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November 2021

  • Monday, November 1st Overcoming Challenges in the Research Environment in China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 1, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    This panel discussion will focus on guidance and advice for late-stage graduate students who are experiencing challenges accessing archives, conducting interviews, or who otherwise face the types of barriers faced when conducting research in China but are now intensified by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    ***NOTE: THIS LIVE DISCUSSION WILL NOT BE SIMULCAST ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL NOR AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING AT A LATER DATE.***


    Speakers

    Elizabeth Perry
    Panelist
    Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government at Harvard University and Director of the Harvard-Yenching Institute

    Denise Ho
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor of 20th Century Chinese History, Yale University

    Robert Weller
    Panelist
    Professor of Anthropology, Boston University

    Yuen Yuen Ang
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Michigan

    Michael Szonyi
    Moderator
    Frank Wen-Hsiung Wu Memorial Professor of Chinese History and Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 1st Navigating the Age of Disruption

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 1, 20218:00PM - 9:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On November 1 at 5pm (PST)/8pm (EST)/Nov 2 at 9am (JST), the Center for Japanese Research at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs (University of British Columbia) and the Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy (University of Toronto) will hold a joint event on the Japanese Cabinet and Lower House elections and their global impact.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Joseph Caron
    Speaker
    Former Ambassador, Canada to Japan

    Mari Miura
    Speaker
    Sophia University, Tokyo

    Sheila Smith
    Speaker
    Council on Foreign Relations, Washington DC

    Harukata Takenaka
    Speaker
    GRIPS, Tokyo

    Yves Tiberghien
    Moderator
    CJR and Political Science, University of British Columbia

    Phillip Lipscy
    Speaker
    Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 2nd – Wednesday, November 3rd MGA & MPP attends McGill Graduate Online Fair 2021

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 2, 20218:00AM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    Wednesday, November 3, 20218:00AM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Visit the McGill Graduate Online Fair and connect with the Admissions Officer from the Munk school of Global Affairs & Public Policy.

    Learn more about the Master of Global Affairs & Master of Public Policy degree programs.
    Get your questions answered over these 2 days at the McGill Fair!


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 4th “One China” Contention and Taiwan’s Future

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 4, 20219:30AM - 10:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Beijing and Taipei have long disputed ideas of “one China.” The nature of their contentions has also varied across time. What is certain now is that a majority of Taiwanese disagree with any “one China” concept that implies Taiwan is part of the People’s Republic of China. Most people in Taiwan want to remain a self-governing liberal democracy and reject Beijing’s “one country, two systems” policy. Our speaker, Yu-Jie Chen, an assistant research professor at Taiwan’s Academia Sinica and an affiliated scholar of U.S.-Asia Law Institute of NYU School of Law, will talk about the diversified political positions on the two sides of the Taiwan Strait, Taiwanese attitudes towards their own identity, and whether a peaceful solution can be found to this increasingly volatile and high-stakes dispute.

    Speaker’s Bio:

    Yu-Jie Chen is an assistant research professor at the Law Institute of Taiwan’s Academia Sinica. Her research focuses on human rights and international law and relations, particularly in the context of China, Taiwan, and China-Taiwan relations. Professor Chen received her J.S.D. and LL.M. degrees from New York University School of Law. She also holds an LL.M. and LL.B. from National Chengchi University in Taiwan. She was an inaugural Global Academic Fellow at the University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law (2019-2020). She has been a research scholar at the US-Asia Law Institute, a researcher and advocate for the non-governmental organization Human Rights in China, and an attorney at the Taipei-based international law firm Lee and Li.


    Speakers

    Yu-Jie Chen
    Speaker
    Assistant Research Professor at the Law Institute of Taiwan’s Academia Sinica

    Sida Liu
    Moderator
    Acting Director of the Global Taiwan Studies Program at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 4th Indigenous-Municipal Relations in Canada: Where Do We Stand?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 4, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    With close to half of Indigenous Peoples living in urban areas, ensuring strong, deep Indigenous-municipal relationships across Canada is vital. Yet, Canadian municipalities are often unsure what duties and obligations they owe First Nations and Indigenous Peoples living in their jurisdictions.

    On November 4, Doug Anderson and Alexandra Flynn will discuss some of the key questions on the way forward to improved Indigenous-municipal relationships. Do municipalities, like federal and provincial governments, have a “duty to consult,” and is this duty the appropriate framework for Indigenous-municipal relationships? How have municipalities reformed their governance in the last decade to strengthen relationships with Indigenous Peoples? And what more can be done to respond to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples, United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action?

    Working from their recently published paper for IMFG, Anderson and Flynn will look at how Indigenous-municipal relations can move forward in a reciprocal and respectful manner.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Doug Anderson
    Speaker
    Creative and Strategic Director at Invert Media and a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Education, York University

    Dr. Alexandra Flyn
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia’s Allard School of Law and a Fellow at IMFG

    Ginger Gosnell-Myers
    Moderator
    Fellow in Decolonization and Urban Indigenous Planning at Simon Fraser University’s Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 5th Seeing China and the Asia-Pacific from India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 5, 202110:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    With their shared and yet diverged colonial and postcolonial experiences, both China and India have embarked on their own modernizing and state-building projects after World War II. From a brief hope of solidarity in the 1955 Bandung Conference to repeated border conflicts, and from postwar developmentalism to neoliberal market reforms, the two self-assured Asian giants have entangled with one another in numerous ways. Today, as China and India seem to drift further apart from each other under the rhetoric of the “New Cold War,” what does it mean to talk about South-South relations in research, activism, and policy-making in the context of China and India? How do scholars and intellectuals from or working on India view China and the changing Asia-Pacific order? This panel brings together scholars and intellectuals from a variety of backgrounds to engage these urgent questions.


    Speakers

    Uday Balakrishnan
    Panelist
    Former Indian civil servant, newspaper columnist and public intellectual; Former Registrar and Visiting Faculty, Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Mark W. Frazier
    Panelist
    Professor of Politics and Co-Director of the India China Institute, The New School for Social Research

    Arunabh Ghosh
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of History, Harvard University

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy; Director of the East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 5th The COVID-19 pandemic, Korea-Canada comparison: Government response, social welfare, labor, and gender II

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 5, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Chair and discussant: Yoonkyung Lee (Associate professor in Sociology and Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, U of T)

    Speaker 1
    David Pettinichio, “The Impacts of COVID-19 on People with Disabilities and Chronic Health Conditions”

    Abstract
    The pandemic has reeked disproportionate havoc on already marginalized and vulnerable communities. People with disabilities and chronic health conditions are not only more at risk of getting COVID-19, but they are also more likely to be economically disadvantaged, more likely to experience social isolation and negative mental health status, and to be left out of important social and economic policymaking that ultimately affects their daily lives. Not surprisingly, the pandemic has reified and exacerbated these dimensions of disadvantage and inequality. In June of 2020, we conducted a cross-national survey among Canadians with disabilities and chronic health conditions as well as in-depth qualitative interviews. This talk focuses on findings from this project divided into three areas: employment and financial effects of the pandemic, COVID-19’s effects on mental health, and how people with disabilities and chronic health conditions are making sense of government COVID-19 policies and countermeasures.

    Bio
    David Pettinicchio is an Associate Professor of Sociology and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. His research lies at the intersection of political sociology and inequality. He recently (2021) edited Volume 28 of Research in Political Sociology (Emerald). His book published with Stanford University Press in 2019 titled Politics of Empowerment: Disability Rights and the Cycle of American Policy Reform, examines the back-and-forth relationship between policymaking and citizen participation. Currently, he is working with Prof. Michelle Maroto and a research team of doctoral students on a project focused on COVID-19, disability, and chronic health based on an original national survey and qualitative interviews on which this talk is based. Peer-reviewed articles drawing from this data are already published in Canadian Public Policy, Disability and Health Journal, and Sociological Perspectives.

    Speaker 2
    Juyeon Lee, “The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the public healthcare system and socioeconomically disadvantaged people in South Korea”

    Abstract
    South Korea adopted the test-trace-treat model to contain the spread of COVID-19 and almost all patients with any symptom or underlying conditions have been hospitalized while asymptomatic ones have been isolated in community care facilities. As most public hospitals were designated exclusively for COVID-19 care, patients who had been hospitalized or regularly visited outpatient clinics in public hospitals had to be discharged or transferred to different facilities. In this presentation, I will present the findings from qualitative health research that investigates the processes and implications of the Korean government’s response to the pandemic, specifically the mobilization of public hospitals as dedicated COVID-19 treatment facilities. I will demonstrate how the government’s response devastated the nation’s already fragile public healthcare system and adversely affected socioeconomically disadvantaged people

    Bio
    Juyeon is a PhD student in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences program at Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. Prior to her doctoral studies, Juyeon worked in a variety of research settings, such as a scholar-activist in People’s Health Institute, a not-for-profit research institute in South Korea, focusing on health inequities, and precarious employment and health. Juyeon’s doctoral research deals with the issue of work-related injuries and deaths in South Korea, critically probing the social, political, and economic structures behind the development of the regulatory regime for health and safety at work in the country. Juyeon is engaged in a variety of projects including the health and health inequity implications of informal employment in a global context, public health activism for health and safety at work, and the Korean government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the nation’s public healthcare system and socioeconomically disadvantaged people.

    This virtual event is organized by the Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto and sponsored by the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto.


    Speakers

    David Pettinicchio
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology and the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Juyeon Lee
    Speaker
    PhD student in the Social and Behavioural Health Sciences program at Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor in Sociology and Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 5th Special talk: Professor Breznitz talks to 4th year students from the Munk School's undergraduate programs!

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 5, 20215:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Professor Breznitz talks to 4th year students from the Munk School’s undergraduate programs and shows how they can expand what they learn in their respective programs in the Master of Global Affairs degree program.

    Prof. Breznitz will tell you more about the five Pillars of the Master of Global Affairs program, our dual degree partnership programs, as well as the eight emphases of the program that students can specialize in.

    Come connect with a MGA Professor and Director of the MGA program!


    Speakers

    Professor Shiri Breznitz
    DIRECTOR, MASTER OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS PROGRAM ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MUNK SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS AND PUBLIC POLICY FACULTY, AMERICAN STUDIES AFFILIATED FACULTY, CSUS



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 6th The Munk School Professional Masters Degree Programs Virtual Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 6, 20219:00AM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    We are inviting you to our annual Open House for our 2-year professional master degree programs at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy!

    You will learn all about the Programs and the Admissions processes of the Master of Global Affairs & Master of Public Policy!

    Applications for these programs are open for fall 2022 and the deadlines are January 20, 2022! Come to our Open House and learn more about these programs and how to apply!

    Come listen to mini-lectures by sitting professors of the programs, talk to current students and alumni of both programs and join in on our Admissions Information sessions and hear from representatives from the Hertie School, London School of Economics and more!

    Don’t miss it! Register today!

    SCHEDULE FOR THE DAY:

    Munk School Professional Master’s Degree Programs Virtual Open House Sat Nov 6, 2021| SCHEDULE |

    MGA Open House (9:00am-1:15pm) | MPP Open House (1:45pm-5:00pm)

    9:00 am – 9:20 am – Director’s Land Acknowledgment/Welcome: Professor Shiri Breznitz & Kristen Ligers

    9:20am – 9:50 am – Mini Lecture – Title: “How China Became a Global Power” by Professor Diana Fu

    9:50am – 9:55am – Break

    9:55 am – 10:55 am – MGA Admissions Information Session : by Rejeanne Puran

    10:55am – 11:00am – Break

    11:00 am – 12:00 am – Student & Alumni Q & A

    Panelists:
    Alumni: Darcy Drury
    Students: Tabitha Oni; Sky Shi
    Moderator: Kirsten Ligers

    12:00pm – 12:30 pm – Lunch Break

    12:30pm – 1:15 pm: Dual Degrees Q & A
    (Hertie School Representative; London School of Economics Representative; Sciences Po (TBA))

    End of the MGA Open House / Beginning of MPP Open House

    1:45 pm – 2:05 pm – Director’s Land Acknowledgment/Welcome: Professor Daniyal Zuberi & Kristen Ligers

    2:05 pm – 2:35 pm – Mini-Lecture – Title: “An Insider’s View: How government works and how you can make it better” by Professor Drew Fagan

    2:35pm – 2:45 pm – Break

    2:45pm – 3:45 pm – MPP Admissions Information Session by Rejeanne Puran

    3:45 pm – 3:55 pm – Break

    3:55 pm – 4:55 pm – Student & Alumni Q & A

    Panelists:
    Alumni: Fatemah Ibrahim
    Students: Ruth Rosalle; Evelyn Chong
    Moderator: Kate Dewasha

    4:55pm – 5:00 pm – Goodbyes: Rejeanne Puran


    Speakers

    Rejeanne Puran
    Recruitment & Admissions Master of Global Affairs Master of Public Policy University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 8th Book Launch: Populist Moments and Extractivist States in Venezuela and Ecuador: The People’s Oil?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 8, 20211:30PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us as we discuss the intersection of extractivism, populism, and accountability in Latin American politics with co-authors Donald Kingsbury and Teresa Kramarz.

    Although populist politics are often portrayed as a driver of poor environmental governance, Populist Moments and Extractivist States identifies it as an intervening variable at best – one that emerges in response to the accountability deficits of extractive states. Case studies in Venezuela – for many, the prototypical petrostate – and Ecuador – which exchanged agribusiness dependency for oil decades later – illustrate how extractive states are oriented by a colonial logic of export and service. This logic regulates state-society-nature relationships and circumscribes avenues for local stakeholders to hold public officials and extractive industries to account for environmental and human harms. Populist moments of the early 21st century across Latin America responded to these conditions, promising more equitable and sustainable futures. However, rather than reversing the technocracy, verticalism, and exclusion of the recent past, populist moments often intensified and legitimated them in the drive to maximize and distribute resource rents. The result has been cyclical, as populist moments of hope and rupture fall prey to the extractivist states they tried, and failed, to replace.


    Speakers

    Donald Kingsbury
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Departments of Latin American Studies and Political Science, University of Toronto

    Teresa Kramarz
    Speaker
    Director, Munk One Program; Co-Director, Environmental Governance Lab; Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Nadège Compaoré
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Antulio Rosales
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of New Brunswick

    Craig Johnson
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Guelph



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 9th – Wednesday, November 10th National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism: Building Solidarities

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 9, 202111:00AM - 7:00PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 10, 202111:00AM - 7:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    *View the FULL PROGRAM at: https://www.ryerson.ca/national-forum-on-anti-asian-racism/session-descriptions/

    The National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism: Building Solidarities will bring together students, staff, faculty and academic leaders, as well as community partners, to engage in a timely and open dialogue about anti-Asian racism in Canada’s post-secondary education sector. Hosted by the Faculty of Arts, this two-day event will build on the important work initiated by the University of British Columbia at its inaugural National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism in June 2021.

    This event is being organized by the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University (renaming in process), in partnership with the University of British Columbia, the University of Manitoba and in collaboration with students and faculty from a number of other Canadian universities.

    ***********************
    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2021

    11:00 a.m. EST | Welcome and Opening Remarks
    Janice Fukakusa – Chancellor
    Josel Angelica Gerardo – MA Candidate, Political Science, University of Toronto; Planning Co-Lead, National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism
    Dr. Hayden King – Executive Director, Yellowhead Institute
    Mohamed Lachemi – President and Vice-Chancellor, Ryerson University
    Pam Sugiman – Dean of the Faculty of Arts; Executive Lead, National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism

    11:45 a.m. EST | Plenary Panel #1: Understanding Asian and Asian Canadian Experiences in Higher Education
    Panelists:
    Dan Cantiller – Decision Support Analyst, Office of the Dean, Ted Rogers School of Management
    Amy Go – President of Chinese Canadian National Council for Social Justice
    Rabiah Lombard – Human Rights Studies MA Candidate, Columbia University
    Minelle Mahtani – Brenda and David McLean Chair of Canadian Studies, University of British Columbia
    Moderator:Takashi Fujitani – Dr. David Chu Chair in Asia-Pacific Studies and Professor of History, University of Toronto

    1:15 p.m. EST | Interview: Personal Journeys of Racialized Leaders in Higher Education
    Host: Mary Ito – Broadcast Journalist
    Speaker: Pam Sugiman – Dean of the Faculty of Arts; Executive Lead, National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism

    1:45 p.m. EST | Plenary Panel #2: Addressing Racism in the Classroom
    Panelists:
    Parsa Alirezaei – Political Science Student, Simon Fraser University
    Hela Bakhtari – Research assistant, Factor Inwentash School of Social Work, University of Toronto
    Heunjung Lee – Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, Department of Drama, University of Alberta
    Dr. Rai Reece – Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, X University
    Dr. Megan Scribe – Assistant Professor, X University
    Moderator: Dr. Hijin Park – Associate Professor of Sociology at Brock University

    3:45 p.m. EST | Plenary Panel #3: Disrupting the Status Quo: Mobilizing Action to Address Anti-Asian Racism
    Panelists:
    Binish Ahmed – Writer, Educator, Organizer, Artist, PhD (ABD) Candidate, Policy Studies
    Professor Eve Haque – York Research Chair in Linguistic Diversity and Community Vitality
    Dr. Hayden King – Executive Director, Yellowhead Institute
    Dr. Melanie Knight – President of the Black Canadian Studies Association; Advisor to the Dean of Arts on Blackness and Black Diasporic Education; Associate Professor of Sociology, X University
    Moderator: Dr. Laura J. Kwak – Assistant Professor in the Law and Society Program, York University

    5:05 p.m. EST | Concurrent Session #1: Asian Studies and Asian Canadian Studies: Challenges and Opportunities
    Panelists:
    Dr. Rohini Bannerjee – Associate Professor, St. Mary’s University
    Dr. Anne-Marie Lee-Loy – Associate Professor, English; current Chair of the Department of English, X University
    Dr. Lisa Mar – Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto
    Bailey Irene Midori Hoy – Research Assistant, University of Toronto; Japanese Canadian Researcher
    Amanda Wan – Community Engagement and Events Coordinator (UBC Asian Canadian and Asian Migration Studies program); MA Student (UBC Department of English)
    Moderator: Dr. JP Catungal – Interim Director (Asian Canadian and Asian Migration Studies); Assistant Professor (Social Justice Institute), University of British Columbia

    5:05 p.m. EST | Concurrent Session #2: Legal Education and Anti-Asian Racism in the Legal System
    Topic #1: Legal Clinics and Advocacy for Low-Income Racialized Communities
    Introductory Remarks: Joanne Tsang – Legal Counsel and Director of Development Administration
    Speakers:
    Emily Lam – Partner, Kastner Lam LLP
    Avnish Nanda – Nanda & Company
    Richa Sandill – Staff Lawyer, Scarborough Community Legal Services
    Moderator: Rosel Kim – Staff Lawyer, Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund
    Q&A Facilitator: Gary Yee – Clinic Director, Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic

    Topic #2: Teaching and Learning about Anti-Asian Racism and the Law
    Introductory Remarks: Julia Shin-Doi
    Speakers:
    Professor Gil Lan – Associate Professor, Law and Business Department at the Ted Rogers School of Management (TRSM) and the Lincoln Alexander School of Law; Ryerson University (renaming in process)
    Dr. Angela Lee – Assistant Professor, Lincoln Alexander School of Law
    Q&A Facilitator: Aaron Bains – Partner at Aird Berlis
    Closing Remarks: Gerald Chan – Partner at Stockwoods LLP

    5:05 p.m. EST | Concurrent Session #3: Faculty Representation: University Recruitment, Retention and Promotion
    Panelists:
    Davina Chan – Senior Human Resources Consultant, Ryerson University
    Derrick Lee – Assistant Professor (Mathematics & Statistics) and Coordinator (Interdisciplinary Health Program), St. Francis Xavier University
    Jeongmin Kim – Assistant Professor, University of Manitoba
    Zenab Pathan – Director of Faculty Recruitment and Development, Ryerson University

    5:05 p.m. EST | Concurrent Session #4: The Intersectionality of Gender, Sexual Orientation and Asian Identities
    Panelists:
    Tiffany Shamiran Bondoc – Health Student, St. Francis Xavier University
    Dr. Robert Diaz – Associate Professor, University of Toronto
    Christine Hsu – ARAO & Sports Inclusion Learning Consultant and EDI Design Strategist & Movement Coach
    Phoenix Nakagawa – Agroecology student with minors in Entomology and Soil Science, University of Manitoba
    Moderator: Jenna Tenn-Yuk – Writer, Speaker, Facilitator

    5:05 p.m. EST | Concurrent Session #5: Lived Experiences and Opportunities for Asian Canadian Staff
    Panelists:
    Annabelle De Jesus – Student Success Navigator, Student Affairs, X University
    Hillary Nguyen – International Student Transition Advisor, University of New Brunswick
    Szu Shen – Program Manager, Asian Canadian and Asian Migration Studies, UBC
    Moderator: Wincy Li – Senior Manager, Career Education, Career & Co-op Centre, Ryerson University

    7:00 p.m. EST | Closing Remarks and Reflections
    Speakers:
    Ameerah Andaya – Social work student, University of Manitoba
    Lynn Deutscher Kobayashi – Vice-President, National Association of Japanese Canadians (NAJC); Chair, NAJC Human Rights Committee; President, Greater Toronto Chapter, NAJC
    Wincy Li – Senior Manager, Career Education, Career & Co-op Centre, Ryerson University
    John Shiga – Associate Professor in the School of Professional Communication, X University

    WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2021

    11:00 a.m. EST | Welcome and Keynote Remarks
    Keynote remarks: Iyko Day – Elizabeth C. Small Associate Professor of English and Chair of Gender Studies and the Program in Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College
    Speaker: Connor Hasegawa – Co-President, McGill Asian Law Students’ Association; Human Rights Committee member, National Association of Japanese Canadians

    11:45 a.m. EST | Concurrent Session #6: Ethics of Representing Asian Communities in Research
    Panelists:
    Dr. Laura Ishiguro – Associate Professor, University of British Columbia
    Dr. Jennifer Matsunaga – Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, University of Ottawa
    Kirsten Emiko McAllister – Professor in the School of Communication, Simon Fraser University
    Nicole Yakashiro – PhD student, Department of History, University of British Columbia
    Moderator: Tina Chen – Community Organizer

    11:45 a.m. EST | Concurrent Session #7: Building Alliances to Confront Anti-Asian Racism
    Panelists:
    Donette M. Chin-Loy Chang – Communications Leader and Philanthropist
    Tim Fox – Vice President, Indigenous Relations & Racial Equity, Calgary Foundation
    Samya Hasan – Executive Director, Council of Agencies Serving South Asians (CASSA)
    Angela Lee – Director of Partnerships and Research, Canadian Race Relations Foundation
    Christine Nakamura – Vice President, Toronto Office, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada
    Moderator:
    Krishan Mehta – Assistant Vice President, Engagement at Ryerson University

    11:45 a.m. EST | Concurrent Session #8: Addressing Sexual Violence Targeted at Southeast and East Asian Communities in Higher Education hosted by Consent Comes First
    Panelists:
    Elene Lam – Executive Director of Butterfly
    Joy Masuhara, MD, CCFP – Clinical Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, UBC; Co-Chair Women Transforming Cities International Society
    Jesmen Mendoza – Registered Psychologist, Ryerson University
    Jiaqing Wilson-Yang – Sexual Violence Specialist, X University
    Moderator: Kristyn Wong-Tam – Toronto City Councillor for Ward 13

    11:45 a.m. EST | Concurrent Session #9: In Conversation: Equity and Community Inclusion Leaders on the Issues of Racism
    Panelists:
    Dr. Arig al Shaibah – Associate Vice-President, Equity and Inclusion; Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, McMaster University
    Stephanie Simpson – Associate Vice Principal (Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion), Queen’s University
    Valerie Williams – Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Facilitator, Human Resources, University of Manitoba
    Moderator:
    Denise O’Neil Green – Vice-President, Equity and Community Inclusion and Associate Professor, School of Child and Youth Care, Ryerson University

    11:45 a.m. EST | Concurrent Session #10: Precarity and Racism: Upward Mobility in Academia
    Panelists:
    Sharoni Mitra – President of CUPE 3906, McMaster University
    Dr. Satoru Nakagawa – Contract Instructor in Asian Studies, University of Manitoba; Contract Instructor in Education, University of Winnipeg
    Winnie Ng – Immediate past Unifor National Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, X University
    Dr. Angie Wong – Adjunct Professor, Department of Indigenous Learning, Lakehead University
    Habiba Zaman – Professor in the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies, Simon Fraser University
    Moderator: Jamie Liew – Director of the Institute of Feminist & Gender Studies, University of Ottawa

    1:00 p.m. EST | Interview: Personal Journeys of Racialized Leaders in Higher Education
    Speaker: Santa Ono – President and Vice-Chancellor, The University of British Columbia
    Host: Mary Ito, Broadcast Journalist

    1:30 p.m. EST | Plenary Panel #4: Coalition Building: Dismantling Systems of Oppression to Build Solidarity
    Panelists:
    Jasmeet Bahia – PhD Student, Carleton University
    Anny Chen – Lead Coordinator, Community Engaged Learning, University of Manitoba
    Dr. Delia Douglas – Anti-Racism Practice Lead, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba
    Pamela Palmater – Professor and Chair in Indigenous Governance
    Vinita Srivastava – Journalist, educator and media innovator
    Moderator: Sanjay Ruparelia – Associate Professor of Politics and Jarislowsky Democracy Chair, Ryerson University

    3:00 p.m. EST | Plenary Panel #5: Racialized Representation in Student Governance and Leadership
    Panelists:
    Molly Burke – Third- year student, Sociology program, St. Francis Xavier University
    Deborah Lim – Law student at the Lincoln Alexander School of Law & Vice President, Social and External Affairs of the Lincoln Alexander Law Students’ Society, X University
    Alex Rana – 3rd year Student, University of Manitoba
    Moderator: Natasha Chawdhry – MA Candidate, Political Science, York University

    4:50 p.m. EST | Plenary Panel #6: In Conversation: University Provosts on the Issues of Accountability and Racism in Universities
    Panelists:
    Sun Woo Baik – Alumnus, Simon Fraser University (SFU)
    Minelle Mahtani – Associate Professor at the Institute for Social Justice; Brenda and David McLean Chair in Canadian Studies, UBC
    Gaaya Srimarthandan – Third Year Undergraduate Student, X University
    Verna St Denis – Professor, Educational Foundations, University of Saskatchewan
    Pamela Sugiman – Dean of the Faculty of Arts; Executive Lead, National Forum on Anti-Asian Racism, Ryerson University

    6:05 p.m. EST | Special Performance: Adrian Sutherland

    7:00 p.m. EST | Closing Remarks and Refelctions

    Sponsors

    Ryerson University (renaming in process)

    University of British Columbia

    University of Manitoba

    Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations

    Shiseido

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 10th – Friday, November 19th Reel Asian Screening: S-Express: Myanmar

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 10, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 11, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 12, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 13, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 14, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 15, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 16, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 17, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 18, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 19, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Asian Institute x Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    FREE Screening Dates: November 10-19, 2021

    Myanmar | 66 min | Burmese with English subtitles | Drama, Experimental, Women Filmmakers

    Guest-programmed by Thaiddhi in partnership with the Minikino S-Express Short Film Program Exchange, this collection of short films showcases young and new voices of independent filmmakers from Myanmar amid the sociopolitical changes of the country.

    This collection includes ‘Late Summer Day’ by Nay Wunn Ni, ‘Burn Boys’ by Kaung Myat Thu Kyaw, ‘The Cockroach Thu’ by Sxar Kiss, and ‘Age of Youth’ by Myo Thar Khin.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 10th – Friday, November 19th Reel Asian Screening: Waikiki

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 10, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 11, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 12, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 13, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 14, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 15, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 16, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 17, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 18, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 19, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Asian Institute x Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Screening Dates: November 10-19, 2021

    USA | 2020 | 77 min | English, Hawaiian with English Subtitles | International Premiere | Drama

    PART OF THE CENTREPIECE SPOTLIGHT ON HAWAI’I

    Kea can’t make ends meet, even while working as a luau dancer, karaoke-bar hostess, and elementary school Hawaiian-language teacher. After a violent altercation with her boyfriend, Kea accidentally hits a homeless man with her car. Not wanting to involve the authorities, she decides to take care of the mysterious man herself. But while she continues to struggle with her own financial hardship and difficulty finding housing, Kea’s downward spiral begins to reveal a deeply rooted trauma from her past. As her life careens out of control, so too does her grasp on the world around her.

    Christopher Kahunahana’s captivating storytelling ventures beyond the world-famous titular tourist destination and strikes an aesthetic that is perhaps unfamiliar to those with cursory knowledge of idyllic Hawaii. Kahunahana’s juxtaposition of the latter against the cold concrete of looming and perpetual urban development casts a critical look at the gentrified waste of ecological decay, systemic poverty, and the enduring legacy of U.S. colonization, which haunts the faces and spaces of Kahunahana’s film. Waikiki is a critical contribution to the growing body of Native Hawaiian cinema. – Kevin Lim

    Director Bio:
    Christopher Kahunahana is a Sundance Institute Native Lab and Feature Film Program Alumni. As the founder of 4th World Film, he’s written and directed LĀHAINĀ NOON and directed a short documentary for the Smithsonian Institute’s Asian Pacific American “A Day in the Life” project.

    Recognitions
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Hawai’I International Film Festival, 2020
    Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, 2020
    Seattle International Film Festival, 2021

    AWARDS
    Best Hawai’I Feature Film, Hawai’I International Film Festival, 2020
    Best Feature and Best Cinematography, Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, 2020

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 10th – Friday, November 19th Reel Asian Screening: The Blind Rabbit

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 10, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 11, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 12, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 13, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 14, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 15, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 16, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 17, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 18, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 19, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Asian Institute x Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    ‘The Blind Rabbit’ by Pallavi Paul
    FREE Screening Dates: November 10-19, 2021

    India | 2020 | 43 min | Hindi, English with English subtitles | North American Premiere | Documentary, Experimental, Women Filmmakers

    A mysterious tiger walks through the forest, barely revealing itself, save for a few rare and magical glimpses. This allegorical fiction begins Pallavi Paul’s description of systemic police violence in Delhi, India, based on events suppressed from official history. Using scattered but historically significant fragments of documentation, including video and audio eyewitness accounts, Paul explores the intersections of power, gender, and the narrativization of memory. The film moves across moments like the national emergency of 1975–77, and the anti-Sikh pogrom of 1984, all while remaining contemporary by alluding to recent police brutality across university campuses.

    Creating a narrative from the memories and stories of collective power, resistance, and violence, Paul arrives at a coherent study of an abuse of power that is situated in Delhi, but that is easily recognizable almost anywhere in the world. – Mariam Zaidi

    Recognitions:
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    2021 International Film Festival Rotterdam
    2021 Sheffield DocFest

    Director Bio:

    Video artist and film researcher Pallavi Paul works with video, installations, and performance. She started her scientific career with a study of literary science, and has now completed her PhD in film studies in New Delhi. Paul’s work has been shown at, among others, the Tate Modern in London, Contour Biennale in Mechelen, Belgium, and the Mumbai Film Festival.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 10th – Friday, November 19th Reel Asian Screening: Manzanar, Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 10, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 11, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 12, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Saturday, November 13, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Sunday, November 14, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Monday, November 15, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Tuesday, November 16, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Wednesday, November 17, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Thursday, November 18, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    Friday, November 19, 202110:00AM - 11:30PMExternal Event, External Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Asian Institute x Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    USA | 2021 | 84 min | English | Canadian Premiere | Documentary, Women Filmmakers

    FREE Screening Dates: November 10-19, 2021

    About four hours from Los Angeles, on the dusty valley floor beneath the snow-capped Sierra mountains, lies a single white obelisk gravestone, one of the iconic remains of the notorious Manzanar camp for Japanese Americans during World War II. But the valley wasn’t always so. Payahuunadü, or “the land of flowing water,” Owens Valley is the home of the Nüümü (Paiute) and Newe (Shoshone) people who, years earlier, were forced from their land after ranchers and farmers claimed it, while the Los Angeles water department later drained the valley dry, diverting its water to the thirsty city.

    Ann Kaneko’s Manzanar, Diverted invokes this history to tell the story of generations of women: Native American, Japanese American WWII incarcerees, and environmentalists, fighting for the future of the valley. Through a mix of testimonials, archival, and aerial photography, Kaneko weaves intersectional histories with the urgency of the present. – Aram Siu Wai Collier

    Recognitions:
    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, 2021
    DOXA Documentary Film Festival, 2021
    CAAMFest, 2021

    Director Bio:

    Ann Kaneko is known for her personal films that weave her intimate aesthetic with the complex intricacies of political reality. Her work has screened internationally and been broadcast on PBS Independent Lens and NewsHour. Her wig-shop musical 100% Human Hair played Reel Asian in 2002.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 10th Development Charges and Housing Affordability: A False Dichotomy?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 10, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Over the past 30 years, Ontario’s municipalities have relied on development charges to recover growth-related capital costs. At the same time, critics have argued that development charges increase the price of housing, and therefore work against efforts to make housing in the province more affordable.

    On November 10, Adam Found will review the findings from his forthcoming paper for IMFG, which examines the connection between municipal development charges and housing affordability. By considering the effects of development charges on not only housing prices but also on property tax rates and municipal services, Found will argue that properly designed development charges in fact improve housing affordability.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Adam Found
    Speaker
    Adam Found has published several peer-reviewed and policy papers on topics such as property taxation, development charges, tax increment financing, and municipal governance. He is Manager of Corporate Assets at the City of Kawartha Lakes.

    Enid Slack
    Moderator
    Enid Slack is the Director of the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 11th MGA attends MIA/ (Hertie School) / MGA (MUNK) Dual Degree Student Panel Q & A

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 11, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Meet current students in the MIA/MGA dual degree with the Munk School of Global Affairs.

    Thinking of applying to our dual degree with the Munk School? Meet current students in the programme and ask them your questions on Thursday, 11 November, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm CET/11:00 am to 12:00 pm EST!

    Students begin their studies in Berlin and follow the Hertie School’s first-year Master of International Affairs curriculum, choosing a specialisation in international security, European governance, or human rights and global governance. For their second year, students pursue the Master of Global Affairs at the Munk School in Toronto.

    Join us for this info session to get more details on this exciting programme and how you can take part!


    Speakers

    Ishraq Fazal
    MIA (Hertie) / MGA (Munk, U of T) Dual Degree 2nd year Student University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 11th Is A Just Code Possible? Innovation in Information and Algorithmic Systems over Two Hundred Years

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 11, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Today the power of algorithms to shape our lives is undeniable. The contests are about how fair, just, equitable, and socially useful these information-based decision systems are. They raise issues of power, both in the economic sense of control of markets and in the more political sense of who gets to decide the code and what it is used for. But the issues, and the systems, are deeply embedded in the history of capitalism, and have been developing and proliferating for nearly two centuries.

    Join us as Ken Lipartito looks at the earliest examples of such systems, for mediating credit and financial relationships, starting with their origins in the nineteenth century and tracing their development into modern credit assessment surveillance platforms. Over that time most of the same issues that today surround information and decision-making systems arose, were debated, and were decided, in ways that have continued to shape practice down to the present.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Kenneth Lipartito
    Speaker
    Fellow, Innovation, Equity, & The Future of Prosperity at CIFAR and Professor, Steven J. Green School of International & Public Affairs at Florida International University

    David Wolfe
    Moderator
    Co-Director, Innovation Policy Lab at Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Professor, Political Science at University of Toronto Mississauga



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 11th Plumbing the Depths: The Moscow Canal as Cultural Icon & Atypical Gulag Site

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 11, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    This presentation will trace the history of the construction of the Moscow Canal by forced labor. Building on this foundation we will then explore the myriad cultural products and programs that were produced and implemented during the waterway’s construction by the very same “canal soldiers” who were building the canal. These cultural elements emanated from a desire to spatially inscribe, showcase, and glorify Stalinist ideology through a major Gulag construction project, the likes of which was never seen before. Arguably this impulse continues to infuse and affect the project’s legacy as succeeding generations of its observers and users attempt to reconcile the Moscow Canal’s deathly past with its evolving future.

    Cynthia Ruder is Professor of Russian Studies at the University of Kentucky where she teaches Russian language, literature, and culture. Her first book Making History for Stalin: The Story of the Belomor Canal explored the construction of this waterway with special attention paid to the concomitant volume published to celebrate it The History of the Construction of the Stalin White-Sea Baltic Canal. Her most recent book Building Stalinism: The Moscow Canal and the Creation of Soviet Space unravels the nexus of gulag-culture-memory by examining the spaces and places they occupied within the context of a Gulag construction project and contemporary Moscow. In her current project she hopes to translate and annotate booklets in the Library of Reforging series authored and produced in the Dmitlag camp that constructed the Moscow Canal to give voice to those gulag inmates from whom little is often heard.


    Speakers

    Cynthia Ruder
    Speaker
    Professor, University of Kentucky

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 12th Tea Circle hosts "The Future of Federalism and Political Decentralization in Myanmar"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 12, 20219:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    * Tea Circle is a Burma/Myanmar blog founded in 2015 and housed at the Asian Institute since 2018

    A panel discussion moderated by Htet Min Lwin (York University)

    The military coup in Myanmar prompted a quick shift by major ethnic Burman political actors—including the National Unity Government (NUG)—to adopt language of a “federal democracy” and commit to meaningful federal reform. While political uncertainty and repressive military rule persist, conversations continue about what political changes are necessary to enact meaningful decentralization, but also what complementary processes are needed within Myanmar society to counteract decades of entrenched discrimination and inequality.

    Panelists:
    David Thang Moe (Asbury Theological Seminary)
    Naw May Oo Mutraw (Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, University of San Diego)
    Dr Sai Thet Naing Oo (Pyidaungsu Institute)

    This event is supported by a grant from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) of Canada


    Speakers

    David Thang Moe
    Panelist
    Asbury Theological Seminary

    Naw May Oo Mutraw
    Panelist
    Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice, University of San Diego

    Dr Sai Thet Naing Oo
    Panelist
    Pyidaungsu Institute

    Htet Min Lwin
    Moderator
    York University


    Sponsors

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC)

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 12th MGA/MBA Combined program Admissions Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 12, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    MGA/MGA Admissions Information Session

    Come join us and learn about this incredible combined program with the Master of Global Affairs at U of T and the Master of Business Administration with the Rotman School of Management.

    Connect with our representatives and get all of your questions answered today!


    Speakers

    Rejeanne Puran
    Recruitment and Admissions Officer Master of Global Affairs University of Toronto, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Richard Feliciano
    Assistant Director Recruitment & Admissions, Full-Time MBA Rotman School of Management



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 15th From Science to Entrepreneurship

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 15, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    There is a plethora of research on university commercialization and technology transfer. However, there is less of a discussion on the skillset and technical capabilities that allow a scientist to become an entrepreneur. In this webinar we will focus on these skills and programs that induce entrepreneurship. Moving from the scientist’s lab, to entrepreneurship courses, to forming a startup, to growing the firm within an incubator or accelerator.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Innovation Policy Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto and 4POINT0 Partnership for the Organisation of Innovation and New Technologies.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Fabiano Armellini
    Speaker
    Associate Professor Department of Mathematics and Industrial Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal

    Shiri M. Breznitz
    Speaker
    Director, Master of Global Affairs Program; Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Elicia Maine
    Speaker
    W.J. VanDusen Professor of Innovation & Entrepreneurship; Academic Director, Invention to Innovation (i2I); Special Advisor on Innovation to the VPRI, Simon Fraser University

    Sophie Veilleux
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Management of the Faculty of Business Administration at Université Laval

    Sarah Lubik
    Moderator
    Director of Entrepreneurship; Co-Champion, Technology Entrepreneurship@SFU Lecturer, Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 15th Material Culture Wars: Lessons from Italy

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 15, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    More than seven decades after the collapse of Mussolini’s regime, the physical and iconographic traces of Italian Fascism – monuments, buildings, inscriptions, artworks – remain a lightning-rod of controversy. In this talk, historian Joshua Arthurs considers the central role played by Fascist material culture in contemporary debates over the future of Italian democracy and national identity, race and immigration, and memory and modernity. He also considers the implications of Italian debates for current memory politics in Canada and around the globe.

    Joshua Arthurs is an Associate Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto-Scarborough, specializing in the cultural, social, and intellectual history of modern Italy and Europe. His interests include fascism and the far right; the politics of memory, monuments and museums; ideologies of race, empire, and the classical tradition; and everyday life in wartime and dictatorship. He is the author of Excavating Modernity: The Roman Past in Fascist Italy (Cornell University Press, 2012) and co-editor of Outside the State? The Politics of Everyday Life in Fascist Italy (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017). His current book project, Forty-Five Days: Emotion, Experience and Memory after Mussolini, under contract with Oxford University Press, examines popular responses to the collapse of the Fascist regime in 1943. He has also written extensively on the afterlives of Fascist monuments in contemporary Italy and contested heritage in a global context.


    Speakers

    Joshua Arthurs
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, UTSC

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Professor, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 15th Centrepiece Spotlight on Hawai’i: Live Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 15, 20217:00PM - 8:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Series

    Asian Institute x Reel Asian

    Description

    Since the advent of cinema and the forced colonization of the islands, Hawai’i stories on film have too often been told by outsiders. Reel Asian is bringing a spotlight onto two acclaimed Hawai’i-made dramatic feature films. Christopher Kahunahana’s award winning WAIKIKI is the first dramatic feature film written and directed by a Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian). Christopher Makoto Yogi’s I WAS A SIMPLE MAN had its World Premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2021. Unique films and filmmakers, both Kahunahana and Yogi share a genuine reverence for their home and seek to provide images and sounds of the Hawaii they know.

    In this moderated filmmaker to filmmaker conversation Kahunahana and Yogi will discuss each others films and the groundbreaking context that surrounds them.


    Speakers

    Christopher Kahunahana
    Filmmaker

    Christopher Makoto Yogi
    Filmmaker


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 16th In Conversation: COP26 in Glasgow: What happened, what it means, and what was missed

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 16, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Description: Amid intensifying extreme weather events linked to climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the publication of a bombshell UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report in August 2021, there are growing calls from NGOs, activists for climate justice. Postponed for one year due to the pandemic, the stakes will be high at COP26 to achieve concrete and robust outcomes, including updated emission reduction commitments, implementation rules for the Paris Agreement, and development financing.

    Join the Environmental Governance Lab for a conversation with Dr. Jennifer Allan, Amalie Wilkinson, Kimberly R. Marion Suiseeya and Raul Salas Reyes to discuss what happened in Glasgow, what was missed in media coverage of the events, the significance of COP26 for Canada, and where global climate governance will go from here.

    Speakers:
    Dr. Jennifer Allan is a lecturer at Cardiff University and Strategic Adviser and Team Leader with Earth Negotiations Bulletin

    Dr. Allan’s research explores environmental and social movements, and how global rules are made and remade. Her publications engage with a wide range of environmental issues, including climate change, biodiversity, forest protection, and chemical and wastes management. Through contributing to the Earth Negotiations Bulletin – the de facto record of global environmental negotiations— she has attended roughly 40 UN conferences where states negotiate the rules of global environmental rules and has published over 100 Bulletins with her ENB colleagues. She also edits a yearly round of up the State of Global Environmental Governance for ENB.

    Amalie Wilkinson
    Amalie Wilkinson is a dedicated climate justice advocate and a second-year undergraduate student at the University of Toronto, where she double-majors in International Relations and Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies. She leads the Toronto chapter of Stop Ecocide Canada, an organization dedicated to the criminalization of Ecocide at the International Criminal Court, as a deterrent and accountability mechanism for environmental destruction.

    Amalie has long been a strong social justice advocate, leading U of T’s Hart House High Schools Women and Gender Minorities Debate Tournament in 2021, speaking on issues of climate and gender justice as her high school’s valedictorian, and more. During the summer of 2021, Amalie worked as a Research and Advocacy Intern at World Without Genocide, a human rights organization based out of St Paul, Minnesota. Her research focused on underrepresented genocides, climate change as a threat multiplier, and the proposal to criminalize ecocide. This year, she is a member of Professor Donald Kingsbury’s Research Opportunities Program team at U of T, focusing on the emerging Lithium extraction industry as a key component in the clean energy transition.

    Kimberly R. Marion Suiseeya
    Kimberly R. Marion Suiseeya is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Environmental Policy and Culture program at Northwestern University. Trained as an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist, Suiseeya’s research examines complex questions around how the politics of justice and representation in different approaches to addressing global environmental challenges are negotiated and experienced from global to local scales, with particular attention to Indigenous Peoples and environmental justice communities. She co-leads the Presence to Influence project that examines how Indigenous Peoples influence international climate change and biodiversity policies and the Disproportionate Impacts of Environmental Change working group that is co-developing transdisciplinary resilience research initiatives with tribal Nations and Indigenous communities in the US and Southeast Asia. Suiseeya is Faculty Affiliate with the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research, the Center for the Study of Diversity and Democracy, the Institute for Policy Research, and the Northwestern-Argonne Institute for Science and Engineering.

    Raul Salas Reyes
    Raul is a senior PhD candidate in the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences at UTSC and is currently researching the evolution of the differential treatment norm in the climate regime, which is embedded within the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities (CBDR). Raúl has been working in climate governance and transparency issues for more than a decade where he has assisted developing and developed countries in meeting their obligations under the UNFCCC.

    Moderator:
    Dr. Matthew Hoffmann, Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab

    Matthew Hoffmann is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto and co-director of the Environmental Governance Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. He is also co-editor of the flagship journal Global Environmental Politics, a lead faculty member in the Earth Systems Governance network, and an Honorary Professor at Australia National University. His research on climate change and environmental politics has been published in 4 books and over 50 journal articles and book chapters. Professor Hoffmann is also the chair of the board of directors for the environmental NGO, Green Economy Canada.


    Speakers

    Raul Salas Reyes
    Speaker
    Senior PhD candidate in the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences at UTSC

    Dr. Jennifer Allan
    Speaker
    Lecturer at Cardiff University and Strategic Adviser and Team Leader with Earth Negotiations Bulletin

    Amalie Wilkinson
    Speaker
    Climate justice advocate and a second-year undergraduate student at the University of Toronto

    Dr. Matthew Hoffmann
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, Co-Director of the Environmental Governance Lab

    Kimberly R. Marion Suiseeya
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Environmental Policy and Culture program at Northwestern University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 16th Between the Streets and the Assembly: Social Movements, Political Parties, and Democracy in South Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 16, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Notable U of T Faculty

    Description

    Abstract:
    In this talk, I present the core findings and arguments of my upcoming book, Between the Streets and the Assembly: Social Movements, Political Parties, and Democracy in South Korea (University of Hawaii Press 2022). This research traces how Korean citizens have become “participatory democrats” who experience greater political efficacy when they engage in direct action than in institutional politics. In comparing the coordinating capacity of three groups of democracy activists between 1987-2017 – i.e., activists in social movement organizations (SMOs), activists turned politicians in centrist parties, and activists-cum-politicians in progressive parties – I center my explanation on the concept of national solidarity infrastructure. I maintain that activists in Korean SMOs, compared to their counterparts in formal party politics, have developed a remarkable infrastructure to address a broad spectrum of national public policy areas, to organize nationwide popular demonstrations, and thus to nurture the political dynamics of participatory democrats. These findings not only suggest a rethinking of the interconnection between and mutual constitution of social movements and political parties, but further revise the definitional characteristics of social movement actors when the scholarship has conventionally approached SMOs as focused on a narrow scope of social issues or as provisional organizations compared to political parties and institutional politics.

    Speaker’s Bio:
    Yoonkyung Lee is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism with a regional focus on East Asia. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011), Between the Streets and the Assembly: Social Movements, Political Parties, and Democracy in South Korea (University of Hawaii Press 2022), and numerous journal articles that appeared in Politics and Society, Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies. She regularly teaches courses on Theories of Social Movements (graduate), Research Practicum (graduate), Comparative Political Sociology (undergraduate), Social Movements (undergraduate), and Transnational Asia (undergraduate).

    Discussant’s Bio:
    Joan Cho is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and Government at Wesleyan University. Authoritarianism, democratization, social movements, and authoritarian legacies in Korea and East Asia are her primary research and teaching focus. She is also a non-resident adjunct fellow at CSIS Korea Chair and an associate-in-research of the Council of East Asian Studies at Yale University. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the Department of Government at Harvard University in 2016.


    Speakers

    Joan Cho
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and Government, Wesleyan University

    Takashi Fujitani
    Moderator
    Professor of History and Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Speaker
    Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology; Director of the Centre for the Study of Korea, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 17th Down With Feudalism, Long Live the People: Challenging the Monarchy in Thailand

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 17, 202110:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Beginning in July 2020, youth-led protests filled the streets of Bangkok and other cities in Thailand. Fed up with the remnants of dictatorship that lingered despite the elections in March 2019, the protestors made three demands: 1) The current prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, who first came to power in the May 2014 coup, must resign and a new election held; 2) The 2017 Constitution, drafted by a junta-appointed body, must be revised; and 3) The institution of the monarchy must be reformed. The third demand is both what has made the protests potentially socially and politically transformative – and has caused the state to respond with repression. Since November 2020, at least 155 people, including many secondary school and university students, have been accused of lèse majesté, or insulting, defaming or threating the king, queen, heir-apparent or regent, a crime that carries a sentence of up to 15 years imprisonment per count. This talk examines the courageous dissent of activists and the repression they now face.

    Bio:
    Tyrell Haberkorn is Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin. Tyrell researches and writes about state violence and dissident cultural politics in Thailand from the end of the absolute monarchy in 1932 until the present. She is the author of Revolution Interrupted: Farmers, Students, Law and Violence (2011) and In Plain Sight: Impunity and Human Rights in Thailand (2018). She is currently writing a first draft of an indictment of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), the military junta that took power in the 22 May 2014 coup, and translating Prontip Mankhong’s prison memoir, All They Could Do To Us [มันทำร้ายเราได้แค่นี้แหละ]. Tyrell also writes and translates frequently about Southeast Asia for a public audience, including Dissent, Foreign Affairs, Mekong Review, Los Angeles Review of Books, openDemocracy, and Prachatai.


    Speakers

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Speaker
    Professor of Southeast Asian Studies, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Christal Cheng
    Moderator
    President of the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU), University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 17th Nationalist Extremism in North America: The Current Threat Landscape

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 17, 202111:45AM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Nationalism and extremism pose mounting challenges around the world, including in North America. This web-based panel discussion will be the second in a tri-national series organized as part of the 2021-22 North American Colloquium by the Autonomous National University of Mexico, University of Toronto, and University of Michigan.

    The first session examined the historical drivers of nationalist extremism in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. This second session will discuss the current landscape of threats posed by extreme forms of nationalism in each of the three countries. How and why are these ideas spreading? What are the key groups propagating extreme nationalist ideology, and what near-term security challenges do they present?


    Speakers

    Dr. Stephanie Carvin
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of International Relations, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University

    Dr. Leonardo Curzio Guttierez
    Speaker
    Professor, Center for Research on North America (CISAN) Strategic Studies Area at the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM)

    Dr. Cynthia Miller-Idriss
    Speaker
    Professor, School of Public Affairs and School of Education, and Director, Polarization and Extremism Research & Innovation Lab (PERIL) in the Center for University Excellence (CUE) at American University

    John D. Ciorciari
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Public Policy; Director, International Policy Center and Weiser Diplomacy Center, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

    Javed Ali
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Practice, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 17th Changing Global Health Governance and Japan’s Role

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 17, 20217:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a public health emergency but a more complex phenomenon closely linked to various social factors. Its remarkable feature is that, unlike other recent outbreaks such as Ebola and MERS, it spread worldwide simultaneously, and almost all countries have been scrambling for access to vaccines, medical equipment, and medicines. As a result, the gap between the haves and the have-nots is increasing. It is estimated that by the end of 2021, rich countries will have 1.2 billion surplus vaccine doses, whereas only around 3% of Africa’s population is fully vaccinated at present. Under such circumstances, most countries have realized how unreliable the global health governance system is, especially during a crisis, and they are attempting to strengthen their preparedness and response capacity at the national and regional levels. In this regard, both the European Union and African Union have strengthened their regional health cooperative system, and the Quad (Quadrilateral Security Dialogue)—comprising Australia, India, Japan, and the U.S.—has announced its own vaccine partnership. This, however, gives rise to the possibility that the post-COVID-19 global health governance system will be more fragile and lack of leadership.

    The ongoing pandemic is not going to be the last, and we should prepare for the future based on the lessons learned from it. How can we achieve efficient global health governance, and what role is Japan expected to play? Or, is it possible for the World Health Organization to regain its leadership position? This speech will examine the problems plaguing the current global health governance and propose some solutions.

    Speaker Bios:
    Dr. Kayo Takuma is a professor of international politics at the Faculty of Law and Politics, Tokyo Metropolitan University. Her research interest is global health governance’s origin, evolution, and challenges, with a focus on its relationship with the changing international political order. In this regard, she has been engaged in several projects such as a comparative study on G7 countries’ contribution to the implementation of the International Health Regulations and health cooperation in Asia. Her recent publications are as follows: Kayo Takuma, ‘Global Solidarity is Necessary to End the COVID-19 Pandemic’, Asia Pacific Review, 27-2 (2020), pp.46-56; Kayo Takuma, ‘Current Status and Issues Surrounding the COVID-19 Vaccine: The Expected Role of Japan’, Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA, Japan Looking Ahead Series, April 2021; Kayo Takuma, Jinrui to Yamai: Kokusai Seiji Kara Miru Kansen Sho to Kenko Kakusa [Mankind and Diseases: Infectious Diseases and Health Inequality in International Politics], Chuokoron Shinsha, 2020 (in Japanese).

    Tana Johnson is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research, which examines the operations and design of international institutions, has been published in top outlets such as International Organization and Journal of Politics, Her book Organizational Progeny: Why Governments are Losing Control over the Proliferating Structures of Global Governance (https://www.organizationalprogeny.com/) won the Alger Prize from the International Studies Association. Johnson has received fellowships from Princeton University, Vanderbilt University, and the Global Governance Futures (GGF) program. Prior to joining the UW-Madison faculty, she was an Associate Professor at Duke University.

    Yves Tiberghien (Ph.D. Stanford University, 2002; Harvard Academy Scholar 2006; Fulbright Scholar 1996) is a Professor of Political Science and Konwakai Chair in Japanese Research at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada. He is also Director Emeritus of the Institute of Asian Research, and Director of the Center for Japanese Research.
    Yves is Distinguished Fellow at the Asia-Pacific Foundation of Canada and a Senior Fellow at the University of Alberta’s China Institute. He is an International Steering Committee Member at Pacific Trade and Development Conference (PAFTAD). In November 2017, he was made a Chevalier de l’ordre national du mérite by the French President.
    In 2014-2016, Yves served as Co-Director of the UBC Master of Public Policy and Global Affairs (MPPGA), which he founded as Chair of the UBC Public Policy Curriculum Committee in 2014.
    He is a regular visiting professor at Tokyo University (Graduate School of Public Policy) and at Sciences Po Paris (Paris School of International Affairs). He has held other visiting positions at National Chengchi University (Taiwan), GRIPS (Tokyo), and the Jakarta School of Public Policy (Indonesia).
    Yves’ research specializes in comparative political economy and global economic and environmental governance, with an empirical focus on Japan, China, Korea, and Europe.
    His books include The East Asian Covid-19 Paradox. August 2021. Elements in Politics and Society in East Asia, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108973533, Entrepreneurial States: Reforming Corporate Governance in France, Japan, and Korea (2007, Cornell University Press); L’Asie et le futur du monde (2012, Paris: Science Po Press); and Leadership in Global Institution-Building: Minerva’s Rule (2013, edited volume, Palgrave McMillan). In 2020, he edited an online collection of papers on Japan’s leadership in the Liberal International Order. He has published articles and book chapters on the political economy of Japan and China, global governance, global climate change politics, and the governance of agricultural biotechnology.
    He is working on two books: Up for Grabs: Disruption, Competition, and the Remaking of the Global Economic Order and Navigating the Age of Disruption: Understanding Canada’s Options in a Shifting Global Order.
    Dr. Tiberghien co-founded the Vision 20 initiative in 2015, a new coalition of global scholars and policy-makers aiming at providing a long-term perspective on the challenges of global economic and environmental governance. The V20 held six summits (Hangzhou, 2016, Buenos Aires 2018, Tokyo 2018, and Washington DC, 2017, 2018, 2019.

    Phillip Y. Lipscy is associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto. He is also Chair in Japanese Politics and Global Affairs and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. His research addresses substantive topics such as international cooperation, international organizations, the politics of energy and climate change, international relations of East Asia, and the politics of financial crises. He has also published extensively on Japanese politics and foreign policy. Lipscy’s book from Cambridge University Press, Renegotiating the World Order: Institutional Change in International Relations, examines how countries seek greater international influence by reforming or creating international organizations.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Kayo Takuma
    Speaker
    Professor, Faculty of Law and Politics, Tokyo Metropolitan University

    Tana Johnson
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Public Affairs and Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Yves Tiberghien
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science; Konwakai Chair in Japanese Research, University of British Columbia; Director Emeritus, Institute of Asian Research; Director, Center for Japanese Research

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    SASAYAMA Takuya
    Opening Remarks
    Consul-General of Japan in Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 18th Divided By the Wall: Progressive and Conservative Immigration Politics at the U.S.-Mexico Border

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 18, 20214:10PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    Why is immigration a controversial topic in the United States? Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork spanning 2010 to 2016, I begin to answer this question by examining the motivations and life histories of Americans who are active in politically-opposed volunteer organizations in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. By focusing on activists who, because of the privileges of whiteness and U.S. citizenship, are not directly impacted by immigration policy, I consider why they nevertheless feel strongly enough to engage in this political struggle. I find that division around immigration is rooted in deep phenomena: the long-standing trend of growing economic inequality, racialized anxiety in the post-civil rights era, and ultimately, the search for personal reconciliation. Although Trump amplified these dynamics, he did not create them and they will not disappear in the wake of his presidency. I conclude by discussing how my findings may explain, in part, why immigration is such a polarizing issue and how addressing the underlying problems of social inequality may help mitigate the current contentiousness of immigration and border policy in the United States.


    Speakers

    Emine Fidan Elcioglu
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 19th Orality, Literacy, and Agency in Buddhist Book Worship

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 19, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This colloquium opens a dialogue on themes related to the Buddhist practice of book worship. It centres around themes of orality, literacy, the agency of objects, and manuscripts in South Asia. In its relation to Buddhist book worship, it aims to consider to what extent Mahāyāna Buddhist book worship is in any way unique. In this manner, it considers connections with Theravāda textual practices, as well as non-Buddhist practices from South Asia involving the Śaiva Āgamas, Pāñcarātra Śāstrapīṭha worship, and the purāṇas.

    Alexander James O’Neill is a PhD Candidate at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for South Asian Studies. His research focuses on Newar Buddhism of the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, and Mahāyāna Buddhist texts and rituals. His research interests include paratexts, book worship, ritual studies, and agency. He is set to defend his thesis, entitled Pustaka Pūjā: A Study of Sūtra Worship in Mahāyāna Buddhism, at the end of November.


    Speakers

    Srilata Raman
    Commentator
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Alexander James O’Neill
    Speaker
    PhD Candidate at the Department for the Study of Religion and the Centre for South Asian Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 22nd What Worries the World?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 22, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    For the past 18 months, the coronavirus pandemic has been the top concern for people around the world. As pandemic concerns begin to lessen, the attention of global citizens is turning to issues of poverty and social inequality, unemployment, financial and political corruption, crime and justice, and climate change. In this second event in the Munk School / IPSOS / CEVIPOF-Sciences Po, Global Advisory Data Series, panellists will discuss the top global concerns for citizens around the world. IPSOS CEO, Public Affairs Darrell Bricker will provide new data from IPSOS’ Disruption Barometer and What Worries the World survey and discuss citizens’ views with Professors Peter Loewen and Martial Foucault, with an emphasis on perspectives in Canada and France.


    Speakers

    Darrell Bricker
    CEO, Ipsos Public Affairs and Senior Fellow, Munk School

    Martial Foucault
    Professor and Director, CEVIPOF-Sciences Po, Paris

    Peter Loewen
    Professor and Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 22nd President of Kosovo H.E. Dr. Vjosa Osmani: New Directions for Kosovo

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 22, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for a special event with H.E. Dr. Vjosa Osmani, President of Kosovo.

    Vjosa Osmani-Sadriu was born on May 17, 1982 in Mitrovica, Republic of Kosovo. She finished elementary and high school in Mitrovica. She graduated from the Faculty of Law at the University of Prishtina, while she completed her Master and Doctoral studies at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, USA. She was elected a member of the Assembly of the Republic of Kosovo in five terms. In the last elections she was a candidate for President.

    In previous terms, she chaired the Parliamentary Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on European Integration and was the Deputy Chair of the Committee on Constitutional Reform.

    On February 3, 2020, Vjosa Osmani was elected the first female Speaker of the Assembly of the Republic of Kosovo. On November 5, 2020, Vjosa Osmani became Acting President of the Republic of Kosovo, offices she held until March 22, 2021.

    During 2006-2010, Vjosa Osmani served as Chief of Staff of President Sejdiu and Senior Advisor on Legal Affairs and International Relations. She has represented the President in the Commission for the drafting of the Constitution of the Republic of Kosovo. She was a member of the representative team of the Republic of Kosovo in the case before the International Court of Justice regarding the declaration of the independence of Kosovo.

    Since 2006 she has been lecturing at the Faculty of Law of the University of Prishtina, while she has also lectured at the University of Pittsburgh in the USA as a visiting professor. For several years she has also lectured at RIT – Kosovo (AUK), AAB – Riinvest College and has held thematic lectures at other universities in Europe and the USA.

    She has been honored by the University of Pittsburgh with the Sheth International Award. She is a member of the Board of the Parliamentary Network on the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund and a member of the Steering Committee of the young Deputies of the World Bank and the IMF.

    She speaks English, Turkish, Serbian, Croatian and communicates in Spanish. She is married to Prindon Sadriu and have two twin daughters, Anda Elisa Sadriu and Dua Tiara Sadriu. She lives in Prishtina.

    On April 4th 2021, she took office as President of the Republic of Kosovo.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    H.E. Dr. Vjosa Osmani
    Speaker
    President of Kosovo

    Robert Austin
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 22nd Suffering and Smile: Everyday Life in North Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 22, 20212:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    “Smile Broadly!” is the title of a dynamic performance by children in the Arirang Festival. The scene symbolically shows the culture that can command a smile to breathless children, and actually train them to do so. It is this cultural background that makes it possible to advance the slogan “March with a smile though the roads are rough!” to the people suffering from severe famine. To comprehend the present changes and anticipate future developments in North Korea, we should understand their past experiences and socialization processes of their values, norms, and lifestyles. During the period of famine, I visited North Korea, met North Korean refugees in China near the border, and taught refugee youths in the South. As an anthropologist, famine relief activist and educator, I would like to share my experience with North Koreans and their culture.

    Bio:
    Dr. Byung-ho Chung received his Ph.D. from Illinois in 1992 in Anthropology. He is professor emeritus at Hanyang University, South Korea, and special advisor to the president of Korean Red Cross. He was professor of the department of cultural anthropology and founded the Institute for Globalization and Multicultural Studies at Hanyang University ERICA Campus. He has been a teacher, scholar, social activist, and social reformer. While keeping one foot in the university and sustaining a career as a researcher and writer, he has extended his reach to social activism and reform. As a public intellectual and action anthropologist, he is the founder or co-founder of seven social justice organizations for equality and multiculturalism in Korea and East Asia, including Cooperative Childcare and Communitarian Education, Okedongmu Children (NGO for relief of North Korean famine), Hanadul School for North Korean Refugee Children, Rainbow Center for Migrant Youths, and Steppingstone for Peace (NGO for the Peace and Reconciliation in East Asia). He is the author or co-author of a number of works on inter-Korean affairs and multicultural issues including North Korea: Beyond Charismatic Politics, Welcome to Korea: North Koreans in South Korea, Multicultural Spaces in South Korea, and Suffering and Smile (published in Korean in 2020, translated in Japanese in 2021, and English translation in progress).

    This event is organized by Jesook Song (Anthropology, University of Toronto), Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto) and Laam Hae (Politics, York University).

    This virtual event is co-organized by the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at University of Toronto and the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean Studies.


    Speakers

    Dr. Byung-ho Chung
    Emeritus Professor, Hanyang University


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 23rd The 10th Annual IMFG Toronto City Manager’s Address

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 23, 20214:30PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    How a Prescription for Supportive Housing Can Reduce Hallway Medicine and Why Every Government and Community Should Care

    It is often said that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have created a new urgency for coordinated actions that address the root causes and systemic impacts of housing and homelessness. What we face as a city and society is clear. No single community, government or institution can tackle these challenges alone. Collaborative, sustained, effective and innovative interventions are needed – including regional coordination, application of best practices, engagement of civil society and intergovernmental investments.

    For the tenth annual IMFG City Manager Address, Chris Murray will speak to the urgency of a whole-of-community and whole-of-government approach to tackle the precursors of homelessness before the downstream consequences and costs multiply for all orders of government. Never has the whole been more important to ensuring success in tackling this issue.

    Contact

    Piali Roy


    Speakers

    Chris Murray
    Speaker
    Chris Murray was appointed the City Manager of Toronto on June 27, 2018. Prior to this, Chris was the City Manager of Hamilton for almost 10 years. He is by profession a registered city planner; by previous experience a transportation and housing director; by necessity, a relationship builder; and by passion, a public sector employee.

    Lori Spadorcia
    Moderator
    Lori Spadorcia is CAMH’s Senior Vice-President, Public Affairs and Partnerships and Chief Strategy Officer. She has led the development and implementation of an ambitious strategic plan to redefine health, placing mental health at the centre of healthcare and including social determinants as key forces in the health and wellbeing of Canadians.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 24th Policing Prostitution: Regulating the Lower Classes in Late Imperial Russia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 24, 202112:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    From the 1840s until 1917, prostitution was legally tolerated across the Russian Empire under a system known as regulation. Like other systems of regulation that were in place across the European continent and beyond, women who sold sex in the Russian Empire were required to register their details with the police, attend regular gynaecological examinations, and abide by a whole host of restrictions. The regulation system had a far-reaching impact upon the lives of various groups within urban society. Brothel madams bickered with urban residents over the visibility and audibility of prostitution in urban space. Poorly paid police agents forged advantageous financial relationships with registered prostitutes and their managers. As the Russian government became more concerned with combatting rising venereal diseases amongst the population in the early twentieth century, the bodies of certain groups of lower-class men also became objects of state intervention.

    In this talk, Siobhán Hearne will present an overview of her book Policing Prostitution: Regulating the Lower Classes in Late Imperial Russia (OUP, 2021). This book approaches the history of state regulation from the perspectives of those working, using, or encountering the commercial sex industry on a regular basis. Examining the lives, challenges, and voices of registered prostitutes, their clients, their managers, the police, and the urban communities who shared their streets with state-licenced brothels allows us to examine the rich tapestry of urban life in the final decades of the Russian Empire.

    Siobhán Hearne is a historian of gender and sexuality in the Russian Empire and Soviet Union. She received her PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2017 and is currently a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at Durham University. Her work has appeared in the journals Kritika, Journal of Social History, Revolutionary Russia, Social History, and the Journal of the History of Sexuality.


    Speakers

    Siobhán Hearne
    Speaker
    Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, School of Modern Languages and Cultures, Durham University

    Alison Smith
    Chair
    Professor and Chair, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 25th Historicizing Roma in Central Europe: Between Critical Whiteness and Epistemic Injustice

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 25, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    We look forward to our talk and would like to discuss following questions that led us to writing this book:
    How to pose the struggle against anti-Gypsism, if claims of eliminating racism seem to be unrealistic or, even more, bringing risks to historical justice for Romani people?
    What is the role of critical whiteness in shaping the agenda of desegregation for Romani people? Who are the potential agents of critical whiteness and what are the specific ways of practicing it in Central and Eastern Europe?
    Was nation-building, or more generally, the building of national identities in Central Europe a decisive factor in rooting the segregation of Romani people? What was the historical impact of Central European racially minded experts on legitimizing the segregation of Romani people?
    And why do all these questions have a continuing relationship with Czech race science, and the history of state police and medical surveillance across Central Europe?

    Victoria Shmidt brings together the issue of historical roots of segregation with the legacy of colonial and socialist policies in Central Eastern European countries. Since 2019 Victoria leads the project “Race science: Undiscovered Power of building the nations” at the University of Graz.

    Bernadette Nadya Jaworsky is associate professor of sociology at Masaryk University, Brno (Czech Republic), and Faculty Fellow at Yale University’s Center for Cultural Sociology.


    Speakers

    Victoria Shmidt
    Speaker
    Historian and Head Researcher for the project 'Race Science: Undiscovered Power of Building the Nations', University of Graz

    Bernadette Nadya Jaworsky
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Masaryk University (Brno) and Faculty Fellow, Centre for Cultural Sociology at Yale University

    Ana Petrov
    Chair
    Assistant Professor, Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 25th MGA & MPP Black Alumni and Student Panel - for Black Prospective Undergraduate Students

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 25, 20216:00PM - 7:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Inviting Black prospective undergraduate students who are interested in public policy and global affairs. Come learn about the Programs and the Admissions processes for these 2-year professional master degrees offered at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.

    This panel will consist of current and past Black students of the MGA and MPP programs! Come learn why you should consider these amazing programs and how it can help you achieve your career goals!


    Speakers

    Kaidie Williams
    Speaker
    Master of Public Policy Alumni Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Tabitha Oni
    Speaker
    Master of Global Affairs Student Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Jude Asare
    Speaker
    Master of Global Affairs/Master of Business Administration Student Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Nicola Alexis-Brooks
    Speaker
    Master of Public Policy Student Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Hilda-Matilda O. Idegwu
    Speaker
    Master of Public Policy Student Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Rejeanne Puran
    Moderator
    Recruitment & Admissions Officer Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Moyosore Arewa
    Speaker
    Master of Global Affairs Alumni Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Ruvimbo Chidziva
    Speaker
    Master of Global Affairs Alumni Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Jean-Paul St Rose
    Speaker
    Master of Public Policy Alumni Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 26th Caste and the Body as Infrastructure of Equality: Labour, Death, Force

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 26, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Pathbreakers: New Postdoctoral Research on South Asia at U of T

    Description

    Abstract:

    Taking up treatments in social thought on work as an insult to status and an assertion of dignity, the recuperation of collective standing in the recognition of individualised death, and the imagination of sovereignty derived from common culpabilities, this presentation explores how caste as a particular contextualisation of questions of equality is framed through mediation of the body as an analytical instrument. How might we understand the polemical force of B.R Ambedkar’s formulation of a “division of labourers” as description of inequality? How does the category of atrocity anchor untouchability as the reconciliation between multitudes of the dead and death as individual event? How might a poetic figuration of force frame sovereignty as collective culpability for every body harmed? Through thumbnail sketches of polemical, conceptual, and aesthetic strategies through which Dalit and other thinkers frame and engage these questions, I hope to share the sense in which these particular operationalisations of caste may be inhabited as lessons in thinking with equality as an axiom and aspiration.

    Speaker’s Bio:

    William F. Stafford, Jr. is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Visual Studies at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. He completed his PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley with a dissertation on the autorickshaw meter in Delhi as an exemplary format of “public” transactions and anchor of a variable ethos of commercial sociality. His current project takes up the autorickshaw meter-mounted panic button to explore architectures of “sequester” as a spatialising genre of governance and sociality in India. Taking the Lakshman Rekha as a technological artefact and visual rhetoric of security, his project works through political theologies and aesthetics of the individuation, identification, and fungibility of city residents in the “democratisation” of a gendered moral economy of location through the platformisation of bodily security. He has co-edited a collection of essays on topology and method in anthropology, authored essays and book reviews on political theologies of demonitisation in India and imaginaries of belonging through and beyond labour in Sri Lanka, and undertaken academic, policy, and legal research on bonded labour, forced labour, and the minimum wage in South Asia.


    Speakers

    William F. Stafford, Jr.
    Speaker
    Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Kajri Jain
    Discussant
    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Department for the Study of Religion and Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 26th 'Monster Saharan Dust Plume Heading for Europe': A Cultural History of the French Bomb, 1960-2021

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 26, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    From 1960 to 1966, after more than a century of colonial occupation in Algeria, the French military exploded multiple nuclear bombs in the region of the central Sahara: four atmospheric “tests” at Reggane, followed by another 13 underground, southeast at In Ekker. The health, environmental, political, cultural, and psychological effects of these detonations in the Sahara have continued to radiate for decades since. In this talk, Dr. Panchasi will be sharing a set of historical objects and questions from her current book project, The “French Bomb” in Culture and Empire, 1945-1962.

    Roxanne Panchasi is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in modern France and empire. She is the author of Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars (Cornell University Press, 2009). Her current research focuses on the cultural politics of French nuclear weapons and testing since 1945. Her most recent publication related to this project, “‘No Hiroshima in Africa’: The Algerian War and the Question of French Nuclear Tests in the Sahara,” appeared in the Spring 2019 issue of History of the Present.


    Speakers

    Roxanne Panchasi
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History, Simon Fraser University

    Deborah Neill
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, York University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 26th Not By Starvation Alone: Stalinist Cultural Genocide in Ukraine

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 26, 20217:30PM - 9:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Serhy Yekelchyk is Professor of History and Slavic Studies at the University of Victoria and the author of seven books on Ukrainian history and Russo- Ukrainian relations, including the award-winning Stalin’s Citizens: Everyday Politics in the Wake of Total War. Dr. Yekelchyk is president of the Canadian Association for Ukrainian Studies.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Serhy Yekelchyk
    University of Victoria


    Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 29th Organizing Within, Against, and Beyond the State: Martin Sostre and the Struggle for Prison Abolition

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 29, 20212:00PM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Historian and organizer Garrett Felber, Visiting Faculty Fellow at Yale University, will discuss abolitionist lessons from his biography-in-progress of Black Puerto Rican anarchist and former U.S. political prisoner Martin Sostre. First as a politicized prisoner and jailhouse lawyer, and later as a political prisoner who was framed during the 1967 Buffalo rebellion while running a radical bookstore, Sostre embodied the dialectical transformations between self and society which led him to lead a life of “continuous struggle.” Sostre creatively adapted law, solitary confinement, surveillance, and organized abandonment to disrupt state violence and create life-affirming communities. His ideas and deeds formed architectures of resistance within the scaffolding of an oppressive state that provide a variety of illustrations for movements organizing within, against, and beyond it today.

    Speakers:
    Garrett Felber, Yale University
    Garrett Felber received his B.A. in English from Kalamazoo College, a M.A. in African American Studies from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in American Culture from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is an interdisciplinary historian whose work focuses on 20th-century social movements, the Black radical tradition, and the carceral state. Felber’s Those Who Know Don’t Say: The Nation of Islam, the Black Freedom Movement, and the Carceral State (UNC Press, 2020) received the Merle Curti Intellectual History Award from the Organization of American Historians and was a finalist for the Museum of African American History’s Stone Book Award and the African American Intellectual History Society’s Pauli Murray Book Award. He is co-author of The Portable Malcolm X Reader (Penguin 2013) with Manning Marable and has published articles in the Journal of American History, Journal of African American History, Journal of Social History, Souls, and South African Music Studies.

    Brett Story, Ryerson University
    Brett Story is a geographer and award-winning non-fiction filmmaker. Her films have screened at True/False, Oberhausen, Hot Docs, the Viennale, and Dok Leipzig, among other international festivals. Her second feature-length film, The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (2016) was awarded the Special Jury Prize at the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival and was a nominee for Best Canadian Feature Documentary at the Canadian Screen Awards. Her interests across the fields of documentary and critical theory are expansive, and include experimental cinema and essay films, politics and aesthetics, racial capitalism and Marxist political economy, and visual geography. Brett holds a PhD in geography from the University of Toronto and is the author of a forthcoming book titled Prison Land: Mapping Carceral Power across Neoliberal America from the University of Minnesota Press. She was a 2016 Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow and is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow.

    Max Mishler, University of Toronto, History Department and the Center for the Study of the United States
    Mishler specializes in the transnational history of the United States, with a focus on slavery and abolition, incarceration, and the history of capitalism.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Garrett Felber
    Speaker
    Visiting Facutly Fellow, Yale University

    Brett Story
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Ryerson University

    Max Mishler
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, University of Toronto

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Khaleel Grant
    Panelist
    PhD Student, History Department, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 30th "Does Brexit Mean the Break-Up of the United Kingdom?" by Sir Graham Watson

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 30, 20214:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    It is now five years since the Brexit referendum and nearly two years since the UK left the EU. Former Member of the European Parliament Sir Graham Watson discusses the causes of Brexit, current developments, and future implications for the UK.

    Sir Graham Watson’s political career started with the Scottish Young Liberals, of which he was the International Officer and later Vice-Chairman. In 1997 he was elected to the Bureau of the International Federation of Liberal and Radical Youth; from 1999 to 2001 he served as its Secretary General. He was a founder member of the Liberal Youth Movement of the European Community (LYMEC) and of the European Youth Forum.

    From 1983 to 1987, Graham Watson was Head of the Private Office to UK Liberal Leader the Rt Hon Sir (now Lord) David Steel. From 1983 to 1993 he was a Council Member of the European Liberal Democrat Party and an active participant in Liberal International meetings. Elected as the first UK Liberal ever to the European Parliament in 1994, he served as Chairman of the Parliament’s Committee on Citizens Rights and Freedoms, Justice and Home Affairs from 1999 to 2002 before being elected as Leader of the ELDR (later ALDE) Group. Under his leadership it became the largest third party ever in the European Parliament. He served as Leader from 2002-09.

    In 2010 his tenth book, Building a Liberal Europe, was published by John Harper Publishing and in 2011 he was knighted in the Queen’s birthday honours list.

    Elected to the ELDR (now ALDE) Party Bureau in 2011, Sir Graham became Party President in 2012 and served until 2016, stepping down to devote his energies to the EU referendum campaign in the UK.

    During his twenty years in the European Parliament Sir Graham was particularly active in the foundation and development of the Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats and in the accession of central and eastern European countries to the EU. He is also a co-founder and former Chairman of The Climate Parliament, a global network of legislators committed to accelerating the switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources.

    Sir Graham remained active in politics at international level until January 2020, serving as a Member of the European Economic and Social Committee and taking part in activities of the ALDE Party and the Liberal International. He is currently Distinguished Visiting Fellow 2020-22 at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and is researching to write a biography of Lord Russell-Johnston for Birlinn Books.


    Speakers

    Sir Graham Watson
    Distinguished Visiting Fellow, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2021

  • Wednesday, December 1st Book Launch: 'Warring Visions: Photography and Vietnam'

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 1, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Notable U of T Faculty

    Description

    In Warring Visions, Thy Phu explores photography from dispersed communities throughout Vietnam and the Vietnamese diaspora, both during and after the Vietnam War, to complicate narratives of conflict and memory. While the visual history of the Vietnam War has been dominated by American documentaries and war photography, the book turns to photographs circulated by the Vietnamese themselves, capturing a range of subjects, occasions, and perspectives. Phu’s concept of warring visions refers to contrasts in the use of war photos in North Vietnam, which highlighted national liberation and aligned themselves with an international audience, and those in South Vietnam, which focused on family and everyday survival. Phu also uses warring visions to enlarge the category of war photography, a genre that usually consists of images illustrating the immediacy of combat and the spectacle of violence, pain, and wounded bodies. She pushes this genre beyond such definitions by analyzing pictures of family life, weddings, and other quotidian scenes of life during the war. Phu thus expands our understanding of how war is waged, experienced, and resolved.

    NOTE: Warring Visions: Photography and Vietnam (Duke University Press) will be published in January 2022. Learn more about the book at: https://www.dukeupress.edu/warring-visions

    **************
    Thy Phu is a Professor of Media Studies at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. She is coeditor of Feeling Photography, also published by Duke University Press, and Refugee States: Critical Refugee Studies in Canada. She is also author of Picturing Model Citizens: Civility in Asian American Visual Culture.

    Rebecca A. Adelman is Professor and Chair of Media and Communication Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is the author of Beyond the Checkpoint: Visual Practices in America’s Global War on Terror and Figuring Violence: Affective Investments in Perpetual War, and the co-editor of Remote Warfare: New Cultures of Violence.

    Elizabeth Wijaya is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and Cinema Studies Institute of the University of Toronto. She is Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and an Associate Producer of Taste (Dir. Le Bao, Special Jury Award, Berlin Film Festival).


    Speakers

    Thy Phu
    Speaker
    Professor of Media Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Rebecca A. Adelman
    Commentator
    Professor and Chair of Media and Communication Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Commentator
    Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and Cinema Studies Institute; Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor of History and Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 3rd Inter-Asian Forum on Film Censorship

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 3, 20219:00AM - 10:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Theory/Praxis/Politics

    Description

    Inter-Asian Forum on Film Censorship is the first webinar roundtable discussion for the series, Theory/Praxis/Politics. This forum highlights film practitioners and programmers’ thoughts and reflections on the practices of censorship across Asia. Join our panelists, Zhu Rikun, Kek Huat Lau, and Park Sungho, as they articulate their first-hand experiences in the field and unfurl the complexities of censorship both in the production and circulation of cinema.

    Theory/Praxis/Politics is a webinar series working to advocate for and bring together perspectives of academics, filmmakers, programmers, civil servants, and other stakeholders with an interest in the question of censorship across Asia and its diasporas. We consider Asia as a productive site in which theory, practice, and politics overlap. The intersection allows us to question not only our understanding of censorship and the ways in which we engage with cinema in the region but also to reconsider the relationship between theory, aesthetics, and politics.

    ****************
    PARK Sungho is a programmer for Cambodia International Film Festival and Busan International Film Festival, and is working to promote Southeast Asian cinema globally. Park was born in Seoul, Korea in 1977. He majored in Film Editing at the Cinematography Department at Chung-Ang University. In 2007, he joined the Busan International Film Festival and served as a program coordinator for Asian cinema and manager for the Asian Film Academy. In 2013, he moved his base to Phnom Penh. Since 2016, he has joined Cambodia-based film production company Anti-Archive as a producer.

    ZHU Rikun is an independent film director and producer, as well as a curator from China. He is the founder of Fanhall Films and chief editor of cinema website fanhall.com. Zhu founded Documentary Film Festival China in 2003, which is one of the earliest independent film festivals in China. As a director, Zhu’s has made the following film: The Questioning, The Dossier, Welcome, Dust, Anni, and No Desire to Hide(also named Siren in original title).

    LAU Kek-Huat is a Malaysia-born filmmaker based in Taiwan. His debut film Boluomi was in competition Busan International Film Festival, New Currents section, and Golden horse nominated for a Best new director. The project won him the Tokyo Talent Award 2015, Best Script Award in 2013 Taiwan, and was selected for La Fabrique. Cinema du monde. His short film Nia door won Best Short Film Award, Sonje Award at the Busan International film festival, selected for the 38th Clermont-Ferrand International Short Film Festival. Both his documentary Absent without leave and The Tree Remembers still face censorship challenges today in Malaysia. He is an alumnus of Golden Horse Academy and Berlinale & Tokyo Talents. Lau had also a jury and mentor for regional filmmaking events such as Doc Doc, Asiadoc, FFD, New Asian Scenery.

    Palita Chunsaengchan is an assistant professor of Southeast Asian cinema in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She is working on her book manuscript entitled, Sovereign Screen: Early Thai Cinema and Politics of Media Modernity. This project focuses on early Thai cinema — particularly on its intermedial relationships to prose, poetry, and traditional theatre — from the period of the absolute monarchy to the Siamese Revolution. She also published in Asian Cinema (2021) and Thai Cinema: The Complete Guide (2018).

    Elizabeth Wijaya is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and Cinema Studies Institute of the University of Toronto. She is Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and an Associate Producer of Taste (Dir. Le Bao, Special Jury Award, Berlin Film Festival).


    Speakers

    Park Sungho
    Panelist
    Programmer for Cambodia International Film Festival and Busan International Film Festival

    Zhu Rikun
    Panelist
    Independent film director, producer, and curator from China

    Lau Kek-Huat
    Panelist
    Malaysia-born filmmaker based in Taiwan

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Visual Studies and Cinema Studies Institute; Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Palita Chunsaengchan
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Pan-Asian Seminar Series: The Political Life of Information

    Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, December 6th Q&A with Ronald Deibert "Digital Subversion: The Threat to Democracy"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 6, 20215:00PM - 6:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Seymour Martin Lipset Lecture

    Description

    On December 1, 2021, Ron Deibert, director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, delivered the 18th annual Seymour Martin Lipset Lecture: https://www.ned.org/events/eighteenth-annual-seymour-martin-lipset-lecture-ronald-deibert-on-digital-subversion-the-threat-to-democracy/

    Join us on December 6th at 5pm ET for an online Q&A session with Professor Deibert on “Digital Subversion: A Threat to Democracy.”

    Ronald Deibert is professor of political science and director of the Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Black Code: Surveillance, Privacy and the Dark Side of Cyberspace; Parchment, Printing, and Hypermedia: Communications in World Order Transformation; and Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society, as well as several edited volumes.

    Previously, Deibert was a principal investigator and co-founder of the OpenNet Initiative (2003-2014) and Information Warfare Monitor (2003-2012) projects. Deibert was one of the founders and (former) vice president of global policy and outreach for Psiphon. He serves on the editorial boards of Explorations in Media Ecology, Astropolitics, Journal of Global Security Studies, Review of Policy Research, and International Political Sociology.

    He has received several awards, including the University of Toronto’s President’s Impact Award (2017), the Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity (2014), and the Advancement of Intellectual Freedom in Canada Award from the Canadian Library Association (2014). In 2013, Deibert was appointed to the Order of Ontario and awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal for recognizing and mitigating the “growing threats to communications rights, openness and security worldwide.”

    The Seymour Martin Lipset Lecture on Democracy in the World was inaugurated in 2004 by the International Forum for Democratic Studies at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the Munk School for Global Affairs at the University of Toronto as an important new forum for discourse on democracy and its progress worldwide.

    The Seymour Martin Lipset Lecture on Democracy in the World was inaugurated in 2004 by the International Forum for Democratic Studies at the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the Munk School for Global Affairs at the University of Toronto as an important new forum for discourse on democracy and its progress worldwide.


    Speakers

    Ronald Deibert
    Director,of the Citizen Lab and Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Donner Canadian Foundation

    The National Endowment for Democracy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 7th Tea Circle presents “Social research and the Internet in post-coup Myanmar”

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 7, 20219:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This discussion will reflect on the possibilities of doing research in a hostile political environment through presentations of two recent studies funded by the International Development Research Centre’s Knowledge For Democracy Myanmar project. The studies document people’s attitudes towards the evolving political situation in Myanmar online and consider how youth navigate digital culture in Myanmar today, how they are redefining freedom of expression in the process, and their mixed feelings towards the Internet as a tool for resistance.

    * Tea Circle is a Burma/Myanmar blog founded in 2015 and housed at the Asian Institute since 2018. Learn more about Tea Circle at: https://teacircleoxford.com/

    This event is hosted by the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto and supported by the IDRC’s Knowledge for Democracy Myanmar project.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 7th Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 7, 20213:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Organized in the wake of World War Two by the victorious Allies, the Nuremberg Trials were intended to hold the Nazis to account for their crimes and to restore a sense of justice to a world devastated by violence. As Francine Hirsch reveals in her groundbreaking new book, a major piece of the Nuremberg story has routinely been left out: the critical role of the Soviet Union. Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg offers a startlingly new view of the International Military Tribunal and a fresh perspective on the movement for international human rights that it helped launch.

    Francine Hirsch is Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she teaches courses on Soviet history, Modern European history, and the history of human rights. Her first book, Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union (2005), received several awards, including the Herbert Baxter Adams Prize of the American Historical Association and the Wayne S. Vucinich Prize of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Her second book, Soviet Judgment at Nuremberg: A New History of the International Military Tribunal after World War II (2020), was awarded four book prizes: the 2021 Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship from the American Society for International Law, the Heldt Prize of the Association for Women in Slavic Studies, the Barbara Jelavich prize of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and the Beer Prize of the American Historical Association. Hirsch has started work on a new book project on the history of Russian-American entanglement, with a focus on economics, science, culture, and international law.


    Speakers

    Francine Hirsch
    Speaker
    Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Lynne Viola
    Chair
    Professor, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 9th Celebrating Ravindra Jain: A conversation in conjunction with the publication of Michael Herzfeld's 'Subversive Archaism'

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 9, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The UTSC Centre for Ethnography is pleased to invite you to our upcoming event, which is generously co-sponsored by the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and the Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, and the Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series and Graduate Program, University of Toronto:

    This roundtable in honour of Ravindra Jain presents a chance to engage with an eminent and path-breaking anthropologist of global reach who pioneered work on diaspora and migration long before these became common topics. He has always delighted in encouraging his students to explore contradictions and complexities that theorists of caste, kinship, and other familiar anthropological topics had not anticipated. For the students he has taught around the world, many of them now successful academics in their own right, he thus represents precisely what a university teacher should be.

    Ravindra Jain is perhaps best known for his work on the Indian diaspora, starting with the pioneering South Indians on the Plantation Frontier in Malaya (1970), and on the central Indian region of Bundelkhand, published in Between History and Legend: Status and Power in Bundelkhand (2002). His other books include Indian Communities Abroad (1993); The Universe as Audience: Metaphor and Community among the Jains of North India (1999); Indian Transmigrants: Malaysian and Comparative Essays (2009/2011); Nation, Diaspora, Trans-Nation: Reflections from India (2010); Innovative Departures: Anthropology and the Indian Diaspora (2017); and the edited volume Text and Context: The Social Anthropology of Tradition (1977). He taught at Lucknow University before obtaining his PhD at the Australian National University, Canberra, in 1966. He then went on to teach at Oxford University (1966-1974) and Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (1975-2002). He has also held visiting positions at the University of the West Indies (Trinidad), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, and the University of KwaZulu Natal. In 2013 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Indian Sociological Society. He is widely known as an extraordinary teacher, and this event is intended to celebrate the confluence of his intellectual and his pedagogical influence.

    The event will be a conversation between Ravindra Jain and anthropologist Michael Herzfeld (among others). Michael Herzfeld is Ernest E. Monrad Research Professor of the Social Sciences, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University.
    His forthcoming (December 2021) book Subversive Archaisms Troubling Traditionalists and the Politics of National Heritage (Duke University Press) is dedicated to Ravindra Jain. Introduction available at: https://www.dukeupress.edu/Assets/PubMaterials/978-1-4780-1762-2_601.pdf


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 10th Nationalist Extremism in North America: The Current Threat Landscape

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 10, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Series

    North American Colloquium Speaker Series

    Description

    Nationalism and extremism pose mounting challenges around the world, including in North America. This web-based panel discussion will be the second in a tri-national series organized as part of the 2021-22 North American Colloquium by the Autonomous National University of Mexico, University of Toronto, and University of Michigan.

    The first session examined the historical drivers of nationalist extremism in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. This second session will discuss the current landscape of threats posed by extreme forms of nationalism in each of the three countries. How and why are these ideas spreading? What are the key groups propagating extreme nationalist ideology, and what near-term security challenges do they present?


    Speakers

    Dr. Stephanie Carvin
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of International Relations, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University

    Dr. Leonardo Curzio Guttierez
    Speaker
    Professor, Center for Research on North America (CISAN) Strategic Studies Area at the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM)

    Dr. Cynthia Miller-Idriss
    Speaker
    Professor, School of Public Affairs and School of Education, and Director, Polarization and Extremism Research & Innovation Lab (PERIL) in the Center for University Excellence (CUE) at American University

    John D. Ciorciari
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Public Policy; Director, International Policy Center and Weiser Diplomacy Center, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

    Javed Ali
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Practice, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan

    Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 14th TAAT Annual Reception and Panel Discussion: Climate Change: Perspectives, Challenges and Opportunities

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 14, 20214:00PM - 7:00PMExternal Event, The National Club (Howland Room)
    303 Bay Street, Toronto, M5H 2R1
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Taiwan Alumni Association of Toronto, launched at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto in 2017, is the largest student association dedicated to the studies of Taiwan and global Asia in Canada. We bring together alumni, students, researchers, and public interested in a wide range of issues related to Taiwan. This year, we hope to bring the focus of our end of the year annual event with a panel discussion on the topic of climate change. We invite four experts from diverse backgrounds to share their thoughts and views on climate change, and its challenges and opportunities for Taiwan and Canada.

    4:00 pm – 5:15 pm Panel Discussion
    5:15 pm – 7:00 pm Reception

    Speakers:
    Dr. Chih C. Chao, Principal, Cantech Environment Service and former Vice President of Tunghai University – “Climate Change Mitigation through Circular Economy Actions”

    Ms. Jin-Ling Chen, Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto – “Taiwan
    Government’s Climate Change Policy Initiatives”

    Mr. Marc J. Drouin, General Manager and Principal Officer, Rabobank Canada – “Climate Change Financing in Agriculture”

    Prof. Ito Peng, University of Toronto – “Care Work as a Climate Action”

    Co-Sponsors: TECO and Global Taiwan Studies Program at the Munk School.

    Contact

    Ito Peng


    Speakers

    Dr. Chih C. Chao
    Principal, Cantech Environment Service and former Vice President of Tunghai University

    Ms. Jin-Ling Chen
    Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto

    Mr. Marc J. Drouin
    General Manager and Principal Officer, Rabobank Canada

    Prof. Ito Peng
    Prof. Ito Peng, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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January 2022

  • Friday, January 7th Book Launch & Discussion – Fresh Voices from the Periphery: Youthful Perspectives of Minorities 100 Years After Trianon

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 7, 20221:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for the book launch and discussion of Voices from the Periphery, a new collection of thought-provoking essays written by young people whose families have lived as minorities in various countries in east-central Europe for four generations. They became minorities not because their families migrated to different parts of Europe, but because the borders were changed overnight by the Treaty of Trianon after the end of the First World War.

    Much has been written about the outcomes of Trianon, but this book is very different. These essays are the result of a competition for students and young professionals who live in minority status in four different countries surrounding Hungary: Romania, Slovakia, Ukraine, and Serbia. The writings of several Canadian students on this topic are included as well.

    Voices from the Periphery examines how the current generation of young people perceive the impact of the treaty that has had such a long-term effect on their lives. During this book launch, we will hear from the contributors. Their essays not only examine the legacy of the past but also recommend pathways to a more positive future.

    Dr. Emőke J.E. Szathmáry is a biological anthropologist whose career combined research, teaching, administration, and community service. She served 12 years as President and Vice-Chancellor of The University of Manitoba. Earlier she was Provost and Vice-President (Academic) at McMaster University, and before that, Dean of Social Science at Western University. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a Member of the Order of Canada, and the Order of Manitoba. Dr. Szathmáry’s focus on the genetics of the indigenous peoples of North America included research on the causes of type-2 diabetes, the genetic relationships within and between North American and Siberian peoples, and the microevolution of subarctic populations. Her field research involved Ottawa, Ojibwa and Tlicho peoples in Ontario and the Northwest Territories. She has published over 90 scientific articles and reviews, and co-edited four books. As well, she served terms as Editor-in-Chief of the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology (1987-91), and the American Journal of Physical Anthropology (1995-2001).

    Susan M. Papp has had a distinguished career as an award-winning broadcaster and filmmaker. One of her documentaries received the prestigious Michener Award for Public Service. Dr. Papp is the author of several books and many scholarly articles, including a history of the Munk-Munkácsi family in the volume How it Happened: Documenting the Tragedy of Hungarian Jewry. One of her books, Outcasts: A Love Story, is based on a true story that took place during the Holocaust. Originally written in English, Outcasts has been translated into three languages and made into a documentary film. Susan Papp earned her Ph.D. in Modern European History from the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, The Politics of Exclusion and Retribution in the Hungarian Film Industry, 1929–1947, is presently being prepared for publication.


    Speakers

    Dr. Emőke J.E. Szathmáry, CM, OM, Ph.D, FRSC
    Speaker
    President Emeritus, University of Manitoba

    Susan M. Papp, Ph.D
    Speaker
    Editor, Voices from the Periphery

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Professor and Associate Director, CERES

    Various contributors to the anthology
    Speaker
    Students and young professionals from Slovakia, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, and Canada



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, January 8th MGA & MPP Admissions Q & A

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 8, 20222:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Are you interested in applying to the Master of Global Affairs &/or Master of Public Policy Programs? Are you planning on applying by the January 20, 2022 application deadline?

    Then come get all of your admissions questions answered in this Admissions Q & A. There will be no presentation. You will just come in and ask questions about how to apply. If you are in the process of the application and you have questions, this session is the one for you! Don’t miss it!


    Speakers

    Rejeanne Puran
    Recruitment & Admissions Officer Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy MGA & MPP Programs



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 10th National Governments & Innovation Policy: Where – and What - Is Utopia?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 10, 20229:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Canada, the Nordics, Taiwan? In this webinar, panelists will examine the diverse roles played by national governments in setting the stage for innovation, as well as the key elements that ought to be considered in formulation of innovation policy in Canada and elsewhere.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Susana Borras
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Organization, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark

    Dan Breznitz
    Speaker
    University Professor and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies; Co-Director, Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School; Clifford Clark Visiting Economist, Department of Finance, Government of Canada

    Joseph Wong
    Speaker
    Vice-President, International, University of Toronto; Roz and Ralph Halbert Professor of Innovation, Munk School; Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Darius Ornston
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Munk School

    Rana Foroohar
    Moderator
    Global Business Columnist and Associate Editor, Financial Times, and Global Economic Analyst, CNN



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 10th Nationalist Extremism in North America: Policy tools & frameworks

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 10, 202211:45AM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    North American Colloquium Speaker Series

    Description

    Nationalist extremism poses mounting challenges around the world, including in North America. This web-based panel discussion will focus on the policy tools and frameworks available for countering nationalist extremism in Mexico, Canada and the United States. How have each country’s laws and security institutions evolved since 9/11 to deal with new nationalist threats? What are the limits of existing policy approaches and the key debates surrounding them?

    This event will be the third in a series organized for the 2021-22 North American Colloquium convened jointly by the Autonomous National University of Mexico, University of Toronto, and University of Michigan.


    Speakers

    Raul Guillermo Benitez Manaut
    Speaker
    Professor, Center for Research on North America at the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM)

    Richard Fadden
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs

    Thomas Warrick
    Speaker
    Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council with its Middle East Programs and the Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security’s Forward Defense practice

    John D. Ciorciari
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Public Policy; Director, International Policy Center and Weiser Diplomacy Center, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

    Javed Ali
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Practice, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, January 10th What happened in Kazakhstan, and why?

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, January 10, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    They began as local protests in western Kazakhstan over rising fuel prices. By January 4, all of Kazakhstan witnessed mass mobilization against poor economic prospects and elite corruption. Government buildings were seized, security forces began to support the protesters, and looting and street fighting occurred in the country’s largest city of Almaty. Late on January 5, troops from the Russia-led Collective Security Treaty Organization arrived at the request of embattled President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

    In this panel, we discuss what happened in Kazakhstan, why it happened, and what the prospects are for the near future.

    Dr. Asel Doolotkeldieva is a Senior Lecturer at the OSCE Academy, Bishkek Kyrgyzstan. Her ongoing book project focuses on protests and contentious politics in Eurasia.

    Dr. Assel Tutumlu, Assistant Professor in International Relations and Political Science at Near East University, Northern Cyprus. Her research focuses on Central Asian authoritarian politics and regimes with the focus on Kazakhstan.

    Darmen Koktov is a Research Assistant at the University of Toronto. He holds an MA in European and Russian Affairs from the University of Toronto and an MA in International Relations from KIMEP University, Kazakhstan. His final research paper at UofT focused on power transitions in Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan.


    Speakers

    Dr. Asel Doolotkeldieva
    Speaker
    Senior Lecturer, OSCE Academy, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

    Dr. Assel Tutumlu
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, International Relations and Political Science, Near East University, Northern Cyprus

    Darmen Koktov
    Speaker
    MA, European and Russian Affairs, University of Toronto and MA, International Relations, KIMEP University, Kazakhstan

    Dr. Lucan Way
    Discussant
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Dr. Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Eurasia Initiative, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 13th Afghan Voices: Minaa Rayan

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 13, 202212:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Afghan Voices Speakers Series

    Description

    Afghanistan is complex, diverse, and changing. In ‘Afghan Voices’ we invite Afghans from a variety of perspectives to reflect on the past twenty years—from the US invasion in 2001 to the Taliban takeover in 2021. In doing so, they link their own personal stories to questions about Afghanistan’s past and future.

    Minaa Rayan is a humanitarian and development practitioner, currently doing an MA in Policy Economics at the Center for Development Economies, Williams College, Massachusetts.

    “I grew up in Afghanistan where I completed high school and did a BSc. in Physics and spent the last 5-6 years working for international organizations and the UN in the field of programme evaluation and community engagement.

    I began my career at Save the Children, where I worked in the evaluation unit of a community-based education project, aimed at enchasing school enrollment and transition to secondary school.

    Later on, I moved to Action Against Hunger, where I worked to bring the organization and beneficiaries closer through downward accountability mechanisms, especially around the time of drought in Ghor and Helamand.

    For the last two years, I worked for UNICEF and contributed to the evaluation of several programmes in education, health, nutrition and child protection sectors. The findings of those evaluations were used to guide the policies of the government and partner organizations.

    I have had formal and informal membership of some social groups including Ayel Social Association, Afghan Evaluation Society and ICOMSA.
    I am a friend and colleague to many brilliant Afghan girls and women and an aunt to three brilliant children, which I think explains part of my passion to work for child- and women-centered programmes.

    To sum up, I lose sleep over issues of inequality, poverty and inefficiency.”


    Speakers

    Minaa Rayan
    Speaker
    Centre for Development Economies, Williams College

    Ed Schatz
    Chair
    Professor of Political Science and Director of the Eurasia Initiative, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 13th Woody Guthrie, the Left, and the Politics of Intimacy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 13, 20224:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Gustavus Stadler’s Woody Guthrie: An Intimate Life is a new biography of the storied folk singer and icon of the Popular Front Left, one that does the work of disentangling him from myth and setting him down amid the messy, contradictory, human struggles of his day: “an expansive and strikingly unique portrait,” as the Los Angeles Review of Books recently put it, “of a man, not of an immortal legend.” The book also functions as a kind of intimate history of the Left, tracking the definitive importance for Guthrie of a series of dilemmas — about illness and shame, pain and joy as they are experienced through the body, intimacy as a crucible for solidarity — that suggest a greater continuity between Old and New Lefts than we are used to acknowledging.

    Join us for a conversation about the book, these issues, and more, between Stadler and eminent historian of U. S. music David Suisman.

    —Speaker Bios—
    Gustavus Stadler is William R. Kenan Professor and Chair of English at Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania, where he directs the John B. Hurford Center for the Arts and Humanities. In addition to Woody Guthrie: An Intimate Life (Beacon Press, 2020), he is the author of Troubling Minds: The Cultural Politics of Genius in the U. S. 1840-1890 (U of Minnesota Press, 2006). He has published essays on U. S. literature, music, and politics in such venues as Al Jazeera, Public Books, Avidly.com, and Social Text.

    David Suisman is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware, where he specializes in cultural history, the history of music, sound studies, war and society, and the history of capitalism. His books include Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music (Harvard University Press, 2009), recipient of numerous awards and honors, and Sound in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010), co-edited with Susan Strasser. His articles and reviews have appeared in the Journal of American History, Social Text, Radical History Review, The Believer, American Historical Review, Journal of Social History, and other publications. From 2010 to 2021, he was associate editor and book review editor of the Journal of Popular Music Studies. A sometime disc jockey at freeform radio station WFMU, he lives in Philadelphia.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Gustavus Stadler
    Speaker
    William R. Kenan Professor and Chair of English, Haverford College

    David Suisman
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of History, University of Delaware

    Nicholas Sammond
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, January 13th Understanding Politics of Climate Change in Taiwan: International Isolation, Green Developmentalism, and Energy Democracy

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, January 13, 20227:30PM - 9:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Global Taiwan Lecture Series

    Description

    Taiwan is among the top 20 largest economies in the world and plays a key role in global supply chain. Yet, the industrial activities also come with a heavy environmental cost. Taiwan is the fifth largest coal importer in the world; at the per capita level, Taiwan’s carbon emission is higher than most developed countries. This talk will review the politics of climate change in Taiwan at different levels. At the global level, the talk will discuss how being a non-member to UNFCCC constrains Taiwan’s internal discussions on climate change; at the national level, the talk will focus on how Taiwan’s legacy of developmentalism shapes the policy trajectories on energy sources; at the local level, the talk will showcase how the potentials and challenges for Taiwan’s vibrant civil society to contribute to climate actions.
    ____________

    John Chung-En Liu is an associate professor of sociology at National Taiwan University, and a faculty affiliate in the International Program on Climate Change and Sustainable Development. Dr. Liu received his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and previously was an assistant professor at Occidental College in Los Angeles and a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School.


    Speakers

    John Chung-En Liu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, National Taiwan University

    Sida Liu
    Chair
    Acting Director of the Global Taiwan Studies Program at the Asian Institute; Associate Professor of Sociology and Law, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Global Taiwan Studies Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, January 14th Gods in the Time of Democracy: Book Launch Event

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, January 14, 202211:00AM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Please join us for a panel discussion of Kajri Jain’s new book, Gods in the Time of Democracy (Duke University Press, 2021)

    In 2018 India’s prime minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the world’s tallest statue: a 597-foot figure of nationalist leader Sardar Patel. Twice the height of the Statue of Liberty, it is but one of many massive statues built following India’s economic reforms of the 1990s. Drawing on a decade of fieldwork at giant statue sites in India and its diaspora, Gods in the Time of Democracy examines how monumental icons emerged as a religious and political form in contemporary India. Centering the ex-colony in rethinking key concepts of the image, it mobilizes the concept of emergence towards a radical treatment of art historical objects as dynamic assemblages. Its richly layered narrative describes how these public icons have proliferated at the intersections between new image technologies, neo-spiritual religious movements, Hindu nationalist politics, globalization, and Dalit-Bahujan verifications of equality and presence.

    Learn more about the book at: https://www.dukeupress.edu/gods-in-the-time-of-democracy


    Speakers

    Kavita Singh
    Discussant
    School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University

    Francis Cody
    Discussant
    Anthropology/Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Yi Gu
    Discussant
    Culture & Media/Art History, University of Toronto

    J. Barton Scott
    Discussant
    Historical Studies/Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Kajri Jain
    Speaker
    Visual Studies/Art History, University of Toronto; Author of the 'Gods in the Time of Democracy' ((Duke University Press, 2021).

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director of the Centre for South Asian Studies; Buddhist Studies/ Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies (UTM)

    Department of Art History (UofT)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, January 15th MPP & MGA Admissions Q & A

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, January 15, 202210:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Are you interested in applying to the Master of Global Affairs &/or Master of Public Policy Programs? Are you planning on applying by the January 20, 2022 application deadline?

    Then come get all of your admissions questions answered in this Admissions Q & A. There will be no presentation. You will just come in and ask questions about how to apply. If you are in the process of the application and you have questions, this session is the one for you! Don’t miss it!


    Speakers

    Rejeanne Puran
    Recruitment and Admissions Officer MPP & MGA Programs Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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