« April 2020 - June 2020 July 2020 - Present

July 2020

  • Tuesday, July 7th Will COVID-19 Bring Us Together or Blow Us Apart? The Global Security Implications of the Pandemic

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, July 7, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    What are the national and international security implications of the COVID-19 pandemic and the economic catastrophe caused by it? Janice Stein will discuss the historical security lessons of previous pandemics and depressions, Jon Lindsay will consider emerging military and strategic dangers exacerbated by COVID-19, and Ron Deibert will discuss the cybersecurity and surveillance threats associated with the unprecedented relocation of life online. This conversation will attempt to look for solutions within this growing morass of problems.


    Speakers

    Ron Deibert
    Speaker
    Director, Citizen Lab, Professor, Political Science & Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Speaker
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and University Professor, Political Science

    Nahlah Ayed
    Moderator
    Host, CBC Radio's Ideas



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, July 16th Innovation on remote? The short and long term impacts of COVID-19 on innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystems

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, July 16, 202011:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    As firms and communities adapt to current pandemic conditions, many entrepreneurs and creative/knowledge workers continue to work from home. While some predict this will spell a long term shift to working from home and a reorganization of businesses more generally, what are the implications for the role of entrepreneurial ecosystems in supporting innovation? This panel explores the short and long term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystems.


    Speakers

    Rubina Ahmed-Haq
    Moderator
    Personal Finance Columnist

    Catherine Beaudry
    Panelist
    anada Research Chair in Creation, Development and Commercialization of Innovation and Professor, Department of Mathematical and Industrial Engineering at Polytechnique Montréal

    Ben Spigel
    Panelist
    Senior Lecturer in Entrepreneurship and Director of Entrepreneurship and Innovation MSc at the University of Edinburgh Business School

    Tara Vinodrai
    Panelist
    Director, Master of Urban Innovation and Associate Professor at the University of Toronto Mississauga

    David Wolfe
    Panelist
    Co-Director, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Professor, Political Science at the University of Toronto Mississauga



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, July 21st Defunding the Police: Rethinking Public Safety so that Black Lives Matter

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, July 21, 202012:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Defunding the Police: Rethinking Public Safety so that Black Lives Matter

    What does it mean to defund the police, and for whom? On May 25, 2020, Minneapolis police officer Derrick Chauvin murdered George Floyd. Cell-phone footage of this public lynching sparked protests in Minneapolis that quickly spread to hundreds of cities and towns across the nation and beyond its borders. Protestors displayed righteous anger that was met with tear-gas, batons, rubber bullets, and, in some cases, live ammunition. State violence spared neither peaceful protestors nor journalists. This political crisis has provoked a global reckoning with anti-black racism the failure of liberal “police reform.” Protestors have instead amplified radical demands to defund or, in some cases, to abolish police departments, which they argue are fundamentally irreformable. Legislators are now taking seriously demands that once seemed utopian. On June 12, 2020, the Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to disband the city’s police department and replace it with a community-led safety model. In San Francisco and Los Angeles, municipal leaders have proposed slashing police budgets and substituting social workers for police officers as first responders in cases involving mental health issues and potentially deviant but non-criminal behavior. In Toronto, too, calls to defund the police are gaining traction and several City Councilors have embraced the idea. These efforts reflect a growing belief that we cannot continue to fund a militarized police department, underfund social services, and expect to solve the problem of racial inequality and racist policing. As Ruth Wilson Gilmore reminds us, the slow death of “social abandonment” is intimately connected to overt state violence.

    This forum takes up the question of what exactly it might mean to “defund the police” and how this demand can help us to realize the slogan “Black Lives Matter.” Is this the right demand? If so, which of the many models for defunding the police should activists and policy makers pursue? Is it possible to maintain community safety without a police force as we currently understand it? Can we simply talk about de-funding or divestment without thinking about investment? Is the reduction of police budgets sufficient to fund critical social programs or do we also need to think about raising taxes on the wealthy? Is police reform also a question of tax policy? Are there any parallels between new calls to defund the police and long-standing efforts to reign in military spending in the United States and Canada? Is defunding a step towards the outright abolition of police? Should it be? What kinds of enduring political coalitions might emerge from the current protest movement?

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Nicholas Sammond
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto

    Dexter Voisin
    Speaker
    Dean & Professor, Sandra Rotman Chair in Social Work, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

    Max Mishler
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Robyn Maynard
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate and Vanier Scholar, University of Toronto

    Brett Story
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, School of Image Arts, Ryerson University

    Julilly Kohler-Hausmann
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of History, Cornell University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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August 2020

  • Wednesday, August 26th Belarus on Edge

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, August 26, 20203:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Sometimes called “Europe’s last dictatorship,” Belarus has seen massive and unprecedented street protests in the aftermath of its presidential election on August 9. Decrying fraud and harassment, protesters have called for fundamental change to Belarus’s political system, which has undergone little reform since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

    In this discussion, Olga Onuch (University of Manchester), Maryia Rohava (University of Oslo) and Lucan Way (University of Toronto) discuss Belarus’s protests and its prospects for change.

    Moderator: Seva Gunitsky (University of Toronto)

    Sponsors

    Eurasia Initiative, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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September 2020

  • Friday, September 4th Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 4, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    Professor Naoki Sakai’s Distinguished Lecture on “Equality and Nationality: How to Classify Humanity” is the inaugural event for the JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 on “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics.” The respondent is Professor Takashi Fujitani from the University of Toronto.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics” aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________________

    Naoki Sakai teaches in the departments of Comparative Literature and Asian Studies and is a member of the graduate field of History at Cornell University. He has published in a number of languages in the fields of comparative literature, intellectual history, translation studies, the studies of racism and nationalism, and the histories of semiotic and literary multitude – speech, writing, corporeal expressions, calligraphic regimes, and phonographic traditions.

    Takashi Fujitani is the Dr. David Chu Professor and Director in Asia Pacific Studies. His research focuses especially on modern and contemporary Japanese history, East Asian history, Asian American history, and transnational history (primarily U.S./Japan and Asia Pacific). Much of his past and current research has centred on the intersections of nationalism, colonialism, war, memory, racism, ethnicity, and gender, as well as the disciplinary and area studies boundaries that have figured our ways of studying these issues.

    Elizabeth Wijaya works at the intersection of cinema, philosophy, and area studies. She is especially interested in the material and symbolic entanglements between East Asia and Southeast Asia cinema. Her work emphasizes a multimethodological approach, which is attentive to media forms, ethnographic detail, material realities, archival practices, international networks, and interdisciplinary modes of theorization. For 2020-2021, she is the convenor of “Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics,” JHI-UTM Seminar.


    Speakers

    Naoki Sakai
    Speaker
    Goldwin Smith Professor of Asian Studies, Cornell University

    Takashi Fujitani
    Respondent
    Professor, Department of History and Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Asian Institue

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 10th Book launch for "Might Nature Be Canadian? Essays on Mutual Accommodation", by William A. Macdonald

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 10, 20209:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    To mark the publication of William A. Macdonald’s “Might Nature Be Canadian? Essays on Mutual Accommodation”, Trent University’s School for the Study of Canada, the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, and William A. Macdonald are sponsoring a webinar on mutual accommodation in both national and international affairs, featuring Martin Wolf, Thomas Mulcair, Margaret MacMillan, David Walmsley, and Shawn and Heather Atleo, with Heather Nicol and the Hon. Bill Graham.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, September 10th A City for All: Achieving More Inclusive Municipal Governance in Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, September 10, 20204:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Over the last several months, Toronto’s fissures and inequalities have been put on display. Protests against police brutality and anti-Black and anti-Indigenous racism have once again highlighted the systemic racism that undergirds many of the city’s key institutions, all while COVID-19 has disproportionately affected racialized residents.

    These events have sparked many important conversations about policy gaps, such as the need for more race-based data, and policy solutions, such as calls to defund the police. They have also underlined what Brittany Andrew-Amofah, Alexandra Flynn, and Patricia Wood have called “the democratic deficits in local decision-making” – the fact that, too often, those most affected by policy changes, most dependent on public services, or most vulnerable to abuse and racism, are those least heard when decisions get made.

    What changes need to be made to ensure all Torontonians are meaningfully engaged in the City’s decision making? How can the voices of racialized, newcomer, and Indigenous residents be firmly integrated into the City’s governance structures? On September 10, this panel will explore these questions and examine how Toronto can begin to address its divisions and build toward a more inclusive future.

    Speakers
    Heather Dorries is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto where she is cross-appointed to the Department of Geography and Planning and Centre for Indigenous Studies. Her research is focused on the relationship between urban planning and settler colonialism, as well as the application of Indigenous knowledge systems in planning contexts. She is currently revising her book manuscript Planning the End of the World: Indigenist Planning Theory and the Art of Refusal, and is co-editor of the collection Settler City Limits: Indigenous Resurgence and Settler Colonial Violence in the Urban Prairie West (University of Manitoba Press 2019).

    Anthony Morgan is a lawyer and the Manager of the City of Toronto’s Confronting Anti-Black Racism (CABR) Unit. The CABR Unit is responsible for the implementation of the Toronto Action Plan to Confront Anti-Black Racism. Prior to joining the City, Anthony was an Associate at Falconers LLP, specializing in the areas of civil, constitutional and criminal state accountability litigation. He has a special interest in anti-racist human rights advocacy, particularly in the area of anti-Black racism.

    Devika Shah is passionate about building a civic society that is grounded in diversity, equity, social and economic justice, and active democratic engagement. Her interdisciplinary background and experience in the non-profit sector has strengthened her commitment to advancing grassroots, community-led, multi-stakeholder solutions, which she views as the most powerful lever for achieving systems change. Devika is currently Executive Director of Social Planning Toronto and has held past positions with the World Wildlife Fund Canada, Pembina Institute, York University, and KCI Philanthropy.

    Patricia Wood is is Professor of Geography at York University and a co-founder of its City Institute. With Alexandra Flynn (Allard School of Law, UBC), she is conducting international comparative research into urban governance, and public consultation about the future of Toronto’s governance structures. She is the author of Citizenship, Activism and the City: the Invisible and the Impossible (Routledge 2017). She also writes an urban affairs column for Spacing.ca.

    Moderator:
    Brittany Andrew-Amofah is a public policy professional based in Toronto. She is currently the Senior Policy and Research Analyst at the Broadbent Institute, where she is responsible for assisting with setting the research and policy direction of the organization, and managing the Broadbent Institute’s Fellow Program. Prior to joining the Broadbent Institute, Brittany was on the policy team at the Maytree Foundation where her work focused on researching various poverty reduction strategies. She is also a former Program Manager at Harmony Movement, where she delivered diversity, equity and anti-racism training to students, educators and non-profits across Ontario.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 11th Book Launch – Private Governance and Public Authority

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 11, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab invites you to the launch of Stefan Renckens’ new book, Private Governance and Public Authority!

    At a time of significant concern about the sustainability of the global economy, businesses are eager to display responsible corporate practices. While rulemaking for these practices was once the prerogative of states, businesses and civil society actors are increasingly engaged in creating private rulemaking instruments, such as eco-labeling and certification schemes, to govern corporate behavior. When does a public authority intervene in such private governance and reassert the primacy of public policy? Renckens develops a new theory of public-private regulatory interactions and argues that when and how a public authority intervenes in private governance depends on the economic benefits to domestic producers that such intervention generates and the degree of fragmentation of private governance schemes. Drawing on European Union policymaking on organic agriculture, biofuels, fisheries, and fair trade, he exposes the political-economic conflicts between private and public rule makers and the strategic nature of regulating sustainability in a global economy.

    Opening remarks by Margaret Kohn, Professor, and Chair of the Department of Political Science in the University of Toronto at Scarborough

    Discussants:

    Graeme Auld, Professor, and Director of the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carlton University

    Jessica Green, Associate Professor, Political Science and School of the Environment at the University of Toronto

    Moderator: Matthew Hoffmann, Professor, Political Science and Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab at the University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20202:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pan-Asian Seminar Series: The Political Life of Information

    Description

    “The Political Life of Information” series at the Asian Institute brings together scholars, activists, artists, and other practitioners to reflect on practices of surveillance, data visualization, population management and identification, news and journalism, and the social aspects of algorithms from a perspective based in Asia, but speaking to a broad audience interested in the political ramifications of media and information technology.

    As our inaugural event, Citizenship in the Age of Digital Surveillance will consist of a panel of three experts who will speak about the socio-technical dimensions of digital spying and the contested sphere of privacy shaping contemporary activism and journalism in Asia. Speakers will focus on counter-surveillance work done at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, and how this research and public outreach has been engaged by privacy and free speech advocates.
    _______________________________

    Chinmayi Arun is a resident fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and an affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society at Harvard University. She has served on the faculties of two of the most highly regarded law schools in India from 2010 onwards, and was the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University Delhi. Chinmayi has been consultant to the Law Commission of India and member of the Indian government’s multi stakeholder advisory group for the India Internet Governance Forum in the past.

    Irene Poetranto is a Senior Researcher for The Citizen Lab and a Doctoral Student in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interest is on cybersecurity policy development in the Global South, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. She obtained her Master’s degree in Political Science and Asia-Pacific Studies from the University of Toronto, and a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of British Columbia.

    John Scott-Railton is a Senior Researcher at the Citizen Lab, University of Toronto. His work focuses on technological threats to civil society, including targeted malware operations and online disinformation. His greatest hits include a collaboration with colleague Bill Marczak that uncovered the first iPhone zero-day and remote jailbreak seen in the wild, as well as the use of NSO Group’s Pegasus spyware to human rights defenders, journalists, and opposition movements around the globe. Other investigations with Citizen Lab colleagues include the first report of ISIS-led malware operations, and China’s “Great Cannon,” the Government of China’s nation-scale DDoS attack. John has also investigated Russian and Iranian disinformation campaigns, and the manipulation of news aggregators such as Google News. John has been a fellow at Google Ideas and Jigsaw at Alphabet. He graduated with a University of Chicago and a Masters from the University of Michigan. He is completing a PhD at UCLA. Previously he founded The Voices Projects, collaborative information feeds that bypassed internet shutdowns in Libya and Egypt.


    Speakers

    Chinmayi Arun
    Speaker
    Resident Fellow of the Information Society Project, Yale Law School; affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center of Internet & Society, Harvard University; the founder Director of the Centre for Communication Governance, National Law University Delhi

    Irene Poetranto
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    John Scott-Railton
    Speaker
    Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies; Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology (UTM)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, September 18th Transnational Solidarities / Complicities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, September 18, 20204:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    JHI - UTM 2020-2021 Seminar Series: Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics

    Description

    “Transnational Solidarities/Complicities” is the second lecture for the Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics, JHI-UTM Seminar for 2020-2021 co-hosted by the Department of Visual Studies, the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics proposes a series of lectures and film screenings featuring scholars and creators of cinema and media in order to investigate how moving image media contribute to formations of race, racism, and racialization from global perspectives. In a time when racist politics and racial capitalism pose increasing physical and psychical dangers to communities across the world, it is critical to examine the histories, theories and role of cinema and media in shaping the geopolitical imagination of the relations between people and nation-states from micro and macro scales.

    Mediating Race, Reimagining Geopolitics aims to create a sustaining conversation among junior, senior scholars and film creators across disciplines, institutions and geographical locations.

    ___________

    Nadine Chan, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University
    “Asynchronicity and the Time-Lagged Medium: Racializing Space-Time in the Colonial Documentaries of British Malaya.”

    Ryan A. Buyco, Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College
    “Navigating Asian Settler Colonialism: Okinawa-Hawai’i Connections through the Works of Laura Kina and Lee A. Tonouchi.”

    Cheryl Suzack, Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto
    “Indigenous-Feminist Political Imaginaries in Four Settler-Colonial Countries.”

    Jessica Harris, Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University
    “African-American Women and Love, Italian Style in 20th and 21st Century Media.”

    Moderator: Kun Huang, PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Speakers

    Nadine Chan
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies, Claremont Graduate University

    Ryan A. Buyco
    Speaker
    Riley Scholar-in-Residence, Asian Studies Program, Colorado College

    Cheryl Suzack
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of English, University of Toronto

    Jessica Harris
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of History, St John’s University

    Kun Huang
    Moderator
    PhD Candidate, Department of Comparative Literature, Cornell University


    Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute

    UTM Collaborative Digital Research Space, University of Toronto

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Department of Visual Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, September 22nd Has the pandemic disrupted carbon lock-in?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, September 22, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance Lab invites you to join the panel discussion in the first pre-symposium webinar on carbon-lock in during COVID
    About this Event
    Early optimism that the pandemic lockdowns would significantly lower greenhouse gas emissions and disrupt the world’s reliance on fossil energy has started to fade. Our panelists will discuss what impact the pandemic has had on carbon lock-in, what exactly has and has not changed, and whether these changes are likely to endure.

    Panelists:

    Samantha Gross, Director of Energy Security and Climate Initiative at Brookings
    Professor Jonas Nahm, Assistant Professor of Energy, Resources, and Environment at Johns Hopkins University
    Professor Piers Forster, Professor of Climate Physics at University of Leeds


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, September 23rd Engendering History: Gender, Sexuality, and Love in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, September 23, 202011:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Ashley Thompson suggests an engendering of history that bears “the potential to make history, literally and figuratively, insofar as it threatens or promises to upset established notions of the field” (2008:106). This panel takes up Thompson’s call to engender history and interrogates dominant conceptions of gender, sexuality, and love in modern Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. From texts to textiles, classrooms to forests, and wedding photos to state records, the papers focus on particular spaces and materials that vibrated with social and political intensities through the long period of the Cold War in Thailand, Lao PDR, and Cambodia. The panel shows how materiality and spatiality were key aspects that shaped the ideological extremes that manifested in violence and unrest in Southeast Asia, and the panel begins its inquiries in the 1950s.

    Alexandra Dalferro – “Weaving Queer Pasts and Futures in Thailand”

    Chairat Polmuk – “Of Eros and the Forest: The Topography of Love in Lao Revolutionary Literature”

    Catriona Miller – “Sewing Patterns and Visions of Democracy: Khmer Women Organizing during Decolonization (1948 – 1952)”

    ___________________

    ALEXANDRA DALFERRO is a PhD candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University. She is currently writing her dissertation about the politics and practices of sericulture and silk weaving in Surin, Thailand, and she pays particular attention to the sensory and affective dimensions of these processes. Her fieldwork was supported by the Wenner Gren Foundation and the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad program, and for the 2019-2020 academic year, she was a Mellon Graduate Fellow at the Society for the Humanities at Cornell. Alexandra likes to weave and to sew and to think about how craft and art intersect with daily life.

    CHAIRAT POLMUK teaches Southeast Asian languages and literature, cultural theory, and media studies at the Department of Thai, Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. He received a PhD in Asian Literature, Religion, and Culture from Cornell in 2018. His doctoral project titled, “Atmospheric Archives: Post-Cold War Affect and the Buddhist Temporal Imagination in Southeast Asian Literature and Visual Culture,” received the 2018 Lauriston Sharp Prize for best dissertation.

    CATRIONA MILLER is a PhD candidate in the History Department at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Her dissertation, Gendering the Cambodian State (1900 – 1970) utilizes transnational feminist methods to recast the political history of Cambodia during the transition from a French Protectorate to a neutral Buddhist nation-state. She conducted this research with generous funding from the NSEP Boren Fellowship and Center for Khmer Studies Fellowship.

    ARNIKA FUHRMANN is an interdisciplinary scholar of Southeast Asia, working at the intersections of the region’s aesthetic, religious, and political modernities. She is an associate professor of Asian Studies at Cornell University and the author of Ghostly Desires: Queer Sexuality and Vernacular Buddhism in Contemporary Thai Cinema (Duke University Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Alexandra Dalferro
    Panelist
    Phd Candidate, Cornell University

    Chairat Polmuk
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Chulalongkorn University

    Catriona Miller
    Panelist
    PhD Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Arnika Fuhrmann
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, Cornell University

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


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