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March 2021

  • Tuesday, March 2nd The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy: Employer Organization and the Law: Historical Legacies and the Long Shadow of the American Courts

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 2, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy

    Description

    A strong and well-organized labor movement is clearly essential to achieving high levels of economic equality and shared prosperity in post-industrial political economies. However, a large comparative literature suggests that durable progress is possible only where employers too are well organized. Based on a comparison with Germany, this paper suggests that interventions by the American courts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries had a profound and enduring impact on the organization, goals, and strategies of American employers – discouraging and indeed actively disarticulating forms of business organization that were emerging in this period in Europe’s more coordinated “social” market economies.

    About the Speaker:

    Kathleen Thelen is Ford Professor of Political Science at MIT.

    Her work focuses on the origins and evolution of political-economic institutions in the rich democracies. She is the author, among others, of Varieties of Liberalization and the New Politics of Social Solidarity (2014) and How Institutions Evolve (2004), and co-editor of Advances in Comparative Historical Analysis (with James Mahoney, 2015), and Beyond Continuity (with Wolfgang Streeck, 2005). Her awards include the Aaron Wildavsky Enduring Contribution Prize (2019); the Michael Endres Research Prize (2019), the Barrington Moore Book Prize (2015), the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award of the APSR (2005), the Mattei Dogan Award for Comparative Research (2006), and the Max Planck Research Award (2003). She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2015 and to the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences in 2009. She was awarded honorary degrees at the Free University of Amsterdam (2013), the London School of Economics (2017), the European University Institute in Florence (2018), and the University of Copenhagen (2018).

    Thelen has served as President of the American Political Science Association (APSA), Chair of the Council for European Studies and as President of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics. Thelen is General Editor, along with Eric Wibbels, of the Cambridge University Press Series in Comparative Politics, and a permanent external member of the Max Planck Institut für Gesellschaftsforschung in Cologne, Germany.

    The Cadario Visiting Lecture in Public Policy was established through the extraordinary generosity of Paul Cadario, Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.


    Speakers

    Kathleen Thelen
    Speaker
    Ford Professor of Political Science, MIT

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Associate Director, Global Engagement Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and the Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Carolyn Tuohy
    Opening Remarks
    Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Distinguished Fellow Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 4th Voting with their feet? Emigration from Greece in the 2010s

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 4, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online
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    Series

    Hellenic Studies Program

    Description

    Greece (and other southern European countries) have experienced in the early 2010s an unprecedented economic and financial crisis which has led many people to emigrate. Those leaving were generally highly educated and they mainly headed towards EU countries as they had the right to free movement as EU citizens. Our research results though suggested that while important, economic reasons were far from being the exclusive, or even the predominant driver of highly skilled emigration from Greece. The desire to improve one’s training and career perspective, to increase employability and derive individual satisfaction from occupation, was mentioned by more than half of our respondents in a survey conducted in 2013 in all southern European countries (Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece). The strongest emigration potential was to be found among those who were dissatisfied with the quality of life and their job prospects at the home country, and who refuses to renounce what they thought they could/should achieve in terms of life style and overall satisfaction. These findings will be the starting point of a reflection on what shapes highly skilled emigration from Greece today. Perhaps the lessons learnt from the financial and Eurozone crisis of the early 2010s can serve as a compass for navigating the post-pandemic downturn and recovery.

    Anna Triandafyllidou holds the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University in Toronto. She is an internationally recognized sociologist and migration policy expert whose interdisciplinary research focuses on the governance of migration and asylum; the management of cultural diversity, nationalism and identity issues; and overall, the contemporary challenges of migration and integration across different world regions. Prior to her CERC at Ryerson University, Triandafyllidou was based in Florence, Italy, where she held a Robert Schuman Chair at the European University Institute and directed the Cultural Pluralism Research Area as part of the European University Institute’s Global Governance Programme.


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    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Hungarian Foreign Policy between the World Wars

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Miklós Zeidler (b. 1967), historian, studied History (M.A. at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, 1994) and International Relations (M.Sc. at Budapest University of Economics, 1994). In 1998, he joined the Department of Modern and Contemporary History of Hungary at the Eötvös Loránd University. After his Ph.D. (2001) and his habilitation (2011) he was promoted to associate professor in 2014. In the same year he joined the Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences as a part-time senior researcher. Meanwile, he was a guest lecturer at the College of Hospitality Managament (Budapest), the Budapest University of Economics and the University of Theatre and Film Arts (Budapest). He specializes in inter-war international relations and 19th and 20th century sport history of Hungary. He did archival research in Geneva, London, Madrid, Oxford, Paris and Rome and gave lectures in several countries including the United Kingdom and the United States of America. He published a great number of studies and books, including Ideas on Territorial Revision in Hungary 1920–1945 (2007).

    His paper provides an overview of Hungarian foreign policy between the World Wars. Defeated in the Great War and subsequently partitioned yet regaining its full independence, Hungary started a revisionist foreign policy aiming to upset the Peace Treaty of Trianon and recover at least some but preferably or all of her lost territories. Seeking wide-ranging political partnership during the 1920s – including her former enemies France, the British Empire and the US as well – Hungary began to narrow down her scope of potential allies to the Axis Powers in the 1930s. With some initial hopes towards the League Nations to protect the Hungarian national minorities in the neighbouring states and to raise the question of treaty revision, the Hungarian government finally followed the example of Germany and Italy and left the Geneva-based organization in 1939. After the Axis-assisted restoration of about half of her lost territories between 1938 and 1941, Hungary reluctantly entered World War II, and was defeated again in 1945 by the Allied and Associated Powers. The huge loss of life and material as well as of the temporarily regained territories combined with the subsequent Soviet occupation and political influence left Hungary in an arguably worse situation than she had been after the Great War.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Miklós Zeidler
    Speaker
    The Institute of History of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Associate Director, CERES


    Main Sponsor

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Asian Research in the Fog of Pandemic

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Dr. David Chu Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    ASIA-PACIFIC CONVERSATIONS

    In recent years, researchers have highlighted the importance of using “Asia” as a site to develop new research tools and methods to rethink the global world. The outbreak of Covid-19, in many ways, has only heightened this call. Beyond the Asian stories of “failures” and “successes” in dealing with the ongoing public health crisis, the pandemic has exacerbated the existing geopolitical tensions, dispossession, as well as state violence against minorities and political dissidents, all against the backdrop of a series of ever-growing planetary crises.

    With the pandemic still evolving, how should specialists of Asia begin to examine their “field” when the field itself is mutating, and when there is no clear sense of how to go about documenting and knowing the unknown? In this conversation, distinguished Asia scholars working from a variety of interdisciplinary contexts, including anthropology, cultural studies, history, and media studies, will reflect on the challenges of conducting research into the unknown in a politicized, racialized, sensationalized, and emotion-laden environment.
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    MICHAEL BERRY is a translator and author who is Professor of Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies and Director of the Center for Chinese Studies at UCLA. He has written and edited eight books on Chinese literature and cinema, including Speaking in Images: Interviews with Contemporary Chinese Filmmakers (2006) and A History of Pain: Trauma in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (2008). He has served as a film consultant and a juror for numerous film festivals, including the Golden Horse (Taiwan) and the Fresh Wave (Hong Kong). A two time National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellow, Berry’s book-length translations include The Song of Everlasting Sorrow: A Novel of Shanghai (2008) by Wang Anyi, shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize, To Live (2004) by Yu Hua, a selection in the National Endowment for the Arts Big Read library, and Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from a Quarantined City (2020) by Fang Fang.

    BISHNUPRIYA GHOSH is Professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she teaches environmental media and global postcolonial studies. Much of her early scholarly work interrogated the relations between the global and the postcolonial; area studies and transnational cultural studies; popular, mass, and elite cultures. Apart from works that address global mediascapes, in the last decade, Ghosh turned to risk distributions and their relationship to media. She has written several essays on the subject and has co-edited collection (with Bhaskar Sarkar), The Routledge Companion to Media and Risk (2020). She is completing a single-authored , The Virus Touch: Theorizing Epidemic Media which considers how mediatic processes detect and compose epidemics as crises events.

    RALPH LITZINGER is Professor of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. He is the author of Other Chinas: the Yao and the Politics of National Belonging (Duke University Press, 2000), and, more recently, with Carlos Rojas, Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China (Duke University Press, 2016). He has published in leading cultural anthropology and Asian studies journals. He directed Duke’s Asia/Pacific Studies Institute from 2001-2007, and the Duke Engage Migrant Education Project from 2008-2015. His new research concerns questions of planetary futures, digital labor and platform capitalism, human and post-human techno-imaginaries. His most recent publication, with Fan Yang, is “Eco-Media Events in China: From Yellow Eco-Peril to Media Materialism,” Environmental Humanities, May 2020.


    Speakers

    Michael Berry
    Speaker
    Professor of Contemporary Chinese Cultural Studies, Department of Asian Languages & Cultures; Director, Center for Chinese Studies, UCLA

    Bishnupriya Ghosh
    Speaker
    Professor of English and Global Studies, UC Santa Barbara

    Ralph Litzinger
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology, Duke University

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto; Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 5th Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #2: Hands-on Learning in the Classroom

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 5, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Being a part of the Munk One program is so much more than just readings and lectures.

    Join us for this interactive session to discover the unique hands-on learning opportunities that make up the classroom experience.

    You’ll learn about our ethnography practicums in the city, how students conduct interviews with organizations working on projects to address persistent global problems, “devastating facts” video assignments, Munk One debates, small seminar discussions, and developing real interventions of your own to advance the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 8th Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 8, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us to learn about studying at the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Meet our program staff, faculty and student ambassadors to find out what the Peace, Conflict and Justice programs have to offer, the application process, student life, and have any of your questions answered.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 8th Looking Back and Looking Forward: A Conversation on Japan and Canada’s Ageing Societies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 8, 20217:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Centre for the Study of Global Japan will be welcoming Prof. Hiroko Akiyama to present her research on the ageing society. Prof. Akiyama will be joined by Prof. Margarita Estevez-Abe and Prof. Michelle Silver for discussions following the presentation. This webinar will be moderated by Prof. Ito Peng.

    Presenter:
    Hiroko Akiyama
    Visiting Professor, Institute of Gerontology and Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo
    Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo

    Hiroko Akiyama, a gerontologist, is professor of emeritus at the University of Tokyo and the former vice president of Science Council of Japan. Professor Akiyama has conducted a number of cross-national surveys and is widely recognized as an expert on issues of global aging. She is known for the long-running research on the elderly in Japan—tracking the aging patterns of approximately 6,000 Japanese elderly over 30 years. She also initiated social experiment projects that pioneer to re-design communities to meet the needs of the highly aged society, and more recently Kamakura Living Lab, a platform for open innovation by co-creation among users, industry, government and academia. She started the Institute of Gerontology at University of Tokyo in 2006. Professor Akiyama received Ph.D. in psychology from University of Illinois, the United States.

    Panelists:
    Margarita Estevez-Abe
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Syracuse University

    Margarita Estevez-Abe teaches political science at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. She works in the sub-field of political science called comparative political economy of advanced industrial countries. She is interested in how political and economic institutions are constructed differently across countries and in their varying effects on politics and ordinary people’s lives. Her work so far has dealt with Japanese political economy, the Varieties of Capitalism, and comparative political economy of gender.

    Michelle Silver
    Acting Chair, Department of Health and Society and Associate Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Michelle Silver is an Associate Professor of Gerontology at the University of Toronto where she holds appointments in the Department of Health and Society, Sociology, and Public Health. Her book, Retirement and Its Discontents, was published in 2018 by Columbia University Press. Her work has been featured in Forbes, the Times Literary Supplement, Zoomer, Next Avenue, The Globe and Mail, Global News, and other popular media sources. She received a BA, BS, and MPP from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Chicago. She is currently chair of the Department of Health and Society at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

    Ito Peng
    Professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy and Director, Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto (Moderator)

    Professor Ito Peng is a Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. She is an expert in global social policy, specializing in gender, migration and care policies. She has written extensively on social policies and political economy of care in Asia Pacific. Her teaching and research focus on comparative social policy, and family, gender, employment and migration policies. She just completed an international partnership research project entitled Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care (http://cgsp.ca/), and is now engaged in two research projects: The Care Economy: Gender-sensitive Macroeconomic Models for Policy Analysis, and Care Economies in Context: Towards Sustainable Social and Economic Development.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Hiroko Akiyama
    Speaker
    Visiting Professor, Institute of Gerontology and Institute for Future Initiatives, The University of Tokyo and Professor Emeritus, The University of Tokyo

    Margarita Estevez-Abe
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Political Science, Syracuse University

    Michelle Silver
    Panelist
    Acting Chair, Department of Health and Society and Associate Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough

    Ito Peng
    Moderator
    Professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy and Director, Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, and Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 10th Book Discussion: The Art of Sharing

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 10, 202112:30PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Graham Centre presents a discussion of The Art of Sharing: The Richer versus the Poorer Provinces since Confederation, by Toronto-based journalist and historian Mary Janigan. This book studies the history of Canada’s path toward Equalization, with comparisons between Canadian and Australian approaches.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 10th Taking Flight: The Role of Airports in Thriving City Regions

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 10, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Pearson International Airport is an indispensable hub for mobility, goods movement, and employment in the Greater Toronto Area. COVID-19 has significantly affected airports around the world, however, and it remains unclear how quickly they will recover once the crisis is over.

    What role do airports play in ensuring thriving and prosperous city regions? How will that change following the COVID-19 crisis? How can governments at all levels work together to make sure airports are fully integrated within their regions and continue to succeed as economic hubs?

    On March 10, Jean-Paul Addie, Assistant Professor at Georgia State University’s Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, will examine what we can learn from other city-regions on these questions. A group of local experts will then join him for a panel discussion on the implications of his findings for Pearson and the region.

    Speaker
    Jean-Paul Addie is an Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University. He is an urban geographer working on issues of urban and regional governance with a focus on the politics of infrastructure. Questions of city-regionalism are at the heart of Jean-Paul’s research. He has investigated the politics and practices of city-region formation through the geography of higher education, the experiences of infrastructural regionalism, and the multi-scalar dynamics of urban transportation – including the development of ‘aero-regions’.

    Panelists
    Lloyd A. McCoomb was President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) from 2007 until 2012. Prior to that, he served as Vice President, Airport Planning and Development, in which capacity he was responsible for the planning and construction of the GTAA’s four billion-dollar facility restoration and expansion program. He most recently has served as Chair of the Board of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority and is currently the Chair of the Advisory Panel of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute.

    Pamela Blais is an urban planner and Principal of Metropole Consultants, a Toronto-based planning practice. In her twenty-plus-year career as an urban planning consultant, her work has included reurbanization strategies; long-term regional growth planning; municipal economic development strategies; innovative land use policies; and urban regeneration strategies. She recently completed Planning the Next Greater Golden Horseshoe, a report that explains a shifting economic landscape in the Toronto region and its implications for planning.

    Josh Neubauer is a Principal at Urban Strategies. Josh plays a key role in Urban Strategies’ airport planning practice. Josh has helped develop the vision for a new transit hub at Pearson airport, evaluated the pros and cons of expanding passenger volumes at Billy Bishop Airport, articulated the need for regional air planning with the Southern Ontario Airport Network, and reviewed the regional and local benefits of a new airport in the east GTA.

    Moderator
    Matti Siemiatycki is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, Canada Research Chair in Infrastructure Planning and Finance, and Interim Director of the School of Cities at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on large-scale infrastructure projects, public-private partnerships, and the effective integration of infrastructure into the fabric of cities. He has undertaken studies on major cities in Canada and around the world including Vancouver, London, Los Angeles, Sydney, Bilbao, and Delhi.

    Contact

    Piali Roy
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    Jean-Paul Addie
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University

    Lloyd A. McCoomb
    Panelist
    Former President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) and current Chair of the Advisory Panel of the University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute.

    Pamela Blais
    Panelist
    Urban planner and Principal of Metropole Consultants, a Toronto-based planning practice

    Josh Neubauer
    Panelist
    Principal at Urban Strategies with a key role in Urban Strategies’ airport planning practice

    Matti Siemiatycki
    Moderator
    Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Planning, Canada Research Chair in Infrastructure Planning and Finance, and Interim Director of the School of Cities at the University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 11th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 1: “The Indian Question in the United States”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 11, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 1 Theme: Racisms in the United States

    Title of Presentation: “The Indian Question in the United States”

    Abstract:
    Making the radical argument that the nation-state was born of colonialism, this talk calls us to rethink political violence and reimagine political community beyond majorities and minorities. Dr. Mamdani argues that the nation-state and the colonial state created each other. In case after case around the globe—from the New World to South Africa, Israel to Germany to Sudan—the colonial state and the nation-state have been mutually constructed through the politicization of a religious or ethnic majority at the expense of an equally manufactured minority. The model emerged in North America, where genocide and internment on reservations created both a permanent native underclass and the physical and ideological spaces in which new immigrant identities crystallized as a settler nation. In Europe, this template would be used by the Nazis to address the Jewish Question, and after the fall of the Third Reich, by the Allies to redraw the boundaries of Eastern Europe’s nation-states, cleansing them of their minorities. After Nuremberg the template was used to preserve the idea of the Jews as a separate nation. By establishing Israel through the minoritization of Palestinian Arabs, Zionist settlers followed the North American example. The result has been another cycle of violence.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University. He received his PhD from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of African history and politics. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. He has authored several ground-breaking books including Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror, and Good Muslim, Bad Muslim: America, the Cold War and the Roots of Terror. His new book, from Harvard University Press, is titled Neither Settler nor Native: The Making and Unmaking of Permanent Minorities.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Mahmood Mamdani
    Speaker
    Herbert Lehman Professor of Government, Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Czech Geopolitical Identity and Its Impacts on Today's Chechia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Although the geographical position of Czechia is in the very centre of Europe, its geopolitical identity has been contested many times in its history. The internal and external influences in political struggles over the country’s political and geographical “soul” have resulted in a unique character of thinking about Czechia itself and its relationship to the rest of Europe and the world – the “Czech archive” of geopolitical imaginations. Such an archive of geopolitical knowledge plays a vital role in the state’s current foreign politics, especially towards its neighbours, the EU, and the world. The lecture shows a still changing and complex nature of thinking about the Czech geopolitical identity and its impacts on today’s Chechia.

    Tomáš Drobík, Ph.D., holds a PhD in political science with a specialization in Political geography. He works at the Department of Human Geography and Regional Development as an assistant professor and at the Faculty of Science holds the position of vice-Dean for Internal and External Relations. He focuses primarily on political geography theories and geopolitics with territorial specialization in Central Europe and the Middle East. In the area of critical geopolitics, he predominantly focuses on the popular geopolitics of Czechia.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th The rise of authoritarianism and populism: Challenges to critical analysis of law

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 202112:00PM - 2:00PMExternal Event, External Event

    Speakers

    Professor Guenter Frankenberg
    Panelist
    Goethe University, Frankfurt

    Helena Alviar Garcia
    Panelist
    Science Po Law School, Paris

    Bojan Bugaric
    Speaker
    University of Sheffield



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Why has Japan’s immigration policy remained so restrictive, especially in light of economic, demographic, and international political forces that are pushing Japan to admit more immigrants? Michael Strausz will answer this question by drawing on insights from nearly two years of intensive field research in Japan. In addition to answering this question by outlining the central argument of his 2019 book, Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan, this presentation provide context to recent developments in Japanese immigration policy – particularly the December 2018 decision to admit more than 300,000 low skilled foreign laborers as well as the immigration policy response to the COVID pandemic.

    Speaker Bio:
    Michael Strausz is an Associate Professor of Political Science and the Director of Asian Studies at Texas Christian University. He earned his PhD from the University of Washington. He is currently editing a collection of essays by an interdisciplinary group of scholars tentatively titled _The Past and Future of Immigration in Japan_ which aims to put recent immigration reforms into context. His book _Help (Not) Wanted: Immigration Politics in Japan_ was published in 2019 with SUNY Press.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Michael Strausz
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of Asian Studies, Texas Christian University

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing's Koreatown

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    The Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University and the Centre for the Study of Korea (CSK) at the University of Toronto are inviting you to the presentation by Prof. Sharon J. Yoon (University of Notre Dame) based on her recently published book on March 12, 2021 (Friday), 3 to 4:30 pm (EST).

    In the past ten years, China has rapidly emerged as South Korea’s most important economic partner. With the surge of goods and resources between the two countries, large waves of Korean migrants have opened small ethnic firms in Beijing’s Koreatown, turning a once barren wasteland into the largest Korean enclave in the world. The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing’s Koreatown fills a critical gap in East Asian and migration studies through an investigation of how the rise of transnationalism has impacted the social and economic lives of South Koreans searching for wealth and stability in China. Based off in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, this book studies the tensions, relationships, and perceptions in the ethnic enclave of Wangjing between Korean Chinese cultural brokers and South Koreans starting out as entrepreneurs.

    Speaker Bio:
    Prof. Sharon J. Yoon is Assistant Professor in the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She received her Ph.D. in sociology at Princeton University. Her research focuses on the Korean diaspora in China and Japan. She is the author of The Cost of Belonging: An Ethnography of Solidarity and Mobility in Beijing’s Koreatown (Oxford University Press, 2020).

    This event is organized by Hae Yeon Choo (University of Toronto) and is presented by the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University which is funded by the Academy of Korean studies, and the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto.

    For more information: kore@yorku.ca || https://kore.info.yorku.ca/calendar/


    Speakers

    Sharon J. Yoon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor in the Keough School of Global Affairs, University of Notre Dame

    Hyun Ok Park
    Moderator
    Professor of Sociology and the Director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Worlding Taiwan-China Relations: Film Screening of "Our Youth in Taiwan" and Q&A Discussion

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: To register for the Q&A discussion, please click the “Register” button above. To receive the link for the asynchronous film screening of Our Youth in Taiwan, please register on the Eventrbrite (see the link below).

    The year 2021 marks the tenth anniversary of Taiwan’s introduction of degree-pursuing Mainland Chinese students (lusheng) to its higher education institutions. However, this landmark moment also witnesses the demise of lusheng policies across the Taiwan Strait. China’s Ministry of Education has suspended lusheng enrollment in Taiwanese colleges beginning this fall. How might we address the shifting political economy which shapes and contests lusheng policies? How have the lived experiences of lusheng brought new meanings to the geopolitical terrains under which these policies came into being? In what ways have the recent COVID-19 pandemic intensified the political and personal conundrums facing lusheng? This film screening and Q&A event seeks to understand the mounting geopolitical tension between Taiwan and China by directing focus on the stories of lusheng in Taiwan.

    Professor Michelle Cho is an assistant professor of East Asian Popular Cultures in the Department of East Asian Studies, and graduate faculty in Cinema Studies, University of Toronto. Her research interests include East Asian cinema, television, video, and pop music, genre cinemas, social media platforms, and Korean-wave pop culture fandoms.

    FILM SYNOPSIS:

    Our Youth In Taiwan (dir. Fu Yue) is a story of resistance, collaboration, and frustration between three protagonists: Cai Boyi, a politically engaged mainland Chinese student in Taiwan; Chen Wei-ting, a student leader of Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement; and Fu Yue, the documentary filmmaker. As their interwoven narratives unfold, the meanings of democracy, national belonging, social movement, political engagement, sexuality, and even filmmaking are called into question.

    The film won the Best Documentary at the 2018 Taipei Golden Horse Awards. In her award acceptance speech, director Fu Yue advocated for the recognition of Taiwan as an “independent entity.”
    ____________________________________

    Based in the Global Taiwan Studies Program at the Asian Institute, University of Toronto, The Taiwan Gazette is a student-run online platform that aims to introduce Chinese-language sources about Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China to a wider readership across the English-speaking world. It also features Taiwan-related student research and introduces scholarly works which approach Taiwan in critical perspectives and methods.
    ____________________________________

    FILM SCREENING: March 8 (12 pm) to March 14 (11:59 pm EST)

    ***To receive the link for the film screening, please register on the Eventbrite below***


    Speakers

    Michelle Cho
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Cultures in the Department of East Asian Studies, and graduate faculty in Cinema Studies, University of Toronto

    Yu-Han Huang
    Moderator
    Managing Editor, Taiwan Gazette

    Sabrina Chung
    Moderator
    Managing Editor, Taiwan Gazette


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Taiwan Gazette

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 12th Women Breaking Ceilings

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 12, 20215:00PM - 6:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    On Friday, March 12th, 2021 from 5 – 6:30 PM EST the Munk School will be hosting an online panel event in the spirit of the International Women Day celebration. The event is titled “Women Breaking Ceilings”. The panel will be composed of high-ranking women in government and in the private sector that will shed light on how they overcame barriers to access and navigate professional spaces often deemed inaccessible to many women. Moreover, this event aims to showcase trailblazing women in our economy and government to hopefully inspire and encourage women at the Munk School and beyond.

    Bios:

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard is the first African Nova Scotian woman to be appointed to the Senate of Canada, representing the province of Nova Scotia and her hometown of East Preston. Senator Bernard champions issues impacting African Canadians and people living with disabilities. She is particularly invested in human rights, employment equity, and mental health. Through her involvement in community projects, her social work career, her time with Dalhousie School of Social Work, and now her work in the Senate and as Deputy Chair of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights, Senator Bernard has maintained a deep dedication to social justice and racial justice. Senator Bernard advocates for reparations for the historic and continued anti-Black racism impacting the lives of African Canadians in her work.

    Dr. Sarah Saska

    Dr. Sarah Saska (She, Her, Hers) is the Co-founder and CEO of Feminuity, a global strategy firm that partners with leading technology startups through Fortune 500 companies to build diverse teams, equitable systems, and inclusive products and company cultures. Before co-founding Feminuity, Sarah led pioneering doctoral research at the intersection of equity, technology, and innovation. Her research highlighted the need for companies in the technology and innovation sector to centre ethical and equitable design and became the inspiration for Feminuity. Since then, Sarah has twice been named amongst the Women’s Executive Network’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women in Canada and on Culture Amp’s list of “Diversity and Inclusion Leaders You Should Know.” She is a powerful TEDx speaker, and she has been featured on CBC’s The National and Fast Company for her straightforward and actionable approach to the work.

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond is the CEO of the Delmore “Buddy” Daye Learning Institute. Her work in education and the community is rooted in core Africentric Principles. She has a successful history of collaboration with the communities and stakeholders with whom she has worked. Through her extensive public sector involvement, Ms. Parris-Drummond has gained a deep understanding and appreciation for what it takes to conduct policy analysis, oversee publishing projects, and develop and implement education product and develop anti-racism and social equity transformation programs. Known for getting things done in a thoughtful, respectful and engaging way, she has been actively involved across a broad range of community initiatives and organizations such as Akoma Family Centre and Holdings, FEEDNS, the NS Early Childhood Intervention Services, the Black Business Initiative Community Investment Fund and the NS Mass Choir. She has worked for both municipal (Halifax Regional Municipality) and provincial governments (Departments of Education and Justice) as well as the Nova Scotia Community College. Sylvia is proud that during her time at provincial government she founded and was supported by sistahs to develop the African Canadian Women in the Public Service (ACWPS). Ms. Parris-Drummond holds a Masters of Arts in Life Long Learning – Africentricity, a Masters of Education – Curriculum, and a Bachelor of Science, Home Economics / Education.

    An-Noûra Compaoré

    An-Noûra Compaoré is passionate about changes and movements focused on long-term development, auto-sufficiency of developing nations, women equality. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Upon her arrival in Vancouver from Burkina Faso, she introduced innovative foreign policy ideas, development analysis plans, and arts. Her passion for developing countries led her to present her research about the effects of foreign aid and foreign direct investments on corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa. This earned her the UBC Undergraduate Research Award. Compaoré is currently pursuing her Master of Public Policy at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto. She is one of the co-founders and co-president of the Munk School Black Student Association. She was a pro-bono consultant at the Public Good Initiative and Equity Diversity Public Policy Initiative. Her love for women uplifting led her to organize one of the first International Women Day celebrations at UBC and International Women Day inspired panel event at the Munk School.


    Speakers

    Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard
    Speaker
    Senator – Nova Scotia (East Preston)

    Sylvia Parris-Drummond
    Speaker
    CEO of Buddy Daye Learning Institute

    Dr. Sarah Saska
    Speaker
    Co-founder and CEO of Feminuity

    An-Noûra Compaoré
    Moderator
    Master of Public Policy Candidate 2021, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 15th The Business Reinvention of Japan – Why it Matters for Global Business and Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 15, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Over the past 20 years, Japan’s leading companies have seen their former competitiveness in the mass-manufacturing of high-quality consumer products competed away, first by Korea and Taiwan, and the China. A complete pivot has become necessary to compete not through size and output volume of consumer gadgets, but nimble specialization and technology leadership in input components. The goal is to anchor Asian supply chains and stay ahead of China by occupying critical deep-tech niches. As Japanese companies have gone on a refocusing diet, they have attracted foreign capital and reorganized internal processes of innovation. This conversation will lay out these changes and show why we should pay attention to what they mean for global business and politics.

    Speaker Bio:
    Ulrike Schaede is Professor of Japanese Business at the University of California, San Diego, School of Global Policy and Strategy. She is the Director of JFIT (Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology) where she organizes a weekly “Japan Zoominar” on current issues on Japan. Schaede works on Japan’s changing corporate strategies, including business culture, change management, employment practices, the rise of private equity, corporate governance, and manufacturing and innovation under the digital transformation. She has written extensively on Japanese business organization, and is the author of The Business Reinvention of Japan: How to Make Sense of the New Japan (Stanford University Press, 2020) as well as Choose and Focus: Japanese Business Strategies for the 21st Century (Cornell UP, 2008). She holds a PhD in Japan Studies and Economics from Marburg University, Germany, and has been invited to visiting professor and scholar positions at UC Berkeley, Harvard Business School, Stanford University in the U.S., as well as Hitotsubashi University and the research institutes of The Bank of Japan, various Ministries, and the Development Bank of Japan. All told, Schaede has spent over nine years of research in Tokyo and is an advisor to two startup incubators in Japan. See more at www.TheJapanologist.com.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Ulrike Schaede
    Speaker
    Professor of Japanese Business, School of Global Policy and Strategy, UC San Diego and Director, Japan Forum for Innovation and Technology (JFIT)

    Phillip Lipscy
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 16th Book Launch: The Frontlines of Peace: An Insider's Guide to Changing the World

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 16, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Graham Centre is pleased to sponsor a virtual launch of The Frontlines of Peace: An Insider’s Guide to Changing the World, by Severine Autesserre, Professor of Political Science, Barnard College, Columbia University. This book takes the reader behind the scenes of contemporary peacebuilding efforts and has been praised by Nobel Laureates and the editor of Foreign Affairs.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 18th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 2: “Survival of Indigenous and Communities of Color in Los Angeles During a Global Pandemic and Ongoing Racial Violence”

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 18, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 2 Theme: Racisms in Public Health: What Pandemics Teach About Racial Disparities

    Title of Presentation: “Indigenous and Communities of Color Survival in Los Angeles in the Times of a Global Pandemic and in the Wake of Ongoing Racial Violence”

    Abstract:
    In the U.S., the COVID-19 pandemic has made the disproportionate outcomes of health isparities among Indigenous and communities of color clear. To be Indigenous, Black, and Latinx marks you for death twice as much than that of whites. In Los Angeles County, one of the most populated counties in the US, it has now been ten months since city officials first declared quarantine on March 29, 2020. Nine months have passed since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. We have witnessed how people themselves have re-organized, strategized, copped, and suffered loved ones losses at an incredible rate never seen in recent times. The lack of affordable healthcare and cultural awareness of medical professionals, especially towards Indigenous Oaxacans, puts them at a higher risk of exposure, contracting, re-occurance, or dying from COVID at an alarming scale. Making matters worse, on Christmas Day, South LA and its major hospital were declared “on the edge of catastrophe” as it streams with patients (New York Times 2020). How is one of the most populated neighborhoods, in the most populous states, where Indigenous, Black, and Latina/os together make up an overwhelming 95% facing the challenges? This talk considers how Indigenous and communities of color, have been affected by the pandemic, and how they have collectively responded to each other when the US settler state continues to fail them.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Brenda Nicolas (Zapotec) received her PhD in Chicana/o and Central American Studies from UCLA. Her work looks at the transborder communal experiences of Zapotec diasporas in Los Angeles. Specifically, she looks at women’s and adult children of migrants’ participation in community sociocultural and political organizing to contest settler colonial logics of Indigenous erasure. Dr. Nicolas is the recipient of several fellowships. She was born and raised in Los Angeles. Her book project is titled Transborder Comunalidad: Gendering Practices of Belonging and Identity Across Settler Colonial Borders.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Brenda Nicolas
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, Loyola Marymount University

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 19th Navigating Canada-China-US Trilateral Relations

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 19, 20212:00PM - 3:15PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    As U.S.-China relations have deteriorated significantly over the past several years, Canada-China relations have spiraled downward in tandem. Both Canada and the United States face the need to preserve the benefits of cross-Pacific relations—including economic and trade ties and educational and cultural exchanges—while also addressing the China challenge.

    With a new administration taking the reins in Washington, can the United States and Canada find more effective joint efforts––by acting together rather than acting alone––to open up greater diplomatic space and compete with China? At a time when the world shares the goal of combatting COVID-19, accelerating economic recovery, and responding to climate change, are these and other areas ripe for trilateral collaboration?

    On Friday, March 19, the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto and the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution will provide a forum for scholars from the United States and Canada to explore what the future holds for trilateral relations.


    Speakers

    Ryan Hass
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings; Former Director for China, Taiwan and Mongolia in the Obama White House

    Cheng Li
    Panelist
    Director and Senior Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Peter Loewen
    Panelist
    Professor of Political Science and Associate Director of Global Engagement, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Janice Stein
    Panelist
    Professor of Political Science and Founding Director, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the East Asia Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto; Nonresident Fellow; John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, March 22nd An Oxford Union-style Debate "Be it Resolved That Canada should sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons"

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 22, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History and Massey College present:

    An Oxford Union-style Debate

    “Be it Resolved That Canada should sign the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons”

    For the Affirmative: Beatrice Fihn, Executive Director, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

    For the Negative: Robert Baines, President and CEO, NATO Association of Canada

    Moderator: The Hon. Bill Graham, Chancellor, Trinity College

    Audience Members will vote on the Resolution at the Start and again at the End of the Debate.

    Submit questions at events.munk@utoronto.ca


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 23rd Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 23, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Entrepreneurship is an important part of growing one’s economy. Studies show that entrepreneurship can be learned, it is a skill. In Canada, one of the things that has been holding our entrepreneurs back is intellectual property and data protection. This webinar will focus on the importance of IP protection for entrepreneurship. In particular, we will discuss the intellectual property environment in Canada and existing support for firms.

    Panelists will discuss issues relating to their firm’s ability to secure IP especially as it relates to IP education and the role of government in supporting IP protection.


    Speakers

    Seray Çiçek
    Speaker
    Co-Founder & CEO, LSK Technologies Inc.

    Ryan Hubbard
    Speaker
    Senior Counsel, IP Litigation, Shopify

    Graeme Moffat
    Speaker
    Chief Scientist and Co-Founder, System 2 Neurotechnology and Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Shiri Breznitz
    Moderator
    Director, Master of Global Affairs Program and Associate Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 24th How Demography Challenges Are Shaping Democracies in Eastern Europe

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 24, 202111:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Annual Daniel and Elisabeth Damov Lecture in European Affairs

    Description

    In a democracy numbers matter. Demography may not be destiny but it shapes political power in the way that water shapes rock. Put simply, when populations change, power changes hands. This lecture is about how shrinking ethnic and racial majorities in Western democracies are trying to adjust to a future in which their declining numbers threaten their majority status. It’s not about how people elect their governments, but rather how different governments select their people. This occurs by re-designing citizenship criteria and electoral law, by crafting new immigration regimes, by employing practices like gerrymandering and voter suppression, and by changing national narratives. The central argument is that today’s clash between liberalism and illiberalism is at root a contest between two contrasting ideals of the “people”. Liberalism is a vote for an inclusive body politic, representing the diversity of modern society, in which the only majority that matters is the one born on election day. Illiberalism, by contrast, is a belief that the political and national community should be aligned. It’s an effort to try and preserve the indigenous character of national democracies at a time of dramatic change in ethnic, racial or generational composition.

    Short bio: Ivan Krastev is the chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences, IWM Vienna. He is a founding board member of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board of Trustees of The International Crisis Group and is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. He is the author of “Is it Tomorrow, Yet? How the Pandemic Changes Europe” ( Penguin, 2020); The Light that Failed: A Reckoning (Allen Lane, 2019), co-authored with Stephen Holmes – won the 30th Annual Lionel Gelber Prize; “After Europe” (UPenn Press, 2017); “Democracy Disrupted. The Global Politics on Protest” (UPenn Press, 2014) and “In Mistrust We Trust: Can Democracy Survive When We Don’t Trust Our Leaders?” (TED Books, 2013). Ivan Krastev is the winner of the Jean Améry Prize for European Essay Writing 2020.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Ivan Krastev
    Speaker
    The chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies and permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences, IWM Vienna

    Robert Austin
    Chair
    Associate Director and Professor, CERES


    Sponsors

    Mr. Daniel Damov


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 24th What does the Atlanta Tragedy Mean? Korean Diaspora Speaks

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 24, 20216:30PM - 8:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    Virtual Roundtable Participants:

    – Michelle Cho, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto 
    – Hae Yeon Choo, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto 
    – Laam Hae (Politics, York University 
    – Yeon Ju Heo, WIND-Toronto Korean Feminist Group
    – Eunjung Lee, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto 
    – Yoonkyung Lee, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto; Director, Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    – Ann Kim, Department of Sociology, York University 
    – Hyun Ok Park, Department of Sociology, York University 
    – Jesook Song, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto 

    Hosted by the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto, the Korean Office for Research and Education at York University, the Resource Center for Public Sociology at York University, WIND-Toronto Korean Feminist Group, the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto Mississauga.

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Korea at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE), York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 25th 2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event: “Racisms in the United States” – Session 3: “The Interconnected Histories of South African and American Sociology: Knowledge in the Service of Colonial Violence"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 25, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    2021 Bissell-Heyd Public Research Event:
    “Racisms in the United States”

    Event Info:
    Perhaps in more pertinent ways than any other time in recent memory, the power of globalization and how it intersects with race is at full display. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that what happens in a faraway land does not stop at its borders but can produce domino effects, forceful enough to lock down almost the entire world. Immigrants, long been singled-out as disease carriers, have once again been blamed for the world’s pandemics. The coronavirus originating in China, this time xenophobia has turned its gaze on immigrants of Asian descent. At the same time, the world is witnessing massive protests against anti-Black racism in the U.S. echo across countries as far-flung as Canada, France, Great Britain, India and Ethiopia, showing that such domino effects are not just produced as a result of once-in- a-lifetime epidemiological crises but also because of sociopolitical dynamics that have long percolated in our societies. These events highlight how the age-old colour line that still divides an “us” from a “them” are challenging America’s identity as a nation.

    This webinar series hosts a panel of distinguished scholars to situate the ongoing conversations on race, migration, and nationalism in today’s global context to discuss how racisms—such as, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, anti-immigrant sentiments, anti-Blackness, and settler colonialisms—all work together to produce systemic racial disparities in the United States and abroad. The event is open for free to the public. Please register to receive a Zoom link for each session.

    Session 3 Theme: How Racisms Work Together in the United States and Abroad

    Title of Presentation: “The Interconnected Histories of South African and American Sociology: Knowledge in the Service of Colonial Violence”

    Abstract:
    South African sociology is a colonial discipline. As such, it was not born out of a desire to add to the general store of knowledge about human nature and social relations. Rather, its raison d’être was to produce knowledge in the service of apartheid. Therefore, the matrix of ideas and understandings that coalesced around the concept of ‘culture’ in South African sociology cannot readily be separated from the issue of cultural violence. Indeed, to review the history of South African sociology is to review the history of an idea—culture—deployed in the service of colonial violence. But where did the ideas about culture that were so central to the apartheid episteme come from? The genealogical exploration of South African sociology I undertake below argues that the ideas about culture that were the bedrock of the South African apartheid policy of ‘separate development’ took the shape that they did because of the strength of the connection between ‘scientific sociology’ in South Africa and the apartheid regime. South African sociology was not, however, a sui generis phenomenon. As an imperial episteme it traced its roots and borrowed many of its concepts about culture from American sociology,
    which was, itself, a product of American slavery. The goal of this essay, therefore, is to explain how the concept of ‘cultural difference’ in American sociology, which evolved out of the practical needs of transforming industrial and agrarian labor relations in the period following emancipation, captured the hearts and minds of the first generation of South African sociologists.

    Speaker Bio:
    Dr. Zine Magubane received her PhD from Harvard University. Her work has dealt with two major geographic areas of the world, the United States and Southern Africa. Her choice of research topics reflects a deliberate effort to make an innovative contribution in the following four sociological sub-fields: the sociology of knowledge, the sociology of culture, social stratification, and historical sociology. In addition to several influential books and articles, she is the author of Bringing the Empire Home: Race, Class, and Gender in Britain and Colonial South Africa, which explores colonial conceptions of blackness across England and South Africa and how these representations continue to influence ideas of race, gender, and class today.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Zine Magubane
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Sociology, Boston College

    Tahseen Shams
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2020-21 Bissell-Heyd Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of the United States, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 25th How Embedded Interventions Controlled Contagion: Ideas, Institutions and the First Vaccine in China and India

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 25, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Harney Lecture Series

    Description

    Prerna Singh is Mahatma Gandhi Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Brown University. Singh is a fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, serves on the academic advisory board of the Harvard-Yenching Institute, the steering committee of the Center for Contemporary South Asia at Brown, and co-convenes the Brown-Harvard-MIT Joint Seminar in South Asian Politics. She studied at Princeton, Cambridge and Delhi Universities, and taught previously at Harvard University. Singh has published numerous award-winning books and articles on questions of human development, public health, ethnicity and nationalism. Her first book, How Solidarity Works for Welfare was awarded best book prizes from both the American Political Science and the American Sociological Associations. Singh has received fellowships from the Center for Advanced Study of Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, the Andrew Carnegie foundation, the American Academy of Berlin, the SSRC, the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, the University of Pennsylvania, and the American Institute of Indian Studies. Singh has shared her research with scholarly, policy and popular audiences in over a hundred lectures delivered across twenty different countries. Singh is presently working on two book projects. The first, tentatively entitled Embedded Interventions: Vaccines, Viruses, and Public Health in China and India compares the differences in the popular uptake of vaccines and consequently the control of infectious diseases with a focus on China and India across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The second is a book on the potential of, and challenges to constructing an inclusive nationalism.


    Speakers

    Prerna Singh
    Associate Professor of Political Science and International Studies, Brown University


    Sponsors

    Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 26th How urban is contemporary India?

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 26, 20219:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Since independence in 1947, India’s urban story has been a major highlight of the country’s path to economic and social progress. The State of the Cities Report: India, “to be released in March 2021” will bring together empirical findings on the complex and historic nature of the country’s urban transition. In this comprehensive contribution, the report focuses on the demographic, economic and infrastructural characteristics of India’s urbanization and aggregates data at the state level, with a view to addressing a key question: how urban is contemporary India?

    This report also makes an attempt to study the process and phenomenon of urbanization at different spatial levels and probes such questions as: is Indian’s urbanisation spatially more balanced today than in the past?; is it more productive? ; is it better equipped with infrastructural services? ; is it moving closer to the goals of inclusion and environmental security? During this online webinar, the lead author of this report on Indian cities will answer questions from a panel of experts drawn from India, the United States, Canada and Europe. The report also aims to contribute to our understanding of how urbanization in India contributes to urban theory and applies concepts such as planetary urbanization, subaltern urbanism to an empirical framework. Academics, students of urban planning and activists will benefit and are particularly welcome to attend this event.

    *** A digital copy of the State of the Cities: India report is available for reading on the Institute of Social Sciences website here: http://www.issin.org/pdf/State-the-Cities-Report.pdf

    *** A printed version will be available on the Amazon India website starting March 26, 2021.

    *** More information on the Institute of Social Sciences (New Delhi): http://www.issin.org/

    Organizer:
    Centre for South Asian Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Co-hosts:
    Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India
    Guelph Institute of Development Studies, University of Guelph
    Canada India Research Centre for Learning and Engagement, University of Guelph


    Speakers

    Partha Mukhopadhyay
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi

    Jan Nijman
    Panelist
    Professor of Urban Studies and Geography, University of Amsterdam

    Richard Bird
    Panelist
    Professor Emeritus, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto and Senior Fellow, Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG), Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy

    Shahana Chattaraj
    Panelist
    Director, Research Data & Innovation, World Resources Institute (WRI) India

    Yue Zhang
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Illinois, Chicago

    Om Prakash Mathur
    Panelist
    Senior Fellow and Head, Urban Studies at the Institute of Social Sciences, New Delhi

    Bharat Punjabi
    Moderator
    Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute; Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 30th Empire online: The US government’s reterritorialization of cyberspace after 9/11

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 30, 20213:30PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Not long after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the US government responded by creating the Department of Homeland Security, publishing the nation’s first substantial cybersecurity strategy, and passing the PATRIOT Act into law. Among the many reasons for these measures was anticipation of a large-scale cyberattack – a “cyber Pearl Harbor.” Although there has been no such catastrophe in the subsequent two decades, these institutions, strategies, and laws have endured and expanded. They have become particularly effective at securing cyberspace to reproduce structures of US imperialism online. To better understand the post-9/11 moment in the history of the US cybersecurity state, in this presentation I show how the privatization of the internet throughout the 1990s was directly related to the US government’s production of the internet as an object of security. I then trace how this legacy informed key US cyber policies that emerged after 2001.

    Speaker Bio:
    Jordan Ali is an MA student in Human Geography at the University of Toronto’s Department of Geography & Planning. His research interests lie at the intersection of geography, communication, and new media. “Empire online: The United States government’s reterritorialization of cyberspace after 9/11” is funded by SSHRC and the Canadian Department of National Defence (in partnership with SSHRC).

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Jordan Ali
    Speaker
    MA student, Human Geography, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Alexandra Rahr
    Moderator
    Bissell-Heyd Lecturer, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 31st Nation and Religion: The Secular-Religion Dynamics in Modern Korea

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 31, 20213:00PM - 4:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Transcendence has been largely mobilized in formulating a modern nation-state in Korea. In this talk the presenter looks into how religion is constructed in relation with the development of secular modernity in Korea from a perspective of circulatory history. The category of religion appeared in Korea in processes through which East Asia was incorporated into the globalized modern world. Unlike those in China and Japan, a considerable portion of Korea’s enlightenment elites and major nationalists recalled spiritual societies to the making of the Korean nation in the globalized East. Such formation of religion in modern Korea was greatly attributed to the colonial and postcolonial politics of the secular nation-building. Rather than condemned as a symbol of feudalism, irrationality and imperialism, religion was largely thought of as an alternative venue of communication for resisting colonialism, contributing to national enlightenment as well as overcoming the nation’s geopolitical limit in the Far East.

    Dr. Kyuhoon Cho is a research associate in the Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. Previously he taught at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul National University and Nanyang Technological University. His research and teaching focus on Korean religions and heritage in the context of globalization.


    Speakers

    Kyuhoon Cho
    Speaker
    Research Associate, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Director, Centre for the Study of Korea, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 31st Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #3: Beyond the Classroom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 31, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    University life isn’t confined to a classroom — and neither is the Munk One Program.

    Join us for this interactive session to learn about opportunities for travel, field work, course-based research abroad, and the many opportunities to continue taking part in labs and programs in the Munk School – beyond your first year of University .

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2021

  • Tuesday, April 6th Pope Francis and the Future of Work

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 6, 202111:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    A recent report by a network of Catholic-inspired institutions, titled “Care is Work, Work is Care”. They ask the questions: “What is the meaning of decent work in today’s world?” or “How can we achieve the goal of proving decent work to all in todays’ world?” or “Every worker in the world has a right to decent work: how can we ensure it is respected?” By examining global challenges connected to building a world that is both socially and environmentally just, the report identifies practices and processes that can help direct the future of work towards sustainable and inclusive outcomes.

    In this webinar, panelists will discuss the role of innovation in building a future of work that responds to the call to care for our common home.


    Speakers

    Paolo Foglizzo
    Editorial Board Aggiornamenti Sociali, Milan

    Fr. Clete Kiley
    Senior Advisor, UNITEHERE International Union. Chaplain, Chicago Federation of Labor

    Joe McCartin
    Executive Director, Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor, Georgetown University

    Sarah Prenger
    International President, Young Christian Workers, Brussels

    Peter Warrian
    Distinguished Research Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 7th The Dynamics of Disruption: Start-Ups, Venture Capitalism and Digital Entrepreneurship in Greece

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 7, 202110:00AM - 12:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    How is digital entrepreneurship, led by start-up companies and backed by venture capital, transforming the Greek economy? How might this movement be expanded to better enable Greece to improve its economic prospects? What steps might be taken to limit the social costs of disruption and enhance its benefits?

    Stergios Anastasiadis was born in Canada to Greek immigrant parents, finished his secondary school education (Lyceum) in Greece, and returned to Canada to complete degrees at the University of Toronto and McGill University. He has worked in the technology space for more than thirty years, building teams and creating and scaling products. Most recently he has focused his energies in the start-up space, drawing on experience at Google, Good Technology, and Shopify. Stergios has worked with product development, user experience, design and data teams throughout his career. As an engineer he has enjoyed building systems in consumer and enterprise spaces and, most recently, in the area of big data and machine learning. Anastasiadis has made a conscious effort to invest in Greek start-ups through local venture capital funds. He has reviewed more than 50 Greek start-up pitches and formed relationships with innovative and dynamic entrepreneurs. His focus in on deepTech, cleanTech, agriTech and shippingTech, four areas of significant relevancy to Greece. Stergios is committed to mentoring members of the Greek tech community and has developed two of his own start-up companies. He is bullish about the Greek technology and start-up ecosystem and committed to returning to Greece on a full-time basis.

    Steve Vranakis is an award winning creative who has worked on the launch of the iPhone and Amazon in the UK, with NASA (Space Lab), and the United Nations UNICEF). He led the Creative Lab at Google in EMEA for over 8 years. Vranakis was appointed as the first ever Chief Creative Officer for Greece in 2019, to develop a new country narrative as a Special Advisor to the Prime Minister. To help the Tourism Industry cope with the effects of the Covid-19 crisis, he launched #GreeceFromHome, an initiative developed and deployed in two weeks. Some of his past projects include: a machine learning musical instrument called the NSynth Super, the Assembly of Youth (an installation giving youth a voice at the United Nations), and Inside Abbey Road – a virtual tour of the iconic music studios. You can view some of those projects here: https://youtu.be/MeHdXaSNaRU. Steve also worked on the launch of project Bloks, a physical coding platform that teaches kids to code for which he was granted two Google patents. In 2015 Vranakis went to the island of Lesvos to build a mobile information site (refugee.info) to help Syrian refugees fleeing civil war. Steve’s work has earned many international awards and has been featured in WIRED, The New York Times, Telegraph, Wall Street Journal, Creative Review, Huffington Post, FT, Design Week, and Adage. He’s written columns for Adweek, Marketing, and Campaign, and conducted interviews with the BBC, CNN, and CNBC. Steve serves as an advisor to one of the world’s hottest fashion technology start-ups, unmade.com, as well as SUPERPERSONAL, an AI company using advanced visual personalisation technology. In 2017 he was president of D&AD where he made it his mission to help young people from disadvantaged backgrounds get into the creative industries.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Sponsors

    The Hellenic Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 8th What Do Companies Say When Their Drugs Are Withdrawn From the Market?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 8, 202112:00PM - 1:00PMExternal Event, External Event
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    Description

    About Dr. Joel Lexchin

    Joel Lexchin received his MD from the University of Toronto in 1977. He is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Health Policy and Management at York University in Toronto Canada where he taught health policy until 2016. In addition, he has worked in the emergency department at the University Health Network also in Toronto for over 32 years. He has published two books since 2016: Private Profits vs Public Policy: The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Canadian State was published by University of Toronto Press in 2016 and Doctors in Denial: Why Big Pharma and the Canadian Medical Profession Are Too Close for Comfort was published by Lorimer in 2017.

    Hosted by Dr. Jillian Kohler:

    Connaught Scholar, Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health & Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, and Director at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency & Accountability in the Pharmaceutical Sector.

    Please note that zoom information will be directly emailed the day of the event (April 8, 2021).


    Speakers

    Dr. Joel Lexchin
    Speaker
    Professor Emeritus in the School of Health Policyand Management at York University

    Dr. Jillian Kohler
    Moderator
    Connaught Scholar, Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health & Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto and Director at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency & Accountability in the Pharmaceutical Sector.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 9th Political Farming in Central European Policy-Making

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 9, 20219:30AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Discourses are essential arenas where policy-making occurs. Analysis of parliamentary debates on material need assistance reveals how governing societies through security, biologisation, the normalisation of self-responsibility, and through moral claims, redefines relationships in the society, leads to restrictive control oriented measures, resulting in symbolic and social exclusion that deepens inequalities and solidifies the institutional racism against the Roma in Slovakia.

    Lenka Kissová, PhD is a junior researcher at the Institute for Research in Inclusive Education at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic. She received her doctoral degree in Sociology from Masaryk University, Her professional interests include migration, minorities, political discourses, securitisation, social justice, and human rights. She has been a member of many local, national or international research projects., she was a visiting student at the University of Bologna and at the University of Toronto.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Lenka Kissová
    Speaker
    Institute for Research in Inclusive Education at Masaryk University

    Barbara Falk
    Moderator
    Royal Military College of Canada


    Sponsors

    Czech Studies Initiative

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 9th Lives of Data: Computational Cultures from India

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 9, 202110:00AM - 12:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    Political Life of Information Series

    Description

    “The Political Life of Information” series at the Asian Institute brings together scholars, activists, artists, and other practitioners to reflect on practices of surveillance, data visualization, population management and identification, news and journalism, and the social aspects of algorithms from a perspective based in Asia, but speaking to a broad audience interested in the political ramifications of media and information technology.

    This, our second event will focus on the edited volume, Lives of Data, edited by Sandeep Mertia, a groundbreaking new study mapping the historical and emergent dynamics of big data, computing, and society in India. Data infrastructures are now more global than ever before. In much of the world, new sociotechnical possibilities of big data and artificial intelligence are unfolding under the long shadows cast by infra/structural inequalities, colonialism, modernization, and national sovereignty. This book offers critical vantage points for looking at big data and its shadows, as they play out in uneven encounters of machinic and cultural relationalities of data in India’s socio-politically disparate and diverse contexts.

    Lives of Data emerged from research projects and workshops at the Sarai programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies. It brings together fifteen interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners to set up a collaborative research agenda on computational cultures. The essays offer wide-ranging analyses of media and techno-scientific trajectories of data analytics, disruptive formations of digital economy, and the grounded practices of data-driven governance in India. Encompassing history, anthropology, science and technology studies (STS), media studies, civic technology, data science, digital humanities, and journalism, the essays open up possibilities for a truly situated global and sociotechnically specific understanding of the many lives of data.

    *** Link to the Lives of Data volume, published in the “Theory on Demand” series by the Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam:
    https://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/lives-of-data-essays-on-computational-cultures-from-india/
    ___________________________

    SANDEEP MERTIA is a PhD candidate at the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and Urban Doctoral Fellow at New York University. He is an ICT engineer by training, and former Research Associate at The Sarai Programme, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies, Delhi.

    TONG LAM is Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto and a visual artist. He is the author of A Passion for Facts: Social Surveys and the Construction of the Chinese Nation-State, 1900–1949 (University of California Press, 2011), Abandoned Futures: A Journey to the Posthuman World (Carpet Bombing Culture, 2013), and the co-editor (with Jahnavi Phalkey) of the inaugural special issue of BJHS Themes: Sciences of Giants: China and India in the Twentieth Century (2016). His current research focuses on information, infrastructure, special zones, and borders in socialist and postsocialist China. His ongoing research-based visual projects examine contemporary China’s breakneck transformation, as well as the material evidence of Cold War mobilizations globally and their environmental and social consequences. He has exhibited his photographic and video works internationally.

    SARAH SHARMA is Director of the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology at the University of Toronto and Associate Professor of Media Theory at the ICCIT. Her research and teaching focuses on the relationship between technology, time, and labour with a specific focus on the politics of gender and race. She is the author of In the Meantime: Temporality and Cultural Politics (Duke UP, 2014). Sarah is currently at work on a new book on technology and feminism tentatively titled Broken Machine Feminism. Next year Duke University Press will publish her co-edited collection MsUnderstanding Media: A Feminist Medium is the Message (with Rianka Singh). She has also published articles in such venues as Cultural Studies, The Boston Review, Feminist Media Studies, Canadian Journal of Communication, Communication and Critical Cultural Studies, and Transfers: Journal of Mobility Studies.

    MARIANA VALVERDE is a noted sociolegal scholar who has worked on diverse issues and topics over the years, but has recently focused attention on ‘smart city’ initiatives, mainly in Canada but also elsewhere including India. Her most recent book is the co-edited collection Smart Cities in Canada: Digital Dreams, Corporate Designs (2020)


    Speakers

    Sandeep Mertia
    Panelist
    PhD candidate at the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and Urban Doctoral Fellow, New York University

    Tong Lam
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto; Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School

    Sarah Sharma
    Panelist
    Director of the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology; Associate Professor of Media Theory at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (ICCIT), University of Toronto

    Mariana Valverde
    Panelist
    Professor Emerita, Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Contemporary Asian Studies, Asian Institute; Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 9th Exporting Canada's Resettlement Model? Reflections on the Private Sponsorship Program

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 9, 202112:30PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Following the Syrian refugee program, the Government of Canada led a major effort to internationalize private refugee sponsorship through the Global Refugee Sponsorship Initiative. Four years later, what have we learned about this effort to export and internationalize aspects of Canada’s program? Panelists will draw from their chapters in the recently-published volume, Strangers to Neighbours: Refugee Sponsorship in Context (MQUP 2020).

    Moderator:
    Geoffrey Cameron is research associate at the Global Migration Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. He has a PhD from the University of Toronto, where he was a Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholar, and an MPhil from the University of Oxford. His forthcoming book is Send Them Here: Religion and Refugee Resettlement in North America (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2021), and he is co-editor of Strangers to Neighbours: Refugee Sponsorship in Context (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2020)

    Panelists:
    Megan Bradley is associate professor of political science and international development studies at McGill University. Her research and teaching focus on refugees, human rights, humanitarianism, transitional justice, natural disasters, and gender. She serves as Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of International Development, and Associate Director of the Centre for International Peace and Security Studies. She also coordinates the McGill Refugee Research Group. She is the author of Refugee Repatriation: Justice, Responsibility and Redress (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and The International Organization for Migration: Commitments, Challenges, Complexities (Routledge, 2020).

    Craig Damian Smith is senior research associate at the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University. He was previously Associate Director of the Global Migration Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, and he is a Research Affiliate at York’s Centre for Refugee Studies. He is also the founder of Pairity, a data-driven platform to facilitate community-based refugee integration.

    Shauna Labman is an associate professor of human rights in the Global College at the University of Winnipeg. She co-founded the Migration Law Research Cluster at the University of Manitoba and was a consultant for the Law Commission of Canada, the Canadian Embassy in Beijing, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in New Delhi. She is the author of Crossing Law’s Border: Canada’s Refugee Resettlement Program (UBC Press, 2020), and co-editor of Strangers to Neighbours: Refugee Sponsorship in Context (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2020)

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Sponsors

    Migration Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 12th Women's Independent Animation and Feminized Creative Labour

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 12, 20213:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Women have been historically restricted from upward mobility in American animation studios, but the increasingly fragmented and decentralized landscape of animation production in the 1970s-80s made space for a burgeoning community of independent women animators. How did their creative work flourish in these decades, at a time when the animation industry itself was facing an uncertain future? In pursuing this question, this talk brings together a feminist history of animation production in the 1970s-80s and the history of social reproduction theory in these same decades, in order to understand independent animation in the context of an increasingly precarious and feminized post-Fordist creative economy. Building a composite portrait anchored by autobiographical films of fours artists (Suzan Pitt, Jane Aaron, Sally Cruikshank, and Candy Kugel), I propose the figure of the “homeworker” as a model for self-employed artists maintaining their practice under conditions of economic, social, and spatial precarity, often within their own home. Conceived as an alternative to the independent or freelance artist, the homeworker allows us to understand creative labour in a post-Fordist economy as pervasively feminized labour, increasingly extended to all artists. Looking closely at the work of women animators who navigated this economy at its nascency allows us to understand its complexity and speculate about tactics of its survival.

    Author Bio:
    Dr. Alla Gadassik is assistant professor of Media History and Theory at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Her research bridges the disciplines of cinema studies, history of technology, and genealogies of media practice. Particular areas of interest include the history of cinematography, film editing, and animation methods, as they transformed across different disciplines invested in rendering movement. She is currently working on a SSHRC-funded research project on eco-materialist approaches to animation.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Alla Gadassik
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Media History and Theory, Emily Carr University of Art + Design

    Nicholas Sammond
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 13th Les voyages du pasteur Pierre du Moulin (1568-1658): entre exil et imaginaire

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 13, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    -DESCRIPTION : Le pasteur Pierre du Moulin (1568-1658) est l’une des grandes figures de la communauté protestante française de la première moitié du XVIIe siècle. Premier pasteur du temple de Charenton à quelques lieues de Paris, il est bien connu pour ses écrits théologiques et ses controverses avec le clergé catholique. Mais du Moulin a également rédigé ses Mémoires dans lesquels sont consignés les évènements plus personnels de sa longue existence marquée par les guerres de Religion (1562-1598) et les relations très tendues entre les réformés et le pouvoir royal durant le règne de Louis XIII (1610-1643). En s’appuyant sur une version restée manuscrite des Mémoires de du Moulin, cette présentation analysera la thématique du voyage et s’interrogera sur ses significations. La vie de Pierre du Moulin se caractérise par de nombreux déplacements, voulus et contraints, tant en France qu’à l’étranger (Sedan, Angleterre, Provinces-Unies), et ce pasteur incarne à la fois la France huguenote et le Refuge huguenot. Cette présentation montrera en outre que les imaginaires liés au voyage doivent être pris en compte, dans la mesure où ces Mémoires visent à délivrer un message religieux à ses lecteurs.

    -BIOGRAPHIE : Marie-Clarté Lagrée est agrégée d’histoire et docteur en histoire moderne de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, et elle a publié sa thèse sous le titre : « C’est moy que je peins ». Figures de soi à l’automne de la Renaissance (PUPS, 2012). Elle est spécialisée en histoire culturelle de la France des XVIe-XVIIe siècles, et privilégie une approche enrichie par l’apport des autres sciences sociales. Ses recherches actuelles et ses dernières publications portent sur les thématiques du corps et du voyage, et elle travaille en ce moment sur le pasteur Pierre du Moulin (1568-1658).

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 13th Book Launch: Information Technology & Military Power by Jon R. Lindsay

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 13, 20213:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Militaries with state-of-the-art information technology sometimes bog down in confusing conflicts. To understand why, it is important to understand the micro-foundations of military power in the information age, and this is exactly what Jon R. Lindsay’s Information Technology and Military Power gives us. As Lindsay shows, digital systems now mediate almost every effort to gather, store, display, analyze, and communicate information in military organizations. He highlights how personnel now struggle with their own information systems as much as with the enemy.

    Join us on April 13, as Jon Lindsay sits down to discuss his new book with Brian Cantwell Smith, the Reid Hoffman Professor of Artificial Intelligence and the Human at the Faculty of Information Studies and Ron Deibert, Professor and Director of Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.

    Information Technology and Military Power is available from Cornell University Press. Attendees may use the following promotional code to receive a 30% discount: 09FLYER


    Speakers

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science

    Brian Cantwell Smith
    Discussant
    Reid Hoffman Professor of Artificial Intelligence and the Human, and Professor of Information, Philosophy, Cognitive Science, and the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Faculty of Information

    Ron Deibert
    Moderator
    Director, Citizen Lab and Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 13th Japan and Asia in the Post Pandemic Era: Selective Cooperation vs Strategic Competition in Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 13, 20217:00PM - 8:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    In his book, In the Dragon’s Shadow, The Diplomat editor Sebastian Strangio talks about the challenges for Southeast Asia in managing the rise of China. Do Japan’s longstanding ties to the region—including as its largest infrastructure investor– stand it in good stead to provide a counterweight to China? And what can Canada learn from Japan in its approach to this important region? Join Strangio and a panel of international experts to discuss the roles of Japan, Canada, the USA and China in Southeast Asia.

    Speaker Bios:
    Sebastian Strangio is Southeast Asia Editor at The Diplomat. In 2008, he began his career as a reporter at The Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia, and has since traveled and reported extensively across Southeast Asia, paying special attention to the impact of China’s growing power. Sebastian’s writing has appeared in leading publications including Foreign Affairs, the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. He is also the author of Hun Sen’s Cambodia (Yale, 2014), a path-breaking examination of Cambodia since the fall of the Khmer Rouge, and In the Dragon’s Shadow: Southeast Asia in the Chinese Century (Yale, 2020).
    *More information: http://www.sebastianstrangio.com

    Nobuhiro Aizawa is Associate Professor of Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University. He is the author of ‘Beyond the Non-Interference Dilemma: The Indonesian Initiative on ASEAN Charter, Nargis Crisis and Regionalism’, Australian Journal of Politics and History: Volume 65, Number 3, 2019. The Ethnic Chinese and the State: Indonesia’s China/Chinese Problem (in Japanese) (Shoseki Kobo- Hayama, 2010). He has been a Wilson Center Japan Scholar, a Visiting Scholar at Thammasat University, Chulalongkorn University and Cornell University. He is a former Research Associate at the Institution of Development Economies-JETRO, National Graduate Institute of Policy Studies and a member of Project 2045: A Joint Project of Two Maritime Democracies Indonesia-Japan.

    Stewart Beck is the President and CEO of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. Prior to joining APF Canada, Mr. Beck served as the Canadian High Commissioner to the Republic of India with concurrent accreditation to the Kingdom of Bhutan and to Nepal. He joined Canada’s Department of External Affairs and International Trade (now Global Affairs Canada) in 1982 and served abroad in the United States, Taiwan, and the People’s Republic of China. In Ottawa, he held a number of progressively more senior positions, including Director General of the North Asia Bureau, Director General Responsible for Senior Management and Rotational Assignments, and Assistant Deputy Minister for International Business Development, Investment, and Innovation. He was Consul General in Shanghai and prior to his posting to India, he was Consul General in San Francisco.

    Elina Noor is Director, Political-Security Affairs and Deputy Director, Washington, D.C. Office at the Asia Society Policy Institute. A native of Malaysia, Elina’s work focuses on security developments in Southeast Asia, global governance and technology, and preventing/countering violent extremism. Previously, Elina was Associate Professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. Prior to that, she was Director, Foreign Policy and Security Studies at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies Malaysia. While there, she also served as the Secretary of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific, a 21-member Track Two regional security network. Between 2017 and 2019, Elina was a member of the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace. She is also on the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs’ roster of experts, supporting efforts to build member states’ cyber-related capacity.
    *More information: https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/elina-noor

    Deanna Horton is Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto. As part of her Canadian foreign service career, Deanna Horton spent a total of twelve years in Japan, including as Deputy Head of Mission, and also served as Ambassador to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. She was a NAFTA negotiator, followed by two postings in Washington, most recently as Minister (Congressional, Public and Intergovernmental Affairs). As a Munk School Senior Fellow she has led a digital mapping project on Canada’s footprint in Asia (https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/canasiafootprint/) and related research on Canadian technology multinationals. Ms. Horton is also affiliated with the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, and the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, commenting on economic and trade policy issues with a focus on Asia.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Sebastian Strangio
    Speaker
    Southeast Asia Editor, The Diplomat

    Nobuhiro Aizawa
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University

    Stewart Beck
    Panelist
    President and CEO, Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada

    Elina Noor
    Panelist
    Director, Political-Security Affairs and Deputy Director, Asia Society Policy Institute, Asia Society

    Deanna Horton
    Moderator
    Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 15th Book Talk: Laleh Khalili Discusses Her New Book "Sinews of War and Trade: Shipping and Capitalism in the Arabian Peninsula"

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 15, 202112:00PM - 1:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Series

    The Belt and Road in Global Perspective

    Description

    The Belt and Road in Global Perspective project is delighted to welcome Laleh Khalili (Professor of International Politics, Queen Mary U of London), who will discuss her book “Sinews of War and Trade Shipping and Capitalism in the Arabian Peninsula” with Joseph McQuade (Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy)

    On the map of global trade, China is now the factory of the world. A parade of ships full of raw commodities—iron ore, coal, oil—arrive in its ports, and fleets of container ships leave with manufactured goods in all directions. The oil that fuels China’s manufacturing comes primarily from the Arabian peninsula. Much of the material shipped from China are transported through the ports of Arabian peninsula, Dubai’s Jabal Ali port foremost among them. China’s “maritime silk road” flanks the peninsula on all sides.

    Sinews of War and Trade is the story of what the making of new ports and shipping infrastructure has meant not only for the Arabian peninsula itself, but for the region and the world beyond. The book is an account of how maritime transportation is not simply an enabling companion of trade, but central to the very fabric of global capitalism. The ports that serve maritime trade, logistics, and hydrocarbon transport create racialised hierarchies of labour, engineer the lived environment, aid the accumulation of capital regionally and globally, and carry forward colonial regimes of profit, law and administration.

    Laleh Khalili is a professor of International Politics at Queen Mary University of London and the author of Heroes and Martyrs of Palestine: The politics of national commemoration (Cambridge 2007), Time in the Shadows: Confinement in Counterinsurgencies (Stanford 2013) and Sinews of War and Trade: Shipping and Capitalism in the Arabian Peninsula (Verso 2020).

    Joseph McQuade is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada and Digital Content Manager for the Munk School’s Belt and Road in Global Perspective research initiative.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938

    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Department of Geography and Planning


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 15th From “You Won’t Have a Name” to “Say Their Names” Looking to Woody Guthrie in the 21st Century

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 15, 20213:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    *THIS WEBINAR HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO UNFORSEEN CIRCUMSTANCES. THANK YOU.*

    Gustavus Stadler is a writer and an English professor at Haverford College. His most recent book, Woody Guthrie: An Intimate Life, rejects the legendary folksinger’s reputation as a mythic American “ramblin’ man,” instead delving into the importance of intimacy in his personal and political life. Called “revelatory” by Greil Marcus and “a landmark work” by NPR music critic Ann Powers, Woody Guthrie: An Intimate Life is a fresh and contemporary analysis of the overlapping influences of sexuality, politics, race, and disability on the art and mind of an American folk icon. He is currently beginning work on a book about Café Society, the first nightclub in New York City to be fully integrated, where Billie Holiday first performed “Strange Fruit.”

    Lance Canales is a roots-blues influenced Americana musician from California’s breadbasket, the Central Valley, where Canales lived the life that so many songs have been written about since the birth of roots music: hard labor, one room shacks and taunting ghosts whispering of a better life. Canales’ guttural vocals combine a hard-edged storytelling approach beneath a stripped down, foot-stomping, acoustic instrumentation. As described by music journalist, Robin Wheeler, Canales ”plays hollow-bodied, anger-fueled blues guitar. He growls and stomps with his feet clad in the heavy work boots of his grandfather.”

    With and without his band, The Flood, Canales has released three albums, most recently The Blessing and the Curse. He has performed across the US and Europe. In 2013, he released a torrid, revisionist version of Woody Guthrie’s “Deportee (Plane Crash at Los Gatos),” a song about the deaths of 28 Mexican Braceros in 1948. The refrain of Guthrie’s original song laments that the victims weren’t named in news reports of the event, simply referre to as “deportees.” Between 2012 and 2015, Canales and author Tim Hernandez found the names, inserted them in the new version of the song, located many of their relatives, and, in collaboration with the Woody Guthrie Foundation, organized a memorial headstone commemorating the lost passengers.

    Drawing on the research for his recent book, Stadler will discuss Guthrie’s views on race, racism, and whiteness. Canales will describe his work and his relationship with Guthrie’s music, playing a few songs along the way. The two will have a brief chat and then open up the event to discussion for all.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Lance Canales
    Roots-blues influenced Americana musician

    Gustavus Stadler
    Professor of English, Haverford College



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 20th Canada's Quantum Internet: Prospects and Perils

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 20, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Quantum information science harnesses the strange properties of quantum physics to perform new kinds of communication and computation. A future internet that uses quantum networks and quantum computers has the potential to enable many new applications for governments and civil society. Canada has emerged as a leader in quantum information science, and academic and commercial labs are actively experimenting with quantum networks. Yet with any great technological promise there is also danger. Architects of the classical internet did not anticipate the crises of disinformation, cybersecurity, and surveillance that plague global networks. As we look toward a possible future quantum internet, what risks and challenges should we anticipate? How can Canada best position itself to take advantage of its own potential for innovation in quantum technology?

    This panel brings together experts to discuss the political, economic, and scientific implications of quantum communications, for Canada and the world.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Francesco Bova
    Associate Professor, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

    Anne Broadbent
    Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Ottawa

    Jon R. Lindsay
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Christoph Simon
    Professor and Associate Head, Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 21st Book Launch: Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 21, 20212:00PM - 3:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    For the last few decades, the dominant growth model has been to focus on technological innovation. Yet, while a small number of cities and regions have benefited, many other communities have struggled. In his latest book, Innovation in Real Places: Strategies for Prosperity in an Unforgiving World, Dan Breznitz sets out to challenge this model and sets out how these communities might succeed. He argues that by understanding the changed structure of the global system of production and then using those insights to enable communities to recognize their own advantages, cities and regions can foster surprising forms of specialized innovation.

    On April 21, join us as Dan Breznitz sits down to discuss his new book with Ludwig Siegele, US Technology Editor at The Economist.

    Innovation in Real Places is currently available as an ebook and will be available at local bookstores, as well as from Indigo and Amazon, on April 17. You can find links to purchase at Oxford University Press.


    Speakers

    Dan Breznitz
    Speaker
    Professor and Munk Chair of Innovation Studies, and Co-Director of the Innovation Policy Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Ludwig Siegele
    Moderator
    US Technology Editor, The Economist



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 22nd – Friday, April 23rd Centre for South Asian Studies Graduate Symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 22, 202110:00AM - 4:20PMOnline Event, Online Event
    Friday, April 23, 202110:00AM - 3:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The first ever graduate symposium in contemporary South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto was conceived of as a platform for students engaging in critical research connected to South Asia. As the pandemic disrupts our societies, it serves as a stark reminder of the importance of social relations and the need to transform the “normal.” Presenters in the conference draw our attention to a range of lenses to observe and imagine possibilities within history, religion, politics and technology. We invite students, faculty, professionals, and practitioners of South Asian Studies from across geographies to engage with and learn about emerging research in the field. We are immensely proud of the team at South Asian Studies that brought this event together and we wish all of our brilliant participants good luck with their presentations and academic journeys.

    Asmita Bhutani, PhD student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and Centre for South Asian Studies
    Sarah Alam, PhD student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education and Centre for South Asian Studies
    (Co-Chairs of the CSAS Graduate Symposium 2021)

    ***Follow the link below to view the Symposium Program***

    PLEASE NOTE: The registration for the Keynote Address is conducted separately from the registration for the CSAS Graduate Symposium. Follow the link below to register for the Keynote Address via Zoom and register for the Symposium via Eventbrite OR copy/paste the URLs below in your web browser:

    * Register for the Keynote Address: https://bit.ly/3tdiMGH

    * Register for the Symposium: https://csasgradsymposium2021.eventbrite.ca

    * For further information: https://uoft.me/CSASGrad21

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 22nd Experiments in Skin: Race and Beauty in the Shadows of Vietnam

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 22, 20212:00PM - 4:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Experiments in Skin: Race and Beauty in the Shadows of Vietnam (Duke University Press, 2021) examines the afterlife of the Vietnam War, and its continued impact on our understanding of race and beauty. Framing skin as the site around which these ideas have been formed, materially and metaphorically, the book considers the work of wartime scientists in the U.S. Military Dermatology Research Program, who attempted to alleviate the environmental and chemical risks to soldiers’ bodies, while helping to shore up the widespread use of these same chemicals, alongside the labors of women in contemporary Vietnam, who continue to struggle to remediate war’s biochemical effects. By foregrounding the histories of US militarism, biomedical investigations, chemical warfare, consumer culture and the bodies of U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers, prisoners, and civilians who have been the subjects of research and remediation, Experiments in Skin advances a transpacific theory of aesthetics and politics critical to our understanding of colonial modernity and the lives lived in its shadows.

    Speaker Bios:

    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU (presenter)
    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu is Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at NYU. She is the author of Experiments in Skin and of The Beautiful Generation: Asian Americans and the Cultural Economy of Fashion (Duke UP, 2011), and co-editor of the anthologies Fashion and Beauty in the Time of Asia, Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America, and Technicolor: Race and Technology in Everyday Life. At NYU, she currently serves as the faculty coordinator for the Prison Education Program’s multi-year collaborative research project on “Debt and Incarceration” (https://wp.nyu.edu/nyu_debt_project/).

    Matthew Farish, Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T (panelist)
    Matthew Farish is Associate Professor of Geography and Associate Chair, Undergraduate at the University of Toronto. He teaches courses in cultural and historical geography, and studies the militarization of the planet by the United States during the middle decades of the twentieth century. He is finally nearing completion of a co-authored history of the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, and is drawing together a collection of essays on US military climate laboratories, survival schools, and proving grounds.

    Edward Jones-Imhotep, Associate Professor and Director, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, U of T (panelist)
    Edward Jones-Imhotep is a historian of the social and cultural life of machines. He received his PhD in History of Science from Harvard University and is Director of the University of Toronto’s Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology (IHPST). He is a co-founder of Toronto’s TechnoScience Salon, a public forum for humanities-based discussions about science and technology. His research deals with topics ranging from the history of music studios and artificial life to space technologies and the technological geographies of islands. But his work is particularly interested in histories of technological failure — breakdowns, malfunctions, accidents — and what they reveal about the place of machines and the stakes of machine failures in the culture, politics, and economics of modern societies. His book, The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War (MIT Press), won the Sidney Edelstein Prize. His current book project, Unreliable Humans/Fallible Machines, examines how people from the late-18th to the mid-20th centuries understood machine failures as a problem of the self — a problem of the kinds of people that failing machines created, or threatened, or presupposed.

    Elizabeth Wijaya, Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies, Graduate Faculty, Cinema Studies Institute and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, U of T (panelist)
    Elizabeth Wijaya is an Assistant Professor of East Asian Cinema in the Department of Visual Studies and a Graduate Faculty at the Cinema Studies Institute and the Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. She was a President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities). She is a co-founder of E&W Films and an Associate Producer of Taste (dir. Le Bao, Special Jury Prize, Berlinale 2021).

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu
    Associate Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

    Matthew Farish
    Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Undergraduate, Department of Geography and Planning, U of T

    Edward Jones-Imhotep
    Associate Professor and Director, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, U of T

    Elizabeth Wijaya
    Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Studies, Graduate Faculty, Cinema Studies Institute and Director, Centre for Southeast Asian Studies, U of T



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 23rd Munk One Open House Series 2021 - Session #4: Student Life at Munk One

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 23, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Community is at the heart of the Munk One Program.

    The smallest of the One programs, learn how Munk One students benefit from small class sizes, a dynamic student life, mentorship opportunities, and a close connection to the Munk School community including graduate students, faculty and distinguished fellows who come from public service, private firms and the non-profit world.

    We’ll also cover how you can apply to join our 2021 cohort!

    *This session is aimed at students entering their first year of undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Arts & Science in the St. George campus at the University of Toronto in September 2021*

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326

    Main Sponsor

    Munk One Program


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, April 26th A Conversation with Bob Rae

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, April 26, 20214:00PM - 5:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The Bill Graham Centre presents: A Conversation with Bob Rae

    Join Canada’s Ambassador to the UN to discuss events in Myanmar and other global hotspots.

    Appointed in 2020 as the Canadian Ambassador to the United Nations, Bob Rae has had an extensive career in politics. He served as Premier of Ontario in 1990, interim leader of the federal Liberal Party in 2011, and as Canada’s Special Envoy on Humanitarian and Refugee Issues (then called the Special Envoy to Myanmar) in 2017.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, April 27th Local Implications of a National Housing Strategy: The Case of Toronto

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, April 27, 20214:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Canada is facing a distinctly urban housing crisis. After decades of relative disengagement, federal and provincial governments are now working to manage the housing crisis. The 2017 National Housing Strategy (NHS) represents a potentially substantive shift not only in the degree of governmental engagement in housing development and affordability, but also in the role of municipalities and communities.

    This graduate fellow presentation will examine the implications for Toronto of recent national re-engagement in housing policy. It will analyze major elements of the National Housing Strategy, assess how it differs from previous housing policy efforts, and explore the new policy tools and approaches the federal government is using to engage local partners in the development and management of new housing stock. It will discuss the implications of this new approach for managing the country’s worsening urban housing crisis and for empowering municipalities and local communities in the process.

    Speaker

    James Ankers is the 2020-2021 Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Toronto and his research focuses on Canadian housing policy, particularly the relationship between housing, the welfare state, and social policy.

    Contact

    Piali Roy
    (416) 946-3688


    Speakers

    James Ankers
    James Ankers is the 2020-2021 Blanche and Sandy Van Ginkel Graduate Fellow in Municipal Finance and Governance.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th Ageing and Later Life Caregiving Arrangements in Urban India

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 20219:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The Manipal Centre of Humanities meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed until further notice.

    This lecture will be examining how ageing experiences, intergenerational relationships, and eldercare are shaped in a globalized India. Although, the law emphasizes on the role of the family to provide later life care, nonetheless, increasingly eldercare is becoming market (private companies providing a host of caregiving services to the older adults of urban India) oriented. Additionally, post the pandemic, virtual care has emerged as a strong option for later life care. Against this backdrop, this lecture will highlight how family care, virtual care and market-based care determines ageing experiences in urban India.

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay’s main research areas are Medical Sociology and Social Gerontology. Her work analyzes the intersections between health, cultural practices, laws, and policies among older adults. Additionally, her work deals with questions related to women and infant health in India.
    _______________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Naisargi Dave
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th The Secret Pleasures of a Migrant Dictionary

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 202110:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed until further notice.

    This paper will look at a tiny portion of Benyamin’s Aadujeevitham (Goat Days, trans. Joseph Koyipally) commercially the most successful of Malayalam novels and a recipient of a number of literary awards. In the said portion, the migrant protagonist who finds himself faced with a foreign language compiles a dictionary of the words that he has learnt so far in his unforeseeably strange experience in the Arabian Gulf. The paper reads into the entries of this dictionary to speak about how migration produces a rent in the public sphere and invests it with zones of discrete communitarian pleasures.

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil is interested in the cultural dimensions of the migration to the Arabian Gulf from the south Indian state of Kerala. His papers on various aspects of the cultures of Gulf migration have appeared on various platforms including academic journals. Shafeeq received his PhD in Cultural Studies from the English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.
    ___________________________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Srilata Raman
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, April 28th The End of Travel: Time to Revisit Mass Tourism

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, April 28, 20211:00PM - 2:30PMOnline Event, Online Event
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Long before COVID-19 choked off flights, the planet was suffocating from the rise of mass tourism and the decline of travel. Post-pandemic, we need a new way to visit ancient relics and living cultures without crowding ourselves out. A look at the economics and sociology of mass tourism and alternative travel — scalability, sustainability and diminishing returns.

    About our Speaker

    Martin Regg Cohn is a political columnist for the Toronto Star. A foreign correspondent for 11 years, he ran the Star’s Middle East and Asia bureaus, reporting from more than 40 countries — from Afghanistan to Yemen. He was later Foreign Editor and a world affairs columnist. Nominated five times for the National Newspaper Award, he also received an Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada fellowship to research Islam in Indonesia, and won the Amnesty International Media Award for his coverage from Sudan.

    A Senior Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, he is also a Visiting Practitioner in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson University, and delivered lectures for New York Times Journeys on trips to Iran, Egypt, Lebanon and Jordan.


    Speakers

    Martin Regg Cohn
    Speaker
    Political Columnist, Toronto Star Senior Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Peter Loewen
    Moderator
    Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Department of Political Science Associate Director, Global Engagement, Munk School



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 29th The Waiting Dissolve: Abrar Alvi's Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (1962)

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 29, 20219:00AM - 10:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed until further notice.

    Black and white Hindi cinema–from the time of independence (1947) to the emergence of colour (early 1960s)–can be studied for a distinct and fully-realized aesthetic of shadows, stark contrasts, grey tonalities and spatializations of the frame. Indeed, the camera displays an autonomy from the expressed or stifled desires of characters or plot points. Such a camera has true freedom moving respectfully and attentively into secret spaces that can be playful, intimate, inviting, lingering, transgressive and melancholic by turns and often within the same movement. It innovates in the private, unhurried ardency of light and shade, as this talk demonstrates with reference to Abrar Alvi’s Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (Master, Mistress and Servant, 1962).

    Gayathri Prabhu is Associate Professor at the Manipal Centre for Humanities and holds a doctoral degree in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is the author of four novels, a memoir and a novella in prose poetry. She is also the co-author (with Nikhil Govind) of Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). She works with mental health advocacy and is the Coordinator of the Student Support Centre, a psychotherapy service for students in Manipal.

    ___________________________________

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to a panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion; Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Gayathri Prabhu
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Rijuta Mehta
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 29th Panel Discussion: The Manipal Centre for Humanities Meets the Centre for South Asian Studies

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 29, 202110:30AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed until further notice.

    The Manipal Centre for Humanities is one of two Centres of Excellence under the Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE)–MAHE itself was one of the six original Institutes of Eminence recognized by the Government of India in 2018. Over the last decade, the Manipal Centre for Humanities has helped pioneer in India a strong multi-disciplinary, research-driven, and India-relevant approach to undergraduate and graduate education. Its faculty are internationally recognized in three key disciplines–literature, sociology and history–and many of its students and alumni are at the forefront of South Asia research in India, Europe and North America.

    This is the first of a series of encounters, planned for the coming years, in which research and teaching institutions in South Asia represented by their faculty will be invited to the Centre for South Asian Studies to present their work, discuss shared interests, and meet and exchange as collectives dealing with the same global challenges. A series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities will lead up to this panel discussion in which the MCH and the CSAS communities will be given the opportunity to begin an open-ended conversation.

    * The series of talks by colleagues from the Manipal Centre for Humanities are posted above on our events website. Please look up the event titles below on our website and register for the ones you would like to attend.

    April 28, 9:00 – 10:00 am | Ageing and Later Life Caregiving Arrangements in Urban India (Speaker: Jagriti Gangopadhyay)
    April 28, 10:30 – 11:30 am | The Secret Pleasures of a Migrant Dictionary (Speaker: Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil)
    April 29, 9:00 – 10:00 am | The Waiting Dissolve: Abrar Alvi’s Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam (1962) (Speaker: Gayathri Prabhu)

    ________________________

    Nikhil Govind joined the Manipal Centre for Humanities after completing his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include modern Indian literature and film. He is the author of Between Love and Freedom: The Revolutionary in the Hindi Novel (Routledge, 2014), Inlays of Subjectivity: Affect and Action in Modern Indian Literature (Oxford, 2019), and (with Gayathri Prabhu), Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). He has been Head of the Manipal Centre of Humanities since 2015.

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay’s main research areas are Medical Sociology and Social Gerontology. Her work analyzes the intersections between health, cultural practices, laws, and policies among older adults. Additionally, her work deals with questions related to women and infant health in India.

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil is interested in the cultural dimensions of the migration to the Arabian Gulf from the south Indian state of Kerala. His papers on various aspects of the cultures of Gulf migration have appeared on various platforms including academic journals. Shafeeq received his PhD in Cultural Studies from the English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad.

    Gayathri Prabhu is Associate Professor at the Manipal Centre for Humanities and holds a doctoral degree in English from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. She is the author of four novels, a memoir and a novella in prose poetry. She is also the co-author (with Nikhil Govind) of Shadow Craft: Visual Aesthetics of Black and White Hindi Cinema (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). She works with mental health advocacy and is the Coordinator of the Student Support Centre, a psychotherapy service for students in Manipal.


    Speakers

    Nikhil Govind
    Panelist
    Associate Professor and Head, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Jagriti Gangopadhyay
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Mohamed Shafeeq Karinkurayil
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Gayathri Prabhu
    Panelist
    Associate Professor, Manipal Centre for Humanities

    Christoph Emmrich
    Moderator
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute, Munk School; Associate Professor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, April 29th Collectors, Selectors, KEEPERS, and MCs: Black Feminist Sonic World-Making

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 29, 20213:00PM - 5:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    We are sorry to announce that the event “Collectors, Selectors, KEEPERS and MCs: Black Feminist Sonic World-Making,” originally scheduled for April 29, 2021, has been cancelled after consultation between the invited guests and the Centre for the Study of the United States. After a unanimous vote of its members last week, the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) has placed the University of Toronto under censure. As a result, the greater academic community, both here in Canada and internationally, has been called upon to boycott the University of Toronto. This includes speaking engagements and visits such as this event and is meant to continue until the decisions that led to censure have been more thoroughly addressed.

    You can read the CAUT report here (https://www.caut.ca/latest/2021/04/caut-council-imposes-rare-censure-against-university-toronto-over-azarova-hiring), more detail of the implications of censure and the resulting boycott here (https://www.caut.ca/about-us/caut-policy/lists/administrative-procedures-and-guidelines/procedures-relating-to-censure), and media coverage in the Toronto Star, the Globe and Mail and The Varsity. You can also find President Meric Gertler’s statement regarding censure here (https://www.president.utoronto.ca/presidents-letter-to-faculty-and-librarians-regarding-the-ihrp-program), and discussion of the events that led to censure from these three links (1 – https://drive.google.com/file/d/14nCDW6R32E7R80pFtbmrFcDOpJk57xty/view) (2 -https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RGh5JafLP-YTlvaSvK0lWOeoHs7mlvWu/view) (3 – https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w3xWm1I08Ueiy9AMJYrRZsU667AfJFvJ/view).

    While we hope that the censure will be short lived, we respect the wishes of our guests to honor the boycott, and we urge the university to revisit the decisions that led to its imposition.

    Please check the CSUS website for updates regarding this and other events at the Centre for the Study of the United States.

    ———-

    We gather together to amplify our understanding of hip hop as a form of Black Feminist Sonic World-Making. Akua naru, Azmera Hammouri-Davis, and Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo (aka SAMMUS), Members of the global Black womxn-led KEEPERS collective (8 countries and counting!), will speak on their creation of the FIRST comprehensive digital archive to focus on the artistic work of womxn and girls throughout 5 decades of Hip Hop music and culture. Jennifer Lynn Stoever joins the conversation by sharing archival and oral history research from the “Living Room Revolutions” project on the vital but often unacknowledged role of Black and Latinx women in bringing hip hop into being in 1970s, particularly the way their record collections and home music selecting practices sounded new ways of being in the world for themselves and their families. Producer and beatmaker SAMMUS, will talk about her sound work and perform a short set that vibrates us all higher and farther on into space, helping us to imagine new futures.

    Bios

    theKEEPERS, represented by Akua Naru, Dr. Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo, and Azmera Hammouri-Davis, are a collective of Hip Hop practitioners, scholars, and cultural workers committed to amplifying the voices and stories of Hip Hop’s womxn and girls through community programs, research projects, and collaborations. They are currently working on theKEEPER archival project, a digital archive that will map the contributions of womxn and girls across nearly 50 years of Hip Hop music and culture.

    Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo (SAMMUS) is a rap artist and producer from Ithaca, NY with a PhD in science and technology studies from Cornell University. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Brown University in the music department where she teaches courses on rap songwriting and gender and sound. Beyond her creative work, Enongo’s research interests include Black feminist sound studies, video game music and sound design, and hip hop studies and performance. Her doctoral research, which she completed in 2019, focuses on the sociotechnical dynamics that shape the development and use of “community-studios.” Since joining the game studio Glow Up Games as the Director of Audio in 2019, she has also been working with a team of artists and engineers to develop a rap composition feature in a mobile-game for the HBO scripted series Insecure. In the summer of 2020 she became a member of theKEEPERS, a Hip Hop collective that is currently developing a comprehensive digital archive to map the international contributions of womxn and girls across Hip Hop’s 50-year history.

    Jennifer Lynn Stoever received her PhD in American Studies and Ethnicity from USC. She is currently Editor in Chief of Sounding Out! And Associate Professor at SUNY Binghamton, where she teaches courses on African American literature and race and gender representation in popular music. She has published in Social Text, Social Identities, Sound Effects, Modernist Cultures, American Quarterly and Radical History Review among others; her most recent research, “Crate Digging Begins at Home: Black and Latinx Women Collecting and Selecting Records in the 1960s and 1970s Bronx” was published in The Oxford Handbook of Hip Hop Studies. In 2016, she published her first book, The Sonic Color Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening (NYU Press

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka


    Speakers

    Jennifer Lynn Stoever
    Associate Professor of English at the State University of New York at Binghamton

    Enongo Lumumba-Kasongo (stage name Sammus)
    A rap artist, producer and postdoctoral fellow at Brown University

    theKEEPERS
    A global Black womxn-led collective of artists, activists and scholars



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 30th Hungary’s Efforts to Leave the Axis Camp: Secret Diplomacy and Strategies for a ‘Low Price Defeat’ (1943–1944)

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 30, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    The lecture will provide an overview of Hungarian policies directed at leaving the Axis camp during the Second World War. After an introductory part on the general political and military situation of the country, the lecture will concentrate on the main goals of the Hungarian government in 1943 and the efficiency of various peace-feelers in the neutral capitals of Europe, primarily Bern Stockholm and Turkey, showing events from the perspective of the Hungarian side. The lecture will place Hungary into the general context of allies’ aims and war efforts, with a special focus on the geopolitical significance of Southeast Europe in the war. The lecture will draw the attention of the audience to the significance of secret peace-talks with the allied side while giving an insight into the related intelligence maneuvers and their impact on Hungary shortly before the German occupation.

    András Joó (VERITAS Institute, Budapest) obtained his doctoral degree at the University of Economics and Public Administration (now known as Corvinus University, Budapest) in 2001. His main area of research is the 20th century diplomatic history with a special focus on World War II. Dr. Joo is the author of a monograph on Hungarian foreign policy during World War II (Kállay Miklós külpolitikája: Magyarország és a háborús diplomácia 1942-1944. The Foreign Policy of Miklós Kállay: Hungary and Wartime Diplomacy 1942-1944. Napvilág Kiadó, Budapest, 2008). Dr. Joo joined the VERITAS Research Institute in 2015, where he has continued his research on the history of Hungary during World War II collecting and editing sources that have survived in the private hands yet not been discovered by the general public. He regularly publishes the results of his research in Hungarian.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    András Joó
    VERITAS Institute, Budapest


    Sponsors

    Hungarian Studies Program

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, April 30th Seeing China and the Asia-Pacific from India

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, April 30, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    PLEASE NOTE: This event has been postponed until further notice.

    With their shared and yet diverged colonial and postcolonial experiences, both China and India have embarked on their own modernizing and state-building projects after World War II. From a brief hope of solidarity in the 1955 Bandung Conference to repeated border conflicts, and from postwar developmentalism to neoliberal market reforms, the two self-assured Asian giants have entangled with one another in numerous ways. Today, as China and India seem to drift further apart from each other under the rhetoric of the “New Cold War,” what does it mean to talk about South-South relations in research, activism, and policy-making in the context of China and India? How do scholars and intellectuals from or working on India view China and the changing Asia-Pacific order? This panel brings together scholars and intellectuals from a variety of backgrounds to engage these urgent questions.
    ____________________________________

    Dr. Uday Balakrishnan, 70, is a former Indian civil servant, newspaper columnist and public intellectual. He retired from the Government of India as Member of the Postal Services Board & Chairman, Investment Board of the then 3 billion USD Postal Life Insurance Fund. Amongst his other assignments, Dr Balakrishnan has been in charge of the national child labour elimination programme as well as women labour and unorganized labour in the Government of India. He has worked in areas of logistics, financial inclusion and anti-corruption in the Government of India. He has also been the administrative head- Registrar- of the Indian Institute of Science – Bangalore.

    Dr. Balakrishnan’s academic interests include modern history (with special focus on India- China relations) and public policy. He has been Visiting Fellow at the National Insitute of Advanced Study – Bangalore, the Central European University – Budapest and Visiting Faculty at the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Insitute of Science Bangalore where he also has been teaching a public policy and contemporary history course titled ‘Introduction to Governance in India.’ Dr. Balakirshnan is a columnist and reviewer of books for some of India’s finest newspapers, The Hindu and its financial newspaper BusinessLine. He has co-authored a chapter on Indian Christianity (Eastern Christianity and Politics in the Twenty-First Century) edited by Lucian N Leustean – published by Routledge in 2014. A selection of his writings, ‘India On My Mind – Reflections on Politics, Democracy and History,’ was released by the Centre For Policy Studies-Vishakhapatnam – India on 14th April 2021.
    ________

    Mark W. Frazier is Professor of Politics at The New School for Social Research and Co-Director of the India China Institute at The New School. His research interests focus on labor and social policy in China, and more recently on political conflict over urbanization, migration, and citizenship in China and India. He is the author of The Power of Place: Contentious Politics in Twentieth Century Shanghai and Bombay (Cambridge University Press, 2019). He has published articles on the Hong Kong protests for Asia-Pacific Journal, Public Seminar, and The Washington Post Monkey Cage blog. His earlier books are Socialist Insecurity: Pensions and the Politics of Uneven Development in China (Cornell University Press, 2010), The Making of the Chinese Industrial Workplace (Cambridge University Press, 2002), and (co-editor) The SAGE Handbook of Contemporary China (SAGE Publications, 2018).
    ________

    Arunabh Ghosh (BA Haverford; PhD Columbia) is a historian of twentieth century China with interests in social, economic, and environmental history, (transnational) histories of science and statecraft, and China-India history. He is currently an Associate Professor in the History Department at Harvard University. Ghosh’s first book, Making it Count: Statistics and Statecraft in the early People’s Republic of China (Princeton University Press, 2020), offers new perspectives on China’s transition to socialism in 1949 by investigating an elemental but hardly elementary question—how did the state build capacity to know the nation through numbers? He is currently working on two new projects: a history of (small) hydroelectric power in twentieth century China and a history of China-India scientific connections. Ghosh’s work has appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies, Osiris, BJHS Themes, EASTS, PRC History Review, and other venues.


    Speakers

    Uday Balakrishnan
    Panelist
    Former civil servant, newspaper columnist and public intellectual; Former Registrar and Visiting Faculty, Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Mark W. Frazier
    Panelist
    Professor of Politics and Co-Director of the India China Institute, The New School for Social Research

    Arunabh Ghosh
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of History, Harvard University

    Tong Lam
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of History; Acting Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto

    Diana Fu
    Moderator
    Associate Professor of Political Science; Director, East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute, Munk School, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    East Asian Seminar Series at the Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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May 2021

  • Tuesday, May 4th Estranged Memory: Holocaust Remembrance and the Attitudes to Jews in Ukrainian Society after 1991

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 4, 202110:00AM - 11:30AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    This talk will address the complex issue of memory of the Holocaust in Ukrainian society after the fall of communism. After a brief overview on the main tendencies in the politics of remembrance, the talk will primarily focus on wider societal attitudes and beliefs. Anna Chebotarova will consider the place that Jews occupy in collective memory in Ukraine, which was home to one of the largest pre-war Jewish communities in Europe and became one of the major Holocaust killing fields during the WWII. She will analyze the dynamics of the attitudes of Ukrainians toward Jews and memory of the Shoah in the context of recent debates on antisemitism in Ukraine and in East-Central Europe. As many researchers have repeatedly stressed, the subject of contemporary antisemitism is often not real Jews, but the images of them, including those transmitted through collective memory frameworks. The presentation will explore the multilevel and multidirectional relations between (trans)national and local Holocaust memory and the social distance towards Jews in Ukraine today. Anna Chebotarova will apply mixed method research – the perspective that combines both data from previously conducted research, nationwide representative surveys as well qualitative data. She will explore how the (trans)formation of historical memory influences the perception of the Holocaust and, more broadly, the attitudes towards Jews in post-Soviet Ukraine and the main factors influencing these phenomena.

    Anna Chebotarova is a research fellow at the School for Humanities and Social Sciences, St. Gallen University (Switzerland), and the coordinator of “Ukrainian Regionalism: a Research Platform” initiative. She is affiliated with Polish Academy of Sciences, and with the Center for Urban History in East-Central Europe (Lviv, Ukraine). She obtained MA in Sociology and Social Anthropology from the Central European University (Budapest, Hungary) and MA in History and Sociology from Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Lviv, Ukraine). Her research interests include collective memory, Jewish heritage in East-Central Europe, Holocaust memory, heritage studies, qualitative methods of sociological research.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Anna Chebotarova
    Speaker
    a research fellow at the School for Humanities and Social Sciences, St. Gallen University (Switzerland)

    Anna Shternshis
    Chair
    Al and Malka Green Professor of Yiddish studies and the director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, May 4th Built For All: How Do We Build Back Better

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, May 4, 20211:00PM - 2:00PMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Built for All, a report by the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth and the Centre for Public Impact, examines the prospects and challenges for building an inclusive global economy. In this webinar, panelists will discuss the three key components of this framework: equitable access to resources and opportunities; collective stewardship of shared resources for future generations; and a level playing field for work and competition. By focusing on the actions that businesses, governments, academia and civic organizations need to play, panelists will explore the potential to build a more inclusive global future.


    Speakers

    Joseph Wong
    Opening Remarks
    Vice-President, International, University of Toronto; Ralph and Roz Halbert Professor of Innovation at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy and Professor, Department of Political Science

    Vibeka Mair
    Moderator
    Senior Reporter for Responsible Investor

    Marcela Escobari
    Speaker
    Senior Fellow, Center for Sustainable Development in the Global Economy and Development Program, Brookings

    Arturo Franco
    Speaker
    Vice President, Research, Data and Insight, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth

    Dan Vogel
    Speaker
    Director, North America, Centre for Public Impact


    Main Sponsor

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Co-Sponsors

    Innovation Policy Lab

    Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, May 5th The 2021 Lionel Gelber Prize: Trade Wars are Class Wars

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, May 5, 202110:00AM - 11:00AMOnline Event, Online Event
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    Description

    Join us for a conversation with the 2021 Lionel Gelber Prize Winners.

    While the U.S.-China trade war has been perceived mostly as projections of great power competition, trade disputes actually should be seen as part of a global pattern of economic imbalances. Contrary to conventional wisdom, spats over tariffs aren’t necessarily rooted in international rivalries but often are attempts at rebalancing massive trade surpluses and deficits. Those in turn are results of domestic policy choices, which reflect the income inequality at the heart of these tensions.

    In their book “Trade Wars are Class Wars” — the 2021 Lionel Gelber Book Prize Winner — Matthew Klein and Michael Pettis trace the origins of today’s trade wars to decisions made by politicians and business leaders in China, Europe, and the United States over the past thirty years. Challenging the mainstream understanding of trade wars, the authors argue that domestic policies that advantage the rich at the expense of workers produce not only strife at home but also rivalries abroad. They tell a gripping story of how economic policies have generated inequality both within and between states causing global tensions and political polarization.

    Join the Lionel Gelber Prize, in partnership with the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto and Foreign Policy Magazine for an exciting virtual dialogue celebrating the 2021 Lionel Gelber Book Prize winners. Hear from the authors as we discuss insights from their seminal research on how the class wars of rising inequality threaten the global economy and international peace—and what we can do about it.


    Speakers

    Matthew Klein
    Speaker
    2021 Lionel Gelber Prize Winner Co-Author, Trade Wars are Class Wars

    Michael Pettis
    Speaker
    2021 Lionel Gelber Prize Winner Co-Author, Trade Wars are Class Wars

    Cameron Abadi
    Moderator
    Deputy Editor, Foreign Policy and Juror, The Lionel Gelber Prize

    Janice Stein
    Opening Remarks
    Jury Chair, The Lionel Gelber Prize and Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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