« July 2019 - September 2019 October 2019 - Present

October 2019

  • Tuesday, October 1st Hunting the Snark (Lewis Carrol). The Politics of Brexit

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 1, 20194:30PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2016, the UK voted by a majority of 52 per cent to leave the European Union. ‘Brexit’ the Prime Minister declared, ‘means Brexit’. Three years later the project is still not defined and no form of it has succeeded in getting through Parliament. The resulting political turmoil has pushed the largely unwritten constitution to its limits and may break up the United Kingdom itself. Brexit comes in several, incompatible, versions, from hyper-globalism to national protectionism. It is predicated on the return to a unitary nation-state, an English concept that contradicts the vision of the UK (especially since 1999) as a plurinational, post-sovereign union.

    About the Speaker
    Michael Keating is Professor of Politics at the universities of Aberdeen and Edinburgh and Director of the Centre on Constitutional Change (CCC). He has a BA from the University of Oxford and in 1975 was the first PhD graduate from what is now Glasgow Caledonian University. In 1981 he gained the title of incorporated linguist (Institute of Linguists) and speaks English, French, Spanish and Italian. Michael is a fellow of the British Academy, Royal Society of Edinburgh, Academy of Social Sciences and European Academy and has taught in universities in Scotland, England, Canada, the USA, France and Spain and at the European University Institute in Italy. Among his publications since 2000 are Plurinational Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2001); The Independence of Scotland (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Rescaling the European State (Oxford University Press, 2013) and (edited) Debating Scotland. Issues of Independence and Union in the 2014 Referendum (Oxford University Press in 2017). With Donatella della Porta, he edited Methods and Approaches in the Social Sciences (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and with David McCrone he edited The Crisis of Social Democracy in Europe (Edinburgh University Press, He is currently leading a major project on the UK constitution and Brexit and preparing a monograph on constitutional accommodation in the UK and Ireland for Oxford University Press.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Michael Keating
    Speaker
    Professor of Politics, Director, Centre on Constitutional Change, University of Aberdeen

    Grace Skogstad
    Moderator
    Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 2nd U of T – JSPS Forum 2019: Forging Research Collaborations with Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 2, 20191:30PM - 5:00PMHart House – Music Room, University of Toronto,
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3
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    Description

    The goal of this forum is to raise the awareness of science and research excellence in Japan by celebrating successful research collaborations between the two countries and increasing interest among U of T faculty and government partners. The forum will also serve as an opportunity to bring current and potential industry partners and facilitate engagement in collaborative research, as well as raise awareness of funding opportunities available through JSPS, NSERC and MITACS.

    October 2, 2019
    1:30 – 4 PM with reception from 4 – 5PM
    Hart House (Music Room)
    University of Toronto
    7 Hart House Circle, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H3

    RSVP by September 20, 2019 to tak.koguchi@utoronto.ca

    PROGRAM

    Opening Remarks (1:30 – 1:40 PM):
    • Professor Ted Sargent, Vice President, International, University of Toronto
    • Consul General Takako Ito, Consul General of Japan in Toronto
    • Kohji Hirata, Director of JSPS Washington Office

    Research Funding (1:40 – 2:10 PM):
    • Learn about funding opportunities for research with/in Japan with representatives from JSPS, MITACS, NSERC

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan (2:10 – 2:40 PM):
    • Professor Phillip Lipscy, Director of CSGJ presents on the Centre’s vision for collaborating with Japan

    Panel Discussion on Research Collaborations with Japan (2:40 – 3:50 PM):
    • Discussion with U of T faculty on collaborating with Japan. Panelists include:
    • Professor Charles Boone (Molecular Genetics)
    • Professor Wai Tung Ng (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
    • Professor Andre Sorensen (Human Geography)

    Moderated by Professor Chris Yip, Dean of Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

    Closing Remarks (3:50 – 4 PM)

    Reception (4 – 5 PM)

    For more information, please visit this link.

    Sponsors

    Office of the Vice-President, International, University of Toronto

    Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 3rd Minds under Siege: Diaries of the Leningrad Blockade

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 3, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Russian History Speakers Series

    Description

    Drawing on 125 unpublished diaries from the Soviet archives, this lecture offers an intimate look at the Leningrad Blockade, one of the longest and deadliest sieges in history. The talk examines how Leningraders trapped inside the city came to intellectual grips with extreme starvation and isolation. In the process of contemplating the meaning of their suffering, they placed themselves, their city, and the Soviet experience under a critical microscope.

     

    Alexis Peri received her PhD in history from the University of California Berkeley, and is an Associate Professor of History at Boston University. The War Within: Diaries from the Siege of Leningrad, the book upon which the talk is based, was published by Harvard University Press in 2017 and won the Pushkin Book Prize, the University of Southern California Book Prize in Literary and Cultural Studies, and the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages Book Prize for Cultural Studies. She is working on a new book project about Soviet and American pen-friendships during WWII and the Cold War. It is entitled Dear Unknown Friend: Soviet and American Women Discovered the Power of the Personal.


    Speakers

    Alexis Peri
    Boston University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 4th Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Jelena Subotic (PhD, Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2007) is Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University in Atlanta, USA. She is the author of two books: Hijacked Justice: Dealing with the Past in the Balkans (Cornell University Press, 2009, Serbian translation 2010) and Yellow Star, Red Star: Holocaust Remembrance after Communism (Cornell University Press, forthcoming, 2019). Professor Subotic is the author of more than twenty scholarly articles on international relations theory, memory politics, national identity, human rights, and the politics of the Western Balkans.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jelena Subotic
    Professor of Political Science, Georgia State University, Atlanta



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 4th The Fear of Being Compared: India, China and the Himalayas

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This lecture examines a form of international relations that arises when emerging states share an inhabited borderland: “state-shadowing”. Authority over people is crucial to effective sovereignty, yet international borderlands are often porous and heterogeneous. Borderlanders have the possibility to look across, observe and compare different state-making and nation-building projects. When neighboring states seek to consolidate in such situations, physical closeness can become a contest to prove their superiority over the state next door—which constitutes an always discernible, readily available, and equally viable alternative political project—to local people. This fear of comparison is particularly high in post-colonial polities like China and India, struggling to transform into nations. The triangular relationship between states and non-state actors in borderland situations turn state-making and nation-building into emulative, mirroring, and competitive attempts at self-definition against the other polity. As China and India’s Himalayan encounter in the 20th century attests, this fear of being compared can escalate into a destructive security dilemma. The concept of state-shadowing thus offers a framework to understand how proximity, mobility and governmentality structure the low politics between neighbouring post-colonial states, and potentially contribute to conflict.

    A specialist of modern South Asia and the Indian Ocean, Dr. Guyot-Réchard holds a senior lectureship (associate professorship) in contemporary international history at King’s College London. Her award-winning work focuses on the long-term impact of decolonization, particularly in terms of international politics. She has written extensively on the strategic borderlands between India, China and Burma. More recent work focuses on India’s practice of diplomacy and on South Asia and the international order and on the geopolitics of the Indian Ocean since 1945. She regularly intervenes on South Asia-related issues in international media and policy circles.


    Speakers

    Dr. Bérénice Guyot-Réchard
    Speaker
    King’s College London

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 7th The 7th Annual Frank W. Woods Lecture - Conflict, Inequality and Redistribution

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 7, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    This lecture addresses an age-old question in political economy: does government spending on welfare ensure peace? This question was at the heart of the European Welfare State model of the early 20th century, and remains relevant today in face of rising inequalities and political conflict. Despite a longstanding historical relationship between peace, democracy and the welfare state, few empirical studies to date have analyzed the causal effect of social policies in preventing or reducing political violence, or the type of policies that may be used to mitigate social conflicts and prevent their escalation into widespread violence.

    We make use of a panel of 12 Latin American countries over the period between 1970 and 2010 to show that government welfare spending has led to substantial reductions in political conflict across the region. This effect is more pronounced when associated with reductions in inequality and increasing social and institutional trust. Similar results are obtained for India, the world’s largest democracy, using panel data collected between 1970 and 2011. This body of evidence suggests that, similarly to Europe at the turn of the 20th century, the implementation of adequate welfare programmes may have an important role to play in the establishment and maintenance of peace and stability in many other parts of the world.

    Speaker

    Professor Patricia Justino is a development economist who works at the interface between Development Economics and Political Science. She is a leading international expert on political violence and development and the co-founder and co-director of the Households in Conflict Network. She is currently a Senior Research Fellow at UNU-WIDER and Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) in Brighton, UK (on leave). Professor Justino’s research focuses on the relationship between political violence, institutional transformation, governance and development outcomes. She has led major research programmes funded by the European Commission, the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID). She is currently PI in a ESRC large grant on the relationship between inequality, social trust and governance outcomes.

    Professor Justino’s research has been published in leading international journals such as the Journal of Development Economics, Journal of Conflict Resolution, the Journal of Peace Research, and the World Bank Economic Review and is the lead author of A Micro-Level Perspective on the Dynamics of Conflict, Violence and Development (Oxford University Press). She has held several advisory positions in major international organisations, including Action Aid, DFID, FAO, UNDP, UNESCO, UNICEF, UN Women, USAID, and the World Bank. She was the director of the MICROCON research programme and deputy director of the TAMNEAC Initial Training Network. Professor Justino holds a MPhil in Economics from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in Economics from the University of London. She has held visiting positions at Harvard University (2007-2009) and the European University Institute, among others.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Professor Patricia Justino
    Senior Research Fellow, UNU-WIDER Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 8th The 7th Annual Frank W. Woods Seminar - Civic Legacies of Wartime Governance

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 8, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    208N
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    Description

    In conflict zones around the world, both state and non-state actors deliver governance at local levels. This paper explores the long-term impact of individual exposure to ‘wartime governance’ on social and political behaviour in Angola. We operationalize wartime governance as the local policy choices and practices of a ruling actor. Building on detailed ethnographic and historical insights, we use survey data and a natural experiment to show that involvement in wartime governance by armed groups makes Angolan war veterans more likely to participate in local collective action twelve years after the end of the war. This effect is underpinned by a social learning mechanism and a shift in political preferences, but has no bearing on political mobilization at the national level or social relations within the family. These results highlight an important institutional legacy of civil wars and expose challenges and opportunities for bottom-up approaches to post-conflict state-building and local development.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Professor Patricia Justino
    Senior Research Fellow, UNU-WIDER Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 8th Asian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 8, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Coinciding with the current Canadian Federal Election season, the Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union (CASSU) is pleased to host a panel discussion on Asian-Canadian Identity in Canadian Electoral Politics. The event focuses on examining Asian representation in Canadian Electoral Politics, exploring the unique sociopolitical conditions that candidates, politicians, and public servants who identify as of Asian-descent experience when navigating Canadian electoral politics.

    Topics of discussion will range from the public perception of Asian-Canadian political leaders in Canada, specific sociopolitical experiences and hurdles that candidates encounter when running for office, and projected shifts in voting behaviour as a result of demographic changes in Canada (i.e. influx of newcomers).

    SPEAKERS:
    Professor Ludovic Rheault
    Ludovic Rheault is Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto. Prior to his appointment as faculty, he joined an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Toronto as a postdoctoral fellow in 2014. He also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Riverside. Prof. Rheault obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Montreal in 2013.

    Professor Rheault’s research interests focus on areas of the Canadian government, and applications of statistical methods to examine public opinions and policy-related questions. As a member of the French-Canadian minority, he will provide examples illustrating the challenges involved with cultural diversity in Canadian federal politics. In addition, Professor Rheault will provide statistical Canadian electoral insights on the topic.

    Kuo Yin
    Kuo Yin began her career in Canadian politics as a constituency assistant for the Member of Parliament in Toronto. She later held the position of parliamentary assistant at the House of Commons in Ottawa. Prior working in federal politics, Yin studied, worked and lived in Edmonton, Washington D.C and Oxford. According to Yin, “What makes me feel powerful as an Asian woman in Canadian politics is that I was given a variety of opportunities on different platforms to lead this country towards the direction where Canadians want to be.”

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi
    Tenzin Chogkyi was born in Tibet and raised in India. She came to Toronto 15 years ago to study filmmaking. Prior to joining politics, Tenzin worked for the Canadian Oscar nominee, Deepa Mehta.

    Over the past 4 years, Tenzin has served as the Community Liaison for MP Arif Virani at the Parkdale-High Park riding. Parkdale is home to the largest Tibetan community outside of India. In addition to her active role at the office, she is also the coordinator for Parliamentary Friends of Tibet Canada Friendship group.


    Speakers

    Tenzin Sudip Chogkyi

    Ludovic Rheault

    Kuo Yin


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 9th Academic Januses: GPU-NKVD Secret Informants at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (1920s–1930s)

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 9, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 2015 the decommunization laws in Ukraine gave open access to the GPU-NKVD-KGB archives, and historians immediately seized the opportunity to study new types of secret police documents which had been inaccessible earlier. Among them were the almost unknown dela-formulyary, i.e. surveillance files on the Ukrainian scholars who worked at the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in the 1920s–1930s.
    These files were prepared for many years and contained all information about researchers and their milieu. They consisted of several types of documents – track records, questionnaires, characteristics, references, secret police supervisory materials, copies of testimonies of the detainees, copies of opened and inspected correspondence, as well as numerous “bulletins” and “informational messages” from the secret informants.

    Despite the fact that there are practically no official archival materials on secret informants (their personal files were either obliterated or moved to Russia), it is very likely that their names can be identified. In her talk Oksana Yurkova will present her analysis of the surveillance files and discuss the problem of secret informants among Ukrainian scholars in the 1920s–1930s. Also she will present her research on deciphering of the academic secret informants’ nicknames.

    Dr. Oksana Yurkova is a Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, in Kyiv, Ukraine.
    She studies Ukrainian historiography of the 20th century, especially focusing on the interwar period (1920s–1930s), the Ukrainian historian Mykhailo Hrushevsky and his Kyiv historical school, as well as the activity of Ukrainian historical institutions of that period; iconography; anthropology of academic life; electronic information resources. In 2015, she initiated the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives which collects and presents all printed and archival materials dealing with this famous historian and political figure (http://hrushevsky.nbuv.gov.ua/ ).
    In 2019 the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies awarded her the Kolasky Visiting Research Fellowship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Law, Education, and Library Sciences 2019–2020. In Toronto she works on the project “Canadian Sources for the Mykhailo Hrushevsky Digital Archives.” For more details see her web-page http://resource.history.org.ua/person/0000512

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Oksana Yurkova
    Speaker
    Leading Researcher at the Institute of History of Ukraine, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine

    Ksenya Kiebuzinski
    Chair
    Head, Petro Jacyk Resource Centre, Co-director, Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Insitute of Ukrainian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th Plotting against Hitler: What Is New About the Military Resistance 75 Years Later?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20191:00PM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the failed coup d’état against Hitler on 20 July 1944, there has been a considerable surge of publications on the topic. Some such books, at times by amateur historians, have focused on the personality of Stauffenberg, the mastermind behind the conspiracy and the man who planted the bomb. Was he driven by religious and ethical motives, by his allegiance to the circle around esoteric author Stefan George, or was he motivated by purely military considerations?

    Winfried Heinemann argues that, in the same way the political resistance was influenced by Weimar-era thought, so too were the military conspirators shaped by their experience in the Reichswehr (Army of the Weimar Republic). He will place the revolt in the context of the Third Reich’s polycratic structures, and explain how that in turn prevented the postwar West German Bundeswehr (Federal Armed Forces) from identifying too easily with the conspirators.

    Winfried Heinemann was born in Dortmund and studied history and English language at Bochum University and King’s College, London. From 1983 to 2018, he served as an officer in the German Army. Since 1986, he was attached to the German Armed Forces ‘ Centre for Military History in Freiburg, later in Potsdam. After taking his PhD with a thesis on the early diplomatic history of NATO, he went on to direct the East German Military History branch, then the departments for research and for historical education. He retired as the Chief of Staff and Deputy Commander of the Centre.

    Gavin Wiens (commentator) completed his PhD in the Department of History at the University of Toronto in 2019. His dissertation argued that the German army remained a decentralized, contingent-based institution between the Wars of Unification and the end of the First World War and that the distribution of military power among Germany’s lesser kings, grand dukes, and princes played a crucial role in legitimizing and perpetuating monarchical rule during a period of rapid economic and social change. He has published essays on the composition and operations of the German army during the First World War and he has held grants and fellowships from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Central European History Society, the German Historical Institute, Washington, DC, and the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. His current research focuses on the activities of German military attachés and advisors in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and South America between the Napoleonic Wars and the end of the Cold War.

    This event is co-financed by the DAAD with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office (AA).


    Speakers

    Gavin Wiens
    Commentator
    University of Toronto

    Prof. Col. Winfried Heinemann
    Speaker
    German Armed Forces Centre for Military History


    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 10th The dark night of love in the Indian tradition

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 10, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    India-Canada Association Lecture

    Description

    This talk focuses on the dark nights of desire, on the difficulties and ordeals lovers have to face and overcome in the pursuit of fulfilment, and also on the tricks that their ingenuity manages to invent in order to escape detection, which sometimes can lead to disgrace or even death. Indian literature covers both illicit and marital love with great nuance. It ranges from problems to do with secrecy to problems of marital privacy in a crowded extended family situation. The differences between literary representations and visual representations of love stories will also be dealt with.

    Dr. Fabrizia Baldissera teaches Sanskrit Language and Literature at University of Florence. She lectures abroad extensively. Her interests are kāvya, satire, Goddess worship, dance, Indian alchemy and Arthaśāstra. Her books include The Narmamālā of Kṣemendra; Śāradātilakabhāṇa; L’universo di Kāma; King and Devī and Emotions in Indian Dramas and Dances.


    Speakers

    Christoph Emmrich
    Chair
    Director, Centre for South Asian Studies

    Fabrizia Baldissera
    Speaker
    Sanskrit Language and Literature, University of Florence


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Instituto Italiano di Cultura Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 11th Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 11, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The talk will be based on my newly published book Marrying for a Future: Transnational Sri Lankan Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War (University of Washington Press). The book examines the life of the Sri Lankan Tamil community in the time of war and migration before the war was ended in 2009. Three decades of war in Sri Lanka ended in 2009, but the prolonged violence during the war devastated the Sri Lankan Tamil community, leading to a serious disruption of ordinary life and mass migrations to escape the violence of the state and of Tamil militants. Jaffna Tamils are now widely dispersed across the world – predominantly in Canada, continental Europe, UK, Australia and India. In the book I have focused on marriage processes (arrangements of transnational marriages), transit places where the actual marriage performance takes place, figures (e.g. marriage brokers, photographers) who facilitate marriages, visual documents (e.g. wedding photos), and laws, in order to understand how Sri Lankan Tamils, who have been dispersed across spaces, rebuilt and shaped their fragmented lives and communities through these documents/figures/ spaces/zones. This study suggests that those fragmented communities were rekindled by ‘in-betweens’ associated with the marriage process, actors like wedding photographers or marriage brokers, legal corpuses, and transit places. The practices, ceremonies, and performances during the marriage process hold an imagined and lived future/s, entangled with past and present. This book deals with temporalities, documents, relatedness and political violence.

    Sidharthan Maunaguru is currently an assistant professor in anthropology at Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies at National University of Singapore. His research interests cover the areas of marriage, migration, religion, diaspora, politics, conscience, ethics, and law. He was awarded a Newton Fellowship by British Academia and Royal Society which was held at University of Edinburgh before he joined NUS. Maunaguru’s work is placed within the South Asian regions and beyond, it often includes multi-site fieldwork and intersects with anthropology, history and philosophy. He has published in Modern Asian Studies, Comparative Studies on Society and History, Religion and Society and Contributions to Indian Sociology. Maunaguru’s book titled Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War is published in 2019 with University of Washington Press, and another of his article is forthcoming in Current Anthropology.

    Marrying for a Future: Transnational Tamil Marriages in the Shadow of War will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Sidharthan Maunaguru
    Speaker
    Department of Sociology and South Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology and Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Anthropology

    Tamil Worlds Initiative


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 16th Religion, Immigration and Settlement

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 16, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Canada has been praised globally for the outcomes of its settlement and integration policies. Religion is often a factor influencing the initial arrival of migrants, and their transition to life in Canada. What ideas, principles, and beliefs motivate those involved with faith-based settlement organizations? What role do religious communities play in supporting the process of settlement and integration? Are there ways in which they inhibit the process of social integration, or reinforce social divisions? What can secular and faith-based organizations involved in the settlement of recent immigrants learn from each other? How should the academic study of the settlement and integration of immigrants take account of the role played by religion in this process?

    Panel Discussion:

    Anne Woolger, Founding Director, Matthew House

    Bayan Khatib, Executive Director, Syrian Canadian Foundation

    Neda Farahmandpour, Manager, Toronto North Local Immigration Partnership, JVS Toronto

    This seminar series is organized in partnership by the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy with the Baha’i Community of Canada and the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Baha’i Community of Canada

    University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMEast Asian Studies Lounge, 14th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Mari Yoshihara will speak about her new book, Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro, which interweaves the history of Leonard Bernstein’s transformation from an American icon to a world maestro with an intimate story of his relationships with two Japanese individuals: Amano Kazuko, a loyal fan who began writing letters to Bernstein in 1947, and Kunihiko Hashimoto, a young man who fell deeply in love with Bernstein in 1979 and later became his business representative. During the period in which these two relationships unfolded, Japan’s place in the world and its relationship vis-à-vis the United States changed dramatically, which in turn shaped Bernstein’s connection to the country. Yoshihara will trace the making of a global Bernstein amidst the shifting change of classical music that made this American celebrity turn increasingly to Europe and Japan.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).

    *Dearest Lenny: Letters from Japan and the Making of the World Maestro will be available for purchase at the venue.

    Location
    The lounge is located on the 14th floor of the Robarts Library. Take the P4 elevator from the 2nd floor of Robarts to the 14th floor. On exiting the elevator, head LEFT and follow signs to EAS.


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Speaker
    American Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of East Asian Studies

    Centre for the Study of the United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 17th The Refugium in Eurasian History and its Spatiality

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 17, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room
    2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    The term refugium—yet to be properly defined—has been used by scholars to denote areas where safety from enemies owing to remoteness or difficulty of access provided long-term security that allowed for polity-formation (no connection to refugium as a medieval village fortification). Often a degree of sacredness is said to have been ascribed to refugia by their possessors. Examples of refugia on the Eurasian steppe: north of the Göbi Desert for the Asiatic Huns (Hiung-nu), Rouran (“Avars”), and Gök Türks; Yeti-su/Semirechye (Lake Balkash basin) for the West Türk Qaganate; Blue Forest on the Samara River (Ukraine) for Qipchaqs/Polovtsians; Burqan Qaldun Mountain for the Mongols of Chinggis Khan. Other possible refugia: the lower Dnieper River below its rapids (Zaporozhia) where the genesis of Ukrainian cossackdom occurred; Scandinavia (“Scandza Island”) for the Goths; Gerrhus for the Scythians. This seminar will survey the sources and spaces, query the reality of refugia as opposed to simple refuges, and explore aspects of spatiality.

     

    Sponsored by the Departments of History and of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations and by the Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    Speakers

    Victor Ostapchuk
    University of Toronto.


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20199:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th American Quarterly: Information Session with Mari Yoshihara

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 201911:00AM - 12:30PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Prof. Yoshihara, who is the Senior Editor of American Quarterly, the journal of the American Studies Association, will offer an informal session about the journal, including advice on submitting an article for publication.

    Mari Yoshihara is Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and the editor of American Quarterly. Her publications include Embracing the East: White Women and American Orientalism (2003) and Musicians from a Different Shore: Asians and Asian Americans in Classical Music (2007).


    Speakers

    Mari Yoshihara
    Senior Editor, American Quarterly


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of United States


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th 2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity "Discrimination and Aging among Visible Minority and Indigenous Older Adults in Canada"

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20191:00PM - 3:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Abstract: Despite the demographic significance of the visible minority and Indigenous older adult populations in Canada, there is little information about their aging process. In particular, the role of discrimination in the aging trajectories of these populations remain understudied and undertheorized in the Canadian context. We aim to fill this gap by first providing a synthesis of the stress and aging, life course perspective, and settler colonialism theories to shed light on the shared and unique factors that contribute to the aging process for these non-white populations. Second, using the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), we examine the association between everyday discrimination and two markers of aging, pain and functional limitations. We discuss the implications of the theoretical frameworks and empirical findings for social service and healthcare delivery for visible minority and Indigenous older adults.

    Speaker bio: Zoua Vang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and an Associate Member of the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Psychiatry (Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry) at McGill University. She is also the founding Director of the Indigenous Maternal Infant Health & Well-being (IMIHW) Lab at McGill. Zoua received her BA in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and her MA and PhD in Sociology from Harvard University.
    She spent two years as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology and the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania where she obtained additional training in racial/ethnic health disparities and perinatal health.
    Zoua’s current research encompasses (i) migration and health, (ii) Indigenous maternal-infant health, and (iii) discrimination as a social determinant of health and well-being.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Zoua Vang
    Associate Professor (Sociology) and Associate Member (Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Psychiatry) at McGill University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th The Korean War through the Prism of the Interrogation Room

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, October 18, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Through the interrogation rooms of the Korean War, this talk demonstrates how the individual human subject became both the terrain and the jus ad bellum for this critical U.S. war of ‘intervention’ in postcolonial Korea. In 1952, with the US introduction of voluntary POW repatriation proposal at Panmunjom, the interrogation room and the POW became a flashpoint for an international controversy ultimately about postcolonial sovereignty and political recognition.

    The ambitions of empire, revolution and non-alignment converged upon this intimate encounter of military warfare: the interrogator and the interrogated prisoner of war. Which state could supposedly reinvent the most intimate power relation between the colonizer and the colonized, to transform the relationship between the state and subject into one of liberation, democracy or freedom? Tracing two generations of people across the Pacific as they navigate multiple kinds of interrogation from the 1940s and 1950s, this talk lay outs a landscape of interrogation – a dense network of violence, bureaucracy, and migration – that breaks apart the usual temporal bounds of the Korean War as a discrete event.

    Monica Kim is Assistant Professor in U.S. and the World History in the Department of History at New York University. Her book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History (Princeton University Press), is a trans-Pacific history of decolonization told through the experiences of two generations of people creating and navigating military interrogation rooms of the Korean War. She has published work in journals such as Critical Asian Studiesand positions: asia critiqueconcerning U.S. empire, war-making, and decolonization. She is also a member of the Editorial Collective for Radical History Review. Her research and writing have been supported by fellowships from the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), the Penn Humanities Forum at University of Pennsylvania, and the Korea Foundation.

    *Copies of “The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History” will be available for sale during this event.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 18th “We have borrowed also from the French, and they I think from the Spaniards": National Lessons from Navigation History

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 18, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Early modern Europeans were preoccupied with the problem of safely crossing
    the oceans. Such trips—for trade, war, and colonial expansion—could end in
    disaster if the navigator fell ill or relied on outdated maps and
    instruments on the treacherous seas. Each polity felt that their neighbours
    were more successful in creating new navigators. In this talk, Margaret
    Schotte will examine French, British, and Dutch records about training
    mariners, arguing that they shared a common set of strategies, which had
    originated in Iberia. And yet, in spite of this pan-European educational
    model, her analysis reveals unexpected variation in how mariners from
    different states approached particular tasks—from assessing the speed of
    their vessels to estimating their position. Where the Dutch chose
    logarithmic tables, the French turned to instruments. What effects did
    these choices have? At a time when maritime knowledge had significant
    geopolitical ramifications, we find that nautical science and practice, had
    distinct national characteristics.

    Margaret E. Schotte is an associate professor of history at York
    University. Her new monograph, Sailing School: Navigating Science and Skill, 1550-1800 (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019), is a comparative study of the development and
    dissemination of Dutch, English, and French sailors’ navigational
    practices—in the classroom, on board ship, and across international
    borders. Schotte traces the impact of print culture on navigational
    instruction, and reconsiders the rise of mathematics in European
    intellectual and artisanal cultures. She has worked on French travel
    narratives and hydrography lessons in New France. Her next project examines
    the unexpected mathematical lessons that took place aboard a Dutch East
    India Co. ship during the Seven Years’ War. www.margaretschotte.com or:
    http://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/profiles/mschotte/


    Speakers

    Margaret Schotte
    York University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 20199:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 21st Street Food in Bangkok and Hanoi: Conflicts Over the Uses of the Urban Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 21, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Street Food research project aims at investigating some challenges posed by street food vending, drawing upon 4 case studies: Bangkok, Hanoi, Chicago and Montpellier. This paper will present the cases of Hanoi and Bangkok. In Bangkok, street food is an affordable and easily accessible source of food throughout the city: thus, it contributes to securing the access to food (in terms of availability and affordability), while often providing income to underprivileged households, in particular migrants. Yet, street vendors are currently facing a vehement eviction process, in order to facilitate the traffic. Hanoi follows the same pattern, although moderately, and shut down several informal markets, for food safety reasons. But what are the consequences of this eviction for vendors and for the food system? How do vendors and consumers adapt to this changing urban environment? Moreover, how do planners consider the food issue within urban planning?

    Dr. Gwenn Pulliat is a researcher in geography at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). She has worked on Southeast Asia for a decade, with a focus on urban development issues. Her research deals with urban food security and the urban environment. In 2017, she has held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto, working on the Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia partnership.


    Speakers

    Gwenn Pulliat
    Researcher, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 24th Internet Voting in Estonia, 2005-2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 24, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Internet voting in Estonia 2005-2019
    How Does It Work and Why Does 50% of the Population Vote Online?

    In 2005, Estonia was the first country in the world to offer universal remote internet voting in all national elections. Since then, the usage numbers have gradually grown in all e-enabled elections. A new milestone was reached in 2019 when close to 50% of all votes given were electronic. The lecture explores the uptake and usage patterns of internet voting, employing both survey and system log data on voter behavior. Specific attention is devoted to what drives usage growth given that every second vote in Estonia is now given online, but voter turnout has hardly changed over the course of 15 years of internet voting.

    Mihkel Solvak (PhD) is a senior research fellow in technology studies and head of institute at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies. His research interest include remote internet voting, electoral behavior, uptake and diffusion patterns of digital public services, data driven and machine learning enabled public services. He is affiliated with the Center of IT Impact Studies (CITIS), a research group that prototypes and builds digital public services for Estonian e-government.


    Speakers

    Mihkel Solvak, PhD
    Director, Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies, University of Tartu, Estonia



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th "Not in Our Town“ – a case study of civic/youth engagement against intolerance and radicalism in Slovakia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Ivan Chorvát is Associate Professor at the Department of Social Studies and Ethnology, Faculty of Arts, Matej Bel University in Banská Bystrica (Slovakia) and at the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts, The University of Trnava (Slovakia). He studied Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Charles University in Prague, Society and Politics at the Central European University in Prague (Czech Republic), and completed his doctoral studies at The Institute for Sociology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava (1998). His main areas of research include the sociology of family, tourism, leisure and consumption, and the study of sociological theory. I. Chorvát is the author of monographs Man – Father in the Contemporary Family (1999), Travel and Tourism in the Mirror of Time (2007), Leisure in Slovakia from a Sociological Perspective (2011), Consumption and the Consumer Society (2015) and co-editor of Family in Slovakia in Theory and Research (2015) and Leisure, Culture and Society: Czech Republic and Slovakia (forthcoming).

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Ivan Chorvat



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th – Saturday, October 26th Difference and Alterity: Critical Models in Modern Thought

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20192:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
    Saturday, October 26, 201910:00AM - 5:30PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Friday October 25

    2:00-2:15 Opening Remarks

    2:15-3:00
    Idit Dobbs-Weinstein, The Same Is the Different: Nature, Fortune, History in Machiavelli

    3:00-3:45
    Oleg Gelikman, The Quake of the Real: on the Ontology of Relation in Montaigne

    3:45-4:15 Coffee Break

    4:15-5:00
    Willi Goetschel, Writing Otherwise: Montaigne and La Boëtie

    5:00-5:45
    Warren Montag, “To Quit the Principles of Human Nature:” Locke’s Notion of the Inhuman

    Saturday October 26

    10:15-11:00
    Tracie Matysik, Substance as Contingency in the Young Karl Marx

    11:00-11:45
    Michael Rosenthal, On the Advantages and Disadvantages of Using Aesthetics to Make Sense of Immorality in Politics: Exempla, Thought-Images, and the Eichmann Trial

    12:00-1:30
    Lunch

    1:30-2:15 James McNaughton, Beckett’s Political Aesthetic

    2:15-3:00 David Suchoff, De-Colonizing Dialect: Beckett’s Palestinian and Irish Canines

    3:00-3:15
    Coffee Break

    3:15-4:00
    Omar Rivera, Resistance as Alterity in Decolonial Aesthetics

    4:00-4:45
    Amogh Sahu, Skepticism and the Philosophy of Difference

    5:00-5:30
    Open Discussion

    Sponsors

    Department of German Languages and Literatures

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service

    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, October 25th Sphere of Knowledge and Experience in Literature: A Case Study of Nepali Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, October 25, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This case study of Nepali literature shows how literature can reflect the expanding spheres of knowledge in societies like that of Nepal where multiple cultural modes prevail. I will present a study on the expanding sphere of Nepali literature in areas such as the choice of subject for writing, the growth of ‘print capitalism’ or printing and dissemination from the last decades of the 19th century, the role of literary journals in keeping up the creative and free spirit under the autocratic regimes, and the creation of the reading public. The presentation will show how in the first half of the twentieth century did Nepali poetry use romanticism as the important literary trend, and how the literary writers, critics and academics see and interpret modernism, and people understand it in common parlance. I will mention my own experience as a playwright in the selection of the motifs for the plays and how that reflects the sphere of creative writing, in terms of cultural diversity and plurality of subjects.

    Abhi Subedi (PhD) received his higher education in Nepal and Britain. He is an essayist, literary critic, linguist, playwright, and poet. He has over two-dozen books on different subjects to his credit. Professor Subedi has taught since 1970. He writes on issues of freedom, culture, literature, arts and social transformations.


    Speakers

    Dr. Abhi Subedi
    Professor Emeritus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Durability of Client Regimes: Foreign Sponsorship and Military Loyalty, 1946-2010

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Conventional wisdom suggests that great power patrons prop up client dictatorships. However, this is generally assumed rather than systematically analyzed. In this paper, I offer the first comprehensive analysis of the relationship between foreign sponsorship and authoritarian regime survival with the use of an original dataset of all autocratic client regimes in the postwar period. These results demonstrate that patronage from Western powers – the United States, France, and the United Kingdom – is not associated with client regime survival. Instead, only Soviet sponsorship reduces the risk of regime collapse. I explain this variation by considering the effects of foreign sponsorship on the likelihood of military coups d’etat. I argue that the Soviet Union directly aided its clients in imposing a series of highly effective coup prevention strategies. In contrast, the United States and its allies did not directly aid their clients in coup prevention which left regimes vulnerable to military overthrow.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Adam Casey
    Trudeau Centre Fellow Ph.D. Candidate & Course Instructor | Dept. of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, October 28th The Frederick Lee Story and the Hill 70 Memorial Project

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, October 28, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    During World War I (WWI), approximately 300 Chinese soldiers enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force despite rampant anti-Chinese discrimination. Anonymous until recently, Frederick “Freddy” Lee was one of those soldiers.

    Born into a Chinese Canadian Merchant family in Kamloops, BC, Freddy volunteered for the war, enlisting with the 172nd Battalion and served in a vital role as a machine gunner. Freddy fought in and survived the Battle of Vimy Ridge in April 1916, but was later killed in the Battle of Hill 70 in August 1917 at only 21 years of age. He fought and died as a Canadian. Freddy was among the 11,286 Canadians killed in France with no known graves.

    Freddy’s story is one that not only symbolizes the strength and determination of Chinese Canadians’ long struggle to gain acceptance as full Canadian citizens, but also embodies the Canadian spirit of “strength in diversity”, where Canadians of all ethnicities contributed to the history and development of their nation.

    While featuring Frederick Lee, the symposium will present a larger Chinese Canadian story. Based on historical research by experts on Chinese Canadian studies and WWI, along with invaluable insights from key figures involved in various Frederick Lee projects, the event will shine new light on Chinese Canadians’ contributions to Canadian history.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca, or by calling 416-946-8978.


    Speakers

    The Honorable Dr. Vivienne Poy
    Opening Remarks
    Chancellor Emerita, University of Toronto, and retired Senator of Canada

    Dr. Jack Leong
    Chair
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

    Dr. Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies, University of Toronto

    Dr. Robert C. Engen
    Panelist
    Department of Defence Studies, Canadian Forces College

    Mr. Mark Hutchings
    Panelist
    Chairman, The Hill 70 Memorial Project

    Mr. Jack Gin
    Panelist
    Finding Frederick Lee Project

    Mr. Larry Alford
    Welcoming Remarks
    Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 29th The Two Solitudes of Russia Abroad: The Exiled Intelligentsia and the Second World War in France

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk addresses the tensions which arose in the Russian emigre community in France during and after WWII. These tensions resulted from the divergent experiences and interpretations of the war by the Russian and Russian-Jewish cultural elites who had emigrated to France after the communist coup of 1917. Examining, on the basis of largely unpublished archival materials, attitudes toward Nazi Germany and the Vichy regime among exiled Russian-speaking writers and intellectuals, those who stayed in war-time France and those who took refuge in the United Stated, the talk will focus on Russian reactions to German and French anti-Semitic policies. The goal is to deepen our understanding of the precipitous decline of the Russian emigre cultural community, which thrived in interwar France, by exploring a taboo aspect of its final years, obfuscated in scholarly literature — namely, its fracturing along ethnic lines under the impact of the Holocaust. The talk will argue that traumatic war experience, including the manifest or perceived political attitudes of ethnic Russians in France, modified the cultural identity of the exiled Russian-Jewish intelligentsia, which had been the backbone of interwar Russian emigre cultural life, weakening its commitment to Russia Abroad and thereby accelerating the cultural community’s fragmentation and decline in France.

    Leonid Livak is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and Centre for Jewish Studies, and an associated researcher at the Centre d’études des Mondes Russe, Caucasien & Centre-Européen (EHESS-Paris). He has published extensively on Russian-French and Russian-Jewish cultural history, and on Russian and transnational modernism. Among his books are: How It Was Done in Paris: Russian Emigre Literature and French Modernism (2003); Le Studio franco-russe (2005); Russian Emigres in the Intellectual and Literary Life of Interwar France (2010); The Jewish Persona in the European Imagination (2010); In Search of Russian Modernism (2018). As part of his current research project, “The Final Chapter of Russia Abroad,” he is writing the cultural history of the decline of the Russian emigre community in France.


    Speakers

    Leonid Livak
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, October 29th In Conversation: Janice Stein and Lyse Doucet, BBC's Chief International Correspondent

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, October 29, 20194:00PM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Lyse Doucet has been reporting for the BBC for nearly 30 years, with posts in Abidjan, Kabul, Islamabad, Tehran, Amman and Jerusalem. In 1999 she joined the BBC’s team of presenters but most of her time is spent going back to regions where she lived, and also discovering new ones too.
    Lyse often presents from the field for BBC World News, and the BBC World Service’s flagship Newshour programme, as well as the News Channel. She works as a correspondent too, reporting across the BBC’s global and domestic TV and radio outlets. She also writes for BBC online and posts – judiciously! – on Twitter and Facebook.
    Lyse feels at home in many places but is still Canadian. She was educated in Canada, at Queen’s University, and the University of Toronto, and has been awarded several honorary doctorates as well as major journalism awards.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. Her most recent publications include Networks of Knowledge: Innovation in International Learning (2000); The Cult of Efficiency (2001); and Street Protests and Fantasy Parks (2001). She is a contributor to Canada by Picasso (2006) and the co-author of The Unexpected War: Canada in Kandahar (2007). She was the Massey Lecturer in 2001 and a Trudeau Fellow. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Janice Stein
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Lyse Doucet
    Chief International Correspondent, BBC



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th Walk in Canada, Talk on Japan: 3 Short Talks on Business Topics in Japan

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20198:00AM - 9:30AMLL1010 (Lower Level, South Building)
    Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
    105 St George Street
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    Description

    3 Short Talks on Business Topics in Japan (Walk in Canada, Talk on Japan)

    7:15-7:59am: Check-in, coffee
    8:00am sharp to 9:30am: Presentations and Q&A

    Speaker(s):
    “Foreign Political and Economic Policy and Security issues in Japan” by Mr. Jonathan Miller, Senior Fellow, Japan Institute of International Affairs

    “Human Resources Management and Corporate Governance Issues in Japan” by Mr. Keith Kakehashi, Corporate Officer and HR Director. NSG Glass

    “Energy and Climate Change Issues in Japan” by Ms. Miho Kurosaki, Head of Japan Research, Bloomberg NEF

    Opening Remarks By: Mr. Kenjiro Monji, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of Japan; former Ambassador of Japan to Canada

    Cost:
    Free to attend. Registration is required by October 29 at 5:00 pm.

    Speaker Biographies:

    Mr. Keith Kakehashi is Corporate Officer, HR Director Asia excl. Japan and HR Director Key Global HR Projects at NSG, one of the world largest glass manufacturers. After joining NSG in 1985, he took various management positions including his 8-year secondment to the U.S. representative office, firstly based in Lexington, KY and next in NYC, NY. He was also closely involved in the management integration mainly in HR areas after NSG acquired a UK listed company Pilkington in 2006. He is now chairing Group Inclusion & Diversity Steering Committee.

    Ms. Miho Kurosaki worked as Head of Japan and Korea Research for Bloomberg NEF, energy and transport research division of Bloomberg. She leads analysis and research on topics including impact of the energy market liberalization. She served as a committee member of climate change advisory panel for Japan Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Prior to BNEF, she has developed Bloomberg’s Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) analytics platform as senior ESG analyst. Miho holds an MSc in Environmental Technology from Imperial College London and a BA in Economics from Keio University.

    Mr. Jonathan Miller is currently senior fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs and also deputy directory and senior fellow at the Ottawa-based MacDonald Laurier Institute. Miller additionally holds concurrent roles as distinguished fellow for the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, senior fellow at the Asian Forum Japan and senior fellow for the East-West Institute. He formerly served in the Canadian government – in the foreign ministry and security community – for nearly a decade. Miller regularly contributes articles, interviews and presentations on East Asian security matters.

    Mr. Kenjiro Monji from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan has served mainly in the areas of treaties, national security and cultural exchange. After holding posts as Deputy Director-General of the Treaties Bureau and as Director-General for International Affairs at the Ministry of Defence, he served as Ambassador to Iraq (2007), Director-General for Public Diplomacy at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2008), Ambassador to Qatar (2010) and Ambassador, Permanent Delegate of Japan to UNESCO (2013). He started his assignment as Ambassador of Japan to Canada and to the Delegation of Japan to the International Civil Aviation Organization in April 2015. Having been awarded the title of Sake Samurai by the Japan Sake Brewers Association Junior Council, Ambassador Monji also promotes Japanese sake overseas.

    REGISTRATION BELOW

    Contact

    Megan Murphy
    (416) 978-6122

    Sponsors

    Rotman Institute for International Business

    Co-Sponsors

    Consulate General of Japan

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th China's Rise and Neoliberalism's Demise?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20195:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The rise of China has coincided with, in the United States, a growing skepticism of “neoliberal” economic assumptions that were previously shared by policy elites across the U.S. political spectrum for decades. Are the two phenomena related? What might their relationship suggest about the future of U.S. domestic and foreign policy?

    Tarun Chhabra is a fellow with the International Order and Strategy program at the Brookings Institution as well as Georgetown University’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology. He has worked on the White House National Security Council staff, at the Pentagon, and at the United Nations. He also has been a visiting fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House and a Graduate Fellow at Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Chhabra holds a law degree from Harvard, where he was a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellow for New Americans, an M.Phil in international relations from Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford.


    Speakers

    Tarun Chhabra
    Speaker
    Fellow, The Project on International Order and Strategy, Brookings Institution

    Janice Stein
    Moderator
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, October 30th Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, October 30, 20196:00PM - 8:00PMFather Madden Hall
    Carr Hall
    St. Michael’s College
    100 St. Joseph St.
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    Description

    “Transformations of the Mind: Technology and the Future of Creativity”
    A conversation with Jacek Dukaj

    To RSVP, please email Prof. Aleksandra Swiecka at aleksandra.swiecka@utoronto.ca

    Sponsors

    Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, October 31st Translator Agency in Turkey under Censorial Constraints: Institutional Pressure on Translation

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, October 31, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room
    BF200B
    4 Bancroft Ave. 2nd floor
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Translation is one of the spheres where the effects of an ideology are most visible because what is allowed and proscribed to exist in a culture is immediately reflected on the constraints surrounding the agents of translators e.g. the translators editors publishers and their resulting translational behavior. Rethinking the issue of translator agency within a framework of censorship can shed light on both the unusual and imperceptible constraints that impinge on translational activity. Through a review of a variety of scandalous translation cases that have generated much legal academic and public debate in Turkey this talk explores the question of translator agency under an emerging authoritarian regime with a focus on the institutional forms of censorship in the production of translated literature. By casting light on the multifaceted power relations between the agents of translation and institutions of power a study on censorship and translator agency also contributes to ongoing studies of how larger systems of culture and literature evolve.


    Speakers

    Dr. Inci Sariz


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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November 2019

  • Friday, November 1st America’s Carceral Landscapes symposium

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 1, 20191:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series
    Center for the Study of the United States

    America’s Carceral Landscapes

    This symposium seeks to historicize, map, and challenge the proliferation of carceral landscapes in the contemporary United States. The Trump administration’s response to a refugee crisis at the nation’s southern border, one precipitated by U.S. military intervention, political corruption, neoliberal economic policies, and climate change, has illustrated once again America’s perverse fascination with caging children of color. Millions of African American, Latinx, and Native American people, meanwhile, remain trapped in evolving regimes of mass incarceration that have enshrined “civil death” in American society. The U.S. military continues to detain thousands of enemy combatants across a vast network of detention centers that stretch from the Middle East to West Africa, and Guantanamo Bay. Even those activists and advocates contesting the nation’s vast carceral archipelago are enmeshed with social media platforms at the vanguard of what Shoshana Zuboff calls “surveillance capitalism.” The “carceral,” as Michel Foucault conceptualized it, is truly hegemonic. This interdisciplinary symposium brings together scholars uniquely positioned to help us map and historicize the current conjuncture: concentration camps at the border, systematic deportation, decarceration / relocation of citizen-captives to municipal jails, surveillance capitalism, and transnational, gendered regimes of incarceration.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Stuart Schrader
    Johns Hopkins University

    Toussaint Lossier
    University of Massachusets

    Brett Story
    Ryerson University

    Donna Murch
    Rutgers University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Geography

    Department of Sociology

    Institute for Women's Studies and Gender Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 1st Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 1, 20192:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Within the labor literature, with its predominant focus on wage workers, self-employed workers are too often ignored and under-examined as part of the modern proletariat. However, this neglect of self-employed workers creates major blind spots in our understanding of the multiplicity of agents of social change that are organizing as workers outside the Global North. As urban spaces are increasingly being captured as a speculative commodity, especially in rapidly urbanizing cities beyond the often-theorized and studied West, urban spaces are becoming a source of precarity for the many self-employed workforce who depend on them to make a living. However, the same spaces are also emerging as loci for building workers’ power. I focus on the South Korean tenant shopkeepers who are waging creative collective actions to defend their rights to their shops and attracting outside allies within the progressive networks to join them. Through ethnographic research, I analyze how and when the making of what I refer to as protest space—a symbolic space challenging the entrenched power structure—can effectively translate into workers’ power. The case of Seoul presents broader implications for understanding how the previously fragmented and isolated self-employed workers can form collective consciousness.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Prior to coming to Toronto, she completed her doctoral degree in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles.
    As a political and labor sociologist and urban ethnographer, Yewon is broadly interested in how speculative real estate interests increasingly dictate the shapes and characters of urban landscapes and how, in response, ordinary people organize to preserve their ways of living. Her dissertation, Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: The Untold Gentrification Story of Tenant Shopkeepers’ Displacement and Resistance in Seoul, examines tenant shopkeepers in Seoul, Korea—how the previously unorganized organize under their collective identity as workers. A manuscript that emerged from this dissertation is currently forthcoming at Critical Sociology and has received many awards including Honorable Mention in the 2019 American Sociological Association’s Mayer N. Zald Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship/ Graduate Student Paper Award competition.


    Speakers

    Yewon Andrea Lee
    Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 1st America’s Carceral Landscapes keynote

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 1, 20195:30PM - 7:30PMAllumni Hall 400, 121 St. Joseph Street.
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Series

    F. Ross Johnson Distinguished Speaker Series

    Description

    It will take place on November 1, 2019 from 5:30–7:30 pm at Allumni Hall 400, 121 St. Joseph Street.

    “Rethinking the Carceral State in the Era of Authoritarianism.”

    America’s Carceral Landscapes

    This symposium seeks to historicize, map, and challenge the proliferation of carceral landscapes in the contemporary United States. The Trump administration’s response to a refugee crisis at the nation’s southern border, one precipitated by U.S. military intervention, political corruption, neoliberal economic policies, and climate change, has illustrated once again America’s perverse fascination with caging children of color. Millions of African American, Latinx, and Native American people, meanwhile, remain trapped in evolving regimes of mass incarceration that have enshrined “civil death” in American society. The U.S. military continues to detain thousands of enemy combatants across a vast network of detention centers that stretch from the Middle East to West Africa, and Guantanamo Bay. Even those activists and advocates contesting the nation’s vast carceral archipelago are enmeshed with social media platforms at the vanguard of what Shoshana Zuboff calls “surveillance capitalism.” The “carceral,” as Michel Foucault conceptualized it, is truly hegemonic. This interdisciplinary symposium brings together scholars uniquely positioned to help us map and historicize the current conjuncture: concentration camps at the border, systematic deportation, decarceration / relocation of citizen-captives to municipal jails, surveillance capitalism, and transnational, gendered regimes of incarceration.

    No RSVP or registration needed.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Professor Donna Murch
    Rutgers University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Department of Geography

    Department of Sociology

    Womenand Gender Studies Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 4th The Ukrainian Bureau in London and Its Documents Related to the Holodomor

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 4, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Dr. Wysocki will discuss the activity and archival heritage of the Ukrainian Bureau in London, which was established in 1931 with the aim of informing international opinion about the Ukrainians in Galicia, then part of Poland. Although the office was to exist for about two years, it continued to operate until the outbreak of World War Two. During its existence, the Ukrainian Bureau played a key role in the area of Ukrainian civic diplomacy and disseminating information on the situation in Ukraine, especially on the Holodomor.

    Historian Roman Wysocki is a lecturer at the Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Poland. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on Polish-Ukrainian relations between the two world wars and on Ukrainians and Belarusians in Poland. His areas of interest include Ukrainian political thought, Polish-Ukrainian history in the twentieth century, Ukrainian emigrants in Poland, reactions to the Holodomor, and the Orthodox Church in Poland.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Roman Wysocki
    Speaker
    Institute of History at Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland

    Piotr Wrobel
    Chair
    Konstanty Reinert Chair of Polish Studies, Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 6th The Rise and Fall of “Good Governance” Promotion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    SEYMOUR MARTIN LIPSET MEMORIAL LECTURE ON DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD

    Description

    On 31 October 2003 the UN General Assembly adopted the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC). Fifteen years on, 181 UN member states have already ratified it, reaching near global unanimity. Unlike its older and more famous antecessor, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and subsequent UN human rights covenants, UNCAC did not meet with claims that it imposed some form of Western institutional hegemony on the rest of the world. But how much difference has the covenant made? Professor Mungiu-Pippidi will trace the history of ethical universalism as a governance norm and benchmark, examine the Western record of promoting it, and consider the pitfalls and the challenges of current efforts to implement it.

    Alina Mungiu-Pippidi is a policy scientist who chairs the European Research Center for Anticorruption and State-Building (ERCAS) at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, where she holds the chair in Democracy Studies. A Romanian by birth, she created and chaired for many years the Romanian Academic Society, the country’s leading think tank, and the Coalition for a Clean Romania, an anti-corruption alliance. She also served in 1996 as the first anticommunist news director of Romanian public broadcasting. Her books include “The Quest for Good Governance: How Societies Develop Control of Corruption” (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and “A Tale of Two Villages” (CEU Press, 2010). The latter was screened as a documentary by the BBC. She has published articles in Nature, Foreign Policy, the Journal of Democracy, and several public policy journals and has frequently been cited in The Economist and other prominent media. She consults for the World Bank and various European institutions, and also serves as a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Democracy and the research council of the International Forum for Democratic Studies.


    Speakers

    Alina Mungiu-Pippidi
    Professor of Democracy Studies, Hertie School of Governance, Berlin, Germany


    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Department of Political Science

    Donner Canadian Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 7th THE COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION POLICY

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 7, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Why do states that confront comparable immigration challenges oftentimes adopt remarkably different policy solutions? Why does immigration policy change radically at certain points in time, whilst showing striking resilience at others? This talk presents a theoretical framework for the comparative study of immigration policy making. I argue the capacity of policy makers to turn their immigration preferences into policy is contingent on three types of political insulation. Whereas popular insulation will shield policy makers from public pressure for policy restrictionism, interest group insulation and diplomatic insulation are necessary if policy makers are to enjoy reprieve from demands by domestic lobbies and foreign governments for policy liberalization. Because each type of insulation differs across institutional arenas, immigration policy choices will vary not only across countries but, in contexts where actors can manipulate the institutional locus of policy making, also over time.

     

    Antje Ellermann is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute for European Studies at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She is also the founder and Co-lead of the UBC Migration Research Excellence Cluster. Professor Ellermann’s research focuses on the politics of migration and citizenship in liberal democracies. Her book States Against Migrants: Deportation in Germany and the United States (2009) was published with Cambridge University Press. Her work has also appeared in World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Politics & Society, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, and West European Politics. Professor Ellermann’s lecture draws from a book manuscript she is completing that theorizes the politics of immigration policy making in liberal democracies. The project is based on case studies of key episodes of immigration reform in Switzerland, Germany, Canada, and the United States from the 1950s to the present.


    Speakers

    Prof. Antje Ellermann
    University of British Columbia


    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 7th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Distinguished Lecture Series:
    Michael Ignatieff: Democracy versus Democracy: The Crisis of Liberal Constitutionalism

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 7, 20195:30PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Munk School Distinguished Lecture Series

    Description

    Watch the live stream of this event HERE

    The populist challenge to liberal democracy is being waged in the name of democracy: the people versus the elites, the majority versus minorities, the electorate versus the courts. Instead of seeing the populism as a threat, we should think of it as a challenge that liberal democracy is fully capable of meeting. Liberal constitutionalism is built for crisis, and the populist crisis could end up strengthening our democracy, provided liberal institutions—and elites—respond.

    About our Speaker
    Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician.
    His major publications are The Needs of Strangers (1984), Scar Tissue (1992), Isaiah Berlin (1998), The Rights Revolution (2000), Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry (2001), The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror (2004), Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics (2013), and The Ordinary Virtues: Moral Order in a Divided World (2017).
    Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Professor of the Practice of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.
    He is currently the Rector and President of Central European University in Budapest.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    Michael Ignatieff
    President and Rector
    Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
    Distinguished Fellow
    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th The Battlegrounds of Ukraine: Ongoing Revolution(s) in Identity, Post-Industrialism, and Geopolitics

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Information is not yet available.

    Contact

    Olga Kesarchuk
    416-946-8938


    Speakers

    Marta Dyczok
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History and Political Science, Western Universtiy

    Mychailo Wynnyckyj
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Sociology, National University of “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy”, Lecturer at Lviv Business School UCU, and Head of the Secretariat of the National Agency for Higher Education Quality Assurance


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th David Peterson Public Leadership Program Lecture Series:
    The Honourable Kevin Rudd: The Future of Centre-Left Politics in Western Democracies

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20195:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Global Leaders in Public Policy

    Description

    Watch the live stream of this event HERE

    You are invited to attend the next installment of the David Peterson Public Leadership Program Global Leaders in Public Policy Series featuring the honourable Kevin Rudd.

    About Our Speaker

    Kevin Rudd joined the Asia Society Policy Institute as its inaugural President in January 2015. He served as Australia’s 26th Prime Minister from 2007 to 2010, then as Foreign Minister from 2010 to 2012, before returning as Prime Minister in 2013. As Prime Minister, Rudd led Australia’s response during the Global Financial Crisis. Australia’s fiscal response to the crisis was reviewed by the IMF as the most effective stimulus strategy of all member states. Australia was the only major advanced economy not to go into recession. Rudd is also internationally recognized as one of the founders of the G20, which drove the global response to the crisis and in 2009 helped prevent the crisis from spiraling into a second global depression. As Prime Minister and Foreign Minister, Rudd was active in global and regional foreign policy leadership. He was a driving force in expanding the East Asia Summit (EAS) to include both the U.S. and Russia in 2010. He also initiated the concept of transforming the EAS into a wider Asia-Pacific community to help manage deep-rooted tensions in Asia by building over time the institutions and culture of common security in Asia. On climate change, Rudd ratified the Kyoto Protocol in 2007 and legislated in 2008 for a mandatory 20 percent renewable energy target for Australia. Rudd launched Australia’s challenge in the International Court of Justice with the objective of stopping Japanese whaling in the Southern Ocean. Rudd drove Australia’s successful bid for its current non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council and oversaw the near-doubling of Australia’s foreign aid budget. Rudd is Chair of the Board of the International Peace Institute, and Chair of Sanitation and Water for All. He is a Senior Fellow at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, a Distinguished Fellow at Chatham House in London, a Distinguished Statesman with the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Paulson Institute in Chicago. Mr. Rudd is a member of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization’s Group of Eminent Persons. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the Schwarzman Scholars program at Tsinghua University, and is an Honorary Professor at Peking University. Rudd is proficient in Mandarin Chinese. He remains actively engaged in indigenous reconciliation.

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    416-946-5670


    Speakers

    The Honourable Kevin Rudd
    26th Prime Minister of Australia President, Asia Society Policy Institute Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge MA



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 11th Reel Asian Film Screening: The Dragon Painter

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 11, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    The Dragon Painter

    USA 1919
    53:00
    Silent with English intertitles
    G

    DIRECTOR
    William Worthington

    CAST
    Sessue Hayakawa
    Tsuru Aoki
    Edward Peil
    Toyo Fujita

    An early Hollywood silent film, The Dragon Painter is a fantasy romance about love and creative inspiration. Tatsu (Hayakawa) is a reclusive artist who lives in the mountains of Japan painting images of the dragon princess he loved in another life. He comes to believe the daughter of a wealthy art collector is his lost princess, but as Tatsu finds happiness in love, his art begins to suffer.

    In his prime, Hayakawa was as popular as Charlie Chaplin, as rich as Douglas Fairbanks, and to this day, the only Asian American to own his own Hollywood studio. Hayakawa founded Haworth Pictures Corporation after becoming fed up with the self-proclaimed Orientalist roles in which he was cast by the major studios, including his character in Cecil B. DeMille’s The Cheat. Hayakawa’s studio subsequently released 19 films between the years of 1918 to 1922.

    Although set in Japan, The Dragon Painter was shot on location in Yosemite National Park and stars a predominantly Japanese American cast, including Hayakawa’s wife, Tsuru Aoki. Produced by Hayakawa’s own studio, the film deliberately strived to provide an authentic perspective on Japanese culture that countered the dominant narrative of stereotypes, violence, and melodramatic conflict expected in so-called “Oriental” films of the period. For these reasons, it is considered it to be one of the first Asian American films in history. – Rob Buscher

    On the occasion of the film’s 100th Anniversary, The Dragon Painter will be presented with a live musical accompaniment and an original score by Los Angeles-based musician Goh Nakamura that was originally commissioned by the Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival. A presentation on Hayakawa’s work and legacy will be given by Stephen Gong, film archivist and executive director of the Center for Asian American Media, who was responsible for locating and overseeing the restoration of the last existing print of The Dragon Painter.

    The screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Takashi Fujitani, Professor of History at the University of Toronto where he holds the Dr. David Chu Chair and is Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia Pacific Studies

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Toronto Silent Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th PCJ Fellows Talk: Failed States or Failed Solutions? An Empirical Assessment of U.S. Treatment of State Failure

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Since the end of the Cold War, the damaging effects of state failure have plagued the international community. Solutions like state or “peace” building efforts and multi-national interventions are plentiful in the literature, though their success is difficult to measure. Also strikingly absent from the literature is the empirical likelihood that the West will indeed respond to state failure. Crucially, if the West does not respond predictably to state failure, then the effort devoted to finding solutions may be based on a biased sample of cases, producing serious methodological flaws. This project seeks to fill this gap by conducting one of the first mixed-methods studies of its kind.

    Using a large-n dataset, I test the relative strength of state failure in determining where the United States will intervene (financially or militarily). I find that the degree of state failure is not a good indicator of where the US will intervene militarily or financially. Counterintuitively, the US tends to send extremely small contingents to the most critically failed states. Secondly, I conduct a case study of Liberia to illuminate the reasons why the US did not immediately intervene during the civil war and the subsequent state collapse. I also draw on counter-examples from Nigeria for contrast. I find that the important factors in determining intervention include pressure from the international community, the perceived threat of terrorism, and the target states’ geostrategic position. The illumination of these empirical realities may help to determine the actual success (or failure) of international responses to state failure, and can help inform efforts in the study for new solutions.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Michele St-Amant
    Department of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th The Indian Water Crisis: Does Technology Offer a Way Forward?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The 2019 Indian water crisis has been termed by researchers, civil society and the national media in that country as being unprecedented in its geographical span and severity. This panel examines some of the policy and technological responses to this multidimensional crisis and argues that current problems, while challenging, have been decades in the making. It also highlights years of missed opportunities towards crafting imaginative solutions to what are primarily issues of unsustainable water use. From the problems of sanitation, the growing disparities in urban water access, and the over extraction of groundwater in many parts of India, the panelists shall also examine the nexus of the water crisis with technological and institutional choices made in the past. In this context, the panelists while maintaining their focus on policy questions shall also map out possible technological solutions and political responses to the present crisis.

    Introductory remarks
    Vladimiros Papangelakis, Director, Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi, Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto
    Understanding recent national policy responses to the water crisis in India. Is governance reform sufficient?

    K J Joy, Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Promoting Participative Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India
    Responding to the Indian water crisis: Emergent ideas and pathways for restructuring the water sector

    David Taylor, Assistant Professor, Civil and Global Engineering, University of Toronto
    Urban water regimes

    Moderator
    Amy Bilton, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Note of thanks: Vladimiros Papangelakis, Institute for Water Innovation


    Speakers

    Amy Bilton
    Moderator
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Director, Center for Global Engineering, University of Toronto

    Vladimiros Papangelakis
    Opening Remarks
    Director, Institute for Water Innovation, University of Toronto

    Bharat Punjabi
    Panelist
    Lecturer, Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    K. J. Joy
    Panelist
    Founder Member and Senior Fellow, Society for Participatory Ecosystem Management, Pune and Convenor, Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India

    David Taylor
    Panelist
    Assistant Professor, Global Engineering, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Institute for Water Innovation, Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 12th Reel Asian Roundtable with Chop Suey Nation and A Sweet & Sour Christmas

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 12, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    PULSE PRESENTATION
    CHOP SUEY NATION
    Canada 2019
    English

    AUTHOR
    Ann Hui
    (in attendance)

    A SWEET AND SOUR CHRISTMAS
    Canada 2019
    16:00
    English, Cantonese with English Subtitles
    G · Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Aram Collier
    (in attendance)

    PRODUCER
    Betty Xie
    (in attendance)

    How do food stories speak to a convoluted history of multiculturalism? What does it take to trace back the stories of diasporic community to its roots? If and when we do arrive, what next? This multimedia program explores this question through an excerpt reading of Chop Suey Nation and a screening of A Sweet and Sour Christmas.

    In 2016, Journalist Ann Hui drove across Canada seeking answers to two questions: Why is there a Chinese restaurant in every small town? Who are the families who run them? Meeting with owners and eating at their restaurants, Hui shares stories of diasporic Chinese communities in her book Chop Suey Nation, while unexpectedly, uncovering her own family history – revealing the importance of these restaurants to Canada’s history.

    In A Sweet and Sour Christmas, director Aram Siu Wai Collier and producer Betty Xie follow two types of holiday meals at the King Wok Restaurant: the deep-fried take-out Chinese Canadian food staples delivered to families across Kitchener and the traditional Cantonese meal for a family sharing a rare Christmas celebration. This film is a CBC Short Doc to be released on CBC Gem and the CBC Short Docs Channel in December 2019.
    – KL

    BIOs:

    Raised in a Chinese-Canadian family in Vancouver, Ann Hui grew up in a food-obsessed household to parents who always knew where the freshest Cantonese seafood or barbecued duck could be found. Since 2015, Hui has been The Globe’s national food reporter. Her work includes investigations into the role of lobbying in the development of Canada’s Food Guide, and a 2018 story that uncovered widespread sexual harassment in one of the country’s most prominent wineries. She has a Masters of Journalism from Ryerson University and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia.

    Aram Siu Wai Collier is a Toronto-based filmmaker, educator, and film festival programmer. He edited the feature documentary Refugee and directed the short doc Who I Became, nationally broadcasted on PBS. His omnibus live music and film project Suite Suite Chinatown (‘11-’14) toured Canada, Asia, and the USA. His Telefilm Canada-funded feature, Stand Up Man (‘17) premiered at multiple international film festivals. Collier is a mixed-race Asian Canadian/American who has a BFA and MFA in Film Production from the University of California at Santa Cruz and York University respectively.

    Betty Xie is a Chinese Canadian filmmaker and a festival curator. Her short documentary The Home Promised (‘14) won the Air Canada Best Short Film at the Reel Asian Film Festival and played at various international film festivals. She produced the Telefilm Canada funded-feature, Stand Up Man (‘17), which premiered at multiple international film festivals. Her short doc Chado: A Way of Tea was selected as a top 10 finalist of the 2018 TVO ShortDoc Contest. She was also a 2019 Doc Institute Canada Breakthrough Fellow.

    Join Hui, Collier and Xie in conversation moderated by multidisciplinary artist Shellie Zhang to discuss the Chinese-Canadian cuisine known as chop suey. These four artists dive by way of food stories into a deeper inquiry around constructs of citizenship, belonging, and tolerance.

    *Chop Suey Nation will be on sale prior to the event and Ann Hui will be available for book signings after the event.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Critical Distance Centre for Curators


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th Religion, Accommodation, Reactions

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Immigration to Canada has always raised questions about how society achieves a greater degree of unity, or integration, in the context of religious diversity. Recent polling reports that religious communities play a key role in the process of integration within Canadian society, by serving as a cultural bridge and offering social and spiritual support to newcomers. However, religion is also a focus point of reactionary forces in society, as national debates around accommodation, education, and schooling become inflamed by local events. These debates are often framed around competing rights claims. What is the role of human rights law and language, including around religious freedom, and what are its limits? What is the role of religious groups and communities in helping to foster understanding, tolerance, and mutual respect? To what extent, if at all, should the government become involved in regulating religious diversity?

    Panelists:

    Dr. Andrew Parkin, Executive Director at Environics Institute for Survey Research

    Dr. Shaheen Azmi, Director of Policy Education Monitoring and Outreach for the Ontario Human Rights Commission

    Dr. Shari Golberg, Senior Policy Advisor, OPS Inclusive Diversity Office, Treasury Board Secretariat

    This seminar series explores the role of religion in migration to Canada, with regard to settlement and integration, accommodation and reaction, and citizenship and participation. Each seminar brings together scholars and practitioners to discuss the ways in which religious belief and practice, religious community life, and religious institutions influence migrant pathways to participation in Canadian life and society. This seminar series is organized in partnership with the Global Migration Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Baha’i Community of Canada and the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre.

    Main Sponsor

    Global Migration Lab

    Sponsors

    Baha’i Community of Canada

    University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th – Friday, November 15th PCJ Indigenous Cultural Competency Training

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20191:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
    Friday, November 15, 20199:00AM - 12:00PMBloor - Transit House, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    This event is only open to registered PCJ students.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th The newest wave of Russian emigration and its implications for Russia and the West

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Dr. Sergei Erofeev is currently a lecturer at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He has been involved in the internationalization of universities in Russia since the early 1990s. Previously, Dr. Erofeev served as a vice rector for international affairs at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, the dean of international programs at the European University at Saint Petersburg, and the director of the Center for Sociology of Culture at Kazan Federal University in Russia. He has also been a Hubert H. Humphrey fellow at the University of Washington. Prior to his career in academia, Dr. Erofeev was a concert pianist, and has worked in the area of the sociology of the arts.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Sergei Erofeev



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 13th Reel Asian Film Screening: What We Left Unfinished

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 13, 20198:00PM - 9:30PMInnis Town Hall Theatre, 2 Sussex Avenue
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    Description

    Please note that the registration is now CLOSED.

    Same-day rush tickets will be available from 7 PM on the night of the show.

    Feature Presentation
    WHAT WE LEFT UNFINISHED

    Afghanistan/USA 2019
    71:00
    Dari with English subtitles
    PG • Toronto Premiere

    DIRECTOR
    Mariam Ghani

    CAST
    Latif Ahmadi
    Hossain Fakhri
    Said Miran Farhad
    Juwansher Haidary
    Wali Latifi
    Faqir Nabi
    Yasamin Yarmal

    OFFICIAL SELECTION
    2019 Berlinale Forum
    2019 SFFILM
    2019 Sheffield Doc/Fest

    From 1978 to 1991, the Afghan Films Institute had been producing propaganda features to fit with the times. This documentary follows the incredible story of five of these unfinished works from Afghanistan’s Communist era, when the constantly shifting political regimes resulted in films remaining unfinished, unedited, and thought to be destroyed.

    In her debut feature, Mariam Ghani pieces fragments of this once-lost footage, from The April Revolution (1978), Downfall (1987), The Black Diamond (1989), Wrong Way (1990), and Agent (1991), unedited (and therefore, uncensored). Just as the original filmmakers did when they shot action scenes with real bullets, hired ex-agents to play spies, or restaged the Communist coup d’état with the army, air force, and an awful lot of tanks and missiles, What We Left Unfinished interweaves histories and fictions. Ultimately, we come to understand both the price paid by Afghan filmmakers for the benefits they gained under Communism and the reasons they persisted despite the risks they faced—and why they still believe that film could save Afghanistan from the divisions tearing it apart today.

    DIRECTOR BIO
    Mariam Ghani’s previous projects in Afghanistan have documented the spatial politics of the post-war constitutional assembly, real-estate speculations in reconstructed Kabul, afterlives of former secret prisons, diasporic translators in theatres of war, and forgotten histories of Afghan modernists, artists and intellectuals. What We Left Unfinished is her first feature.

    This screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Shahrzad Mojab, a scholar, teacher, and activist, internationally known for her work on the impact of war, displacement, dispossession, and violence on women’s learning and resistance. She is professor of Adult Education and Community Development and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto, and currently, the Director of Equity Studies at New College.

    Please arrive early as all tickets become void as of 15 minutes before showtime.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival

    Co-Sponsors

    Farsi Cinema Centre

    Regent Park Film Festival


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th King Milinda in Independent Burma and the Struggle to Control the Buddhist Canon

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Asian Institute PhD Seminar Series

    Description

    The first independent Burmese administration of U Nu embarked on a national Buddhist revivalist project that included laws regulating Buddhism, sponsorship of lay-centred meditation centres, and the so-called Sixth Buddhist Council. This paper focuses on Burmese monk Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw (1868-1954) and the controversy over his Pali commentary in the early 1950s, the Commentary on the Questions of [King] Milinda (Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā). Published in 1948 by a pioneer of mass-lay meditation in the most classical commentarial genre, this text sparked protest in the streets and forced U Nu to send police to confiscate almost 400 copies from a monastery in Rangoon at night. Ostensibly the uproar was over reforms the Mingun Jetavana Sayadaw proposed to the monastic code (vinaya), possibly hurrying the enactment of the Monastic Courts Act of 1949 (Ṭhana Vinicchaya). By examining the controversy over this text through newspaper articles, epigraphic evidence and government documents, this paper will explore the intersection between Buddhist statecraft, emerging communities of insight (vipassanā) meditation, and control of the Pali canon in mid-twentieth-century Burma.

    Tony Scott is a PhD Candidate in the Department for the Study of Religion in collaboration with the Centre for South Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. His research interests lie in South and Southeast Asian Pali discourse and its intersection with communities of practice, vernacular language, and twentieth-century statecraft. He currently focuses on the Milindapañha-aṭṭhakathā, a modern Pali commentary on the Questions of King Milinda (circa 1st century B.C.E.) written by a Burmese pioneer of insight (vipassanā) meditation, the Mūla Mingun Jetavan Sayadaw (1868-1954).

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Tony Scott
    PhD Candidate, Department for the Study of Religion and Collaborative Specialization in South Asian Studies



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th Transnational Solidarity Networks in the Era of Gay Liberation: The Making of Gay Communities in North America (1970s-1980s)

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    This talk discusses the relationship between the gay press and gay liberation movements in North America throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. The talk traces how international solidarity efforts and the need to “build community” in order to advance gay liberation politics fueled gay activists’ “desire to connect” in the post-Stonewall era. The discussion is centered around two (interconnected) networks that brought together people working with Toronto’s gay periodical The Body Politic (1971-1987), San Francisco’s Gay Sunshine (1971-1982), Boston’s Gay Community News (1973-1999), Mexico City’s Política Sexual and Nuestro Cuerpo (1979), as well as academics, activists, intellectuals, and other people based in the U.S. and Mexico throughout the period covered in the study.

    Juan Carlos Mezo González is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History working on a collaborative program in Sexual Diversity Studies at the University of Toronto. He holds an MA in History from the University of Toronto (2016) and an Honors BA in History from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (2014), where he was the recipient of the Gabino Barreda Medal as the top student in his cohort. His doctoral dissertation examines the transnational gay networks that people working with gay periodicals established across North America throughout the 1971-1994 period. His past and forthcoming publications focus on Indigenous and Colonial history and the history of gay liberation in North America. Juan Carlos is a recipient of the Mexican National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) Doctoral Scholarship and an Ontario Graduate scholar.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Juan Carlos Mezo González



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 14th « La plume et l’épée » **IN FRENCH**

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 14, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMCharbonnel Lounge
    Brennan Hall
    81 St. Mary Street
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    Description

    Au XIXème siècle, des révolutions, de la plume et de l’épée, de la « guerre », de l’ « escrime » ou de la « boxe littéraire », comme disaient Balzac ou les Goncourt, sommet de la violence entre écrivains, la République des lettres n’aurait plus été qu’un souvenir de l’Ancien Régime. La démocratisation de la guerre en dentelles aurait multiplié les polémiques, les pamphlets et les duels. Ne peut-on toutefois retrouver la trace, une survivance de cette République des lettres et une authentique académie, par exemple à la prison de Sainte-Pélagie, où nombre d’écrivains séjournent, condamnés pour délits de presse ? Entre les murs de la prison, des complicités se nouèrent entre ennemis devenus adversaires et qui apprirent à se respecter.

     

    Antoine Compagnon est professeur à l’université Columbia, New York depuis 1985 et au Collègue de France, Paris où il occupe la chaire de « Littérature française moderne et contemporaine : histoire, critique, théorie » depuis 2006. Ses recherches portent sur la littérature et la théorie littéraire et l’histoire de la critique du XVIème, XIXème et XXème siècle. Il est l’auteur de deux romans et de plus de vingt ouvrages de référence sur de grands écrivains, de Montaigne à Proust. Plusieurs de ces ouvrages ont été traduits en anglais, notamment Proust entre deux siècles (trad. 1992); Les Cinq Paradoxes de la Modernité (trad. 1994); Démon de la théorie (trad. 2004); La littérature, pour quoi faire? (trad. 2014); Un été avec Montaigne (trad. 2019). Il est cosignataire avec Donald Morrison (2010) du livre The Death of French Culture et il a publié de nouvelles éditons critiques des œuvres de Marcel Proust.

     

    King’s College London, HEC, Paris, l’Université de Liège et l’Université de Bucarest lui ont conféré le titre de docteur honoris causa. Il est membre de l’Académie américaine des arts et des sciences, Academia Europaea et correspondant (corresponding fellow) de la British Academy. La France lui a conféré les décorations de Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur, Officier de l’ordre national du Mérite, Commandeur de l’ordre des Palmes académiques et Officier de l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres.


    Speakers

    Antoine Compagnon
    Collège de France and Columbia University


    Sponsors

    Department of French

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for Comparative Literature

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th The Rise of Illiberal Politics in Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20199:00AM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    9:00 AM – Welcome and opening remarks by CSK Director Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Yoonkyung Lee (Sociology, University of Toronto): “The rise of extreme illiberal politics in East Asia: Conceptual propositions”

    9:30 AM – Panel 1: Illiberal Politics in China
    Chair and discussant: Sida Liu (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Lynette Ong (Political Science, University of Toronto): “Contentious Politics in China under Xi Jinping’s Rule”
    Jun Zhang (Geography and Planning, University of Toronto): “The Clash of Liberal Hong Kong and Illiberal Beijing: “One Country, Two Systems” under Fire”

    10:50 AM – Coffee break

    11:00 AM – Panel 2: Illiberal Politics in Japan
    Chair and discussant: Takashi Fujitani (History, University of Toronto)
    Nathaniel Smith (East Asian Studies, University of Arizona): “Trolling for the Emperor?: Race, Empire, and Battles on the ‘Multicultural’ Right in Japan”
    Sharon Yoon (Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University): “Normalizing Japan’s Far-Right: The Zaitokukai and its Impact on Mainstream Discourse”

    12:20 PM – Lunch

    2:00 PM – Panel 3: Illiberal Politics in South Korea
    Chair and discussant: Andre Schmid (East Asian Studies, University of Toronto)
    Myungji Yang (Political Science, University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa): “The Specter of the Past: Reconstructing Conservative Historical Memory in South Korea”
    Taehyun Nam (Political Science, Salisbury University):” Taegeukgi Protests as a Counter Movement?”

    3:20 PM – Coffee break

    3:30 PM – Panel 4: Illiberal Politics in the Philippines and Thailand
    Chair and discussant: Jack Veugelers (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Marco Garrido (Sociology, University of Chicago): “Democracy as Disorder: Democratic Disenchantment among the Middle Class in Metro Manila”
    Celso Villegas (Sociology, Kenyon College): “Extrajudicial Killings in the Philippines as a Transnational Narrative Trope”
    Tyrell Haberkorn (Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison): “What Cannot Be Spoken: Violence and the Monarchy in Thailand”


    Speakers

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Nathaniel Smith,
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Arizona

    Sharon Yoon
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University

    Andre Schmid
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

    Myungji Yang
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Hawai'I Mānoa

    Taehyun Nam
    Speaker
    Professor, Political Science Department, Salisbury University

    Jack Veugelers
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Marco Garrido
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago

    Celso Villegas
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Kenyon College

    Tyrell Haberkorn
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Speaker
    Director, Centre for the Study of Korea; Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Sida Liu
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Lynette Ong
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Sponsors

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Dangerous Liaisons: The Forbidden Love Affairs of French Prisoners of War and German Women in the Second World War

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Tens of thousands of French prisoners of war (POWs) and German women had to stand trial in Nazi Germany for having engaged in a love relation with each other. The prisoner and the woman both faced severe punishment, and the woman had to suffer public shaming. What do the trials reveal about Franco-German relations in World War II? How did French POWs and German women perceive each other? How did German village and factory communities react to these international love relations? Why did the relations never become part of memory in either country? The project examines Franco-German collaboration and international relations from a new perspective grounded in the everyday life experience in wartime Nazi Germany.

    Raffael Scheck is Katz Distinguished Teaching Professor of Modern European History at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. He has published five books and 40 articles on German right-wing politics and on French colonial prisoners of war. His book on the German army massacres of black French prisoners in 1940 was translated into French and German. He has completed a book manuscript on forbidden love relations between western prisoners of war and German women in World War II and is beginning to write a book on the German campaign in the West in 1940.


    Speakers

    Raffael Scheck
    Colby College


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Rereading Proust in 2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20193:00PM - 5:00PMEmmanuel College
    Victoria University
    75 Queen's Park
    Room EM001
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    Description

    Rereading Proust in 2019? Whose reading? Who is reading the Recherche du temps perdu? I am celebrating fifty years of reading Proust, remembering my first reading of Proust’s novel more than half a century ago. That sounds like a very long time. Proust died in 1922.  When I read him in 1967-69, that was less than fifty years after his death. The interval, the span of time between Proust’s death and my first reading of the Recherche was shorter than the years I have lived with Proust, alongside the Recherche, reading and rereading it all over again, editing it, teaching it. And the cultural, epistemological context of each reading has been profoundly different. Can one recover the original emotion?

     

    Antoine Compagnon has been professor at Columbia University since 1985 and at the Collège de France since 2006, where he holds the Chair in French Modern and Contemporary Literature. His research interests span Sixteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century French literature and literary theory and history of criticism.  He is the author of two novels and over twenty volumes of seminal essays on major writers from Montaigne to Proust, a number of which were translated into English: Proust entre deux siècles (trans. 1992); Les Cinq Paradoxes de la Modernité (trans. 1994); Démon de la théorie (trans. 2004); La littérature, pour quoi faire? (trans. 2014); Un été avec Montaigne (trans. 2019).  He also co-authored The Death of French Culture with Donald Morrison (2010) and edited numerous works by Marcel Proust. Antoine Compagnon has been granted the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa from King’s College London, HEC in Paris and the University of Liège He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Academia Europaea and corresponding fellow of the British Academy. He has been awarded by France the decorations of Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur, Officier de l’ordre national du Mérite, Commandeur de l’ordre des Palmes académiques and Officier de l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

     


    Speakers

    Antoine Compagnon
    Collège de France and Columbia University


    Sponsors

    Department of French

    Centre des Études de la France et du Monde Francophone

    Co-Sponsors

    Victoria College

    Department of Philosophy

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures

    Faculty of Arts & Science

    Department of English

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 15th Tagore in China: The Case for Pan-Asian Poetics in the 1920s

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Friday, November 15, 20195:00PM - 8:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The Annual Bengal Studies Lecture

    Description

    Rabindranath Tagore’s 1924 tour in China has attracted numerous critical analyses throughout the years and continues to pique scholars’ curiosity. The literary luminary’s attempt to raise support for his vision of an Asia-wide investment in spirituality in a rapidly materializing world remains a particularly fraught topic. Scholarship on China’s response to the Eastern spirituality ideal has generally focused on Chinese Marxists’ scathing critiques of Tagore’s vision, epitomized in the cold reception his lectures received from their audience. Less attention has been paid to an array of enthusiastic responses that emerged from May 4th poets in the form of journal articles about Tagore and poetry which directly engaged with his ideas. This talk investigates the exchange with Tagore and his work as an event that deeply informed Chinese poetry. As such, I argue, Tagore’s visit enables a new understanding of the Eastern spirituality project not as a failure, but as a vehicle for the Chinese envisioning of Pan-Asian poetics.

    Gal Gvili is an Assistant Professor at the Department of East Asian Studies at McGill University. She studies and teaches modern, and contemporary Chinese literature, literary and cultural theory. Her first book investigates how interactions between Chinese writers and Indian religions and philosophy fashioned a conviction that literature is the ultimate means for transforming the national fate.

    The lecture will be followed by reception, 7-8 PM.

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies

    Department for the Study of Religion

    Department of English


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 16th Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy Graduate Programs Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 16, 201910:00AM - 3:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Come learn more about the graduate programs offered at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy.

    Representatives from the following programs will be on hand:

    Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Specialization in South Asian Studies
    Collaborative Master’s Specialization in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies
    Master of Arts in European and Russian Affairs
    Master of Global Affairs
    Master of Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 18th Innovation, Ideas, and Human Trafficking: Approaches in Political Economy

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 18, 20192:30PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs
    315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Randall Hansen: “War, Work, and Want: The Political Economy and Human Trafficking in South Africa and Thailand”

    This paper examines two countries with sharply different levels of trafficking: South Africa and Thailand. Both are middle-income countries; both are larger than their contiguous neighbours; both are much wealthier than their immediate neighbours; and both are regional hegemons. Their common migration experiences, geopolitical contexts, and relative wealth levels are precisely the factors that the existing literature cites as the drivers of human trafficking. Given these shared characteristics, the fact that there is more trafficking in Thailand than in South Africa is puzzling. The paper argues that contrasting growth models, developed in the 1980s, explain the difference: whereas Thailand adopted a growth model based on cheap exports and cheap labour, South Africa adopted one based on finance.

    Darius Ornston: “Ideas as an Innovation Policy Instrument: How Collective Narratives Shape Economic Adjustment”

    This paper argues that innovation studies should take ideas more seriously, because innovation is a complex, uncertain, and fundamentally collective activity. While scholars are sensitive to the ways in which ideas shape policy choice, this paper illustrates how collective narratives can function as a policy instrument in their own right, facilitating and channeling innovative activity. Closer attention to collective narratives, and the role of ideas more generally, sheds new light on old cases (high-technology competition in Finland) and resolves some empirical puzzles (the entrepreneurship in Kitchener-Waterloo and financial services in Iceland).


    Speakers

    Alexander Reisenbichler
    Chair
    University of Toronto

    Kimberly Morgan
    Discussant
    The George Washington University

    Randall Hansen
    Panelist
    University of Toronto

    Darius Ornston
    Panelist
    University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Sponsors

    Canada Research Chair in Global Migration


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 19th PCJ Fellows Talk: Homegrown Islamic Terrorism and Hindu Nationalism: A Case Study from India

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Beginning with a series of blasts in 13 sites across Bombay (now Mumbai) that killed 257 people and injured 713 in 1993, the last two decades have seen an increasing frequency of acts of terrorism being perpetrated in the Indian hinterland. While several Pakistan-based militant organizations such as the Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Jaish-e-Mohammad have been implicated in these attacks, Indian Muslims have formed militant organizations of their own. The Tanzim Islahul Muslimeen (Organization for the Improvement of Muslims), formed in 1985 is among the earliest examples of Islamic militancy in the Indian jihadist movement. The gradual radicalization of a section of the Students Islamic Movement of India in the 1990s and the establishment of the Indian Mujahideen in 2002, form more recent additions to the homegrown movement.

    What are the intentions, motivations, and perhaps perceived grievances of those attracted to the contemporary indigenous terrorist movement in India? Is there a connection between the rise of homegrown terrorism and the societal order or domestic politics that can inform our understanding of the former? The Indian security discourse on terrorism has related the issue as external- Pakistan-sponsored or cross-border terrorism. It is fundamentally seen as asocial and inspired by outside factors and any causes or relations to the society it targets are considered secondary. With ample evidence of the establishment of homegrown terrorist groups within India, this view needs to be revaluated with a focus on domestic politics. A parallel trend in Indian politics- the rise of right-wing Hindu nationalism or the Hindutva movement and its targeting of the Muslim minority, is of particular significance. Using key causal-process observations in a process tracing exercise, this link between Hindutva-sponsored communal riots and the rise of homegrown terrorist groups is established within the theoretical framework of Critical Terrorism Studies.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Nidhi Panwar
    Department of Political Science



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 19th EGL In Conversation: What’s next for climate change after the election?

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20192:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    Climate change and climate policy were key issues in the October election and while the re-election of a Liberal government promises some stability in national climate policy, the political landscape is such that the future of Canadian climate policy is uncertain. The Liberal minority government clearly received a signal that climate change is important to the Canadian electorate and the necessity of support from parties with even more aggressive climate priorities could push the government towards more far-reaching ambitions and policies. Of course, the Liberal minority government also clearly received a signal that climate policy is unpopular in the prairies and Alberta and the provincial-federal relationship will continue to be a fraught one on this file. So, with the new cabinet set to be sworn in on November 20 and the next global climate meeting kicking off shortly after on December 2, join the EGL in a conversation about the prospects for Canadian climate action.

    This EGL conversation will be a panel with four distinguished guests:

    Catherine Abreu is Executive Director of Climate Action Network Canada. She is an internationally recognized, award-winning campaigner whose work centres on building powerful coalitions to advance transformative action on climate change.

    Christopher Cochrane is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Left and Right: The Small World of Political Ideas (MQUP, 2015) and is an expert on Canadian politics, ideology, and party competition.

    Andrew Leach is an energy and environmental economist and is Associate Professor at the Alberta School of Business at the University of Alberta. In 2015, Leach was Chair of Alberta’s Climate Change Leadership Panel.

    Heather Millar is a political scientist specializing in comparative public policy and Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. She is an expert in Canadian provincial energy and climate politics.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 19th Book Launch: Policy, Regulation and Innovation in China's Electricity and Telecom Industries

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 19, 20194:00PM - 6:30PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    LECTURE: 4:00 – 5:30 PM
    RECEPTION: 5:30 – 6:30 PM

    China’s innovation ambitions inspire worldwide commentary, much of it poorly informed. Focusing on several sectors central to China’s innovation drive, Loren Brandt (University of Toronto) and Thomas Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) offer a richly detailed account of China’s innovation efforts in their latest book, Policy, Regulation, and Innovation in China’s Electricity and Telecom Industries. The book’s granular studies look beyond specific technologies to incorporate the policy matrix, regulatory structures and global developments into an appraisal of China’s industrial policy and innovation achievements. The massive application of human and financial resources offers great promise, but institutional obstacles and legacies, conflicting objectives, and ill-advised policies inject inefficiencies, resulting in a complex mosaic of success and failure in both technical and commercial dimensions.

    Loren Brandt is the Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade at the University of Toronto. With Thomas G. Rawski, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His current research focuses on issues of industrial upgrading in China, inequality dynamics, and China’s long-run economic growth and structural change.

    Thomas G. Rawski is emeritus Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh. Recent publications include Tales from the Development Frontier (2013), which he co-authored. With Loren Brandt, he was co-editor and a major contributor to China’s Great Economic Transformation (Cambridge, 2008). His research focuses on the development and modern history of China’s economy, including studies of China’s reform mechanism and achievements.

    Lecture: 4 – 5:30 PM
    Reception: 5:30 – 6:30 PM


    Speakers

    Lynette Ong
    Opening Remarks
    Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Loren Brandt
    Speaker
    Noranda Chair Professor of Economics and International Trade, University of Toronto

    Thomas G. Rawski
    Speaker
    Emeritus Professor of Economics and History, University of Pittsburgh

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Professor and Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 20th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 20, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    *Please note this event has been postponed. We will email registrants with updated event timing as soon as it is available.*

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 21st Effusive Spectatorship: John Waters’s Midnight Movies

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    This talk examines director John Waters’s film Pink Flamingos in relation to the midnight movie circuit in major American metropolises during the 1970s. The exhibition practice of screening cult films that tended to transgress social mores late at night fomented a social and participatory form of spectatorship, in which boisterous, effusive responses were encouraged. This talk positions John Waters as a crucial figure in the theorization of spectatorship that extends beyond the space of the theatre through publicity campaigns, and that encourages viewing practices that are opposed to the mainstream etiquette of contemplative viewing. Waters’s work instrumentalizes transgressive imagery in a way that ruptures the separation between the screen and audience, galvanizing a sense of community amongst his cast, crew and their late night fanatics.

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Kate Russell



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 21st Takako Hikotani Lecture: Japan’s ‘Value Diplomacy’ and the Rise of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 21, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 315 Bloor
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    Description

    Abstract:

    Prime Minister Abe, in both his first and second administrations, has emphasized values: democracy, human rights, and the rule of law, in his diplomatic statements. Does the Abe administration’s rhetorical focus on values signify a substantial change in Japanese foreign policy, or is it just window dressing?

    In this public talk, Professor Hikotani argues: (1) Japan’s foreign policy was never value-devoid; but the “value” that drove Japan in its foreign policy was different from other western countries in its emphasis; to be less explicit about the value being promoted, and that the value promoted, especially with regard to Asia, emphasized development assistance over democracy promotion. (2) External developments (the rise of China in the region), and internal developments (institutional empowerment of the Prime Minister) led more emphasis in the use of values as slogans in foreign policy. (3) While values are more often used as slogans, the substance of Japan’s foreign policy has not changed much. Democracy and rule of law is mentioned more frequently as the natural bond among Australia, India and Japan, Japan is also careful about not to force Asian countries to choose between China and Japan and to antagonize China along the way.

    Speaker Bio:

    Takako Hikotani is Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Columbia University. She previously taught at the National Defense Academy of Japan, where she was Associate Professor, and lectured at the Ground Self Defense Force and Air Self Defense Force Staff Colleges, and the National Institute for Defense Studies. Her research focus on civil-military relations and Japanese domestic politics, Japanese foreign policy, and comparative civil-military relations. Her publications (in English) include, “The Japanese Diet and defense policy-making.” International Affairs, 94:1, July, 2018; “Trump’s Gift to Japan: Time for Tokyo to Invest in the Liberal Order,” Foreign Affairs, September/October 2017; and “Japan’s New Executive Leadership: How Electoral Rules Make Japanese Security Policy” (with Margarita Estevez-Abe and Toshio Nagahisa), in Frances Rosenbluth and Masaru Kohno eds, Japan in the World (Yale University Press, 2009). She was a Visiting Professional Specialist at Princeton University as Social Science Research Council/Abe Fellow (2010-2011) and Fellow of the US-Japan Leadership Program, US-Japan Foundation (2000- ).

    Professor Hikotani received her BA from Keio University, MA from Keio University and Stanford University, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University, where she was a President’s Fellow.


    Speakers

    Takako Hikotani
    Gerald L. Curtis Associate Professor of Modern Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy, Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Co-Sponsors

    Asian Institute

    The Japan Foundation


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 22nd Transitions: A Conversation on South American Current Affairs

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 22, 201910:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    Registration Full Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    The recent ouster of Evo Morales in Bolivia is only the latest in a series of dramatic events that have redefined Latin America in 2019. Elections, referenda, protests, coups, and ecological crises have rocked the region in ways that can be challenging to follow and understand.

    This event, co-hosted by the Latin American Studies Program and the Munk One program is intended to be a participatory and collaborative accounting of current events. Faculty, staff, and interested community members are invited to join in as we contextualize and explore the recent wave of transitions in Latin America.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Dr. Donald Kingsbury
    Interim Director, Munk One Program

    Dr. Victor Rivas
    Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature and Culture



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 22nd The Unmaking of the Multiculturalism Policies in a Country of Non-Immigration: How Japan Failed to Learn from North American Experiences

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 22, 201912:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Presentation Abstract:

    According to a comparative research of multiculturalism policies among democratic countries, Japan is known to be one of the least multiculturalist countries. Its national government does not affirm its ethnic diversity, has very few supports for immigrant groups, and still keeps its self-image of a “country of non-immigration.” However, Japan has also a (not so) long history of widening minority’s rights and creating its own version of multiculturalism. During the 1990s and the early 2000s, social scientists and bureaucrats researched the cases of countries in Europe and North America and coined a new term of “multicultural co-existence (tabunka kyosei)” as a response to increasing number of foreign residents. This presentation introduces the special characteristics of multiculturalism policies in Japan from comparative research findings. Then it examines how Japan learned from the experience of multiculturalism in the United States and Canada and how it failed to adopt the vision of “multicultural co-existence” as a platform of integration policy.

    Biography:

    Fuminori Minamikawa is a Professor at the College of International Relations at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan and a Visiting Professor at the R. F. Harney Program in Ethnic, Immigration, and Pluralism Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. He received PhD in Sociology from the Graduate School of Social Sciences at Hitotsubashi University, Japan. His field of research is a sociology of ethnicity, race, and multiculturalism in historical and comparative perspectives. He is now engaging in a research projects on the historical making of American multiculturalism and a comparative study of multicultural policies in the United States, Canada and Japan. He published academic books and journal articles both in Japanese and English, including E Pluribus Unum: A Historical Sociology of Multicultural America (Kyoto: Horitsubunka-sha, 2016, in Japanese) and Trans-pacific Japanese American Studies: Conversations on Race and Racializations (Edited by Yasuko Takezawa and Gary Y. Okihiro, Honolulu: University of Hawai’I Press, 2016).


    Speakers

    Fuminori Minamikawa
    Professor, College of International Relations, Ritsumeikan University, Japan



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 25th Strange Weather: The Science and Art of Climate Change

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 25, 20198:00AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Without artists and humanists, science is frequently lost in translation, while artistic work that disregards science risks irrelevancy.
    About this Event

    Climate change is often framed as an exclusively scientific issue: a matter of rising carbon dioxide levels, decreasing arctic ice and species extinction. But humanists and artists also grapple with this environmental crisis, and today deeply engaged, thought-provoking and artistically savvy responses to climate change are showing up in galleries, concert halls and theaters as well as in universities across the globe. Indeed, much recent art deftly incorporates scientific research and methodologies, such as Philippe Squarzoni’s graphic novel Climate Changed, Mel Chin’s fine art app ‘Unmoored,’ and Daniel Crawford’s string quartet piece “Planetary Bands, Warming World”. Too often climate science and environmental humanities travel two parallel tracks, functioning as concurrent but not collaborative projects. Conjoining the two is a force amplifier.

    This one day symposium will bring together climate scientists, humanists and artists to bridge this disciplinary gap. In partnership with co-sponsors the Jackman Humanities Institute (JHI) and the Centre for the Study of the United States (CSUS), the event will welcome guest scholars and artists who are committed to – and practiced in – the current paradigm shift to less siloed climate change thinking.

    The symposium will feature artists and humanities scholars in dialogue with scientists. Speakers include:

    Katharine Hayhoe, an atmospheric scientist at Texas Tech, is engaged in a conceptually similar project, as she strives to develop better ways of translating climate projections and bridge the gap between scientists and stakeholders.

    Diane Burko – whose visual art incorporates scientific data – will discuss her use of coral reef bleaching metrics in aestheticized images of underwater beauty.

    Cate Sandilands, of York University’s Environmental Studies program – proposes new solutions to a persistent problem: how to effectively communicate environmental crisis to a wide audience. Sandilands believes narrative is key: “Public climate change stories shape how we understand the present, imagine the future, and conceive of possible interventions between the now and the then.”

    Gavin Schmidt, of the NASA Institute for Space Studies, pairs his work on climate change drivers with scientific context for pop culture discussions of environmental crisis.

    Madhur Anand, a poet and a professor of ecology and environmental sciences at the University of Guelph, where she mixes poetic and scientific
    approaches to articulating current and impending crises.

    Paul Kushner, an atmospheric physicist at the University of Toronto, studies the links between ice, snow, and changing atmospheric circulation, while advocating for scientists to speak up about the risks and realities of climate change.

    Bhavani Raman, a JHI fellow and historian at the University of Toronto, who studies the history of colonialism and environmental law, with a particular focus on South Asia, such as in her exploration of the geographies of coastal flooding in Chennai.

    ‘The Science and Art of Climate Change’ will extend the reach of ‘Strange Weather’ beyond 2019-2020. This symposium will be a key step in the
    School of the Environment’s exploration – evident in April 2019’s cross-disciplinary colloquium ‘Imagining a Post-Carbon World’ – of better integrating humanists into the School. To this end, the event will explore both theories of cross-disciplinary work and methodological questions of how exactly to enact such a timely and productive practice.

    If you require accommodation please contact us at environment@utoronto.ca by November 18, 2019.


    Speakers

    Katharine Hayhoe
    an atmospheric scientist at Texas Tech, is engaged in a conceptually similar project, as she strives to develop better ways of translating climate projections and bridge the gap between scientists and stakeholders.

    Diane Burko
    whose visual art incorporates scientific data - will discuss her use of coral reef bleaching metrics in aestheticized images of underwater beauty.

    Cate Sandilands
    of York University’s Environmental Studies program – proposes new solutions to a persistent problem: how to effectively communicate environmental crisis to a wide audience. Sandilands believes narrative is key: “Public climate change stories shape how we understand the present, imagine the future, and conceive of possible interventions between the now and the then.”

    Gavin Schmidt
    of the NASA Institute for Space Studies, pairs his work on climate change drivers with scientific context for pop culture discussions of environmental crisis.

    Madhur Anand
    a poet and a professor of ecology and environmental sciences at the University of Guelph, where she mixes poetic and scientific approaches to articulating current and impending crises.

    Paul Kushner
    an atmospheric physicist at the University of Toronto, studies the links between ice, snow, and changing atmospheric circulation, while advocating for scientists to speak up about the risks and realities of climate change.

    Bhavani Raman
    a JHI fellow and historian at the University of Toronto, who studies the history of colonialism and environmental law, with a particular focus on South Asia, such as in her exploration of the geographies of coastal flooding in Chennai.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, November 25th Central Europe's Repeating Troubles with Great Powers: the Role of China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, November 25, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    China is a new great power entering a geopolitically tense region of Central Europe, where Russia, Western Europe, and the U.S. have competed throughout the 20th century for influence. China benefitted from growing scepticism towards the West after the 2008 crisis and was looked upon by many in the region as an alternative. At the same time, with most of the economic expectations of China remaining unfulfilled, the frustration of China has grown as well, aided also by the different outlooks of Communism and the general suspicions of great powers in the region. The presentation will look into political, economic, and social aspects of China-Central Europe relations and its implications for Europe, in general, to show that even though China has presented new challenges, it is unlikely to compete on equal footing with the established great powers in the region.

    Richard Q. Turcsányi is a Key Researcher at Palacky University Olomouc, Assistant Professor at Mendel University in Brno, and Program Director at the Central European Institute of Asian Studies (www.ceias.eu). He holds a Ph.D. in International Relations and further degrees in economy and political science. In past, he conducted long-term study and research stays at the University of Toronto, Peking University, National Chengchi University in Taipei, and the European Institute for Asian Studies in Brussels. His research interests include Chinese foreign policy, relations between China and (Central and Eastern) Europe, and international relations of Asia-Pacific.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Richard Turcsanyi


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    European Studies Students' Association


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 26th Faith in Formaldehyde: Conversion in the Oldest Cabinet of Curiosity in the Philippines

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 26, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    This paper examines the oldest existing museum in the Philippines, the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Museum of Arts and Sciences, as a cabinet of curiosity and a catalyst of conversion. By Spanish royal decree, its early collection acquired through colonial expeditions, complex evangelical networks, and commercial expositions formed the classroom materials for the Natural History course taught by Dominican friars. By 1877, the fauna, flora, and mineral—from the minute to the monumental, from the ordinary to the odd—were inventoried in a three-volume catalogue raisonné. Its collection has since elicited a sense of wonder in nature’s perfection and diversity. Within the broader philosophical contexts of natural and revealed theology and the revival of Thomism after Charles Darwin’s publication of his theory of evolution through natural selection, the museum’s pursuit of scientific knowledge masked its pursuit of sacred truth, engendering an epiphany through the embalmed and serving the divine through the drama of its dioramas. Operating as a mode of signification and translation of the Word, the museum became a biblical exegesis of the origin of species to archive God, preserving faith in formaldehyde as a means of maintaining the authority of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines.

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut received her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in Art History from the University of California, Los Angeles. A two-time Fulbright U.S. Scholar (Student/Faculty Grant), a Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and a Faculty Learning Community Participant through the NEH Humanities Initiative Grant, she is the co-editor of Confrontations, Crossings, and Convergence: Photographs of the Philippines and the United States, 1898-1998 (1998) and author of Institutions and Icons of Patronage: Arts and Culture in the Philippines during the Marcos Years, 1965-1986 (2012). Besides teaching art history and museum studies at several institutions in the United States, France, and the Philippines, she also served as Advisor for the Arts at the National Museum of the Philippines before her appointment as Project Manager/Curator of the Philippines at the Venice Biennale by the Department of Foreign Affairs. Currently, Baluyut is Assistant Professor of Art History in the Art Department and Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oneonta and Chair of the College Art Association’s International Committee.


    Speakers

    Pearlie Rose S. Baluyut
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Art History; Affiliate Faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, State University of New York (SUNY), Oneonta

    Nhung Tuyet Tran
    Chair
    Associate Professor of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, November 26th The End of the Cold War: Thirty Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, November 26, 20193:30PM - 5:30PMNatalie Zemon Davis Room, Sidney Smith 2098, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S3G3
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    Description

    November 2019 marks the thirty-year anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the beginning of the end of the Cold War. The political figures of the 1980s – especially Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan – have taken on legendary, even mythic status.

    Join us to hear three experts on the end of the Cold War challenge the myths of this era, and present their own scholarly conclusions:

    Melvyn P. Leffler, Edward P. Stettinius Professor of History Emeritus, Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virgina, is a Bancroft prize-winning author of, among other books: A Preponderance of Power: National Security, The Truman Administration, and the Cold War; For the Soul of Mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War; and, most recently, Safeguarding Democratic Capitalism.

    Beth A. Fischer, Associate Professor and Woodsworth One Coordinator, author of The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War and, in 2019, The Myth of Triumphalism: Rethinking President Reagan’s Cold War Legacy.

    Michael C. Morgan, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of North Carolina, and the 2019-2020 Strom Visiting Professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of History, author of The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War.

    Sponsors:
    Department of History
    Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History
    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Contact Information
    Tim Sayle
    tim.sayle@utoronto.ca

    Location:
    Natalie Zemon Davis Room, Sidney Smith 2098, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S3G3

    Contact

    Nikola Milicic
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Melvyn P. Leffler
    Edward P. Stettinius Professor of History Emeritus, Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virgina, is a Bancroft prize-winning author of, among other books: A Preponderance of Power: National Security, The Truman Administration, and the Cold War; For the Soul of Mankind: The United States, the Soviet Union, and the Cold War; and, most recently, Safeguarding Democratic Capitalism.

    Beth A. Fischer
    Associate Professor and Woodsworth One Coordinator, author of The Reagan Reversal: Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War and, in 2019, The Myth of Triumphalism: Rethinking President Reagan’s Cold War Legacy.

    Michael C. Morgan
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of North Carolina, and the 2019-2020 Strom Visiting Professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of History, author of The Final Act: The Helsinki Accords and the Transformation of the Cold War.


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History

    Bill Graham Centerfor Contemporary International History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 27th JAPAN NOW Lecture Series: China-Japan-US Trilateral Relationship and East Asia Order: History, Prospects, and Implications for Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 27, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    JAPAN NOW Lecture Series

    Description

    REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL. GUESTS WHOSE NAMES ARE ON THE LIST WILL BE PRIORITIZED FOR SEATING. BUT RUSH SEATING MAY STILL BE AVAILABLE FOR GUESTS WHO HAVE NOT REGISTERED.

    About the Lecture:

    The trilateral relationship among China, Japan and the United States has generally been stable, and it explained the regional order in East Asia since the 1970s. The trilateral relationship has been stabilized primarily by the stability of the US-China and US-Japan relations, and secondly by the fact that American preponderance has been maintained and the commitment to Asia is certain, with the remaining two parties formulating strategies on the basis of that balance of power. Although Japan-China relations have been repeatedly confronted and approached politically over time, they have not shaken the trilateral relationship to that extent. Also, in the area of regionalism, the role of the United States has gradually become more important and contributed to the stability of order.

    Now, however, the fundamental conditions of the trilateral relationship are changing because of a shift in the balance of power, a loss of confidence on American diplomacy, and the overwhelming importance of the Chinese economy. Relations between the United States and China are described as an era of competition, or as an era of confrontation. How will a change in the relationship between Japan, the United States and China affect the order of Asia? What does good Japan-China relations mean? Is the Japan-U.S. relationship still strong? How will the answers to these questions affect Canada and Canadian foreign policy?

    Speaker Biography:

    Ryo Sahashi is an Associate Professor of International Relations at the Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, The University of Tokyo. Dr. Sahashi specializes on international politics in East Asia, and his most recent book is In a Search for Coexistence: the United States and Two Chinas during the Cold War (Tokyo: Keiso, 2015). He recently edited Looking for Leadership: The Dilemma of Political Leadership in Japan (Tokyo and New York: Japan Center for International Exchange, 2015) in English, and wrote on the impact of rising China on Asian order, Japan’s security policy and Japan-Taiwan relations. Concurrently, he serves as Research Fellow, Japan Center for International Exchange. He frequently contributes to NHK, Nikkei, Asahi Shimbun, Mainichi Shimbun, Yomiuri Shimbun and other major media outlets.

    Dr Sahashi has taught at Kanagawa University as professor until March, 2019 and has been Visiting Associate Professor, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center, Stanford University and Shigeru Yoshida Chair, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). He joined University of Tokyo with tenure from April, 2019, and concurrently, Associate Professor, Future Vision Research Institute, the University of Tokyo. He also served as adjunct Senior Research Fellow at Sasakawa Peace Foundation, Tokyo Foundation-German Marshall Fund of the United States Partnership Fellow, and Guest Researcher for First Special Committee Research Office, House of Councilors. He is the member of UK-Japan 21stCentury Committee.


    Speakers

    Ryo Sahashi
    Associate Professor of International Relations, Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, The University of Tokyo



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, November 27th Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, November 27, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMGeorge Ignatieff Theatre, 15 Devonshire Pl.
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    Description

    Explore the motivations behind the rapid development of museums in China.

    The University of Toronto’s School of Cities, in partnership with the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, the Faculty of Information (iSchool) and Lord Cultural Resources, invite you to join us for the launch of Museum Development in China: Understanding the Building Boom, a new book by the Chinese Museums Association and Lord Cultural Resources.

    This event will feature a presentation by co-editor Gail Dexter Lord, followed by a panel of experts who will discuss the role cultural diplomacy plays in China-Canada relations and the role of museums as an approach to urbanism and city building.

    Museum Development in China is an international collaboration which aims to discover how much East and West can learn from each other about museum roles, our publics, what and how we preserve and future sustainability — even as we marvel at the amazing
    accomplishments of China’s museum building boom.

    *This is a free event, please register to attend.

    Copies of Museum Development in China will be available for purchase at the event.


    Speakers

    Rebecca Catching
    Contemporary art curator and museum planner

    Gail Dexter Lord
    Co-Founder and President, Lord Cultural Resources

    Jennifer Purtle
    Associate Professor, Department of Art History and affiliated faculty of the Asian Institute

    Yan Zhou
    Curator and PhD student, Faculty of Information (iSchool)


    Sponsors

    Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto

    The School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 28th Testbeds as innovation policy: A survey [IPL Speaker Series]

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 28, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL Speaker Series

    Description

    The need to test new technologies in complex real-world environments can be an important barrier to innovation. The solution often comes in the form of a particular type of innovation testbed, a bounded environment in which new technologies can be trialled and tested in real world conditions. Policy tools with these characteristics are sometimes called testbeds, demonstrators, or even sandboxes, and they have become increasingly important in innovation policy. Yet there has been little systematic analysis of this new innovation technology. This paper offers a framework for understanding real world innovation testbeds, a definition, and a typology of different types. Based on an evaluation of over 200 testbeds, it defines, conceptualises and categorises them. We identify four main types – testbed districts, testbeds environments, testbed facilities, and testbed programmes . We argue that real-world testbeds are likely to play an increasingly important role in innovation and industrial policy, but that there are important unresolved ethical and regulatory issues around their use.

    Contact

    Daria Dumbabze
    416-978-6062


    Speakers

    Dr. Neil Lee
    Associate Professor of Economic Geography Department of Geography and Environment



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 28th Book Launch: The Good Fight: Marcel Cadieux and Canadian Diplomacy, by Brendan Kelly

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 28, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor St. West
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    Description

    Marcel Cadieux was perhaps the most influential Francophone diplomat and civil servant in Canadian history. The son of a Montreal letter carrier, he joined the Department of External Affairs in 1941, rising in time to become the first Francophone ambassador to the United States, as well as head of the department. His career intersects with many of the crucial moments in Canadian foreign policy from the Second World War through the Cold War, Vietnam War, and the coming of détente. Drawing on Cadieux’s unpublished diary, Brendan Kelly’s biography illuminates events and personalities that are still debated today.

    Brendan Kelly is a Junior Fellow of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, and teaches in the International Relations Program at Trinity College, University of Toronto. He is also Book Review Editor of International Journal.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, November 28th Journey Stories in Classical Turkish Literature

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, November 28, 20194:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room (BF200B)
    4 Bancroft Ave.
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Classical Turkish Literature is full of road and journey stories. In classical texts of Turkish literature, the journey is circular. This cyclicality is largely related to the perception of the universe by Sufism and this perception was inspired by Ptolemy’s theory. Turkish literature constructs the perception of the mystical universe through the wahdat al-wujud theory. According to Sufism, the soul is in state of homesickness. Sufi stories also tell the story of the return of the soul to the homeland (God). This is also the return of the individual to find himself. There is a saying attributed to the prophet of Islam: To know yourself is to know Allah” (man ‘arafa nafsahu faqad ‘arafa rabbahu). This journey is also the journey of self-maturation. We can trace these themes in pre-Islamic Turkish literature going back to Uighur Buddhist texts and in the Islamic period examples inspired by Persian and Arabic literature: Turkish epics and Uighur Buddhist and Manichean texts (9th and 10th centuries), Iranian masnavis (especially ‘Attar in the 12th century and Jami‘ in the15th century), Arabic symbolic stories (Ibn Tufeyl’s Arabic philosophical novel and an allegorical Hayy bın Yaqzan, early 12th century) were sources of road stories in Turkish literature. This seminar will focus on the mystical lines of this journey with examples from Turkish literature from the 13th through the19th centuries.


    Speakers

    Şerife Yalçınkaya
    Ege University (Izmir)


    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Empire’s Legacy: Roots of the Far Right in Contemporary France

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk introduces Empire’s Legacy (Oxford University Press, forthcoming), which challenges the claim that globalization and its losers explain right-wing populism today. In France, a potential born of older relations between colonizers and colonized has revitalized the party of Jean-Marie and Marine Le Pen. Starting with the French conquest of Algeria in 1830, Empire’s Legacy analyzes shifting settler identities under colonialism; and their place, nature, and transmission in the postcolonial Fifth Republic. Drawing on archival research, subject interviews, and electoral surveys, Empire’s Legacy charts an interdisciplinary course between history, sociology, political science, and discourse analysis. It also combines analysis at the local, national, and international levels. This shows the importance of ethnic cleavages, social milieus, government probity, and political responses. As such, Empire’s Legacy has implications for other party families, social movements, and subaltern politics.

     

    John Veugelers is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. He has written widely on the far right, immigration politics, social movements, and voluntary associations in Canada, France, and Italy. His articles have appeared in a range of scholarly journals that includes: Ethnic and Racial Studies, International Sociology, British Journal of Sociology, Comparative European Politics, European Journal of Political Research, Sociological Quarterly, Current Sociology, Acta Sociologica, and West European Politics. A recipient of awards for outstanding teaching at the University of Toronto, he has been a visiting professor at universities in Europe, Asia, and Africa; and a visiting fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France.

     


    Speakers

    John Veugelers
    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, November 29th Xi Jinping’s ‘Proregress’: Recent Political and Economic Policy Moves

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, November 29, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Xi Jinping’s leadership has been marked by ambiguity and unpredictability. Since becoming China’s top leader in 2012, he has pursued fragile balances: portraying himself as inheritor of the legacies of both Mao and Deng; consolidating power based on both his communist “red nobility” and his understanding of “ordinary people”; promoting market reform in some ways while asserting greater state control in others; and offering contradictory clues as to whether China seeks to be a revisionist power or to preserve the status quo in the post-Cold War international order. It is hardly surprising that public judgments of Xi within China and overseas are so strikingly different.

    Cheng Li’s talk focuses on Xi’s two most recent parallel domestic policy moves: launching an ambitious program for poverty elimination and promoting the country’s largest metropolis clusters for economic growth. Given Xi’s role at the epicenter of these major developments, a discussion of China’s future trajectory requires a comprehensive and balanced assessment of this goal-oriented leader.

    Dr. Cheng Li is Director and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thornton China Center and a Distinguished Fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy. Dr. Li has advised a wide range of US government, education, research, business and not-for-profit organizations on work in China and has frequently been called upon to share his unique perspective and insights on China, appearing on BBC, CCTV, CBS, CNN, C-SPAN, ABC World News, NPR, PBS and more. Li grew up in Shanghai during the Cultural Revolution. In 1985, he came to the United States and later received an M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Princeton University.

    Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate. She is an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University.


    Speakers

    Cheng Li
    Speaker
    Director and Senior Fellow, the John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution; Distinguished Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Janice Stein
    Chair
    Founding Director, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, November 30th 2019 Toronto Black Policy Conference: Black Inclusion & Innovation

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, November 30, 20199:30AM - 5:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Applying an anti-Black racism lens, this conference seeks to explore various urban policy issues affecting Toronto’s Black communities.

    About this Event
    In collaboration with the City of Toronto’s Confronting Anti-Black Racism Unit and the University of Toronto’s Urban Policy Lab, this conference seeks to explore various urban policy issues and how they currently, and will be affecting Toronto’s Black communities for years to come.

    Under this year’s theme, Black Inclusion & Innovation, panel topics include:

    Innovation in Black Communities
    Mental Health
    Art, Music & Culture
    The Black Economy & Finance
    Future of Work
    Political Activism

    Join us as we discuss innovative approaches to advance Toronto’s Black communities.

    For more information about the conference and guest speakers, please visit the Toronto Black Policy Conference Website.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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December 2019

  • Monday, December 2nd Deadlining: Temporality and Transformation in Nepal’s Post-Conflict, Post-Disaster Reconstruction

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, December 2, 20193:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    In Spring 2015, Nepal experienced two massive earthquakes. Later that year, the country’s constitution was ‘fast-tracked’ to a hurried conclusion after a nearly decade-long wait since the 2006 end of the country’s Maoist-state civil conflict. This paper considers how the temporal tool of the deadline has yielded particular political and material results within Nepal’s ongoing experience of transformation. Whether used to bring political actors from seven major parties to the bargaining table, or nearly 1 million individual householders to the local administrative office to begin their application for reconstruction subsidies, the deadline is a commonly experienced mediator of relationships between the Nepali state and its citizens. Familiarity with this temporal tool also leads to experimentation: when deadlines are believed to be extendable, they may not lead to the desired result. But even when deadlines are repeatedly extended—as they were both for Nepal’s constitution drafters and for homeowners seeking reconstruction subsidies—they effect significant political and material transformations on the ground. Individuals hedge their bets by building particular kinds of political and material structures that are at once possible to complete quickly, and open to expansion should timeframes allow. From the vantage point of 2019, four years after both the earthquakes and the constitution, this paper explores how the dual processes of post-conflict state restructuring and post-earthquake reconstruction intertwine at the experiential level to yield large-scale structural transformations—in which the deadline may both enable and constrain new forms of political and material life.

    Sara Shneiderman is Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), in the Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs. She is the author of Rituals of Ethnicity: Thangmi Identities Between Nepal and India(University of Pennsylvania Press 2015; winner of the 2017 James Fisher Prize for First Books on the Himalayan Region) and co-editor of Darjeeling Reconsidered: Histories, Politics, Environments (Oxford University Press, 2018). She has also published widely on the themes of ethnicity, mobility, citizenship, and borders in the Himalayas and South Asia. Her current transdisciplinary research partnership funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) focuses on the social and political dimensions of post-earthquake reconstruction in Nepal in collaboration with Social Science Baha, the Department of Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, and several other partners. At UBC, she coordinates the Himalaya Program, and served as Co-Director of the Centre for India and South Asia Research from 2017-2019.


    Speakers

    Sara Shneiderman
    Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology and the Institute of Asian Research at UBC’s School of Public Policy & Global Affairs, University of British Columbia


    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute

    Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, December 3rd Improving Policy Outcomes Through Better Consultation

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, December 3, 20194:30PM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In an era of increasing political polarization, compromise seems difficult to come by. Simultaneously, recent reports show public trust in government is declining. Both conditions can make public consultation more difficult as communities become reticent to engage with one another and with institutions. However, bringing people together in thoughtful dialogue may be especially important in this environment.

    On December 3, experts from different sectors will discuss the role of public consultation in policy development within the context of increasing polarization and erosion of trust. Panelists will explore connections between consultation and good governance, and will offer strategies for improving policy outcomes in our cities through more effective and inclusive consultation processes.

    Speakers

    Cheryll Case is an urban planner and designer specialized in community engagement and research. She is Urban Design Coordinator with the City of Brampton, where she supports strategic initiatives including the Brampton 2040 Vision, and the Founder and Principal Urban Planner of her own consultancy, CP Planning. Cheryll is an editor of House Divided: How the Missing Middle Will Solve Toronto’s Housing Crisis.

    Lindsay (Swooping Hawk) Kretschmer is Executive Director of the Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council (TASSC). Lindsay’s family comes from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is German and Mohawk; Wolf Clan and her spirit name is Swooping Hawk. Lindsay has worked in the non-profit sector for nearly 20 years, most recently as the Executive Director of the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy.

    John Robinson is a Professor at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and the School of the Environment at the University of Toronto. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Copenhagen Business School, and 2019 Visiting Professor at Utrecht University. At U of T, he is Presidential Advisor on the Environment, Climate Change, and Sustainability.

    Nicole Swerhun is the founder of Swerhun Inc. The Swerhun team designs and delivers public consultation processes that make complex, often controversial and high profile, multi-stakeholder projects constructive and manageable. Nicole has led the design and delivery of hundreds of public consultation projects, including work in post-war Bosnia, post-Katrina New Orleans, and in cities across Canada and the US.

    Moderator

    Dave Meslin is an activist, artist, and community organizer who inspires better engagement between governments and citizens. He is the author of Teardown: Rebuilding Democracy from the Ground Up. He formed the Toronto Public Space Committee, which published the first issue of Spacing Magazine, an award-winning urban affairs publication. Dave appears as an expert on political engagement on national media.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th On Native Testimony: Military Tribunals, War Crimes, and Imperial Judgment in Guam

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1944, the U.S. Navy established the War Crimes Tribunals Program in Guam, one of several Japanese colonies located in the Pacific. For the next five years, the military commission reviewed war crimes cases about assault, murder, treason, and other acts against white civility. Throughout this period, the tribunal also featured more than 100 indigenous Chamorro and Chamorro-Japanese testimonies about Japanese militarism, policing, and torture in Guam. How did these testimonies support the U.S. effort to eradicate Japan’s sovereignty and remake the political bodies and territorial borders of Guam and the Pacific Islands more generally? By drawing on various philosophies and proverbs about life and death, this talk examines the legal and political impact of military courts, native testimonies, and white supremacist violence.

    Keith L. Camacho is an associate professor in the Asian American Studies Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also the author of Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam, the co-editor of Militarized Currents: Toward a Decolonized Future in Asia and the Pacific, and the former senior editor of Amerasia Journal.

    * Sacred Men: Law, Torture, and Retribution in Guam by Keith L. Camacho will be available for purchase at the venue.


    Speakers

    Keith L. Camacho
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

    Takashi Fujitani
    Chair
    Director, Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, Asian Institute and Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, December 4th Minorities and Modi: Modi’s Re-election and Implications for Minority Groups in India

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, December 4, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The Indian Election in 2014 saw Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) secure power. The BJP and Modi’s campaign were catered around themes of Hindu nationalism. Rather than losing momentum, the BJP and Modi continued to gain political traction in India. This has resulted in Modi’s landmark victory for a re-election on May 2019. While certainly lauded by many, Modi’s government has been heavily censured by critics who argue that his political success has been predicated on the oppression of minorities in India. This panel seeks to examine the sociopolitical position of Indian minorities under Modi’s administration. What are the rights implications for this population moving forward?

    Speaker Biographies:

    Bharat Punjabi is a Lecturer in the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. Dr. Punjabi’s research interests include and intersect Indian urbanization and water governance, the role of institutions in economic development and metropolitan governance in India. Dr. Punjabi is presently working towards a monograph on the theme of water policy and governance in large Indian mega regions. His research on water governance has been published in journals such as World Development, Environmental Research Letters and India Review.

    Aparna Sundar teaches in the Comparative Asian Studies programme. Dr. Sundar has previously taught at universities in Bangalore, India. She works on democratic politics and contemporary struggles over the meanings of democracy in India, and is currently involved in two collaborative comparative research projects, one on authoritarian populisms, and the other on neoliberalization, precarity, and contentious politics in the BRICS countries.

    Francis Cody is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Asian Institute at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on language and politics in southern India. He first brought these interests to bear on a study of citizenship, literacy, and social movement politics in rural Tamilnadu. This work was published as a book called The Light of Knowledge (Cornell 2013), winner of the 2014 Edward Sapir Book Prize awarded by the Society for Linguistic Anthropology. Cody’s more recent research traces the emergence of populism and transformations of political publicity through Tamil and English news media. This work explores questions of law, technology, and violence in claims to representing popular sovereignty. Taken as a whole, his work contributes to the transdisciplinary project of elaborating critical social theories of mass mediation and politics in the postcolonial world.


    Speakers

    Bharat Punjabi
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute Research Fellow, Global Cities Institute

    Aparna Sundar
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Asian Institute

    Francis Cody
    Moderator
    Associate Professor, Asian Institute and Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Contemporary Asian Studies Student Union


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, December 5th Uzbekistan’s Independence, the Transition of Power, and Political Parties

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, December 5, 20192:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Since the election of the new president of the Republic of Uzbekistan (2016), the republic has faced sweeping transformations. The reforms have targeted civic, economic, as well as many government structures. On the eve of elections set to take place on Dec. 22, many wonder if now is the right time to expand reforms into the parliamentary arena, which until now has changed little. This talk raises key questions regarding the possible future of the division of power in Uzbekistan and relations between the government and political parties

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Zeev Levin
    Zeev Levin is the head of Central Asian research unit at the Harry S. Truman Institute, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on government institutions in Central Asia.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th The Financial Life of Land in Imperial France, 1850-1914

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20193:00PM - 5:00PMNatalie Zemon Davis Conference Room
    Sidney Smith Hall, 2nd floor
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    The nineteenth century was defined by the global problem of property. Focusing on France, a country whose revolution purportedly birthed a new, liberal form of private property, this paper explores the nineteenth-century debate on ‘mobilization’, or legal modes of turning land into a circulating value. It focuses particularly on the role of imperial entanglements in shaping arguments and experiments in mobilization. In the second half of the century a series of laws advanced the visibility and alienability of real property in Algeria and Tunisia, and it was here that France went furthest with measures of financializing land, experimenting with credit instruments based on real property that were long debated but never introduced in the metropole. Building on recent scholarship that has illuminated the legal transformations in property rights that occurred around the nineteenth-century Mediterranean, this paper demonstrates the degree to which these processes implicated metropolitan and imperial landholding in a common project of commercial and financial modernization.

    Dr. Alexia Yates is Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Manchester, where she researches urban history and the history of economic life in Europe. Her first book, Selling Paris: Property and Commercial Culture in the Fin-de-siècle Capital (Harvard University Press, 2015), won the Wallace K. Ferguson Prize for Best Book in Non-Canadian History from the Canadian Historical Association in 2016. She is currently working on a book on the culture and politics of finance in modern France and as well as a text on real estate and global urban history.


    Speakers

    Dr. Alexia Yates
    University of Manchester


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, December 6th Anatomy of a Protest: The Abolition of Indian Indentured Labor in the British Empire

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, December 6, 20194:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    The B.N. Pandey Memorial Lecture in the History of India

    Description

    Kunti, a dalit (“untouchable” caste) woman, became the poster child for the nation-wide movement in India against the abolition of the system of indentured labor in 1917. The system, managed by the colonial government in India, had supplied approximately 1.3 million workers from India to plantations overseas in the aftermath of the abolition of Atlantic slavery in the 1830s. This paper explores how a woman at the very bottom of the caste hierarchy in India became the face for an empire-wide change. It will argue that Kunti’s role in the movement illustrates an important dimension of the abolitionist movement: the construction of the “people” (or the demos) as the subject of a new kind of politics in late colonial India.

    Mrinalini Sinha is Alice Freeman Palmer Professor in the Department of History and Professor (by courtesy) in the Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written on various aspects of the political history of colonial India, with a focus on anti-colonialism, gender, and transregional approaches. She is the author of Colonial Masculinity: The ‘manly Englishman’ and the ‘effeminate Bengali’ in the late nineteenth century (1995) and of Specters of Mother India: The Global Restructuring of an Empire (2006), winner of the Joan Kelley Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association and the Albion Book Prize from the North American Conference of British Studies. She is currently working on a book project with the working title, “Complete Political Independence: The Curious History of a Nationalist Indian Demand,” for which she received the 2012 John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. Sinha is also a past President of the Association of Asian Studies (2015).


    Speakers

    Mrinalini Sinha
    Speaker
    Alice Freeman Palmer Professor, Department of History; Professor (by courtesy), Departments of English Language and Literature and of Women’s Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Bhavani Raman
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Saturday, December 7th 2019 TORONTO ANNUAL UKRAINIAN FAMINE LECTURE “Remembering the Terror-Famine: Memory and Meaning in the Early Years of the Cold War”

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, December 7, 20195:00PM - 7:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy - 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    Toronto Annual Ukrainian Famine Lecture

    Description

    As the anthropologist Rubie S. Watson once asked, “How do people remember events that ‘did not occur’? How do people ‘remember what is meant to be forgotten”? This lecture will explore the decade between 1945 and 1955, when the Holodomor was “first remembered”. It will examine the active construction and transmission of a social memory of the Terror-Famine among post-war refugees from the Soviet Union. It will also consider how remembrance of the Holodomor shaped and, in turn, was shaped by the emerging Cold War.

    After 1945, the Holodomor became part of making the case in the West for legal recognition and assistance for refugees fleeing Communism. As the Cold War escalated, famine survivors were increasingly called on as witnesses in a fierce political debate in the U.S. about the nature of the Soviet Union and U.S. policy towards the Soviet Union.

    Olga Andriewsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Trent University. She teaches and researches in the area of late imperial and Soviet history. She is the author of “Towards a Decentered History: The Study of the Holodomor and Ukrainian Historiography” (Contextualizing the Holodomor). She has also written numerous articles on identity and politics in late Imperial Russia. Her article “The Russian-Ukrainian Discourse and the Failure of the ‘Little Russian Solution’, 1782-1917” in Culture, Nation, Identity: The Ukrainian-Russian Encounter, 1600-1945 was awarded the AAUS prize for best academic article in 2004.


    Speakers

    Olga Andriewsky
    Associate Professor in the Department of History at Trent University


    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies, University of Alberta

    Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Canadian Foundation for Ukrainian Studies

    Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Toronto Branch


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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