. It is a powerful book”.

    –Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University

    “Cultural Evolution is an intellectual tour-de-force. Drawing on insights from years of research in societies representing 90% of the world’s population, the renowned political scientist Ronald Inglehart traces the most important changes taking place across the globe—the shift from Materialist to Postmaterialist values. His brilliant new Evolutionary Modernization theory explains changes in religion, conflict, gender equality, democracy, happiness, among other phenomena through the same parsimonious scientific lens. It is a fantastic read for anyone interested in understanding the dynamics of culture change”.

    –Michele Gelfand, University of Maryland


    Speakers

    Ronald F. Inglehart
    Speaker
    Research Professor, Center for Political Studies Professor, Department of Political Science University of Michigan

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 20th Phantom Services: Deflecting Migrant Workers in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 20, 201812:30PM - 2:30PMIgnat Kaneff Building, room 4034, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, 4700 Keele St.
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    Description

    As China urbanizes, more migrants need and expect public services. Many municipalities, however, deflect demands for benefits instead of meeting them or denying them outright. Within cities, the authorities may establish nearly impossible eligibility requirements or require paperwork that outsiders struggle to obtain. Municipal leaders may also nudge migrants to seek healthcare or education elsewhere by enforcing dormant rules, shutting a service down, or encouraging them to pursue cheaper options in another city or in the countryside. Urban officials deflect migrants for both political and practical reasons. Limiting access isolates and disempowers migrants and is cheaper than offering benefits. Phantom services are also politically appealing at a time when the central government is calling for greater benefits for non-locals and urging people to move to small cities, but municipal authorities must deal with migrants who continue to appear in large numbers in the biggest, most desirable cities.


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Brien
    Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Osgoode Hall Law School

    The Nathanson Centre

    York Centre for Asian Research


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 21st Speaking to Theory and Speaking to the China Field

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 21, 201810:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Bringing knowledge about China to the disciplines has reduced the outsized role that research on Europe and America has on many topics. But mainstreaming China studies also gives rise to certain tradeoffs. How should we manage these tradeoffs and produce research that is both true to China and contributes to the social sciences? In the last 30 years, China scholars have developed many strategies to navigate the territory between area studies and the social sciences. I myself have vacillated about how area studies and political science should interact and inform each other. How are China scholars addressing this issue now, in the era of mixed methods, experiments, “big data,” and causal inference?

    Biography:

    Kevin O’Brien is the Bedford Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies at UC-Berkeley. A student of contemporary Chinese politics, he has written on legislative politics, local elections, fieldwork strategies, popular protest, policy implementation, protest policing, and political reform. His most recent work centers on the Chinese state and theories of popular contention, particularly as concerns protest control and types of repression that are neither “soft” nor “hard.”

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Kevin O'Brien
    Speaker
    Bedford Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley

    Lynette Ong
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and Asian Institute


    Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 21st 100 Years of Baltic Republics: Statehood and National Cultures in the Globalizing World

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 21, 201812:30PM - 5:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A conference to celebrate the centenary of the Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, bringing together scholars and practitioners from various disciplines from the Baltic states and Canada. The focus of the first day of the conference is on demography and migration, integration of the Russian minorities, and contemporary security challenges in the Baltic Sea region. The second day of the conference (September 22), focusing on language, identity, and the preservation of national heritage, takes place at the Estonian Studies Centre, Tartu College (310 Bloor St. W).

    12:45-13:00
    Words of Welcome

    Randall Hanson, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    Toomas Lukk, Ambassador of Estonia
    Andris Ķesteris, President, Baltic Federation in Canada
    Tea Varrak, Secretary-General, Estonian Ministry of Education and Research
    Andres Kasekamp, University of Toronto

    13:00-14:00 Keynote

    Chair: Mihkel Tombak, University of Toronto

    Keynote: Mare Ainsaar, University of Tartu
    Baltic Population Challenges and their Impact on Societies

    14:00-15:15
    Panel I: The Challenge of Integration of Russian minorities in the Baltic States

    Chair: Merli Tamtik, University of Manitoba

    Piret Hartman, Estonian Ministry of Culture
    Integration of the Russian-speaking Minority and Return Migration
    Irene Käosaar, Integration Foundation, Estonia
    Successes and Failures of Integration in Estonia
    Juris Dreifelds, Brock University
    Latvianization of Minority Schools: Progress or Regress in Ethnic Relations?

    15:15-16:00
    Coffee, snacks and networking

    16:00- 17:30
    Panel II: Baltic Regional Security

    Chair: Toivo Miljan, Wilfred Laurier University

    Aušra Park, Siena College, New York
    Leadership and the Foreign Policies of the Baltic States
    Aurel Braun, University of Toronto
    The Geopolitics of Northeastern Europe in the Era of Trump and Putin
    Marcus Kolga, MacDonald-Laurier Institute
    Canada, NATO’s Eastern Flank and Russian Information Warfare
    Andres Kasekamp, University of Toronto
    The Baltic States and the Future of the European Union

    Sponsors

    Elmar Tampõld Chair of Estonian Studies

    Estonian Foundation of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 21st Interpreting Insurgency: Anticolonial Resistance and British Dissent

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 21, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMRoom 616, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    This lecture is drawn from the introduction to my forthcoming study, Insurgent Empire: Anticolonialism and British Dissent. Against the grain of influential histories of empire as much postcolonial studies, I will make the case, ‘in a spirit of dialectics’, for lines of influence which run from periphery to metropole (as much as in the other direction). One axis, though not the only one, along which this question can be explored is that of dissent around the question of empire in Britain, with dissidents variously referred to as ‘critics of empire’, ‘imperial sceptics’ or British ‘anti-colonialists’. Without pretending that the field could ever have been level or lines of influence simply reciprocal given the constitutive power differential, I suggest that there was also an anticolonial impact from outside Europe on metropolitan thought, specifically, though not only, on British dissent around and criticism of the colonial project. Resistance to the colonial project in several parts of the British Empire in the nineteenth- and twentieth- centuries helped shape criticism of and opposition to the imperial project within Britain itself. That influence was not necessarily always ideational or to be solely assessed using the tools of intellectual history; it was often exercised by the practice of struggle and by crises occasioned by insurgency.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Priyamvada Gopal is University Reader in Anglophone and Related Literatures at the University of Cambridge. A professor in the School of English and Fellow of Churchill College, she is the author of Literary Radicalism in India (2005) and The Indian English Novel: Nation, History and Narration (2009). Her most recent study, Insurgent Empire: Anticolonialism and British Dissent, is forthcoming from Verso.

    Speakers

    Priyamvada Gopal
    Faculty of English, University of Cambridge


    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Centre for South Asian Civilizations at UTM

    Department of English


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 24th Rethinking East Asia in the New Global Economy (IPL Speaker Series)

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 24, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Based on his recent book with Cornell University Press, Strategic Coupling, Prof. Yeung examines economic development and state-firm relations in East Asia, focusing on the region’s emerging role in the new global economy. Much of the earlier social science literature on the political economy of industrial transformation has emphasized the role of the developmental state in picking selected domestic firms as “national champions” and in promoting their rapid growth through sectoral industrial policy. Drawing upon his empirical research on South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore, he argues that production network-level dynamics and firm-specific initiatives are more critical to the successful industrial transformation of these East Asian economies in the contemporary era. This key mechanism of strategic coupling with global production networks offers a dynamic conception of state-firm relations in the changing context of global economic governance in East Asia.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Henry Wai-chung Yeung
    Distinguished Professor Department of Geography, National University of Singapore


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, September 24th Where is the USA in Asia? Washington CSIS Senior Asia VP Mike Green talks about "By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, September 24, 20185:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Where is the USA in Asia? Washington CSIS Senior Asia VP Mike Green talks about
    BY MORE THAN PROVIDENCE
    Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

    From a New York Times book review by Gordon G. Chang on April 7, 2017: “It was “by more than Providence” that the United States, over the course of more than two centuries, became the pre-eminent power in Asia and the Pacific. Commerce, faith and notions of self-defense drove Americans westward, not only across a continent but also a wide expanse of ocean, says Michael J. Green, who served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Asia on the National Security Council staff.”

    Green argues that, going back to 1783, the American strategy in Asia has been to prevent any one country from dominating the Pacific. But with the rise of China, can this strategy hold? And are Americans willing to pay the price?

    Bio:

    Michael Jonathan Green is senior vice president for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and director of Asian Studies at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He served on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) from 2001 through 2005, first as director for Asian affairs with responsibility for Japan, Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, and then as special assistant to the president for national security affairs and senior director for Asia, with responsibility for East Asia and South Asia. Before joining the NSC staff, he was a senior fellow for East Asian security at the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Center and the Foreign Policy Institute and assistant professor at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University, research staff member at the Institute for Defense Analyses, and senior adviser on Asia in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He also worked in Japan on the staff of a member of the National Diet.

    Dr. Green is also a nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, a distinguished scholar at the Asia Pacific Institute in Tokyo, and professor by special appointment at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Strategy Group, the America Australia Leadership Dialogue, the advisory boards of Radio Free Asia and the Center for a New American Security, and the editorial boards of the Washington Quarterly and the Journal of Unification Studies in Korea. He also serves as a trustee at the Asia Foundation, senior adviser at the Asia Group, and associate of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Dr. Green has authored numerous books and articles on East Asian security, including most recently, By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783 (Columbia University Press, 2017). He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from SAIS and did additional graduate and postgraduate research at Tokyo University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Kenyon College with highest honors. He holds a black belt in Iaido (sword) and has won international prizes on the great highland bagpipe.

    “By More Than Providence: Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783” will be available for sale and the author will be available for signing.

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996

    Sponsors

    Manulife Financial Corporation

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 25th Professor Desmond King: Democratic and Racial Backsliding? Making Sense of the American Populist Movement

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 25, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Desmond King is the Andrew Mellon Professor of Government at Nuffield College, Oxford. Professor King is one of the leading scholars of American political development. He has written widely on race (Still A House Divided, with Rogers Smith 2011), immigration (Making Americans, 2001), eugenics (Sterilized by the State, with Randall Hansen 2013), and national identity (The Liberty of Strangers, 2006). In this lecture, Professor King will use a developmental, historical lens to understand the place of populism in contemporary American politics.


    Speakers

    Desmond King
    Andrew Mellon Professor of American Government, Nuffield College, Oxford University


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Political Science, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 25th Book Launch: Taxing Africa: Coercion, Reform and Development

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 25, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Taxation has been seen as the domain of charisma-free accountants, lawyers and number crunchers – an unlikely place to encounter big societal questions about democracy, equity or good governance. Yet it is exactly these issues that pervade conversations about taxation among policymakers, tax collectors, civil society activists, journalists and foreign aid donors in Africa today. Tax has become viewed as central to African development.

    Written by leading international experts, Taxing Africa offers a cutting-edge analysis of the continent’s tax regime, displaying the crucial role such arrangements have on attempts to create social justice and push economic advancement. From tax evasion by multinational corporations and African elites to how ordinary people navigate complex webs of ‘informal’ local taxation, the book examines the crucial potential for reform.

    Wilson Prichard is an Associate Professor jointly appointed to the Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. He is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex and is the Research Director of International Center for Tax and Development. His broad research focus is in international development, with a particular focus on sub-Saharan Africa, and he has an interdisciplinary background in comparative politics, international political economy and economics. His current research explores the political foundations of development, with a focus on the differential implications of taxation, resource wealth, and foreign aid for development outcomes, particularly in post-conflict settings. He works closely with civil society organizations, national governments, regional organizations in sub-Saharan Africa, and international agencies and institutions, including the World Bank, IMF, OECD, the UN, and various aid agencies.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Wilson Prichard
    Associate Professor, Political Science Associate Professor, Master of Global Affairs Research Director, International Center for Tax and Development



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 26th The Poll-itical Perspective: Understanding American Millennial Voter Behavior

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 26, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Poll-itical Perspective: Understanding American Millennial Voter Behavior

    “Millennials are the largest generation in the history of America and the largest generation in the history of the world”. With the 2018 U.S. Midterm elections just around the corner, all 435 House seats, over a third of the seats in the Senate, and 39 state and territorial gubernatorial positions are at stake. What are some of the fascinating trends that have been shaping millennial voting behavior for this November? Described by The Washington Post as one of the world’s leading authorities on understanding global attitudes among Millennials, Professor John Della Volpe will use fresh polling data as a launch point to discuss cultural, political and social trends driving this generation. After his talk, Professor Della Volpe will then open up the floor to student leaders and the general audience for a Q&A period.

    John Della Volpe is the Director of Polling at the Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics (IOP), and has been leading the institute’s polling initiatives on understanding American youth since 2000. The IOP has accurately predicted youth turnout in every election since, and has provided insight into pre-/post- 9/11 attitudes, and into generational shifts in foreign policy, among other topics. In 2008, he received an Eisenhower Fellowship for which he traveled extensively throughout China, Hong Kong, and Korea (including a supervised day in North Korea) studying Millennials; in 2011, he was appointed to the U.S.-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission on Media. John is also founder of SocialSphere, a Cambridge based public opinion and analytics company. He appears regularly on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, and his insights have appeared in U.S. media, including on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, and The Opposition with Jordan Klepper.

    Full bio is here: http://iop.harvard.edu/about/staff/john-della-volpe


    Speakers

    Dr. John Della Volpe
    Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 27th Urban Political Development in the US and Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 27, 20181:00PM - 5:00PMSidney Smith Hall, Room 3130
    100 St. George Street
    Toronto, Ontario
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    Description

    Please join us for a workshop devoted to understanding urban political development in the US and Canada.

    Featuring:

    Desmond King (Oxford) and Margaret Weir (Brown): Race, Redistribution and the Anxieties of Local Democracy (1:10 – 2:00 pm)
    Discussant: Sara Hughes (Toronto)

    Nicholas Jacobs (Virginia): The Political Dynamics of “Creative Federalism”: President Johnson, the Mayors, and the Development of Federal-Local Urban Policy in the 1960s (2:00 – 2:50 pm)
    Discussant: Zack Taylor (Western)

    Mirya Holman (Tulane): Urban Fiscal Crises and the Renegotiation of City-State Relations in American Political Development (3:10 – 4:00 pm)
    Discussant: Connor Ewing (Toronto)

    Richardson Dilworth (Drexel): Meaning and Method in the Marriage of Urban Politics and American Political Development (4:00 – 4:50 pm)
    Discussant: Jack Lucas (Calgary)

    No registration required.

    Contact

    Rob Vipond


    Speakers

    Desmond King
    Oxford

    Margaret Weir
    Brown

    Richardson Dilworth
    Drexel

    Mirya R. Holman
    Tulane

    Nicholas F. Jacobs
    Virginia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 27th Solidification of Ethnic Boundaries and Retreat from Hispanic intermarriage in the United States

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 27, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Prior work on the retreat from intermarriage usually treats Hispanic as a monolithic group, ignoring racial diversity within the Hispanic population. As a result, two questions of fundamental importance to the marital assimilation of Hispanics have remained unanswered: (1) did all Hispanic subgroups, irrespective of their race, experience a retreat from intermarriage? and (2) to what extent did the racial diversification of the Hispanic population contribute to their retreat from intermarriage? To address these questions, I document how the permeability of racial, ethnic, and national boundaries changed during the 1990s. My results underscore the heterogeneity in the marital assimilation of Hispanics. Not all Hispanic subgroups experienced a retreat from intermarriage. Rates of intermarriage with non-Hispanic Whites decreased among Hispanic Whites and Hispanic SORs, but they increased among Hispanic Blacks. Changes in Hispanic men and women’s willingness to marry Hispanic partners of a different race also varied by race. The odds of intermarriage between Hispanic Whites and non-White Hispanics increased during the 1990s, while the odds of intermarriage between Hispanic Blacks and Hispanic SORs decreased during this time. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of considering race when studying the intermarriage behavior of Hispanics.

    Speaker’s bio:

    Kate H. Choi is a social demographer interested in the causes and consequences of family formation, namely how crossing social and national boundaries influence family formation and wellbeing. She contributes to this literature by pursuing two lines of scientific inquiry: (1) investigating how institutional opportunities and constraints arising due to international migration shape family formation and (2) examining how crossing ethnoracial, educational, and age boundaries in spousal selection influence the health and wellbeing of individuals and their offspring. Her work has been published in several renowned journals, including Demography, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Social Science and Medicine. She is currently Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Kate Choi
    University of Western Ontario



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 27th THE NATO SUMMIT OUTCOMES PANEL

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 27, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The aim of the NATO Summit Outcomes Conference is to address key events, ideas, and issues that took place during the July 2018 NATO Summit. The intent is to bring together multiple panel discussions to create a wealth of knowledge for Canadians to understand the importance of NATO domestically and internationally.

    Speaking at this event will be former NATO Ambassador David Wright, Director General of Military Strategic Communications Jay Janzen and Jack Cunningham from the Bill Graham Centre.

    To RSVP, please email rsvp@natoassociation.ca


    Speakers

    AMBASSADOR DAVID WRIGHT
    Former NATO Ambassador

    GENERAL JAY JANZEN
    Director General of Military Strategic Communications

    JACK CUNNINGHAM
    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    Sponsors

    Nato Association of Canada

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 27th Ethnic Relations in Poland After 1989

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 27, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    THIS EVENT HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO 4 OCTOBER. PLEASE SEE https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/26247/

    In the last three decades we have seen important changes in the area of ethnic relations in Poland. In general, ethnic minorities are becoming more and more active and better organized actors in the public scene. Additionally, the state policy has been stabilised, as the official frames of minority protection have been created.

    The lecture will concentrate on two general perspectives: agency and structural one. The main aim is to present these both faces of ethnic relations. The former, an agency perspective, concerns the activities undertaken by minority groups which are focused on their identity and culture. The main argument developed in this part is that a gradual process of moving from culture to politics could be observed in Poland nowadays. The activities undertaken by minorities take a different shape and expression both on institutional and public, as well as more spontaneous and personal levels. The latter, structural perspective, underlines the aspect of power inscribed in minority-majority relations. To develop this issue, the concept of ethnic field will be introduced to show prospects and barriers imposed on these groups, especially by current legal regulations, as well as by the dominating national discourse. The presentation will touch on the problems concerning the so-called old minorities living in Poland, among them Ukrainians and Lemkos.

    Katarzyna Warmińska-Zygmunt, PhD hab., is a socioligist, an associated professor at the Department of Sociology, Cracow University of Economics. Her main interest concentrates on ethnic relations in Poland, identity and politics in the context of minority groups, and anthropological practice. She has conducted fieldwork among Polish Tartars and Kashubs. The author of over fifty articles, and one book (“Polish Tartars. Religious and ethnic identity”) and the coeditor of three other books.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 27th Professor Timothy Garton Ash: WHITE EAGLE, RED BACKGROUND: A Centenary of Polish Independence, A Century of Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 27, 20186:00PM - 7:30PMIsabel Bader Theatre
    93 Charles Street West
    Toronto ON M5S 2C7
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    Description

    Biography:

    Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies, University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of ten books of contemporary history and political writing is which have explored many facets of the history of Europe over the last half-century. They include The Polish Revolution: Solidarity The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, & Prague, The File: A Personal History, In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent and Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade without a Name. He also writes a column on international affairs in the Guardian, which is widely syndicated, and is a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books, amongst other journals.

    From 2001 to 2006, he was Director of the European Studies Centre at St Antony’s College, Oxford, where he now directs the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom. Its Free Speech Debate research project, built around the 13 language website freespeechdebate.com, contributed greatly to the writing of his most recent book Free Speech: Ten Principles For a Connected World.

    Prizes he has received for his writing include the Somerset Maugham Award, the Prix Européen de l’Essai, the Theodor Heuss Prize and the George Orwell Prize. He holds honorary doctorates from St Andrew’s University, Sheffield Hallam University and the Catholic University of Leuven, the Order of Merit from Germany, Poland and Czech Republic, and the British CMG. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, The Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts. In 2017, he was awarded the International Charlemagne Prize of the city of Aachen, for services to European unity.


    Speakers

    Timothy Garton Ash
    Speaker
    Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow, St Anthony's College Professor, European Studies, University of Oxford Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toront

    Randall Hansen
    Moderator
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto Director, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 28th Building Migration Regimes: The Case of Latin America

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 28, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Since the end of authoritarian regimes in the late 80s, migration and refugee law took a new and more liberal direction in all different countries of Latin America. The new Immigration Politics consolidated in the last two decades explain in part the growing number of migrants and refugees to the region. How different Latin America is from nationalistic and restrictive countries on display in other parts of the world? The Global South, contrary to mainstream migration studies, is the region that receives more migrants in the world and urges us to reorient our debate and understanding on how the south hemisphere in general can cope with the challenges of massive migration flows and how the Americas in particular can work together on sharing the burden of migration crisis in the region. To answer these questions the presentation will take two major receiving countries in the region, Brazil and Argentina, and will explain how these liberal policies were implemented under their leadership and how resilient they can be in face of new conservative governments in power in the last few years. Are supranational institutions and liberal refugee and migration regimes strong enough to face these challenges? How effective are national and supra national courts in balancing anti migrants social and political movements in the region? Is the freedom of residence and work agreements for nationals in the region under attack? How Venezuela can be a parameter to test the resilience of our region in preserving our liberal tradition in migration and refugee politics.

    Charles P. Gomes is senior researcher at Fundação Casa de Rui Barbosa and director of the CEPRI, a pro bono legal clinic for Refugees and Migrants in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He has a PhD in Political Science (2001) from the former IUPERJ (University of Rio de Janeiro Research Institute) current IESP. During his doctorate, he was a visiting researcher at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, and at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques in Paris, France. He was a visiting professor at the Université Paris I in the years 2006 and 2007 and the Center for Forced Migration Studies at North Western University in Chicago in the year of 2012. His studies focus on constitutional and supranational courts, international law, immigration and refugee policies. He is now leading a comparative study in Immigration policies and politics in major countries of Latin America. He has several books, articles and reports on the topic of Refuge and International Migration.


    Speakers

    Charles Gomes
    Senior Researcher at Fundação Casa de Rui Barbosa


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 28th Abel Faivre’s Unknown Soldier: The Material and Discursive History of an Iconic French WW I Poster

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 28, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The mural poster that Abel Faivre created in late 1916 for the second national French war loan, showing a young soldier exhorting soldiers and civilians to join him under the caption “On les aura!” (We’ll Get Them!), is one of the most iconic images of the First World War, yet it has never been fully studied in its own right. Based on archival research that reconstructs the poster’s production, distribution, and reception, this paper suggests broader conclusions about the ideological function of illustrated wartime posters: namely, that they were a contested field of cultural production with multiple, contradictory, and evolving meanings that often diverged from those intended by the artists who created them and their commissioning agencies.

    By reconstructing the geographic and numerical scope of the poster’s dissemination in its original form as well as through related media such as postcards, newspapers, and photography, the paper juxtaposes Faivre’s iconic design to very different early draft of the poster; identifies the contemporary and historical models that inspired the artist; and surveys the ways in which various groups (soldiers in the trenches, civilians on the home front, antagonistic political parties) appropriated the image and the caption to express their divergent points of view on the war.

    Brett Bowles is Associate Professor of French Studies and Director of the Institute for European Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington. As a media historian, he has published widely on visual propaganda in France during the World Wars. This paper is taken from a developing book project on comparative history of wartime posters in France, German, Great Britain, and the United States.


    Speakers

    Brett Bowles
    Indiana University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 28th A Colonial Genealogy of the Modern State

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 28, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Recent years have witnessed an increased attention to specifying the characteristics of the colonial state, largely focused on outlining its distinctiveness. Two epistemological frames subtend most inquiries: first, replicating the Weberian view that the state is a territorially circumscribed entity, analyses of the state are also similarly circumscribed. Second, if implicitly, the normative horizon of the inquiries is the European modern state. While recognizing the value and, oftentimes, the necessity, of studies conceived in territorially delimited terms, this paper suggests we need to develop pathways to address the coproduction of the coeval formations of colonial state and the modern state. Through an assessment of state control of colonial Indian migration, it argues that important features of historical state formation are obscured when analyses assume a presentist territorial closure, that modern elements are embedded in the colonial state form, and that a colonial dimension is an integral aspect of the modern state form, globally.

    Biography:

    Radhika Mongia is Associate Professor of Sociology and faculty with the graduate programs in Sociology, Political Science, Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, and Social and Political Thought at York University. She is the author of Indian Migration and Empire: A Colonial Genealogy of the Modern State (Duke University Press, 2018).

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    (416) 946-8996


    Speakers

    Radhika Mongia
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, York University

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and the Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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October 2018

  • Monday, October 1st Comparing the BRICS New Development Bank and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Why have the BRICS New Development Bank (NDB) and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), both created by emerging economies, taken different operational approaches? The NDB has adopted a borrowing country-oriented and South-South cooperation modality, and the AIIB has chosen a donor country-oriented modality similar to existing multilateral development banks. This talk will explore the differences and explain why the two financial institutions are so different, which has some implications for the ongoing process of global governance reform.

    Jiejin Zhu is an associate professor at the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Fudan University in Shanghai. His research interests include international institutions and global governance, especially the BRICS, G20 and multilateral development banks. He has published three books and over 30 papers on these topics. Currently, he is doing the research of the rising powers’ strategy for changing international institutions.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Jiejin Zhu
    Associate Professor at the School of International Relations and Public Affairs at Fudan University in Shanghai



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 1st The Firebombing of Japan: Motivations, Morality and the Effect on the Japanese Surrender

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 1, 20184:00PM - 5:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    Abstract:

    The firebombing of Japan has been eclipsed in postwar writing by both the atomic bombings of Hiroshima/Nagasaki and the conventional bombing of Japanese cities. This is curious given (a) that the death toll – over 300,000 by conservative estimates – exceeded that of the atomic bombs and (b) the strategy relied on the same bombing techniques that caused so much controversy over Germany. The paper reviews the reasons behind the US switch from precision bombing (designed to minimize civilian casualties) to area bombing (designed to maximize them) and evaluates the effect of them on the outcome of the war. Simply put: did the killing hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians through conventional bombing help win the war?


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Speaker
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Takashi Fujitani
    Discussant
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies and Professor, Department of History

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Chair, Department of East Asian Studies


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 2nd Reflections on a Career in Canadian Federal and Provincial Diplomacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ADM Wheeler will discuss his personal experience as a Canadian diplomat working in international relations from both a federal and provincial context. He will provide insight into how we think about international relations from a provincial perspective and how its unique from and complementary to international relations at the federal level.

    Stewart Wheeler is a career diplomat currently on leave from the Canadian Foreign Service working for the Ontario government as Assistant Deputy Minister of International Relations and Chief of Protocol. In addition to various assignments in Ottawa, he has served abroad in Washington, Bogota, London, Kabul and most recently as Ambassador to Iceland. From 1999 to 2004, he was Press Secretary to Governor General Adrienne Clarkson. He has also lived and studied in Norway and Spain.


    Speakers

    Stewart Wheeler
    Assistant Deputy Minister, International Relations and Chief of Protocol, Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs; Former Canadian Ambassador to Iceland



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 3rd Sensory Travels: Landscape and Maps from Early Modern India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 3, 20183:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:

    What kinds of representations of place and landscape did the colonial mapmaking project encounter when its great trigonometrical survey unfolded in early nineteenth century India? Exploring the sensory, affective, and epistemological aspects of place-making images, art historian Dipti Khera and historian of medieval and early modern India Samira Sheikh examine the interfaces between colonial cartography, eighteenth century courtly art, and precolonial revenue systems. The formal innovations generated at these interfaces both informed and exceeded colonial cartography, offering an intriguing historical key to understanding perceptions of landscape in India.


    Speakers

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Dipti Khera
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, New York University

    Samira Sheikh
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Vanderbilt University

    Kajri Jain
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Civilizations

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 4th Walk in Canada, Talk on Japan: Ambassador Shotaro OSHIMA on Japan-Canada economic and business relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 4, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join the Centre for the Study of Global Japan for a unique opportunity to meet Ambassador Shotaro OSHIMA, Former Economic Minister of the Japanese Embassy in the U.S. and former Ambassador of Japan to South Korea and Saudi Arabia.

    Ambassador Oshima will be joined by a team of three panelists with backgrounds in business consulting, international finance and one of the top universities in Japan. Engage with the ambassador and his team in a stimulating dialogue on the economic and business relationship between Japan and Canada.

    ABOUT THE PROGRAM
    “Walk in Canada, Talk on Japan” aims to further develop the Japan-Canada relationship by increasing understanding about Japan in the Canada via grass-roots exchange. Supported by the Prime Minister’s Office in Japan, teams of Japanese citizens of various backgrounds, led by former, high-ranking Japanese diplomats, travel to Canada to share their perspectives and encourage open discussions with the local communities. For more background, visit the official website detailing the original “Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan” project here.

    SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES
    Shotaro OSHIMA (Delegation Leader)
    Ambassador Oshima started his career at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan in 1968. Before retiring in March 2008, he served as Japan’s Permanent Representative to the WTO, and as Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Republic of Korea. Earlier in his career, he served in embassies in Thailand, the U.S., Israel, and Russia. He also served as the Economic Minister of the Japanese embassy in the U.S., as the Director-General for Economic Affairs in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (1997-2000), and as the Deputy Foreign Minister responsible for economic matters (2001-2002). He is currently the Chairman of the Institute for International Economic Studies and a Visiting Professor at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.

    Mitsuko TAKAHASHI
    Ms. Mitsuko Takahashi worked as a communications manager at Boeing and UPS for over 20 years, and has spent more than 10 years in total living abroad in India, France, and Russia. She left Boeing in 2014 to participate in a national project to teach Japanese language and culture in Thailand. After her return to Japan in 2015, she established her own company to help Japanese small and medium-sized enterprises go global.
    Mitsuko will be speaking about her struggles in male-dominated Japanese society as a female business women and how Japanese society is gradually changing for the better.

    Rick LIU
    Born in Taiwan, Mr. Rick Liu grew up in Canada from the age of nine and spent most of his teenage years in Vancouver. In 2011 he embarked on a study-abroad adventure in Tokyo and has stayed in the Japanese capital ever since. During his studies at the Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Tokyo, he became so interested in everyday Japan that he decided to help people settle in the country. He currently works at a local bank, specializing in providing mortgages for foreigners living in Japan.
    Rick will be speaking on how he came to Japan, the cultural differences he has encountered in Japan, and how Japan has now become his “home”.

    Rie SATO
    Ms. Rie Sato is a 23-year-old university student in Tokyo majoring in business law. Last year she went on exchange to Sydney, Australia for a year. In Sydney, she volunteered at a preschool in addition to her university studies. Making the most of her experience, she currently has a part-time job at a language travel agency, where she organizes a program for students who want to study abroad.
    Rie will be speaking about how “kimono”, the Japanese traditional costume, is not just a traditional costume but a symbol of family.

    Addendum

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Louis W. Pauly
    Chair
    J. Stefan Dupré Distinguished Professor of Political Economy, Department of Political Science Interim Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Shotaro OSHIMA
    Keynote
    Former Economic Minister of the Japanese Embassy in the U.S. Former Ambassador of Japan to South Korea and Saudi Arabia

    Mitsuko TAKAHASHI
    Panelist
    Expertise in business consulting

    Rick LIU
    Panelist
    Expertise in international finance

    Rie SATO
    Panelist
    Student at a top university in Japan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 4th Translating Korean Literature: A Conversation and Book Launch

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 4, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMCurrent Resource Centre, Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    In partnership with the Centre for the Study of Korea, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library will be hosting an event to celebrate Dr. Janet Poole’s (University of Toronto) book launch, Dust and Other Stories. Dr. Poole will be joined by Dr. Samuel Perry (Brown University) where they will discuss and share their knowledge and experience on translating Korean literary works.

    Dr. Janet Poole is an associate professor of the East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto and her interests range from the colonial period in Korea to creative practice of translation. Prior to translating Dust and Other Stories, Poole also translated and published Yi T’ae-jun’s other works titled Eastern Sentiments. Yi T’ae-jun was not only a famous writer of his own right but a featuring writer of the important newspaper, “Chosŏn Chungang Ilbo”.

    Dr. Samuel Perry is an associate professor of the East Asian Studies at Brown University where he specializes in Japanese and Korean Studies. One of his most acclaimed work includes translating colonial Korean writer, Kang Kyŏng-ae’s From Wonso Pond.

    Reception to follow.

    Location Instructions: Please take the second floor public elevator at Robarts Library and get off on the 8th floor.

    Please register on the website below


    Speakers

    Dr. Samuel Perry
    Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, Brown University

    Dr. Janet Poole
    Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Cheng Yu Teng East Asian Library

    Centre for the Study Korea

    University of Toronto Libraries


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 4th Ethnic Relations in Poland After 1989

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 4, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the last three decades we have seen important changes in the area of ethnic relations in Poland. In general, ethnic minorities are becoming more and more active and better organized actors in the public scene. Additionally, the state policy has been stabilised, as the official frames of minority protection have been created.

    The lecture will concentrate on two general perspectives: agency and structural one. The main aim is to present these both faces of ethnic relations. The former, an agency perspective, concerns the activities undertaken by minority groups which are focused on their identity and culture. The main argument developed in this part is that a gradual process of moving from culture to politics could be observed in Poland nowadays. The activities undertaken by minorities take a different shape and expression both on institutional and public, as well as more spontaneous and personal levels. The latter, structural perspective, underlines the aspect of power inscribed in minority-majority relations. To develop this issue, the concept of ethnic field will be introduced to show prospects and barriers imposed on these groups, especially by current legal regulations, as well as by the dominating national discourse. The presentation will touch on the problems concerning the so-called old minorities living in Poland, among them Ukrainians and Lemkos.

    Katarzyna Warmińska-Zygmunt, PhD hab., is a socioligist, an associated professor at the Department of Sociology, Cracow University of Economics. Her main interest concentrates on ethnic relations in Poland, identity and politics in the context of minority groups, and anthropological practice. She has conducted fieldwork among Polish Tartars and Kashubs. The author of over fifty articles, and one book (“Polish Tartars. Religious and ethnic identity”) and the coeditor of three other books.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Katarzyna Warmińska-Zygmunt
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Cracow University of Economics

    Paul Robert Magocsi
    Chair
    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    Piotr Wrobel
    Discussant
    Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    The John Yaremko Chair of Ukrainian Studies

    Konstanty Reynert Chair in Polish History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 5th State Highway 31: A Road Trip Through the Heart of Modern India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 5, 201812:30PM - 2:30PMAP246, Department of Anthropology, 19 Russel St.
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    Series

    Development Seminar Series

    Description

    Abstract:
    This talk follows the route of State Highway 31 through western Madhya Pradesh, central India. The research was part of a larger project looking at the ideas behind the production of infrastructure in South Asia. This journey takes us through landscapes of sex work and opium, some of the oldest nationalist networks in the country, and along the fault-lines of long-running tensions between local communities. The road was one of a series built as a public private partnership and, as such, speaks of the reconfiguration of state relations with private capital and business. Toll booths become places of company ethos, education and for the creation of new kinds of citizens. The nexus of government and private enterprise takes us on a dizzying journey through the world’s tax havens and onto the decks of luxury yachts. Exploring the broader political economy of the road and the organisation of institutions and travellers that sustain it encourages questions about the nature of governance and power in the country.

    Biography:
    Edward Simpson is a Social Anthropologist and Director of the South Asia Institute at SOAS University of London. He is currently interested in the relationship between infrastructure, automobility and the global-sustainability agenda. From previous research he wrote: The political biography of an earthquake: Aftermath and amnesia in Gujarat India (Hurst 2013). He is the Principal Investigator on a five-year project funded by the European Research Council looking at infrastructure across South Asia. This work is being undertaken in partnership with the Mumbai-based artists CAMP.

    Please register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScTGB1xzJrz9n2kAwsn99utOsELsBvlsc04LERQOHG3RhxgXA/viewform


    Speakers

    Edward Simpson
    Professor of Social Anthropology and Director, SOAS South Asian Institute School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London


    Sponsors

    Development Seminar at University of Toronto

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 5th Spectrum of Migrant Exclusions: Contemporary Issues, Interdisciplinary Insights

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 5, 20183:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Scholars have long recognized social barriers and structural constraints that result in the “differential inclusion” and “segmented assimilation” of migrants. These concepts have been fruitfully applied to understanding the structural and persistent inequalities that immigrants face after entry into a nation-state’s territory. As Stephen Castles and Alastair Davidson observe, states frequently incorporate migrants “only within strict temporal and functional limits.” While migration studies have long attended to these issues, recent global shifts in immigration politics and temporary labour regimes have increased the urgency of attending to the rise of global and transnational regimes of exclusion.

    Challenging the idea of migration to settlement as normative, non-citizens are increasingly vulnerable to deportation and detention globally; temporary foreign workers are more likely to be ineligible for family reunification and permanent residency; children of refugees may not have full access to public education; and migrant contract workers are denied full and equal participation, rights and protections in the labour market. These mechanisms of exclusion illustrate the range of limitations inhibiting the inclusion of migrants, particularly those who are undocumented, refugees or temporary migrant workers. This panel offers insights from multiple disciplinary standpoints and situates migrant exclusion in current global political context.

    Reception to follow.


    Speakers

    Randall Hansen
    Welcoming Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Patricia Landolt
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jennifer Hyndman
    Panelist
    Professor, Social Science and Geography, York University

    Rhacel Parreñas
    Panelist
    Professor, Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Southern California

    Alison Mountz
    Panelist
    Professor, Canada Research Chair in Global Migration, Wilfrid Laurier University


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    SSHRC Partnership Project, Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

    Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs

    Dornsife College, University of Southern California


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 11th The Trump Trade Agenda and the Digital Economy [IPL Speaker Series]

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 11, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Digital technology is changing how the global economy operates, especially in “low tech” sectors. The Trump trade agenda does not address this transformation.

    The challenges for global economic policy are: 1. How do we address products and services that do not fit the traditional templates for trade rules? 2. How do we best balance efficient globalization of digital technologies with public interest regulation on issues such as digital privacy and cyber security?

    The governance response will require an emphasis on learning and flexibility in rule making and implementation. A prudent response will require greater emphasis on delegation of detailed rule-making to expert groups subject to government oversight and coordination of national policies through “soft law”.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Peter Cowhey
    Dean, School of Global Policy & Strategy, University of California



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 11th Ukrainian Orthodoxy and the Question of Autocephaly: The Religious and Political Dimensions of the Conflict between Moscow and Constantinople

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 11, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In the wake of the 2014 Maidan revolution – the “revolution of dignity” – as Ukraine has begun its movement towards greater democratic rule and closer relationships with its European neighbours, it has struggled with conflicts over the Russian annexation of Crimea and invasion of eastern Ukraine. Part of this revolution of dignity has been a movement within the Ukrainian Orthodox churches toward the establishment of an autocephalous (self-governed) Church in Ukraine. At the same time, the Russian government has tried to maintain the Moscow Patriarch’s position in Ukraine, in part to advance its concept of the Russian World, a Russian sphere of influence. With the decision of the Constantinople Patriarchate to reassert its role as the Mother Church of the Orthodox of Ukraine that has the right to grant autocephaly, a confrontation has emerged affecting Orthodox Churches throughout the world. This roundtable brings together scholars who will address various aspects of the history leading to the process of granting of autocephaly to a new Ukrainian Orthodox Church; international inter-Orthodox relations and divisions; the conflicts with the Russian Orthodox Church’s control over a segment of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in Ukraine; and what a newly established autocephalous Ukrainian Orthodox Church might look like.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Rev. Dr. Jaroslaw Buciora
    Ukrainian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Volodymyr; Professor, St. Andrews College, Winnipeg

    Dr. Frank Sysyn
    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Anatolii Babynskyi
    Journalist, Doctoral Research Fellow, Sheptytsky Institute; PhD candidate, Ukrainian Catholic University

    Dr. Jaroslav Skira
    Acting Director, Sheptytsky Institute; Assoc. Prof., Regis College


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Slavic Department, University of Toronto

    The Sheptytsky Institute

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, Toronto Office


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 12th Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies Distinguished Visitor Lecture: Trauma, Mourning, Witnessing: Photographing the Philippine Drug War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 12, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMJackman Humanities Building, Room 100, 1st floor, 170 St. George Street
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    Description

    Abstract:

    In this presentation, I inquire into one of the earliest responses to the recent Philippine war on drugs: the courageous work of photojournalists. In the context of the drug war, how does photojournalism become a kind of advocacy by becoming a mode of mourning? How is trauma and witnessing braided together in the experience of photographers covering war? What is the role of the camera and what are the ambivalent effects of the technical and aesthetic imaging of the dead and their survivors? What is the fate of photographic images once they travel beyond the control of the photographers? For example, converted into commodities, what happens to them when they circulate in the global mediascape and rendered into items for the daily consumption of anonymous viewers? And among families of the victims, how are the dead remembered in ways that elude photographic capture?

    Biography:

    Vicente L. Rafael is the Giovani and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor of History and Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is the author of several works on the cultural politics of the Philippines including Contracting Colonialism, White Love and Other Events in Filipino History, The Promise of the Foreign, and Motherless Tongues: the Insurgency of Language amid Wars of Translation (all from Duke Univ. Press). He also wrote the Introduction to a recent edition of Nick Joaquin’s stories, The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropic Gothic (Penguin Classics).

    Reception to follow.

    Event Poster

    View Event Poster

    Contact

    Dasha Kuznetsova
    416-946-8996


    Speakers

    Vicente L. Rafael
    Speaker
    Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor of History, University of Washington

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Diaspora & Transnational Studies

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 16th Dual MPP/MGA Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 16, 20184:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Come learn more about the Dual Degree MPP/MGA program with representatives from Sciences Po, Paris and the Master of Global Affairs.

    This two-year dual degree program combines the strengths of the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy to create a unique graduate program combining a Master in Public Policy and a Master of Global Affairs. Students gain complementary perspectives on the pressing challenges of the 21st century and benefit from the unique academic strengths of each institution. The program prepares students and future decision-makers for internationally-focused jobs, both in the private and public sectors.

    Contact

    Megan Ball-Chiodi
    416-946-8917


    Speakers

    Sophie Riviere-Dufour
    International Affairs Manager Canada Sciences Po, Paris

    Megan Ball-Chiodi
    Program Coordinator Master of Global Affairs Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 16th Taking Roots: Coding & Design for Platform Co-Ops

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 16, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Before the 2018 Platform Coop Consortium (PCC platform.ccoop/2018, Sept. 28, 29) formal conference began, Huang SunQuan organized a two-day co-ops+hackathon (coopathon 2). Preceded by a series of panel discussions held in Taipei, Kaohsiung, Hangzhou, and Hong Kong, over forty interested programmers, artists, social innovators, and international tech organizations from greater China and other countries participated. The previous coopathon 1 was held in Shanghai in 2016. The aim of these coopathons is to figure out the collaborative possibilities of coders and cooperatives, addressing fundamental issues before more deeply thinking about the platform of cooperativerism, particularly in the Chinese context.

    A difference exists between coops and hacker geeks, which extends beyond the pursuit of economic equality to differences in cultural and political values. Cooperativism asks for the participation of all or nothing at all, while the hacker geek model mostly pursues individual, ‘genius’ achievement. Coops are threatened by privatization, while the latter is an updated neoliberal version of the Californian ideology of accelerationism and solutionism (1995, Richard Barbrook and Andy Cameron). The former pursues economic justice—that is, better relations of production; the latter pursues efficiently productive forces. Hackers don’t like doors that can’t be opened, but cooperatives hope the door will always open.

    These two groups are more or less unaware of the commonalities they share. They both need a sustainable model, and they both rely on the results of sharing and mutual benefit. In this talk, Huang SunQuan will share some of his experiences of coopathons and some Chinese cooperatives which he deeply engaged in, discussing strategies for introducing a social aspect into coding and the design of platform coops.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Huang SunQuan (PhD, Building and Planning from National Taiwan University) is Professor at the China Academy of Art and Director of the Institute of Network Society, School of Inter-Media Art, CAA. He is an artivist engaging in architecture, media, social movements, and art, known for his long-term research and intervention in media, internet culture, and social activism.

    Huang SunQuan was the editor-in-chief of POTS Weekly (established in 1994) and the director of Cultural Express from 2007 to 2009. He organized the first anti-gentrification movement in Taiwan under the slogan “Against City Government’s Bulldozers” (1997) and made the documentary film Green Bulldozer: the Rise of Your New Homeland. In 2004, he created one of the most influential blogs in Taiwan (twblog.net) and the Taiwan Independent Media Center (tw.indymedia.org) as part of the network of Global Independent Media Center (indymedia.org).

    In recent years, he has undertaken a curatorial and artistic practice, running Monkey-Wrenching Art Center in the southern Taiwan. He has participated in the Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture (2007, 2013), “Memoscape” at Cube Project Space, “Juke Box of Kaohsiung” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, and mounted a solo show, “U-topophilia”, at the Red Brick Art Museum, Beijing, among other projects. Curatorial projects include “Treasure Hill GAPP (Global Artivist Participation Plan)” (2003, 2004), “Lulu Shur-tzy Hou Solo Exhibition—Look toward the other side-Song of Asian Foreign Brides in Taiwan” at the Kaohsiung Museum of Arts (2010), and a migrant workers exhibition at Kaohsiung Labor Museum (2011-2012), etc.

    Contact

    Shannon Garden-Smith
    (416) 946-5372


    Speakers

    Huang Sun-Quan
    Speaker
    Professor and Director of Institute of Network Society, China Academy of Art

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Director, Global Taiwan Studies Program


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Daniels Faculty University of Toronto, Master of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 16th Book Launch Remaking Policy: Scale, Pace and Political Strategy in Health Care Reform

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 16, 20185:30PM - 7:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Focusing on health care policy but with an eye to the policy process at large, Carolyn Tuohy argues for a more nuanced conception of the dynamics of policy change, one that distinguishes between the opening of opportunities for change and the magnitude of the changes that then occur. Four possible strategies emerge: large-scale and fast-paced (“big bang”), large-scale and slow-paced (“blueprint”), small-scale and rapid (“mosaic”), and small-scale and gradual (“incremental”). As Tuohy demonstrates, these strategies are determined not by political and institutional conditions themselves, but by the ways in which political actors, individually and collectively, read those conditions to assess their prospects for success in the present and over time.

    Drawing on interviews as well as primary and secondary accounts of ten health policy cases over seven decades (1945—2015) in the US, UK, the Netherlands, and Canada, Remaking Policy represents a major advance in understanding the scale and pace of change in health policy and beyond.


    Speakers

    Carolyn Tuohy
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus and Founding Fellow in Public Policy, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    The Hon. Tony Dean
    Opening Remarks
    Senator, Parliament of Canada; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Gregory P. Marchildon
    Discussant
    Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design, IHPME; Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Rob Vipond
    Chair
    Professor, Department of Political Science and Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Linda White
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of Political Science and Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Randall Hansen
    Welcome Remarks
    Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    University of Toronto Press


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 17th Sciences Po Info Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 17, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Students, Parents, Counsellors,

    Join us for an info session about Sciences Po on Wednesday October 17th at 6pm ! Sophie Rivière-Dufour, International Affairs Manager for North America, will give an extensive presentation of one of the world’s best Universities for Politics and International Studies (QS 2018 rankings). Sciences Po students will also be present to share their experience and answer questions.

    The session will take place in the 1st floor Boardroom, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, 315 Bloor St W, Toronto.

    To attend, kindly register by filling out the following GoogleForm : RSVP Google Form

    We look forward to meeting you !

    Sponsors

    Sciences Po, Paris

    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 18th Social Closure and International Society: G7, G20 and Status Groups in International Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 18, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    To mark the launch of his new book, Social Closure and International Society, Dr Tristen Naylor will present his theory of “international social closure,” improving the ability of international relations to analyze hierarchy and status seeking in international politics. In a wide-ranging historical survey drawing on the “family of civilized nations” and the great powers’ clubs of the past to the G7 and G20 today, Naylor demonstrates how a stratified international order is reproduced via competition for seats at the top global governance tables.

    Dr Tristen Naylor is a Fellow in International Relations at the London School of Economics and the Deputy Director of the G20 Research Group, London. He was previously the University of Oxford’s Lecturer in Diplomatic Studies, where he was named “Most Acclaimed Lecturer” in 2016. Prior to his academic career Dr Naylor was a foreign policy advisor to the Government of Canada. He is a recipient of the Canadian Public Service Award of Excellence.

    Contact

    Madeline Koch
    416-588-3833


    Speakers

    Dr. Tristen Naylor
    Fellow in International Relations at the London School of Economics; Deputy Director of the G20 Research Group, London


    Main Sponsor

    G20 Research Group


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 19th Uncollecting India: Hidden Histories of a Museum

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 19, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Christopher Ondaatje Lecture on South Asian Art, History and Culture

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    The Victoria and Albert Museum, London, has the largest collection of Indian artefacts outside India, which was mostly acquired during colonial times. The V&A’s Indian collections can be used to track a history of the impulses and opportunities underlying colonial collecting: artefacts entered the collection as loot, as gifts, and as documentation of resources available in the colony.

    Alongside a history of collecting, however, there is a history of uncollecting, where collections are trimmed and refined through the removal of artefacts that are considered unimportant or irrelevant to the museum’s changing aims. The process of “de-accessioning” is one that museums seldom discuss in public, but the museum’s records keep traces of this less visible process.

    This talk will track the fate of four grand, architectural-scale Indian artefacts that were collected by the V&A in the 19th century but are no longer available to view. Each of these four artefacts was collected in response to different impulses; each was hailed in its time as an important acquisition and was prominently displayed; each fell out of favour and was removed from the galleries for a different reason and in a different way. By tracking the histories of these objects the talk will open the door to a hidden history of the museum.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Kavita Singh is Professor of Art History and is currently serving as the Dean of the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, where she teaches courses on the history of Indian painting and the history and politics of museums. She has published essays on issues of colonial history, repatriation, secularism and religiosity, fraught national identities, and the memorialisation of difficult histories as they relate to museums in India and beyond. She has also published essays on aspects of Mughal painting.


    Speakers

    Kavita Singh
    Speaker
    Professor of Art History, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 19th Is There a World History of Genocide?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 19, 20185:30PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The lecture will explore some of the conceptual problems that are involved in writing a world history of genocide. The question posed is really a rhetorical one: genocide has occured in every period of human history and in a wide variety of geographical and cultural circumstances. This seems to be increasingly accepted by genocide scholars, if not necessarily by scholars who are focused on temporal and spatial boundaries of their discipline. The second part of the lecture examines some of the recurring themes that occur in the history of genocide: genocide and war; dehumanization; “cumulative radicalization;” issues of gender, among others.

    Norman M. Naimark received his A.B., M.A. and Ph.D (1972) from Stanford University. He spent fifteen years as Professor at Boston University and Research Fellow at the Russian Research Center at Harvard before returning to Stanford in 1988. He is presently Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor of East European Studies in the History Department at Stanford University, and is Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman-Spogli Institute. He also served as Sakurako and William Fisher Director of Stanford’s Global Studies Division. Earlier he was Chair of the Department of History and Burke Family Director of the Bing Overseas Studies Program. He also directed the International Relations and International Policy Studies Programs. A selection of his books include Terrorists and Social Democrats: The Russian Revolutionary Movement under Alexander III (Harvard 1981); The Russians in Germany: A History of the Soviet Zone of Germany (Harvard 1995); Fires of Hatred; Ethnic Cleansing in 20 th Century Europe (Harvard 2001); Stalin’s Genocides (Princeton 2010); and Genocide: A World History (Oxford 2017).

    He is presently finishing a book project, “Stalin and Europe: The Struggle for Sovereignty, 1944-1949.” Naimark has been awarded the Officer’s Cross First Class of the German Federal Republic. He twice received the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Teaching at Stanford. He won the Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies from ASEEES (the Association of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). He was recently elected as a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

    Contact

    Marta Baziuk
    (416) 923-4732


    Speakers

    Norman M. Naimark

    Robert and Florence McDonnell Professor of East European Studies

    Stanford University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    John Yaremko Chair in Ukrainian Studies, University of Toronto

    the Institute for Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, October 20th 2018 Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture – “Genocide in Ukraine: The Holodomor and Its Lessons for the Future"

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, October 20, 20186:30PM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Liudmyla Hrynevych is the Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv (HREC in Ukraine), and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

    The Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture began in 1998 at the initiative of the Famine-Genocide Commemorative Committee of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch. Past lecturers have included James Mace, Norman Naimark (Stanford University), Anne Applebaum (Washington Post), Timothy Snyder (Yale University), Serhii Plokhy (Harvard University), and Jars Balan (University of Alberta).


    Speakers

    Liudmyla Hrynevych
    Director of the Holodomor Research and Education Centre in Kyiv (HREC in Ukraine), and Senior Scholar at the Institute of the History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 22nd The Nordic Model in the Era of Globalisation

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 22, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

     

    Like the Baltic states, Icelanders are now celebrating their 100th anniversary of restored independence. Initially, they were among the poorest of the poor in Europe. By the twenty-first century, they were among the top ten globally. A decade ago, Iceland was on the verge of national bankruptcy as a consequence of the international financial crisis. Having to rebuild its society from financial ruin, Icelanders faced a fateful choice: should they adopt the small government, low-tax model – the American way? Or should they try to reconstruct their original Nordic state? That is the question the speaker will discuss.

    Jón Baldvin Hannibalsson was the leader of the Social Democratic Party of Iceland (1984-96) and served as foreign minister from 1988 to 1995. During his tenure, Iceland joined the European Economic Area and became the first country to recognize the independence of the Baltic states. Subsequently, he served as ambassador to the USA, Canada, Finland, the Baltic states, and Ukraine. Before entering politics, Mr. Hannibalson obtained an MA in Economics from the University of Edinburgh and worked as a teacher and journalist. He has lectured extensively on the role of small states in international relations. He is the author of The Baltic Road to Freedom – Iceland’s Role (2017) and the subject of the documentary film Those Who Dare (2015).


    Speakers

    Jón Baldvin Hannibalsson
    Former Foreign Minister of Iceland


    Sponsors

    Elmar Tampõld Chair of Estonian Studies

    Nordic Studies Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 24th Peter Alilunas: "Closed (to the Profane) Due to Pressure from the Morality Squad: The Cinema 2000, Porn Studies, and Cultural Consecration."

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 24, 20184:30PM - 6:00PMFaculty of Information
    140 St. George Street, Room 728
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    Description

    Peter Alilunas presents “Closed (to the Profane) Due to Pressure from the Morality Squad: The Cinema 2000, Porn Studies, and Cultural Consecration.”

    The growth of Porn Studies has been accompanied by an exciting surge in research related to adult film history, which has started to fill in long-neglected gaps in traditional film histories. With this growth, however, the field has also slowly begun constructing familiar boundaries and barriers, valuing and foregrounding some objects of study as worthy of scholarly interest while dismissing or ignoring others. To explore these tensions, this presentation explores a wide variety of historical moments, spaces, and places, and foregrounds the Cinema 2000, the legendary Yonge Street adult theater originally created by Max Allen. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s formulations of “legitimate” cultural pleasures—and the ways in which they must be “closed to the profane”—this presentation will ultimately argue for an open and reflexive approach to studying adult film history.

    Peter Alilunas is an Assistant Professor of Cinema Studies at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Smutty Little Movies: The Creation and Regulation of Adult Video (University of California Press, 2016). His work on the history and regulation of the adult film industry has appeared in various edited collections and venues, including Porn Studies, Post Script, Television & New Media, Film History, Cinema Journal, and Creative Industries Journal. He is the creator and co-director of the Adult Film History Project, an online archive dedicated to the preservation of documents related to adult film history, and serves on the editorial board of Porn Studies. He is currently researching material for a new book on the pre-history of online pornography.

    Hosted by the Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, and co-sponsored by the Cinema Studies Institute, Centre for the Study of the United States, and Canadian Studies Program.


    Speakers

    Peter Alilunas
    University of Oregon



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th The Genealogies of Dalit Learning and Humanist Buddhism in 19th and 20th Century India

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 201810:00AM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the modern historiography of Dalit learning in Southern India certain names stand out: Ayothee Thass Pandithar (1845-1914) and Bhimrao Ambedkar (1891-1956) being the most prominent. Much of the historiographical narrative of their scholarly achievements tends to be placed against the backdrop of colonial modernity and particularly tied to the emergence of “Buddhism” as the religion favoured by modernists in the colonial period. Though much recent work has been done on Ambedkarite Buddhism there is still much more that remains to be done on its local and vernacular iterations within specific Dalit regional locations and communities and how it has specifically comes to be used as a vehicle for new religious imaginaries and for an ethical and humanist approach to living. This one-day workshop plans to focus on the resonances of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its South Indian (Tamil and Maharashtrian) context to address some of these issues. It is the intention of this workshop to bring into conversation these two seemingly divergent strands of Dalit learning in showing how in their convergence on the issue of religious authority and “caste” and in their complex negotiation of these we might be able to not just perceive certain common genealogies but that these, in turn, might also to enable us to gain new perspectives on the nature of Ambedkarite Buddhism in its specifically South Indian iterations.

    Program:

    10am-11am: Lecture by Professor Rajangam
    11am-11:15am: Coffee Break
    11:15am-12:15pm: Discussion of Lecture

    2pm-3pm: Lecture by Professor Keune
    3pm-4pm: Discussion of Lecture


    Speakers

    Dr. Jon Keune
    Michigan State University

    Dr. Stalin Rajangam
    American College, Madurai


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    The Buddhist Education Foundation for Canada

    The Dr. Ho Centre for Buddhist Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th Book Launch: Federalism and Decentralization in Health Care: A Decision Space Approach

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20182:00PM - 4:00PMCanadiana Building, Room 160
    14 Queen's Park Cres W, Toronto
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    Description

    Even though health system decentralization is often associated with federations, there has been limited study on the connection between federalism and the organization of publicly financed or mandated health services. Federalism and Decentralization in Health Care examines eight federations that differ in terms of their geography, history and constitutional and political development. Looking at Canada, Brazil, Germany, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, South Africa and Switzerland, it explores vital health care issues such as constitutional responsibility, national laws, and the source and organization of public revenues.

    Beyond these structural features, each country case system is subjected to a “decision space analysis” to determine the actual degree of decentralization. A core question is whether national and subnational governments have narrow, moderate or broad discretion in their decisions on governance, access, human resources, health system organization and financing. This comparative approach highlights the similarities and differences among these federations.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Gregory P. Marchildon
    Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and Professor of Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Thomas J. Bossert
    Director of International Health Systems Program, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University


    Main Sponsor

    Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th Asian-Canadian Futures

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20184:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Ave.)
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    What does the future of Asian-Canadian relations hold? Ever-deepening connections with Asia are reshaping the ways that Canadians participate in global media, transnational business, international education, and cultural and historical production. This panel reflects on the influences of Asian-Canadian dynamics in transforming the speakers’ fields of expertise, including business and media, immigration politics, historical memory, curatorial and archival work, and university education.

    Reception to follow


    Speakers

    Professor Rachel Silvey
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute

    Mr. Justin Poy
    Keynote
    President, The Justin Poy Agency

    Professor Emily Gilbert
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography & Planning and Director of the Canadian Studies Program, University of Toronto

    Dr. Emily Hertzman
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute, and Manager, Richard Charles Lee Asian Pathways Research Lab, Asian Institute

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Speaker
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Professor Lisa Mar
    Speaker
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th Master of Public Policy Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20185:30PM - 7:00PMCanadiana Gallery, Room 160
    14 Queen’s Park Cres. West, Toronto ON M5S 3K9
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    Description

    Come and learn about applying to the Master of Public Policy program at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

    At the Open House you will:

    • Lean in-depth about the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
    • Gain insight into the graduate professional Master of Public Policy (MPP) program
    • Understand how to apply to the MPP 2019 program
    • Learn about Internships and Career Services
    • Meet with some of the MPP program, staff, students, and alumni

    The formal presentations will run from 5:30 to 6:30PM and will be followed by 30 minutes where staff, student, and alumni presenters will be available to answer questions.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 25th The U.S., China, and the Future of the Liberal International Order

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 25, 20185:30PM - 7:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The liberal international order now confronts two powerful governments whose attachment to its norms and institutions are questionable: the United States and China. China’s rise and its implications for the existing world order have been a central issue for some time; the equivocal support of the United States for existing rules is a more recent development. Now that these two powers have taken economic and political steps that threaten to spiral into a deeper conflict, what is the outlook for preservation or change in an order that neither government appears committed to preserve?

    Miles Kahler is Distinguished Professor at the School of International Service, American University, and Senior Fellow for Global Governance at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D. C. Previously, he was Rohr Professor of Pacific International Relations and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. He has published widely in the fields of international politics and international political economy, including articles and books on global governance, international financial institutions, and Asia-Pacific regionalism.


    Speakers

    Miles Kahler
    Speaker
    Distinguished Professor at the School of International Service, American University; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 26th Les réseaux Foccart **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 26, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    N.B.: This event will be presented in French.


    Speakers

    Jean-Pierre Bat
    Archiviste, CNRS (Paris)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 26th Care and Carework in an Uncaring World: What happens when an uncaring world must take care seriously?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 26, 20187:00PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Join us for an evening of short films and conversation.

    Panel:
    Eileen Boris, Professor of Feminist Studies, History, Black Studies and Global Studies, University of California
    Eleonor Faur, Professor of Gender Relations and Welfare in Latin America, National University of San Martin, Argentina
    Fiona Williams, Emeritus Professor of Social Policy, University of Leeds
    Chair: Sonya Michel, Professor Emerita of History, American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Maryland

    Premiering the short film: Everywhere the Invisible Care in Crisis written & directed by Helene Klodawsky and produced by Katarina Soukup (Catbird Productions)

    And screening the short film: In Safe Hands Domestic Workers in Nepal by Jennifer Fish and Eric Miller

    Free admission. No registration required.

    Sponsors

    Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

    Centre for Global Social Policy

    Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 29th Aga Khan Foundation Canada | Daring to Deliver Midwives on the front lines

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 29, 20181:00PM - 2:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    MGA - Program

    Description

    Ninety-nine percent of all maternal deaths happen in developing countries, and more than 1 million children every year die on the same day they are born – mostly from preventable causes. Complications are common in the late stages of pregnancy, delivery, and the first hours after birth.
    Despite grim statistics, there is light on the horizon. According to a 2014 report by the United Nations Population Fund, death is preventable in four out of five cases with the timely help of a skilled professional.

    Midwives are working on the front lines to provide crucial patient-centered care to women and their families during childbirth and support families during pregnancy and after delivery. But midwives often face challenges, including limited professional training opportunities and a lack of recognition of their roles within the community and healthcare system.

    With the right education and support, midwives are key to tackling the root causes of poverty and gender inequality. That’s why Wendy Wood (Canadian Association of Midwives) and Geneviève Allard (Aga Khan Foundation) are passionate about strengthening local health systems, institutions, and professional capacities – investments that will pay dividends for years to come.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    Speakers

    Wendy Wood
    Wendy Wood is a practicing midwife in Calgary, Alberta and teaches midwifery emergency skills and neonatal resuscitation, building in on her prior experience as a paramedic. Her work has taken her around the world, training other midwives in Tanzania, Costa Rica, Peru, Ethiopia, Mexico, and Nunavik.

    Geneviève Allardis
    Geneviève Allard is a Program Officer at Aga Khan Foundation Canada, where she works on a portfolio of projects to improve quality of life for women, girls, and their communities in Africa and Asia.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 29th Neurologic Music Therapy: Defining the foundations of clinical music neuroscience and applications

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 29, 20186:00PM - 7:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The Wiegand Memorial Foundation Lecture

    Description

    Over the past 25 years, research in the clinical neuroscience of music perception has shown how music and rhythm can effectively assist in brain
    rehabilitation, with breakthroughs in motor recovery, speech and language training, and cognitive rehabilitation. Professor Michael Thaut, will share research data and video illustrations that summarize the latest exciting developments in this field.

    Professor Michael Thaut of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music, is a global leader in neuroscience and music, and has internationally
    recognized research in the applications of auditory neuroscience — specifically music and rhythm — to neurological rehabilitation. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Music, Neuroscience and Health, and is the Director of U of T’s Music and Health Research Collaboratory. A professional classical and folk violinist, he has recorded music and toured throughout Europe.


    Speakers

    Michael Thaut
    Professor, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2018

  • Thursday, November 1st "Diasporas, Dual Loyalties, and Suspect Minorities: the (Canadian) Jewish Case"

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 1, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Countries which are diverse and formed largely through waves of immigration — like Canada — must face issues of competing identities and perhaps loyalties within their populations. At times these loyalties reflect competing values and interests, as well as the effects of victimization. When minority rights and interests are defended vigorously these minorities can be perceived as suspect. The Jewish group in its long diasporic history, often as an iconic “other,” has encountered these dilemmas and accusations regularly.
    This is true even for the Canadian Jewish community, which is at the same time highly integrated even while many members perceive themselves in an ongoing marginal position. Transnational ties of diasporic groups may continue to pose challenges even for ostensibly liberal-democratic societies such as Canada.

    Speaker bio: Morton Weinfeld is a Professor of Sociology at McGill University, where he holds the Chair in Canadian Ethnic Studies and directs the Minor Program in Canadian Ethnic and Racial Studies. In 2018-2019 he is a Visiting Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, as well as at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Morton Weinfeld
    Sociology, McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 2nd “Baby Miles”: Reproductive Rights, Labor, and Ethics in the Transnational Korean Reproductive Technology Industry

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This research project examines the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry in South Korea to demonstrate how the concepts of reproductive rights and labor have been contested, negotiated, and reconstructed by various actors—including infertile couples, gamete donors, gestational surrogates, state agents, and medical professionals—across national boundaries. This study envisions reproductive ethics as part of a transnational feminist agenda by examining the ethical issues raised by the complicated relationships between intended parents and gamete donors/gestational surrogates. Drawing on three years of multi-sited ethnographic research conducted in South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Ukraine, this project disputes the unilateral understanding of ART, which is typically conceptualized as having a unidirectional flow from the “West” to Asia, by focusing on the complex relations between Korean intended parents and non-Korean gamete providers and gestational surrogates.

    Dr. Sunhye Kim is currently the Soon Young Kim Postdoctoral Fellow in Korean Studies at the Korea Institute, Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland in 2018. She received her B.A. and B.A in Sociology at Yonsei University, Seoul, and worked at the Korean Women’s Development Institute as a researcher. Sunhye’s research and teaching interests are related to the politics of human (re)production in transnational Asia; in particular, her research centers on the study of the transnational circuits of the assisted reproductive technology (ART) industry as a site of interdisciplinary inquiry.


    Speakers

    Sunhye Kim
    Korea Institute, Harvard University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 2nd The Environmental Governance Lab in Conversation with David Miller: The future of the environment post Toronto elections

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 2, 20184:30PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Join us for a conversation with David Miller, former mayor of Toronto, current C40 Regional Director for North America, and C40 Ambassador for Inclusive Climate Action to make sense of the City of Toronto election results and what they mean for Toronto’s role in responding to the global climate and sustainability crises.

    The conversation will be moderated by Sara Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and a member of the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. Her research focuses on what cities can do to mitigate climate change and environmental degradation. Watch her TEDX here.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    David Miller
    Speaker
    C40 Regional Director for North America & C40 Ambassador for Inclusive Climate Action

    Sara Hughes
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 3rd Munk School Grad Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 3, 201810:00AM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Come learn more about the graduate programs offered at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy.

    Representatives from the following programs will be on hand:

    Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies
    Collaborative Master’s Program in Asia-Pacific Studies
    Master of Arts in European and Russian Affairs
    Master of Global Affairs
    Master of Public Policy

    A separate information session will be held for the Master of Global Affairs program 12:00-1:00pm.

    For more information please contact: mga@utoronto.ca

    To register please visit: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/munk-school-of-global-affairs-and-public-policy-graduate-programs-open-house-tickets-51304850188


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 5th Reconceptualizing Nineteenth-Century Ukraine: Two Monographs on Intellectual, Political, and Social History

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 5, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event will celebrate two recently published books on the 19th century Ukraine: “Brothers or Enemies: The Ukrainian National Movement and Russia from the 1840s to the 1870s” by Johannes Remy (2016) and “Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905” by Serhiy Bilenky (2017).

    Contrary to the prevailing opinion, the idea of Ukrainian independence did not emerge at the end of the nineteenth-century. In Brothers and Enemies, Johannes Remy reveals that the roots of Ukrainian independence were planted fifty years earlier. Remy contextualizes the Ukrainian national movement against the backdrop of the Russian Empire and its policy of oppression in the mid-nineteenth-century. Remy utilizes a wide range of unpublished archival sources to shed light on topics that are absent from current discourse including: Ilarion Vasilchikov’s alliance with Ukrainian activists in 1861, the forged revolutionary proclamation used to deport Pavlo Chubynsky (who is known today as the author of the Ukrainian national anthem), and the 1864 negotiations between Kyiv activists and the Polish National Government. Brothers and Enemies is the first systematic study of imperial censorship policies during the period and will be of interest to those who seek a better understanding of the current Ukrainian-Russian conflict.

    In the nineteenth and early twentieth century Kyiv was an important city in the European part of the Russian empire, rivaling Warsaw in economic and strategic significance. It also held the unrivaled spiritual and ideological position as Russia’s own Jerusalem. In Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands, Serhiy Bilenky examines issues of space, urban planning, socio-spatial form, and the perceptions of change in imperial Kyiv. Combining cultural and social history with urban studies, Bilenky unearths a wide range of unpublished archival materials and argues that the changes experienced by the city prior to the revolution of 1917 were no less dramatic and traumatic than those of the Communist and post-Communist era. In fact, much of Kyiv’s contemporary urban form, architecture, and natural setting were shaped by imperial modernizers during the long nineteenth century. The author also explores a general culture of imperial urbanism in Eastern Europe. Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Johannes Remy
    Speaker
    Adjunct Professor at the Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki

    Serhiy Bilenky
    Speaker
    Research Fellow, University of Alberta

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History; Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 5th An Evening with The Honourable Gordon Campbell

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 5, 20186:30PM - 8:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 2C8
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    Description

    The Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy invites you to an evening with the Hon. Gordon Campbell. As premier of British Columbia from 2001 to 2011, Gordon Campbell oversaw a period of major policy reforms in the province. Under his leadership, the Government of British Columbia introduced major reforms in a wide range of policy issues, and in 2008, introduced the first broad-based carbon tax in North America aimed at reducing provincial GHG emissions. The Hon. Gordon Campbell will speak about his experiences leading the province, the challenges to policy innovation at the provincial level, and his own experiences pushing against the status quo.

    The Hon. Gordon Campbell was recently named an officer of the Order of Canada for his service as the High Commissioner of Canada in the United Kingdom, from 2011-2016, and most recently advised the Government of Ontario as the Chair of the Independent Financial Commission of Inquiry.

    Registration is required (seating is limited and available on a first come first serve basis).


    Speakers

    Hon. Gordon Campbell
    Former High Commissioner of Canada to the United Kingdom Former Premier of British Columbia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 6th Public Lecture by Taiwan’s Digital Minister Audrey Tang: Social Innovation and the Renovation of Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 6, 201810:00AM - 12:00PMRoom 100A, 1st floor, Jackman Humanities Building, 170 St. George Street
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Open, collective, experimental and sustainable. Taiwan’s first Digital Minister Audrey Tang’s talk will show what happens when people who grew up on the internet get their hands on the building blocks of government. As a self-described “conservative anarchist” and a so-called “white-hat hacker,” Audrey Tang will show how she works with her team to channel greater combinations of intelligence into policy-making decisions and public services delivery. She will also discuss “tech for good” and how Taiwan is “SDG indexing everything.” For more information, please view two recent articles on Apolitical (links below) which help elucidate Audrey and her philosophy.

    “Reprogramming power: Audrey Tang is bringing hacker culture to the state”

    “Meet the network tearing down walls between departments in Taiwan”

    Speaker’s Biography:

    Audrey Tang (唐鳳)
    Digital Minister, Taiwan

    Audrey is known for revitalizing the computer languages Perl and Haskell, as well as building the online spreadsheet system EtherCalc in collaboration with Dan Bricklin.

    In the public sector, Audrey serves on Taiwan National Development Council’s open data committee and K-12 curriculum committee; and led the country’s first e-Rulemaking project. Audrey joined the cabinet as Digital Minister on Oct 1st, 2016.

    In the private sector, Audrey works as a consultant with Apple on computational linguistics, with Oxford University Press on crowd lexicography, and with Socialtext on social interaction design.

    In the third sector, Audrey actively contributes to Taiwan’s g0v (“gov-zero”), a vibrant community focusing on creating tools for the civil society, with the call to “fork the government”.


    Speakers

    Audrey Tang
    Digital Minister of Taiwan


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Uncovering New Narratives of the Holocaust in European and Canadian Archives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20181:00PM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    A featured event for Holocaust Education Week presented by the cultural service of the French Embassy, the Goethe Institut Toronto, the Austrian Embassy, the Alliance Française, in collaboration with the CEFMF (Centre d’études de la France et du Monde Francophone) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, with the support of the EUNIC Cluster Fund.

    Entrance free

    This event will be held in English. Please follow the registration link above for a full program.

    With millions of pages of historical documents, photographs and film recorded by perpetrators, victims and rescuers, along with thousands of hours of recorded testimony from survivors as well as perpetrators, the Holocaust is the most documented case of genocide in the world. Yet much remains unknown, awaiting discovery.

    This year’s program sheds light on untold stories, new research, and marginalized histories of the Holocaust. Holocaust Education Week 2018 creates a platform for them to be heard and understood, expanding the familiar picture and leading us to a more robust and complex understanding of the multidimensional nature of the Holocaust.

    The postwar trials, the opening of the Red Cross archives through the International Tracing Service, and the fall of communism in Eastern Europe which enabled scholars to access Soviet-era holdings, all contributed to new insights into the complexity and context of how the Holocaust unfolded. Yet even with access to these extensive collections, much remains unknown, awaiting discovery.

    In partnership with the Neuberger Center and Holocaust Education Week, the Toronto EUNIC cluster (Goethe Institute, Alliance Française, Austrian Forum, Istituto Italiano) and the Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy are working to cast light on lesser-known narratives of the Holocaust, gathered through original and innovative archival work.

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World

    Embassy of the French Republic

    EUNIC Cluster Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Slovakia: big dreams and fears of a small country

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Event description:

    As part of the events related to the 100th Anniversary of Czechoslovakia’s Independence in 1918, CERES is hosting a talk on events in contemporary Slovakia with one of the region’s leading experts.

    Speaker: Milan Nič, Senior Fellow, German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP), Berlin
    Milan Nič is a senior fellow at the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin and outgoing head of Europe program at the GLOBSEC Policy Institute in Bratislava, Slovakia. He is also non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington.
    His expertise includes the EU, Central Europe and the Visegrad Group (the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia), European security, the Western Balkans, EU and NATO enlargement, and transatlantic relations.
    Nič began his professional carrier as a broadcaster at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty covering the transition period in Central and Eastern Europe. He was later program director at the Pontis Foundation, adviser to the High Representative/EU Special Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina Miroslav Lajčák, and senior adviser to the Deputy Foreign Minister of Slovakia in the government of Iveta Radičová (2010-2012). In 2010, he co-authored a book of essays on the EU and Slovak foreign policy with Tomas Valasek, Balazs Jarabik, Jana Kobzova, and others.
    Nič earned his MPhil from the Charles University in Prague, his MA at the Central European University in Budapest, and also studied at the Bologna Center of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

    CERES

    Chair: Robert C Austin

    Contact

    Katia Malyuzhinets
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Cvachovec Foundation

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20184:00PM - 5:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    During the Cold War, more than 36,000 individuals entering Canada claimed Czechoslovakia as their country of citizenship. A defining characteristic of this migration of predominantly political refugees was the prevalence of anti-communist and democratic values. Diplomats, industrialists, politicians, professionals, workers, and students fled to the West in search of freedom, security, and economic opportunity.

    Jan Raska’s Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada explores how these newcomers joined or formed ethnocultural organizations to help in their attempts to affect developments in Czechoslovakia and Canadian foreign policy towards their homeland. Canadian authorities further legitimized the Czech refugees’ anti-communist agenda and increased their influence in Czechoslovak institutions. In turn, these organizations supported Canada’s Cold War agenda of securing the state from communist infiltration. Ultimately, an adherence to anti-communism, the promotion of Canadian citizenship, and the cultivation of a Czechoslovak ethnocultural heritage accelerated Czech refugees’ socioeconomic and political integration in Cold War Canada.

    By analyzing oral histories, government files, ethnic newspapers, and community archival records, Raska reveals how Czech refugees secured admission as desirable immigrants and navigated existing social, cultural, and political norms in Cold War Canada.

    Jan Raska, PhD is a historian with the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 7th – Friday, November 9th Making and Re-Making Europe: The Czech and Slovak Contribution

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 7, 20185:30PM - 9:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Thursday, November 8, 20189:00AM - 8:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 9, 20189:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Making and Re-Making Europe: The Czech and Slovak Contribution Draft Agenda

    Conference Patron: The Cvachovec Foundation

    7 – 9 November 2018

    In honour of the celebration in 2018 of the founding of Czechoslovakia, remembering fifty years since the Warsaw Pact invasion in 1968, and the events of 1989 and after, the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (CERES) at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy will hold a two-day conference to mark these important anniversaries and give visibility to the contribution of Czechs and Slovaks in Europe and North America. The conference combines academic panels, films and a graduate student conference.

    November 7

    Pre-conference events:

    2:00-4:00 pm – Slovakia: Big Dreams and Fears of a Small Country – Milan Nič

    4:00-5:15 pm – Czech Refugees in Cold War Canada – Jan Raska

    Conference opening:

    5:30 PM Evening Cultural Event
    Havel and Underground Culture.
    Michael Kilburn, Endicott College, Beverly, Massachusetts. Paul Wilson, Writer and Translator.
    Michael Žantovský, Václav Havel Library, Prague, Czech Republic.

    Dramatic Readings from Tom Stoppard’s “Rock and Roll” and Václav Havel’s “Protest”

    Two Photo exhibits are open to the public in Cloister of the Munk School for viewing throughout the conference.

    In cooperation with the Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes in Prague and the Consulate General of the Czech Republic in Toronto, we are pleased to present a photographic exhibit depicting protests against the occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1968 within the struggle for freedom in the Communist states of Europe.

    Introductory remarks by Ivan Počuch, Consul General of the Czech Republic in Toronto.

    The Story of an Image: Bare-Chested Man in Front of a Tank
    Photographs of August 1968 by Ladislav Bielik, Bratislava

    This exhibit is sponsored by the Embassy of the Slovak Republic in Ottawa, Canada

    November 8

    9:00-9:15 Opening Remarks

    Professor Randall Hansen, Interim Director, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, H.E. Pavel Hrnčíř, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Canada, H.E. Vit Koziak, Ambassador of the Slovak Republic to Canada.

    9:15 – 11:00 Panel One: The Founding of Czechoslovakia: Was this a Harbinger of the Shaping of Twenty First Century Europe?

    Hugh Agnew, George Washington University, Washington, DC.
    ‘Odrakouštět se’? Czechoslovakia, 1918-1938, and the Habsburg Legacy

    Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    In Search of Modern Czech History: on Real Statehood and Imagined Identity

    Daniel Pratt, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
    Masaryk’s Philosophy and Its Legacy

    Chaired by Robert C Austin, University of Toronto

    11:00 – 12:30 – Panel Two: The Interwar Years: Moving Away From Multiculturalism?

    Nadya Nedelsky, Macalester College, St Paul, Minnesota.
    Czechoslovakism and its Discontents

    Melissa Feinberg, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    Is it democracy if the husband makes decisions autocratically? The problem of gender equality in interwar Czechoslovakia

    James Felak, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
    Slovaks, Czechoslovaks, and Non-Slavs: National Identity in Interwar Slovakia

    Chaired by Alex Toshkov, University of Toronto

    Lunch 12:30 – 1:30

    1:30-3:15 Panel Three: The Legacy of Communism: Is it too Early to Assess?

    Muriel Blaive, EURIAS Senior Fellow, Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, Vienna, Austria.
    What Have We Found in the Archives? Ten Years of Access to Secret Police Files

    James Krapfl, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
    Collective Effervescence in Postwar Czech and Slovak History: 1948, 1968, 1989, and Beyond

    Barbara J. Falk, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario.
    A Legacy of Communism’s Demise: Velvet Revolution(s) in Czechoslovakia and Beyond

    Libor Žídek, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
    The Czechoslovak economic reforms of the 1960s and their long-term impact

    Chaired by Lucan Way, University of Toronto

    3:15 – 3:30 Coffee Break

    3:30 – 17:15 Panel Four: Czechs and Slovaks as a Diaspora – Their Impact on the Evolution of Czechoslovakia and/or the Countries Which They Adopted

    Jan Raska, Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
    Citizen Allies: Czech and Slovak Refugees in Cold War Canada

    Veronika Ambros, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.
    Migration, Exile and Diaspora in Czech Literature

    Xavier Galmiche, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.
    The « Dictionnary of Central-european Thinkers 1945 to our days » : the case of the Czechoslovak emigration

    Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
    Vaclav Havel’s Aphorisms: a Mirror of the World?

    Chaired by Georgina Steinsky, University of Toronto

    17:30 – 19:00 Reception

    19:00 – Film Screening. The Nagano Tapes.

    November 9 – Student Conference and Roundtable on the Post-Communist Experience

    9:15 – Welcoming Remarks, Georgina Steinsky, CERES Executive-in-Residence, University of Toronto

    9:30 – 11:00 Panel One: Consolidation of States and Ideology
    Panelists are asked to explore the factors that led to the emergence of Austro-Hungarian successor states, and the issues of transition faced by these newly formed states, as well as to the movements that promoted independence during World War I. Additionally, panelists will discuss how the success or failure of these states related to the larger European political scene in the inter-war period, particularly regarding the merits and failings of democracy in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as the emergence and impact of fascist and communist ideologies.

    Jovana Papović – Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France
    The Sokol Movement – Patriotic Gymnastics from the Czech Lands to Yugoslavia

    Tess Megginson – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Mapping Czechoslovakia: The Czechs and Slovaks at Versailles

    Daniela Bouvier-Valenta – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Establishing a Unique Presence: An Analysis of Czechoslovakia’s Self-Identification in Interwar Europe

    Chaired by Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University, United Kingdom

    11:00 – 11:15 Coffee Break

    11:15 – 12:45 Panel Two: The Evolution of the Nation-State in “Wilsonian” Central Europe
    Panelists will discuss the impact of World War II and Nazi occupation and hegemony in Central Europe, and how the war altered Central European nationalism domestically and internationally into the post-war period.

    Anna Herran – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    Not Carved in Stone: Building and Rebuilding Statues of T.G. Masaryk after 1938

    Duncan Eaton – Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
    Transitive Democracy: Edvard Beneš In and After Exile, 1938-1945

    Mira Markham – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States
    Rural Partisans and Communists: Resistance and Revolution in Moravian Wallachia, 1945-1950

    Chaired by Piotr Wrobel, University of Toronto.

    12:45 – 13:45 Lunch

    13:45 – 15:45 Panel Three: Understanding Socialism and its Legacies
    In regard to the failed revolts against socialist regimes in Hungary in 1956, Czechoslovakia in
    1968, and Poland in 1956, 1968, and 1970, Milan Kundera wrote that each of these regimes “could not have defended itself for more than three hours if it had not been backed by Russia.” (Milan Kundera, “The Tragedy of Central Europe,” The New York Review of Books vol. 31 no. 7 (April 1984).) Panelists are asked to debate whether socialism truly could have been reformed
    in Central Europe had the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union not intervened? How does this recent socialist past affect contemporary Central European politics?

    Katja Perat – Washington University in St. Louis, United States
    The Straw man of Communism

    Petra Skarupsky – University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
    Exhibition Poland – Czechoslovakia: Centuries of neighbourhood and friendship (1978)

    Réka Krizmanics – CEU, Budapest, Hungary
    Where is the Left? The Revolution of 1956 in Hungarian Memory Politics 1960–2018

    Alexandra Yao – University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
    The Development of Populism in the Czech Republic

    Chaired by James Krapfl, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec

    15:45 – 16:00 Coffee Break

    16:00-17:00 Panel 4: Central European Communities Abroad
    Panelists will outline how Central and Eastern Central European immigrants and diasporas have influenced North America and North American culture, and how the new environment and reasons for emigrating, in turn, influenced their cultures.

    Alex Langstaff – New York University, New York, United States
    Émigré Networks and The Politics of Exile

    Zsolt Máté- University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary
    The reception of the 1956 Hungarian refugees in the United States and Canada

    Chaired by Barbara J. Falk, Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th Taiwan's Transpacific Medical Modernity: Race and Disability in Wu Nien-Jen's Buddha Bless America (1996)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    EAS Speaker Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    Recent scholarship from the US and Asia critiques how US historiographies of post-war development in Asia, shaped by Cold War liberalism, painted imperialism in Asia as largely benevolent, supporting the universal interests of humanism, democracy, and freedom. In this talk, I will look into Wu Nien-Jen’s film Buddha Bless America (1996) to offer critical reflections on the connection between militarism and the postcolonial development of nation building in its “authoritarian” forms, especially measured against the Western liberal language of rights, democracy and sovereignty. I examine how this cultural text renders imperialist violence visible in what is otherwise portrayed as unqualified medical humanitarianism and development, even as it reifies a liberal language of medical and scientific progress for national rehabilitation in the mutual co-constitution of US and Taiwan modernities from the 1960s onwards. Perceiving Buddha Bless America as a putatively post-Cold War cultural production that is integral to the historical reconstruction of Taiwanese liberal nationalism, my reading suggests that a post-authoritarian democratization – one that would be achieved by demanding rights and liberty via Western modernity – paradoxically obscures the process of re-militarization in a racialized biopolitical regime of organizing and managing life, labor, security, health, and dis/ability.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Professor Chien-Ting Lin teaches in the English Department of the National Central University of Chungli, Taiwan. He received his Ph.D. in literature and cultural studies from University of California, San Diego. He has published his research in Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Review of International American Studies, and Taiwan: A Radical Quarterly in Social Studies. His current book project tentatively entitled, Fugitive Subjects of “Secret Doctors”: Politics of Life and Labor in Taiwan’s Medical Modernity, investigates transpacific colonial and neocolonial formations of knowledge production and hierarchies of reproductive labor and life politics within different periods of Taiwan’s medical modernization.


    Speakers

    Chien-Ting Lin
    Associate Professor, Department of English, National Central University


    Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th Social (In)security: Pensions and the Postwar Soviet Economy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Pension reform is all over the news in contemporary Russia. This talk will look at another period in which pension reform was a ‘hot topic’: the postwar years. During the Second World War, the Soviet government’s spending on pensions and other social welfare benefits tripled, yet, most pensions were far from enough to meet the cost of living and pensioners remained some of the poorest members of Soviet society. This talk will place pension reform within the Soviet state’s larger economic project of improving living standards by increasing the real value of money in ordinary citizens’ hands, a project that began in the late Stalin years but came to fruition under Khrushchev in 1956.

    Kristy Ironside is an Assistant Professor of Russian History at McGill University. She is currently writing a book on the role of money in the pursuit of prosperity in the postwar Soviet Union. She has published articles on the Soviet welfare state, lotteries, taxation, and fundraising in Kritika, Slavic Review, the Soviet and Post-Soviet Review, Europe-Asia Studies, and the Journal of Social History. She recently penned an op-ed in the Washington Post on pension reform in contemporary Russia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Kristy Ironside
    McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 8th How Democratic Should Vietnam Be?: Anticommunist Nationalists and the Debate on the Constitutional Transition in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN), May-December 1955

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 8, 20185:00PM - 7:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    In the eyes of many foreign observers, one of the most puzzling aspects of the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam) was the continual in-fighting among anticommunists. Most accounts depict these internal conflicts as simply a struggle for power, but I contend that they also constituted a battle of ideas. Specifically, the presentation examines the debate between Ngô Đình Diệm and rival anticommunist nationalists in the summer and fall of 1955. Virtually all anticommunists agreed that the regime should become a constitutional republic, and they unanimously called for a democracy. Yet the seeming consensus belied starkly different definitions of democratic government. Diệm’s faction and the political parties associated with the southern sects called for a hybrid regime, that is, a regime that combined elements of authoritarianism and democracy. The sect parties demanded greater pluralism than Diệm, though the difference was of degree rather than of kind. The debate took a decidedly more liberal direction under the influence of the émigré politician Phan Quang Đán. Đán advocated for a militant democracy, that is, a full-fledged democracy that minimally limited liberty only to protect itself from extremist forces seeking to subvert democracy. In the end, Diệm prevailed over his rivals because he and his followers controlled the government. By seriously examining the diversity of political ideas in the RVN, the presentation suggests that the regime’s seeming intractable factionalism arose from substantive disagreements rather than factional squabbling.


    Speakers

    Nu-Anh Tran
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Connecticut

    Nhung Tran
    Chair
    Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 9th Hou Hsiao-hsien and Edward Yang: The Epistemological Stakes of Two Realisms in New Taiwan Cinema

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 9, 20182:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    ABSTRACT:

    If, as Umberto Eco has argued, a work of art can be read as an “epistemological metaphor,” then the fictional world created by a film can also be read as an analogical comment on the knowability of the “real” world. This paper explores two models of cinematic realism, one totalizing and one apophatic, the former represented by Edward Yang’s Yi Yi and the latter by the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien. The former raises the ideal of cinema as a means of revealing even the hidden aspects of reality and thereby providing increased epistemological certainty. In contrast, through techniques including editing ellipses and the mobilization of off-screen space, Hou’s realism paradoxically represents a reality that defies or exceeds representation and therefore can only be represented in a negative or subtractive manner. It will further be argued that the two modes of realism reflect opposing impulses in a central dialectic of modernity.

    BIOGRAPHY:

    Jason McGrath is Associate Professor in Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota, with affiliations in Moving Image Studies and Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature. His current book project is entitled Inscribing the Real: Realism and Convention in Chinese Cinema from the Silent Era to the Digital Age.


    Speakers

    Jason McGrath
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota


    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 12th Ukraine's Euromaidan: Five Years Later

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 12, 20184:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Five years ago Ukraine erupted in massive protests that came to be known as the Euromaidan. What’s changed and what hasn’t in the time that has passed? A panel of international and Canadian experts look at the key issues from a variety of perspectives.

    Marta Dyczok is Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University, and Adjunct Professor at the National University of the Kyiv Mohyla Academy. She has published five books, including Ukraine’s Euromaidan. Broadcasting through Information Wars with Hromadske Radio (2016) Ukraine Twenty Years After Independence: Assessments, Perspectives, Challenges (co-edited with Giovanna Brogi, 2015), Media, Democracy and Freedom. The Post-Communist Experience (co-edited with Oxana Gaman-Golutvina, 2009), articles in various journals including The Russian Journal of Communication (2014), Demokratizatsiya (2014), and regularly provides media commentary. Her doctorate is from Oxford University and she researches mass media, memory, migration, and history.

    Olexiy Haran is Professor of Comparative Politics at the National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy (UKMA). In 1991 93, he was Dean and organizer of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the re-born Kyiv Mohyla Academy. Since 2002, he has served as Founding Director of the UKMA School for Policy Analysis, and since 2015 as Research Director at the Democratic Initiatives Foundation, a leading Ukrainian analytical and sociological think tank. He is the co-editor of Constructing a Political Nation: Changes in the Attitudes of Ukrainians during the War in the Donbas (2017), Ukraine in Europe: Questions and Answers (2009), Russia and Ukraine: Ten Years of Transformation (Moscow 2003) and several other books. Also, he is a frequent commentator in Ukrainian and international media.In winter 2013-2014, Prof. Haran was a member of the Council of ‘Maidan’ movement. As a political scientist he spent several weeks at the frontline nearby Mariupol, Luhansk, Avdiivka, and Donetsk airport. He is a member of Public Council under Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine and a member of Washington-based Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS-Eurasia).

    Dr. Olga Onuch (DPhil Oxford 2010) is a Senior Lecturer [Associate Professor] in Politics. She joined the University of Manchester in 2014, after holding research posts at the University of Toronto (2010-2011), University of Oxford (2011-2014) and Harvard University (2013-2014). She is an Associate of Nuffield College (Oxford) and of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute. Onuch was also a Research Fellow at the Davis Center (Harvard) in 2017. Onuch’s comparative study of protest (as well as elections, migration & identity) in Eastern Europe and Latin America has made her a leading expert in Ukrainian and Argentine politics specifically, but also in inter-regional comparative analysis. Her book “Mapping Mass Mobilizations” (2014, reviewed in Europe-Asia Studies), explores the processes leading up to mass protest engagement in Ukraine (2004) and Argentina (2001). She is the author of several scholarly articles (in Journal of Democracy, Europe-Asia Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, Post-Soviet Affairs, GeoPolitics among other journals), book chapters, and policy briefs.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Olexiy Haran
    Speaker
    Professor of Comparative Politics, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy

    Marta Dyczok
    Speaker
    Associate Professor at the Departments of History and Political Science, Western University

    Olga Onuch
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, University of Manchester

    Lucan Way
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto; co-director of the Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Andriy Shevchenko
    Speaker
    Ambassador of Ukraine to Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 13th China “Going Global”: New Configurations of Chinese Overseas Investment

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 13, 201812:30PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The nature of Chinese investment abroad is changing. As China reaffirms its commitment to its “going global” strategy and the One Belt One Road initiative, China’s continued investment in regions such as Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia has caught the world’s attention. What are the implications of China’s shifting investment strategy for the global economy and the international system? To what extent are security and geopolitical concerns about Chinese investment abroad (both by the state and by the private sector) justified? How does China’s investment strategy reflect its shifting state and foreign policy challenges? How have these challenges changed the relationship between the Chinese government and the private sector, or transformed the Chinese approach to foreign investment? Please join us for this important dialogue with Professor Lynette Ong and Professor Howard Lin on November 13th, from 12:30pm-2pm. This event will take place in Room 108N, 1 Devonshire Place (North House, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy).

    Contact

    Angela Hou


    Speakers

    Professor Lynette Ong
    Department of Political Science and Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Professor Howard Lin
    Global Management Studies, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University


    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 13th Book Launch: How to Write Literary History in the 21st Century

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 13, 20186:00PM - 8:00PMFather Madden Hall
    St. Michael's College (Carr Hall)
    100 St. Joseph St.
    Toronto ON M5S 2C4
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    Description

    How to Write Literary History in the 21st Century?
    A Book Launch and Reception for
    Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literture and Culture after 1918

    About the event

    Please join us in celebrating the publication of Being Poland: A New History of Polish Literature and Culture after 1918 on November 13 (Tuesday) at 6pm in Carr Hall. This volume is a monumental intellectual and pedagogical project undertaken by Prof. Tamara Trojanowska and her colleagues, Prof. Joanna Niżyńska (IU) and Prof. Przemysław Czapliński (UAM), involving over 60 scholarly contributions from all over the world! The book launch will feature a discussion panel with the editors and contributors on the topic of How to write literary and cultural histories in the 21st century? A reception will follow. This event is free and open for public. Please register via the link provided above.

    About the book

    Being Poland offers a unique analysis of the cultural developments that took place in Poland after World War I, a period marked by Poland’s return to independence. Conceived to address the lack of critical scholarship on Poland’s cultural restoration,Being Poland illuminates the continuities, paradoxes, and contradictions of Poland’s modern and contemporary cultural practices, and challenges the narrative typically prescribed to Polish literature and culture.

    Reflecting the radical changes, rifts, and restorations that swept through Poland in this period, Polish literature and film reveal a multitude of perspectives. Addressing romantic perceptions of the Polish immigrant, the politics of post-war cinema, poetry, and mass media, Being Poland is a comprehensive reference work written with the intention of exposing an international audience to the explosion of Polish literature and film that emerged in the twentieth century.

    Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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