« November 2019 - January 2020 February 2020 - Present

February 2020

  • Saturday, February 1st 14th Annual PCJ Student Conference: The Future of Reconciliation: Indigenous Rights in Canada

    DateTimeLocation
    Saturday, February 1, 20209:30AM - 4:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The 2020 PCJ Student Conference serves as a platform for discussions on the modern challenges and opportunities for Indigenous communities in Canada.

    The PCJ Student Conference is an annual student-organized event that brings together the PCJ community outside of the classroom for an opportunity to learn about and engage with an issue pertinent to discussions of peace, conflict and justice.

    This year, the conference serves as a platform for Indigenous academics, practitioners, community leaders, Elders and traditional knowledge keepers to guide discussions on the modern challenges and opportunities for Indigenous communities in Canada. This theme serves to provide a domestic context to issues of peace, conflict and justice that are often overshadowed by international events.

    The two-day conference will take place at the Campbell Conference Facility at the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy with the following schedule of events:

    Friday, January 31

    5:00 PM ─ Opening Remarks and Land Acknowledgement
    5:30 PM ─ Keynote Address (Professor Brenda Wastasecoot)
    6:30 PM ─ Networking Event

    Saturday, February 1

    9:30 AM ─ Opening Remarks and Land Acknowledgment
    10:00 AM ─ Session 1: Land and Environmental (TBA)
    11:00 AM ─ Session 2: Legal and Treaty (Delbert Wapass)

    12:00 PM ─ Lunch

    1:00 PM ─ Session 3: Language and Culture (Debby Danard)
    2:00 PM ─ Session 4: MMIWG (Lee Maracle and Jennifer Brant)
    3:00 PM ─ Session 5: Economic Empowerment (Tabatha Bull)

    4:00 PM ─ Final Remarks and Closing

    Please Note: Registration is separate for each day of the conference via Eventbrite. We highly encourage attendance on both the Friday and Saturday for the most comprehensive and impactful experience.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 3rd Meeting with Oleg Sentsov

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine, CERES, and Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Toronto would like to invite you for an exclusive event with Ukrainian filmmaker and writer Oleg Sentsov on Monday, February 3, 4 pm, Room 108N, North House, Munk School, 1 Devonshire Place.

    Film director Oleg Sentsov was active in Ukraine’s Revolution of Dignity and was detained in Crimea in May 2014 and sentenced to 20 years in a Russian prison on charges of terrorism. On September 7, 2019, Senstov was freed from a Russian penal colony after more than five years of detention as part of a prisoner swap between Russia and Ukraine. He was one of 35 Ukrainian citizens that returned home. He continues to fight for freedom of expression and the freedom of other Ukrainian political prisoners. Oleg is visiting on Toronto on the invitation of the Ukrainian Embassy in Canada.

    The event will be chaired by Professor Taras Koznarsky.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962

    Main Sponsor

    Petro Jacyk Program for the Study of Ukraine

    Co-Sponsors

    CERES

    Department of Slavic Languages & Literatures


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 3rd Terror Capitalism: Turkic Muslim Dispossession in Northwest China

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    East Asian Seminar Series

    Description

    A new system of control, made up of a multi-billion dollar industry of computer-vision technologies, militarized policing, and the mass mobilization of civil servants and private industrialists, is attempting to transform Uyghur and Kazakh native societies in Northwest China. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this talk describes the history which produced these forms of surveillance and demonstrates the quotidian experience of their effects on Turkic Muslim social institutions. It argues that this system of “reeducation” is, in fact, a social engineering system that works in concert with a Chinese form of illiberal capitalism to produce forms of family separation and economic production. As it is implemented, it has the effect of partitioning and radically disempowering women and men who are already marginalized within national and international systems.

    Darren Byler is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. His book project titled Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City focuses on the effects of digital cultural production and surveillance industries in the lives of Uyghur and Han male migrants in the city of Ürümchi, Xinjiang.


    Speakers

    Vincent Wong
    Discussant
    William C. Graham Research Associate at the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

    Darren Byler
    Speaker
    Post-doctoral Researcher, Center for Asian Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder

    Jayeeta Sharma
    Discussant
    Associate Professor, History and Global Asia Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of History, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 3rd A Tribute in Memory of Eleazar Birnbaum

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 3, 20205:00PM - 7:00PMNMC Conference Room (BF200B)
    4 Bancroft Ave., 2nd floor
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    A Tribute in Memory of Eleazar Birnbaum
    Professor Emeritus, NMC

    The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations invites faculty and students to attend a special seminar to remember the life and work of Professor Eleazar Birnbaum who passed away on 2 October 2019 at the age of 89. He was trained in Islamic history and Middle Eastern languages at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) of the University of London graduating in 1953. At SOAS he was a member of the famous ongoing Ottoman sources seminar of Paul Wittek. In 1964 he came to the University of Toronto from the University of Michigan and joined the then Department of Islamic Studies (later renamed Middle East and Islamic Studies and in 1996, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations) as an Associate Professor. In 1970 he was named Full Professor. He retired in 1995 but remained active in scholarship and the department until his recent death. His main field was in Ottoman Turkish and other Turkic languages along with Arabic and Persian, but his particular specialty and passion were old Ottoman manuscripts. His large collection of Islamic manuscripts is described by him in two publications—Ottoman Turkish and Çagatay MSS in Canada: A Union Catalogue of the Four Collections (2015) and Arabic and Persian Manuscripts in the Birnbaum Collection, Toronto (2019). This event will also serve as a posthumous launch of the most recent catalogue.

    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 6th Democracy in Myanmar: What to Look for in 2020

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 6, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    For the past several years, Myanmar has found itself in the international spotlight. The state once thought of a pariah in the international community made headlines in 2010 when its military rulers dissolved the junta that had ruled the country since 1962 in favour of a democratically elected civilian government. However, the path to democracy has not been without significant challenges. The Rohingya crisis has shed light on the continued control of military officials over the new government, and once revered leader Aung San Suu Kyi faces increased scrutiny for her defense of their practices at the International Court of Justice. By all accounts, the fight for democracy is ongoing in Myanmar. What are the obstacles to its achivement of a quality democracy? What is the role of international actors in advancing or suppressing this? How will the governing National League for Democracy handle the Rohingya Crisis with increasing nativist sentiments?

    Join the Contemporary Asian Studies Students’ Union and the Synergy Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies on February 6th from 2-4PM as we dissect the democratic progress of Myanmar. Refreshments and snacks will be provided!

    Jacques Bertrand is Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, as well as Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies (Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) at the University of Toronto. He is the author/co- editor of Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Indonesia (Cambridge, 2004); Multination States in Asia: Accommodation or Resistance (Cambridge, 2010); Political Change in Southeast Asia (Cambridge, 2013); and Democratization and Ethnic Minorities: Conflict or Compromise? (Routledge, 2014). He is finalizing a book manuscript on Democracy and Secessionist Conflict in Southeast Asia (Cambridge UP)and a book (w/ Ardeth Thawnghmung and Alexandre Pelletier) entitled Winning by Process: The State, Democratic Transition, and Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar.

    Matthew Walton is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. Previously, he was the inaugural Aung San Suu Kyi Senior Research Fellow in Modern Burmese Studies at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research focuses on religion and politics in Southeast Asia, with a special emphasis on Buddhism in Myanmar.

    Joseph McQuade is the Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow in the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy and a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for South Asian Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief at the NATO Association of Canada, where he runs the newly-created Centre for Disinformation Studies program stream. Dr. McQuade is affiliated with the Queen’s University Global History Initiative and with the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, and is a Managing Editor of the Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies.


    Speakers

    Jacques Bertrand
    Speaker
    Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Joseph McQuade
    Moderator
    The Richard Charles Lee Postdoctoral Fellow, Asian Institute

    Matthew Walton
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Synergy: Journal of Contemporary Asian Studies

    Contemporary Asian Studies Students Union (CASSU)


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 6th Transformative Politics of the Wild: The Power of Solutions

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 6, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West
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    Description

    The twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss are among the greatest challenges humanity has ever faced. But it’s 2020. We know this already. WWF-Canada president and CEO Megan Leslie will discuss why we should stop rehashing the problems and start working on the solutions. 

    When we only focus on what’s wrong, we’re disheartening and disempowering people — and that includes policymakers. Instead, we need to talk about what’s right, or what could be right, and show the successes of past environmental solutions, from banning plastic microbeads to signing the Montreal Protocol. 

    Climate change and biodiversity loss are so great that they have many potential solutions community groups, government and industry can collaborate on. But they share one where WWF-Canada can really contribute: nature-based solutions. Indigenous-led habitat protection and restoration can shield at-risk species, sequester carbon and help safeguard the future for nature and people.

    Megan Leslie began as President and CEO of World Wildlife Fund Canada in December of 2017 after nearly two years at the organization, first as a consultant on ocean governance, then as head of ocean conservation. Before joining WWF, Megan was a Member of Parliament representing Halifax for two terms during which she was deputy leader of the Official Opposition, environment critic and vice-chair of the government committee on environment and sustainable development. In Parliament, Megan introduced a motion to ban plastic microbeads; this motion passed unanimously, leading to a ban on the Canadian manufacture, sale and importation of these products. She also expedited the creation of Sable Island National Park Reserve.

    REMOTE VIEWING INSTRUCTIONS

    Webinar Name : Transformative Politics of The Wild: The Power of Solutions | February 6 2020
    Date &Time February 6 2020 @ 3pm EST

    To Join by Computer or Mobile Device

    Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android- Please click on this link: https://zoom.us/j/139779314

    When you click on the Zoom link above you it will auto-install a browser extension on your computer, or you will be directed to the IOS/Android app if you are using a mobile device. Please follow the prompts to join the webinar. Once that is completed, you will be asked to enter a name and email address to join the webinar. It should be noted that when you join the webinar you are entering as an “observer”- Just like you are watching a webcast.


    Speakers

    Megan Leslie
    President and CEO World Wildlife Fund-Canada


    Main Sponsor

    Environmental Governance Lab

    Sponsors

    The School of the Environment, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Between Human, Non-Human, and Woman: An Actress Theorizes Exhaustion

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    In 1940, at the height of her stardom, the star-actress Shanta Apte wrote a harsh polemic against the Bombay film industry. I interrogate this curious text – Should I Join the Movies? – by placing it at the intersection of female stardom, the corporeality of cinematic labor, and techno-scientific interest in industrial fatigue. The weariness of the actress, her capacity for “being spent,” is an experiential category that pushes us to think embodiment as production experience. This essay positions Apte’s text as theory from the South that helps us rethink the meanings of gender, embodiment, affective labor, inequality, and human-machine relations at a critical phase in the career of cinema in India. In dialogue with Apte, I think through the materiality of the off-screen world of film work and parse her insistence on embodiment as the grounds for refusal and resistance.

    Debashree Mukherjee is Assistant Professor of film and media in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS) at Columbia University. Her first book, Bombay Hustle: Making Movies in a Colonial City (forthcoming from Columbia University Press) brings together insights from film and media studies, feminist cultural studies, new materialisms, and technology studies to narrate the history of Bombay cinema as a history of material practice.


    Speakers

    Kajri Jain
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto

    Debashree Mukherjee
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies (MESAAS), Columbia University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Department of Visual Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga

    Jackman Humanities Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Munk One Open House

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Planning your first year at U of T and want to find out more about Munk One? Join us on February 12 for an opportunity to meet Munk One professors, students and staff who will tell you about this unique first year opportunity for students interested in global affairs.

    To make the most of your time with us, we ask that you arrive promptly at 6:00pm. During the first hour, Professor Donald Kingsbury, Interim Director of Munk One, will present a brief overview of the program. Then, students and staff will talk about specific aspects of the program such as its seminar class format, labs, research opportunities, case competitions, international opportunities and more. You will also have plenty of time to ask questions.

    Meet us in the Boardroom and Library of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at 315 Bloor Street West.

    We look forward to seeing you there!

    In the meantime, you can learn more about the Munk One program by visiting our website and following us on Instagram:

    https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/one/ | @mymunkone


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 12th Political correctness and language of the media – before 1989 and nowadays

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 12, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMAlumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400
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    Description

    Address: Alumni Hall, 121 St. Joseph Street, Room 400

    Elena Krejčová is Associate Professor at the Department of Slavic studies, Faculty of Arts, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia). She studied Czech Studies, Bulgarian Studies, English and American Studies at Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski (Bulgaria), and completed her doctoral studies at Masaryk university in Brno (1999). Her main areas of research include political linguistics, sociolinguistics, contrastive linguistics of Slavic languages, theory of translation. Elena Krejčová is the author of monographs Slavonic Babylon (2016), Quo Vadis, Philologia? (2017), The Power of Public Speech (2017) and author of dictionaries Czech- Bulgarian Law Dictionary (2015) and Czech-Bulgarian Specialized Dictionary of Legal, Economic and Socio-political Terminology (2016).

    Political correctness as a way of forming the principles of communication and in particular the verbal behaviour is very strongly connected with the period of totalitarianism in the countries of the former socialist block (including Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, etc.). The idea of “right” and “wrong”, i.e. unacceptable speaking, thinking, behavior that is treated as a crime, the battle of ideas and ideologies is well presented in media as a tool of propaganda before 1989, this close relation between communication and political systems was a part of the state policy. What happened after 1989 – did we finally gain freedom of speech? Media after the “Velvet revolution” changed a lot – from the feeling of freedom with no restrictions that ended up to vulgarization of language to the new requirements in society to treat people without prejudice and discrimination.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Elena Krejčová
    Associate professor, Masaryk University in Brno (Czechia)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 13th Buffers Against Famine: Social Ties and the Effects of Collectivization in Khmer Rouge Cambodia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 13, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This paper addresses the causes of non-execution deaths during the Cambodian Genocide. Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979) had one of the highest mortality rates of any communist revolution, with the deaths of approximately one quarter of the population: half from direct violence and the other half from indirect means, in particular starvation. What explains the variation in indirect deaths, those that resulted from means other than execution, during this period of mass violence? I argue that it was not just control over agricultural production that led to high rates of starvation deaths, but the policies of social control associated with the collectivization process that exacerbated the problems of famine. The set of policies surrounding the family, including forced marriages and the separation of family units, which I call social collectivization, undermined traditional buffers against famine and decreased the likelihood of survival. The decision to include social components was an ideological one, but those it targeted reflect a strategic logic shaped by economic and security interests. I find that collectivization of economic activities also affected the likelihood of survival; but the social elements tipped the balance toward disaster. High levels of social control targeted preexisting social network and communal ties, fracturing those networks that would ordinarily have acted as a buffer against poor policy or economic downturns in a community. As a result, individuals were more vulnerable to the effects of overwork and over-requisitioned rice, making deaths from indirect means—starvation and exhaustion in particular—more likely. Through this study, I demonstrate the consequences of governing a revolutionary state for the indirect victims of mass violence.

    Rachel Jacobs is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies at Dickinson College. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2019. Her research centers on questions of survival during periods of mass violence. More broadly, she researches issues of political violence, gender and conflict, human rights, and the long-term consequences of conflict.


    Speakers

    Rachel Jacobs
    Assistant Professor, Political Science and International Studies, Dickinson College


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Cente for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 13th Security for Japan: Foreign Policy Challenges on the Korean Peninsula

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 13, 20203:00PM - 5:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    In this lecture Professor Junya Nishino (Keio University, Japan) will elucidate Japan’s ‘three-pillared’ approach to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). Firstly, Japan has pursued engagement and dialogue, which can be seen in events such as the 2002 Pyongyang Declaration, 6-party talks aimed at finding solutions to security concerns in Northeast Asia, and the 2014 Stockholm Agreement. Secondly, Japan has supported the use of pressure by imposing unilateral sanctions and supporting UN Security Council sanctions against North Korea for its nuclear program. Thirdly, it has promoted defense and deterrence by working with the United States and South Korea as part of a ‘defense triangle’. In this context, Professor Nishino’s lecture will emphasize the need for a strong Japan-ROK relationship in order to confront the threat emanating from the DPRK.

    Speaker Biography:
    NISHINO Junya is Professor, Department of Political Science, Faculty of Law and Politics, Keio University in Tokyo, Japan. He also serves as Director of the Center for Contemporary Korean Studies at Keio University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Yonsei University. His research focuses on contemporary Korean politics, international relations of East Asia and Japan-Korea relations. His research focuses on contemporary Korean politics, international relations in East Asia and Japan-Korea relations.
    Dr. Nishino was a Japan Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a Visiting Scholar at the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, George Washington University in 2012-2013. He was also an Exchange Scholar at the Harvard-Yenching Institute in 2011-2012.
    Previously he served as a Special Analyst on Korean Affairs in the Intelligence and Analysis Service of the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2006-2007), and was a Special Assistant on Korean Politics at the Japanese Embassy in Seoul (2002-2004).
    Dr. Nishino received his B.A. and M.A. from Keio University, and Ph.D. in Political Science from Yonsei University in South Korea.


    Speakers

    Junya Nishino
    Professor, Department of Political Science, Faculty of Law and Politics

    Director, Center for Contemporary Korean Studies

    Keio University, Japan


    Sponsors

    Centre for the Study of Global Japan

    Consulate General of Japan in Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 14th The Ethics of the MeToo Movement--Political Transition-From Politics of Identity to Politics of Solidarity

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 14, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    The MeToo movement in Korea that happened for the past two years shows some fundamental differences from past political movements against sexual discrimination. First, the former takes on the form of a voluntary mass movement. The MeToo movement began due to the female audience’s active acceptance of the major head slogan of anti-sexual violence movements, “It was not my fault.” The growing feminist awareness of sexual violence and problems that surged after 2015 allowed the women to accept the slogan with all their hearts and launch the movement. Secondly, as testimonies appeared subsequently, the violence was seen as a communal affliction, different from the past feminist movements. In the past, sexual violence victims faced suspicion and criticism as soon as they open up about their experiences and to prove their experiences, they went through individual trials in court. However, the MeToo movement was different. As the name “MeToo” itself signifies, the sexual assault victims’ cases were not perceived as discrete or separate, or cause to socially ostracize the victim. Instead, the Me Too movement allowed more opportunities for solidarity and collaboration.
    Lastly, the MeToo movement does not involve victim identity politics that responds to the demand to prove the assault and adheres to victim centricism that claims that women are disadvantaged. Rather, the movement demands change in socially mandated male-hegemonic, heterosexual normative, authoritative communal culture and behavior status quo. In this presentation, we will look at the hints of possibilities of change demonstrated by the MeToo movement and whether these possibilities will be held back by the process of court and bureaucratic procedures. Sharing these concerns about possible challenges to these new changes, I plan to discuss how sexual assault could be politicized as a social phenomenon.

    Kwonkim Hyeonyoung is a Guest Professor in the Korea National University of Arts, South Korea. She sees herself as a research activist. She is a guest professor at Korean National University of Arts. She is the co-author of Analyzing the Korean man , Feminism of perpetration and victimhood and author of Will never turn back again. She also co-wrote twenty books, including The Politics of the MeToo Movement . Her primary interest as a researcher lies on exploring ways how gender politics of violence and power plays in today’s Korean society. As an activist, she reads written judgments in court, attends hearings at trials, protests in streets, and writes.


    Speakers

    Hyeonyoung Kwonkim
    Speaker
    (Art and Gender Institute, Korea National University of Arts)

    Jesook Song
    Chair
    (Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto)



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 20th What does open science entail?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 20, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    IPL - Speaker Series

    Description

    Open science has momentum. It is much discussed, though most often by advocates or product suppliers. The idea entails shifts in research practice with substantial implications for resource use in support of research. To understand these implications and to make informed choices about the future of the research enterprise, we must fully understand what is being proposed and consider any empirical evidence on the effects. To this end, this talk will explore the origin, meaning, implications and current status of open science. Aligned with the most recent National Academies report on the topic, open science will be defined as encompassing the following: open access publishing, open data, open software, reproducible research, open evaluation, public engagement and policy.


    Speakers

    Diana Hicks
    Professor, the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 20th Coronavirus in Context: Interdisciplinary Insights through Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 20, 20204:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Please join us as a group of interdisciplinary scholars shares their expertise on the political and economic implications of the novel Coronavirus outbreak.


    Speakers

    Lisa Mar
    Panelist
    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies; Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

    Jun Zhang
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Economic Geography, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

    Mary Boyd
    Panelist
    Director, Shanghai Corporate Network, The Economist Intelligence Unit

    Rachel Silvey
    Chair
    Richard Charles Lee Director, Asian Institute; Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th Dr. David Chu Scholarship Information Session

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20201:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Dr. David Chu Scholarships in Asia-Pacific Studies offer funding to undergraduate and graduate students in the University of Toronto who are pursuing study and research related to the Asia-Pacific region (East and Southeast Asia). These awards are administered by the Faculty of Arts and Science with an application deadline of March 9, 2020. Learn more about the awards and how to apply through the Faculty of Arts and Science Website.

    The information session features Professor Takashi Fujitani, Director of the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, who will provide an overview of the award selection criteria and eligibility and how to build a strong proposal. Representatives from the Faculty of Arts and Science and Asian Institute will also be available to help students in filling out the Financial Need Assessment form and answer questions about the application process.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832

    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th Thrust to the Fore - Canada as top-tier partner in Ukraine 2014-2019

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Toronto-born and educated, with an MA in History from the University of Toronto, Roman Waschuk went on to work at the Commission of Inquiry on War Criminals in 1985-86. He joined the Department of External Affairs in 1987, serving abroad as a political officer in Moscow, Kyiv and Berlin. In Ottawa, he led teams at Policy Planning and the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force. His first ambassadorial posting was in 2011 to Belgrade (covering Serbia, Montenegro and North Macedonia), followed by a five-year assignment as Ambassador of Canada to Ukraine in 2014-19. He retired from Global Affairs Canada in December 2019.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Roman Waschuk
    Former Ambassador of Canada in Ukraine



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Monday, February 24th EXPLORING THE APPLICABILITY OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE TO THE GLOBAL CLIMATE REGIME

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, February 24, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Environmental Governance lab is excited to welcome Sonja Klinsky from Arizona State University for a talk on February 24, 2020. Sonja Klinsky is an alum of the IDS program at UTSC and is both a Senior Sustainability Scientist at the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainabili and Associate Professor, at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. She’s an expert on climate justice and climate policy.

    Abstract : Geopolitical changes combined with the increasing urgency of climate action have the potential to intensify debates about justice within international climate policy. Tensions about historical responsibility have been particularly difficult and could deepen with increased climate impacts and as developing countries face mounting pressure to take mitigation action. Climate change is not the only time humans have faced historically rooted, collective action challenges involving justice disputes. Practices and tools from transitional justice have been used across a range of conflicts at the interface of historical responsibility and imperatives for collective futures. Central to this body of theory and experience is the need to reflect both backwards and forwards-oriented elements in efforts to build social solidarity. This talk integrates arguments emerging from the literature and from a series of international multi-stakeholder workshops that were held to examine the global climate context through the lens of transitional justice. In addition to assessing the potential applicability of a transitional lens to the climate context, including the limitations of this, it then lays out several strategies and practices that could be modified for potential use within the climate regime. This work has recently been released as a book, Klinsky and Brankovic (2018) “The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice” Routledge.


    Speakers

    Sonja Klinsky
    Arizona State University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 25th 2019-2020 Harney Lecture Series in Ethnicity "The Case for Open Borders"

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 25, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Abstract: Countries have a moral obligation to liberalize their immigration policies. Immigration restrictions violate people’s freedom of movement and deprive them of opportunities to become dramatically richer. Moreover, none of the standard objections to open borders–the potential economic costs, special obligations to fellow citizens, states’ rights of self-determination, and so on–are successful. The talk concludes with a discussion of the relevance of immigration policy to issues like climate change and poverty relief.

    Christopher Freiman is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA. His first book, Unequivocal Justice, was published in 2017 and his second book, Why It’s OK to Ignore Politics, is forthcoming with Routledge Press. Chris is the author of over two dozen articles and chapters on topics including democratic theory, distributive justice, and immigration.
    His work has appeared in venues such as the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Utilitas, The Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, Politics, Philosophy, and Economics, and The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. His writing has also been featured in a variety of popular outlets, including Reason Magazine, Aeon, and Inside Higher Education. Chris received a William & Mary Alumni Fellowship Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2016. His website is www.cfreiman.com and he blogs at www.BleedingHeartLibertarians.com.

    Commentary to be offered by Joe Carens (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto), whose book The Ethics of Immigration (Oxford UP, 2013) was recipient of the David Easton Award of the American Political Science Association. Randall Hansen (Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto) will chair the event.

    This event is co-sponsored by The Institute for Liberal Studies, a non-partisan public affairs venue based in Ottawa.

    Contact

    Momo Podolsky
    416-978-4783


    Speakers

    Christopher Freiman
    Speaker
    Philosophy, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA

    Joe Carens
    Commentator
    Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Randall Hansen
    Chair
    Political Science, University of Toroto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, February 25th Frank W. Woods Event: Another World Film Screening & Panel Discussion

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, February 25, 20206:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    We invite you to join the Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice for a screening of Rome-based director, Thomas Torelli’s documentary, Another World/Un Altro Mondo. A panel discussion and Q & A session with Thomas Torrelli will follow the screening. This event is made possible through the generous support of the Frank W. Woods fund.

    ANOTHER WORLD is a feature documentary about mankind’s journey to discover our true force and who we truly are, challenging the modern view of the world and reconsidering the world view and value systems of ancient societies such as the indigenous Americans. It’s a quest through science and consciousness, individual and planetary, exploring our relationships with ourselves, the world around us and the universe as a whole. It demonstrates how connected we really all are, as best expressed in the Mayan greeting In Lak’ech, which means “I am another yourself.” It also demonstrates just how unnatural the sense of separation that characterizes much of modern thought really is as opposed to the understanding of unity and oneness found in many ancient traditions.

    Above all it is a transcendental pilgrimage of repossession and empowerment, affirming our place in the universe and asserting mankind as a conscious mankind with real power as individuals and as a collective to create our reality, leaving us with a message that will not only open our eyes, but will hopefully stimulate everyone into generating a better and brighter tomorrow for the benefit of present and future generations.

    Thomas Torelli is an award-winning Italian independent director and producer best known for compelling socially conscious documentaries. His past work includes: ZERO: An Investigation into 9/11 (2007) and Sangue e Cemento (2009). In 2014 he directed and produced the documentary film that revolutionized the concept of independent distribution in Italy: Another World. His latest work includes Food ReLOVution (2017), which analyzes the effects of the meat industry, Choose Love (2018), about the importance of choosing love in every gesture. He is currently the creative force behind UAM.TV, his newly launched independent web television whose intent is to contribute to the creation of a better social and cultural model: another world.


    Speakers

    Dr. Dylan Clark
    Lecturer, Trudeau Centre for Peace, Conflict and Justice and Lecturer, Contemporary Asian Studies Program, Asian Institute

    Thomas Torelli
    Director

    Professor Kevin J. White
    Assistant Professor, Deptartment for the Study of Religion & Centre for Indigenous Studies, University of Toronto



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Religion, Medicine, Bioethics, and the Law in End-of-life Care: South Asian Religious Adherent Perspectives

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This talk is based on a recently defended doctoral ethnography investigating end-of-life care issues in contemporary India from the perspectives of Indian and Tibetan religious adherents, through the lenses of religious studies, bioethics and the law. The need came in part from a paucity in bioethics studies related to the ancient Indic religious traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, from some studies ignoring the non-theistic Indic traditions altogether and legal challenges in India against Jain fasting at the end of life. Three core themes include attempts to block disclosure of bad news in sharing of sensitive medical information; ritual fasting and immobilization at the end of life; and exposure to and attitudes towards end-of-life care models including pain management, hospice palliative care and assistance in dying. This study is an advocacy anthropology project with hopes that it proves helpful in India and other jurisdictions where South Asian religious adherents receive end-of-life care so that culturally safe care can be better provided.

    Dr. Sean Hillman is a clinical bioethicist with the Centre for Clinical Ethics (CCE), a consultant organization based at Unity Health Toronto and contracted to seven institutions in Ontario. Over the last several years Sean has been the ethics lead for the five-hospital Lakeridge Health system in Durham region. He also is a Buddhist Corrections Chaplain for two facilities in the Kingston region. Sean was a bedside caregiver in hospital for almost two decades and did a year-long fellowship in Clinical and Organizational Bioethics also at the CCE. A medical anthropologist and textualist, Sean recently completed his doctorate in religion and the collaborative programs of bioethics and south Asian studies at U of T.

    A scholar of various Asian philosophies and languages for almost thirty years, with a major focus on the Indic religious traditions, Sean has spent five years living, studying and researching in India. Sean’s current research projects are on maximizing decisional participation by those who might have mental capacity interferences, and on how to better understand why families may request aggressive medical management for their loved-ones despite a poor prognosis (including religious logic such as vitalism, non-harm and filial piety). Sean is a member of Durham Family Resources community advisory committee for their “recognizing capacity” pilot project which advocates for increased inclusion of those with intellectual, cognitive or communication challenges and for including supported decision making in Ontario healthcare law.

    Contact

    Katherine MacIvor
    416-946-8832


    Speakers

    Sean Hillman
    PhD, Religion/Bioethics/South Asian Studies, U of T, 2019; Clinical Ethicist, Lakeridge Health (Centre for Clinical Ethics); Buddhist Corrections Chaplain, Bath and Collins Bay Institutions



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Empires of Vice: The Rise of Opium Prohibition across Southeast Asia

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Opium was once integral to colonial rule in Southeast Asia. The drug was a major source of revenue for European colonizers, who also derived moral authority from imposing a tax on a peculiar vice of their non-European subjects. Yet between the 1890s and the 1940s, colonial states began to ban opium, upsetting the very foundations of overseas rule—how? Empires of Vice traces the history of this dramatic reversal, revealing the colonial legacies that set the stage for the region’s drug problems today. Diana Kim challenges the conventional wisdom about opium prohibition—that it came about because doctors awoke to the dangers of drug addiction, or that it was a response to moral crusaders—uncovering a more complex story deep within the colonial bureaucracy. Drawing on a wealth of archival evidence across Southeast Asia and Europe, she shows how prohibition was made possible by the pivotal contributions of seemingly weak bureaucratic officials who delegitimized the taxing of opium, which in turn made major anti-opium reforms possible.

    Diana Kim is Assistant Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service and a core faculty member of the Asian Studies Program. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago (2013) and held a Postdoctoral Prize Fellowship in Economics, History, and Politics at Harvard University.


    Speakers

    Matthew Walton
    Chair
    Assistant Professor of Comparative Political Theory, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Diana Kim
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, February 26th Japan's Abenomics Reforms after Seven Years

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, February 26, 20204:30PM - 6:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Lecture Abstract:
    When the Liberal Democratic Party in Japan regained power led by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in December 2012, Japan’s government embarked on a set of economic policies dubbed “Abenomics.” Abenomics aimed to bring Japan back from stagnation and restore its growth potential. Prime Minister Abe is now the longest serving Japanese Prime Minister in history. Abenomics looks seemingly successful as well. Japan’s economy has been in the longest expansion phase in the post war era. The unemployment rate is so low that many employers claim they cannot find workers. Yet, the major goals of Abenomics set at the beginning, such as 2% inflation rate and 2% real economic growth, have not been achieved. Has Abenomics really succeeded? What challenges remain?

    Speaker Bio:
    Takeo Hoshi is Professor in the Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo. He is the former Henri and Tomoye Takahashi Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), Professor of Finance (by courtesy) at the Graduate School of Business, and Director of the Japan Program at the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (APARC), all at Stanford University. He served in these roles until August 2019

    Prior to 2012, Professor Hoshi was Pacific Economic Cooperation Professor in International Economic Relations at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

    His book titled Corporate Financing and Governance in Japan: The Road to the Future (MIT Press, 2001), co-authored with Anil Kashyap (Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago), received the Nikkei Award for the Best Economics Books of 2002. His other publications include, “Japanese Government Debt and Sustainability of Fiscal Policy” (with Takero Doi and Tatsuyoshi Okimoto), Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 2011; “Corporate Restructuring in Japan during the Lost Decade” (with Satoshi Koibuchi and Ulrike Schaede), “Japan’s Bubble, Deflation, and Long-term Stagnation,” MIT Press, 2011 (Koichi Hamada, Anil K Kashyap, and David E. Weinstein, eds.); “Will the U.S. Bank Recapitalization Succeed? Eight Lessons from Japan” (with Anil Kashyap), Journal of Financial Economics, 2010; and “Zombie Lending and Depressed Restructuring in Japan” (joint with Ricardo Caballero and Anil Kashyap), American Economic Review, December 2008.

    Hoshi received his BA in social sciences from the University of Tokyo in 1983, and a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988.


    Speakers

    Takeo Hoshi
    Professor, Graduate School of Economics, University of Tokyo



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 27th Technologies of Risk Response in Germany and the United States: 1850-1900

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Series

    CSUS Graduate Student Workshop

    Description

    Technologies of Risk Response in Germany and the United States: 1850-1900

    This talk investigates the history of fire services and the technologies they employed to contribute to the scholarship on infrastructure and power, urban liberalism, and risk management. Specifically, Jan illustrates the fire alarm telegraph’s impact on fire preparedness in Germany and the United States. He argues that this technology materialized the values that guided society’s response to risk. This novel technology led to the rapid decline of the profession of tower watchmen and appeared to democratize fire signaling. By providing evidence about the privileged location and use of the telegraph, Jan puts the notion of democratized fire signaling into perspective. Examining documents from city councils and fire departments in Boston, Philadelphia, Berlin, and Frankfurt, he provides evidence that it privileged use by local officials and police forces. In the formerly free city of Frankfurt, for instance, the fire telegraph allowed Prussia to control potential political threats. His study elucidates a larger insight about risk management during the nineteenth century. Entities worth protecting by fire services were usually not the individual but property. Infrastructures like the fire telegraph mainly benefitted the overlapping groups of property owners, industrials, liberals, and the bourgeoisie.

    Jan Henning is a PhD student in the history of technology and medicine at the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at U of T. His research focuses on the history of emergency services in Europe and North America.
    Emergency services, as they developed during the latter half of the nineteenth century, contributed to the idea that risks are an inevitable but controllable part of urban life. The histories of these services illuminate which forms of life and property were deemed worthy of protection. Jan argues that the technologies employed by emergency services materialized the values that guide society’s response to risk.
    Prior to coming to U of T, Jan received a BA (history and philosophy) and MA (history) from the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany), where he won the Aretin Prize for his Master’s thesis Tuberculosis and Race in Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century American Culture and Media.

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    (416) 946-8972


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, February 27th Who Is Afraid of the "Finance Lobby"? Neoliberal Transformation of Turkey’s Economic Management under the New Presidential System of Government

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, February 27, 20204:00PM - 6:00PMNMC Conference Room, BF200B
    4 Bancroft Ave., 2nd floor
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    The passage to the presidential system of government (PSG) on 9 July 2018 in Turkey, following a two-year-long emergency rule, has meant a leap in the state’s neoliberal transformation since the 1980s. In the economic field, this led to the rise of politicised, centralised, personalised, discretionary, and non-accountable management practices in contrast to the earlier neoliberal mottoes of depoliticization, decentralisation, institutionalisation, rule of law, and transparency. This presentation provides a detailed analysis of economic management in Turkey in the first four months of the PSG, a period which also saw Turkey’s most severe financial crisis since the one in 2001, to highlight the political economic continuities underlying this shift towards re-politicization.


    Speakers

    Pınar Bedirhanoğlu
    Middle East Technical University (Turkey), York University


    Sponsors

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th Pop City: Korean Popular Culture and the Selling of Place

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Friday, February 28, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Pop City examines the use of Korean television dramas and K-pop music to promote urban and rural places in South Korea. Building on the phenomenon of Korean pop culture, Youjeong Oh argues that pop culture-featured place selling mediates two separate domains: political decentralization and the globalization of Korean popular culture. The local election system introduced in the mid 90s has stimulated strong desires among city mayors and county and district governors to develop and promote their areas. Riding on the Korean Wave—the overseas popularity of Korean entertainment, also called Hallyu—Korean cities have actively used K-dramas and K-pop idols in advertisements designed to attract foreign tourists to their regions. Hallyu, meanwhile, has turned the Korean entertainment industry into a speculative field into which numerous players venture by attracting cities as sponsors.
    By analyzing the process of culture-featured place marketing, Pop City shows that urban spaces are produced and sold just like TV dramas and pop idols by promoting spectacular images rather than substantial physical and cultural qualities. Popular culture-associated urban promotion also uses the emotional engagement of its users in advertising urban space, just as pop culture draws on fans’ and audiences’ affective commitments to sell its products. Oh demonstrates how the speculative, image-based, and consumer-exploitive nature of popular culture shapes the commodification of urban space and ultimately argues that pop culture–mediated place promotion entails the domination of urban space by capital in more sophisticated and fetishized ways.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th May ’68 at Fifty: Exhibiting les événements in Paris

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Series

    Seminaire conjoint d'histoire de la France / Joint French History Seminar

    Description

    Few events in the French twentieth century have been as richly commemorated as May ’68. May’s fiftieth anniversary in 2018 provoked a veritable commemorative frenzy, with five major exhibitions in the Paris region alone. These shows were accompanied by new books by leading French scholars, re-editions of classic texts, commemorative magazines, an online exhibit at the Nanterre campus of the Université de Paris, and two outdoor poster displays in central Paris. This illustrated talk examines the capital’s fiftieth anniversary exhibitions on May ‘68 in the context of recent scholarship on the event and its commemorative history, as well as on 1960s youth. It pays particular attention to the shows mounted by the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the Archives nationales, and the municipality of Paris, the last of which aestheticized the events and ended by funneling visitors into a shop selling May-themed souvenirs, including commemorative paving stones priced at 280 or 380 euros.
    Susan Whitney is Associate Professor of History at Carleton University, where she also served as Associate Dean (Undergraduate Affairs) in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences from 2008 to 2011 and 2015 to 2017.  An historian of youth, she is the author of Mobilizing Youth: Communists and Catholics in Interwar France (Duke, 2009).  She is preparing a chapter on 1960s youth culture for the Routledge Handbook of French History and has a chapter in A Cultural History of Youth in the Modern Age (Bloomsbury, forthcoming). In 2018, Professor Whitney received Carleton’s Graduate Mentoring Award for the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.


    Speakers

    Susan Whitney
    Carleton University


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Glendon College, York University

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, February 28th An Indian Outcast in Reform China: Hindi Film and the Chinese Imagination of Global Culture Post-Mao

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, February 28, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    East Asian Seminar Series

    The late 1970s and early ‘80s saw a Chinese craze for Indian films. Members of the generation that came of age in this time have such fond memories of the foreign and exotic Hindi films that many Indian visitors to China are still serenaded with songs from the handful of films that were screened in that period. This talk examines India’s symbolic role in China’s post Cultural Revolution healing, looking especially at the discourse around popular Hindi films such as Caravan, Noorie, and Awara. The contemporary rethinking of the 1980s in China serves as the larger framework of the talk, emphasizing how the India craze of the early 1980s challenges how 21st century scholars see 1985 as marking China’s entry to “world culture.” Looking at Hindi film in the 1980s interrogates the ways in which “the west” can come to symbolize “the world” in contemporary Chinese cultural studies.

    Krista Van Fleit is Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies at the University of South Carolina. Her first book, Literature the People Love, examines culture from the Early Maoist Period, providing a new interpretive framework with which to approach texts from this time. She is currently writing a book titled Bollywood to Beijing: Film Exchange and Cultural Production in China and India.


    Speakers

    Krista Van Fleit
    Speaker
    Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of Asian Studies, University of South Carolina

    Anup Grewal
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Tong Lam
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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March 2020

  • Monday, March 2nd How Volunteering Can Kick-Start & Enhance Your Career

    DateTimeLocation
    Monday, March 2, 20202:00PM - 3:00PMBoardroom, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    On Monday Marchh 2, from 2-3 PM, Chris Snyder is presenting a seminar on How Volunteering Can Kick-Start & Enhance Your Career.

    Chris Snyder is a member of the Trudeau Centre Advisory Board. He is a pioneer in the personal finance business and co-founder and chair of the ECC Group. He has authored many articles and five books on personal finance. His most recent book, Be Smart with Your Money, focuses on human behaviour and money. He is the former Chair of The Canadian Landmine Foundation, current Chair of HIP (Honouring Indigenous Peoples) and runs hands-on school building trips for Rotary to the developing world. Chris is the recipient of The Queen’s Golden and Diamond Jubilee Awards.

    This is a great opportunity to learn important insights on growing your personal and professional networks as you think about embarking on careers in the peace, conflict and justice realm.

    Contact

    Jona Malile
    416-946-0326


    Speakers

    Chris Snyder
    Chairman, ECC Group, Personal Financial Advisors Past Chair, Canadian Landmine Foundation Chair, HIP Honouring Indigenous People Rotary Co-Ordinator, Sweat Equity Projects Trudeau Centre Advisory Board Member



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 3rd Innovations in Advancing Gender Equality

    This event has been relocated

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 20202:00PM - 5:00PM Fleck Atrium (Ground Floor, North Building)
    Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, 105 St George Street
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    Description

    Innovations in Advancing Gender Equality: Diversity and Inclusion in STEM/STEAM, Gender Equality in Post-secondary Institutions, and Gender Equality at a Global Scale – A Symposium for International Women’s Day 2020

    Agenda:

    Opening Remarks

    Prof. Phillip Lipscy (Associate Professor of Political Science & Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto)

    Prof. Rie Kijima (Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto)

    Prof. Tiff Macklem (Dean, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (invited))

    Session 1: “Innovations for Diversity and Inclusion in STEM/STEAM Fields”

    Panelists:
    Prof. Sonia Kang (Associate Professor, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management; Canada Research Chair in Identity, Diversity, and Inclusion, University of Toronto Mississauga and Rotman School of Management; and Research Fellow – Institute for Gender and the Economy at Rotman (GATE), University of Toronto)
    Prof. Rie Kijima (Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto)
    Mr. Daisuke Kan (Executive Director, Cheerio Corporation Co., LTD.)

    Session 2: “Gender Equality in Post-Secondary Institutions: Perspectives from Canada and Japan”

    Panelists:
    Prof. Aya Okada (Professor, Graduate school of International Development and Former Vice Trustee, Nagoya University)
    Prof. Elizabeth Buckner (Assistant Professor, Higher Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto)

    Session 3: “UN HeForShe Program and Gender Equality at a Global Scale”

    Panelists:
    Mr. Edward Wageni (Program Manager, UN Women HeForShe)
    Ms. Stephanie Dei (UN Women National Co-ordinator, WE EMPOWER Canada)

    Closing Remarks

    Ms. Takako Ito (Consul-General of Japan in Toronto)

    Reception will follow immediately after the sessions (4:45pm – 6z:00pm)

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Phillip Lipscy
    Associate Professor of Political Science & Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Sonia Kang
    Canada Research Chair in Identity, Diversity, and Inclusion;

    Associate Professor, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management, University of Toronto

    Rie Kijima
    Assistant Professor, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

    Daisuke Kan
    CEO of Cheerio Japan Corporation

    Elizabeth Buckner
    Assistant Professor, Higher Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

    Aya Okada
    Professor, Graduate school of International Development and Former Vice Trustee, Nagoya University

    Stephanie Dei
    UN Women National Coordinator of WE EMPOWER Canada

    Edward Wageni
    UN Women HeForShe Program Manager



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 3rd 2020 Walter Gordon Symposium on Public Policy Keynote Lecture: Empty Planet: The Shock of Global Population Decline

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 20206:30PM - 8:00PMInnis Town Hall
    2 Sussex Ave
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J5
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    Description

    The Walter Gordon Symposium is an annual conference on public policy held at the University of Toronto.

    This year’s Symposium is entitled “Policymaking for a Well Society”. It will focus in on three major themes at the core of how our societies thrive or struggle – environment, health and housing. By dissecting each of these policy topics in detail this year’s symposium hopes to make us reflect on where we have done well and where we can do better.

    Keynote Lecture – John Ibbitson of The Globe & Mail

    We are pleased to welcome John Ibbitson of the Globe and Mail as the keynote for the 2020 Walter Gordon Symposium. He will be speaking on his recent book, co-authored with Darrell Bricker, “Empty Planet: The Shock of Global Population Decline” followed by a question and answer session.

    Speakers

    John Ibbitson
    Journalist, The Globe and Mail


    Co-Sponsors

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Massey College

    University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 3rd – Wednesday, March 4th Agenda 2020: Making sense of Super Tuesday

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 3, 20207:30PM - 10:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
    Wednesday, March 4, 202010:00AM - 11:30AMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    On Super Tuesday, delegates for the national conventions are selected. Watch live what happens with us on Tuesday night from 7:30pm onwards.

    Then join us Wednesday morning to hear experts from both countries on what it means for the presidential primaries, election cycle and Canadian-American relations.

    If you plan to attend both events, please register for a ticket to the panel + a Super Tuesday reception ticket.

    Co-Sponsors

    U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Canada

    Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Center for Canadian Studies at Johns Hopkins University

    Wilson Center Canada Institute

    Massey College

    Fulbright Canada

    Centre for the Study of the United States

    The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Japan: Climate Change Leader?

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Japan: Climate Change Leader?

    In 1997, Japan hosted the international meeting that produced the Kyoto Protocol, a major agreement to confront climate change. However, the country’s climate change policies have come under intense scrutiny in recent years. Japan regularly ranks toward the bottom of international climate change rankings, and critics have condemned its promotion of coal-fired power plants. Prime Minister Abe Shinzo has sought to reclaim Japanese climate change leadership, for example highlighting the issue as host of the G20 Osaka Summit. What will it take for Japan to reemerge as a climate change leader? In this panel, Professor Phillip Lipscy will provide an overview of climate change politics in Japan, explaining why Japan has struggled to reduce emissions in recent years. Mari Yoshitaka, a leading expert in environment business and environment finance who has served on numerous Japanese government policy committees, will discuss Japan’s climate resilience and energy security challenges.

    Moderator:
    Matthew Hoffman, Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Panelists:
    Phillip Y. Lipscy, Associate Professor of Political Science, Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto

    Mari Yoshitaka, Chief Environmental & Social Strategist for Environmental Strategy Advisory Division at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd.; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University

    Contact

    Mio Otsuka
    416-946-8972


    Speakers

    Matthew Hoffman
    Moderator
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Phillip Y. Lipscy
    Panelist
    Associate Professor of Political Science, Director of the Centre for the Study of Global Japan, University of Toronto

    Mari Yoshitaka
    Panelist
    Chief Environmental & Social Strategist for Environmental Strategy Advisory Division at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd.; Lecturer in the Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 4th Is the Nordic region the most integrated and sustainable region in the world

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 4, 20204:30PM - 6:30PM108N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    The Nordic Council of Ministers and the Nordic Council are the main forums for official Nordic co-operation, which involves Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Åland. The goal of Nordic co-operation is to make the region the most sustainable and integrated region in the world. How successful have the Nordic countries been in achieving this goal? How has Nordic co-operation helped with the branding of the region as egalitarian, efficient, business-friendly and environmental-friendly? Tómas Orri Ragnarsson, Senior Adviser to the Secretary General, Nordic Council of Ministers, will present the strategic lines of Nordic co-operation and will discuss the solutions the Nordics propose to our common, global challenges.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Tómas Orri Ragnarsson
    Speaker
    Senior Adviser to the Secretary General, Nordic Council of Ministers

    Francisco Beltran
    Moderator
    CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Ukraine's War in the Donbas: Description and Prescription in Conflict Resolution

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Jesse Driscoll is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California at San Diego. His first book, Warlords and Coalition Politics in Post-Soviet States (2015), was published by Cambridge University Press in the Series on Comparative Politics, and was honored with the Best Book Award by the Central Eurasian Studies Society and the Furniss Award. He has conducted fieldwork in Tajikistan, Georgia, and Ukraine. He has a book forthcoming from Columbia University Press tentatively titled Doing Global Fieldwork: A Social Scientist’s Guide To Mixed-Methods Research in Difficult Places and a book under review (co-authored with Dominique Arel) on the causes and consequences of the ongoing war in Ukraine.

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Jesse Driscoll
    Associate Professor of Political Science at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California at San Diego



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 5th Conversation on Migration, Art and Identity with Allison Au

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 5, 20205:00PM - 7:30PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Series

    Global Migration Lab - Speaker Series

    Description

    The Global Migration Lab – Student Research Initiative at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy is glad to host a panel discussion with Juno Award-winning Toronto-based saxophonist, composer and arranger Allison Au on Migration, Art, and Identity.

    Allison recently premiered in January 2020 her piece “Migrations Suite”, which was commissioned by the Toronto Royal Conservatory of Music. By exploring her family history through music, Allison addresses the larger issues of displacement, relocation, lament for the loss of home, the feeling of “foreign-ness” and legacy.

    Contact

    Sole Fernandez
    416-946-8912


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th The Politics of the Fatwa: Modern Islamic Legal Authority and Rise of the Indonesian Council of Ulama

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 202010:00AM - 12:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Fatwas from Islamic organizations are prominent elements of public debates in democratic Indonesia, as well as the broader Muslim world. Yet scholars lack a clear theoretical explanation for the power of fatwas in politics. This paper draws on original archival material to explicate the legal authority of the fatwas from the Indonesian Council of Ulama (Majelis Ulama Indonesia, MUI), which over the past twenty years has become one of the country’s most influential actors. The paper distinguishes three periods in the growth and transformation of MUI’s authority; starting with charismatic authority and state corporatism, MUI later gained formal regulatory authority, and now uses agenda setting, lobbying, mass mobilization, and the threat of violence. By examining how the power of MUI’s fatwas increased as the organization accrued more forms of authority, this periodization demonstrates that explaining the political power of the fatwa requires understanding the modern organizational authority of Islamic actors. In the modern age, Islamic legal authority reflects the dominant logic of political authority in society.

    Jeremy Menchik is Assistant Professor in the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University and faculty affiliate in Political Science. His first book, Islam and Democracy in Indonesia: Tolerance without Liberalism (Cambridge University Press, 2016) was the co-winner of the 2017 International Studies Association award for the best book on religion and international relations.


    Speakers

    Faisal Kamal
    Discussant
    PhD Candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Jacques Bertrand
    Chair
    Professor and Associate Chair (Graduate) of Political Science, Director of the Collaborative Master’s Program in Contemporary East and Southeast Asian Studies and Director of the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Jeremy Menchik
    Speaker
    Assistant Professor, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for Southeast Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Institute of Islamic Studies, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Book Launch: The Transcultural Streams of Chinese Canadian Identities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 202010:30AM - 12:30PMRichard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, 8th floor, Robarts Library, University of Toronto, 130 St. George Street
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    Description

    Focusing on the geopolitical and economic circumstances that have prompted migration from Hong Kong and mainland China to Canada, The Transcultural Streams of Chinese Canadian Identities examines the Chinese Canadian community as a simultaneously transcultural, transnational, and domestic social and cultural formation. Taking an innovative interdisciplinary approach to the ways in which Chinese Canadian adapt to and co-construct the Canadian cultural mosaic, the book explores various patterns of Chinese cultural exchanges in Canada and how they intertwine with the community’s sense of belonging and disengagement.

    Please RSVP by emailing events.rclchkl@utoronto.ca
    or by calling 416-946-8978


    Speakers

    Dr. Jessica Tsui-yan Li
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Lily Cho
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Guida Man
    Associate Professor, York University

    Dr. Jack Hang-tat Leong
    Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, University of Toronto


    Sponsors

    Richard Charles Lee Canada - Hong Kong Library

    Richard Charles Lee Chair in Chinese Canadian Studies

    University of Toronto Libraries

    Asian Institute

    Canadian Studies at University College

    York Centre for Asian Research


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 6th Reading and Writing "Possessed by the Virgin," with Kristin Bloomer

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 6, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place
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    Description

    Kristin Bloomer’s Possessed by the Virgin: Hinduism, Roman Catholicism, and Marian Possession in South India introduces readers to three women who become possessed by the Virgin Mary: Rosalind, Nancy, and Dhanam. In this rich ethnographic account of Marian possession, healing, and exorcism in Tamil Nadu, Bloomer pays particular attention to the experience of possession as articulated by these women and the various community members that surround them, from the skeptical Catholic priest to the devotees, and everyone in between. This beautifully written ethnography raises questions about possessed subjectivities and agencies, gender, Tamil language, Hinduism and Catholicism in South India, and, more generally, how to write about possession.

    In this panel, a group of graduate students from the University of Toronto, with diverse research interests ranging from Tamil Studies to Possession Studies, will critically engage with the author and her book from various perspectives. The event aims to raise questions, deeply reflect, and start a critical conversation about the book and its contents.

    PANELISTS:

    Kainat Bashir, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Janani Mandayam Comar, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Stephanie Duclos-King, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Jesse Pruitt, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Kristina Rogahn, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT
    Austin Simoes-Gomes, Department for the Study of Religion, UofT

    __________________

    Kristin C. Bloomer is an Associate Professor of Religion at Carleton College in Northfield, MN. She is currently working on a book about Tamil family gods and lineage deities, with support from the American Institute of Indian Studies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Carleton College.


    Speakers

    Kristin Bloomer
    Speaker
    Department of Religion, Carleton College, Northfield, MN

    Francis Cody
    Chair
    Department of Anthropology; Centre for South Asian Studies, Asian Institute


    Main Sponsor

    Asian Institute

    Sponsors

    Centre for South Asian Studies

    Co-Sponsors

    Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto

    Tamil Worlds Initiative, University of Toronto, Scarborough


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Thursday, March 12th GreekLanguage.ca: A portal to the future for Greek and other community languages in Canada?

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, March 12, 20205:30PM - 8:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    + Register for this Event Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    NOTE: This event is proceeding as planned on March 12. For those unable to attend in person, you may join us via the live webcast: https://hosting2.desire2learncapture.com/MUNK/1/Live/490.aspx

    Cultural and linguistic diversity is one of Canada’s main characteristics and strengths. Beyond the two official languages, English and French, millions of Canadians are speakers of indigenous and immigrant languages, which are taught, learned and promoted mainly by community and educational institutions. New ICT technologies, offer today the opportunity to facilitate the inter-generational transmission of these languages by connecting their speakers and learners with teachers, programs and resources, nationally and globally.

    GREEKLANGUAGE.CA is an online portal designed by Dr.Themistoklis Aravossitas at the University of Toronto’s Hellenic Studies Program, to support Greek language education in Canada. It is aimed at students, educators, parents and community members who wish to locate schools, associations and groups that teach and promote the Greek language and culture in order to access their services and share resources which enhance learning. The portal is based on a doctoral study at the Curriculum, Teaching and Learning department in the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) of the University of Toronto, entitled “The Hidden Schools: Mapping Greek Heritage Language Education in Canada”. The platform’s content is based on dozens of researchers, volunteers, educators and other stakeholders, who shared their insights on where, how and by whom Modern Greek is used, taught and learned across Canada.

    This year’s Hellenic Heritage Foundation Annual Munk Lecture is the official launch is GREEKLANGUAGE.CA. Prof. Aravossitas will guide users through what the platform has to offer and discuss the key components of second-language learning in Canada. A discussion of the role community groups, cultural institutions and associations play in language learning will be examined, along with how connecting communities, educational institutions, language programs and recourses is vital for the survival of community languages in Canada.

    Themistoklis Aravossitas teaches Modern Greek language and culture at the Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto. He holds a Bachelor of Education from the University of Athens, Greece, an MA and a PhD from the Department of Curriculum Teaching and Learning of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. He is a SSHRC-Canada post doctoral fellow investigating the status of heritage/community languages in Canada. His recent publications include the books Rethinking Heritage Language Education (Cambridge University Press), Handbook of Research and Practice in Heritage Language Education (Springer), Interdisciplinary Research Approaches to Multilingual Education (Routledge Research) and Language Diversity and Education Matters (Gutenberg, In Greek).

    Contact

    Stacie Bellemare
    (416)946-5670


    Speakers

    Dr. Themistoklis Aravossitas
    Speaker
    Lecturer, Hellenic Studies Program, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy

    Prof. Robert C. Austin
    Moderator
    Associate Director & Associate Professor, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy


    Sponsors

    Hellenic Heritage Foundation

    Co-Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 13th Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea + film screening of “Family in the Bubble

    This event has been postponed

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 13, 20209:00AM - 4:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Friday, March 13, 202010:00AM - 2:00PM202N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
    Print this Event Bookmark this Event

    Description

    Symposium & Documentary Screening
    Making and Unmaking of the Speculative City: Urban Politics in South Korea
    For screening event info and tickets please go to: https://family-in-the-bubble.eventbrite.ca

    March 13-14, 2020 (Friday-Saturday)

    Friday Symposium: 9:30am-3:15pm
    Saturday Documentary Screening: 2:15-5:30pm

    This event is sponsored by The Academy of Korean Studies, York University’s Korean Office for Research and Education, Center for the Study of Korea (U of Toronto), School of Cities (U of Toronto), and Hope21.

    March 13 (Friday) Symposium

    Room 208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, University of Toronto-St. George campus

    9:30-9:40 Welcome remark by Hyun-Ok Park (York)

    9:40-9:50 Welcome remark by Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)

    9:50-10:00 Introduction to the Symposium: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    10:00-11:00 Keynote Speech
    Chair: Yewon Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    Laam Hae (York) “Toward a Dialectical Vision of Planetary Urbanization: Ecological Pro-Greenbelt Movements against the Construction State in Korea”

    11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

    11:15-12:45 Panel 1: The Making of the Speculative City
    Chair: Yoonkyung Lee (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Seung-Cheol Lee (U of Mississippi)

    Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto) “Juxtaposing biopolitics with speculative urbanisms: the development of private welfare/health institutions in South Korea”

    Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto) “The Dictatorship of Capital: Urban Redevelopment and the Democracy of the Have-Nots in Post-Authoritarian South Korea”

    12:45-2:00 Lunch Break

    2:00-3:30 Panel 2 The Unmaking of the Speculative City
    Chair: Hyun-Chul Kim (U of Toronto)
    Discussant: Jesook Song (U of Toronto)

    Seung-Cheol Lee (U of Mississippi) “Seeing like a community entrepreneur: The capitalization of ‘community’ in Seoul’s community building project (maul mandulgi)”

    Yewon Lee (U of Toronto) “Precarious Workers in the Speculative City: Making Worker’s Power of Self-Employed Tenant Shopkeepers in Seoul through the Production of Space”

    March 14 (Saturday) 2:15pm-5:30pm

    Innis Town Hall, 2 Sussex Avenue, University of Toronto-St. George campus

    Documentary Screening of Family in the Bubble and Panel Discussion

    For screening event please go to: https://family-in-the-bubble.eventbrite.ca

    Moderator: Michelle Cho (U of Toronto)
    Panel: Yewon Lee (U of Toronto) and Hae Yeon Choo (U of Toronto)

    Symposium and Documentary Screening Participant Bios

    Michelle Cho is Assistant Professor of East Asian Popular Culture at the University of Toronto. She has published on Asian cinemas and Korean wave television, video, and pop music in such venues as Cinema Journal, the International Journal of Communication, The Korean Popular Culture Reader, and Asian Video Cultures. She’s currently at work on a book about gender, media, and fandom in Korean-wave popular cultures.

    Hae Yeon Choo is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She is an author of Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016), a comparative study of three groups of Filipina women in South Korea: factory workers, wives of South Korean men, and hostesses at American military camptown clubs. Her current research examines the politics of land ownership in contemporary South Korea, delving into macro-level political contestations over land rights, together with the narratives of people who pursue class mobility through real estate speculation. She has also translated Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider and Patricia Hill Collins’s Black Feminist Thought into Korean.

    Laam Hae is an Associate Professor in the department of Politics at York University. Her research areas are urban political economy, neoliberal urbanism and urban social movements. She is the author of The Gentrification of Nightlife and the Right to the City: Regulating Spaces of Social Dancing in New York (2012, Routledge), and co-edited On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (2019, University of Toronto Press). She is currently developing a research project that examines the spatiality of social reproduction and gender inequality in South Korea.

    Hyun-Chul Kim is a PhD Candidate at the Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto. Her research interests include the varied degree of confined, segregated spaces in East Asian regions, from nursing homes to prisons, considering urban constructions, intimacy, and disability. She is writing her dissertation tentatively titled “Between Communal ‘Village’ and an Atomized ‘Home’: Blurring the boundaries of community organization movement and segregated-confined welfare spaces of South Korea in 1950s-1960s”.

    Seung Cheol Lee received his PhD from Columbia University in 2018 and is now an assistant professor of anthropology and East Asian Studies at the University of Mississippi. His research interests are focused on the question of how neoliberal financialization has reshaped people’s social, affective, ethical, and political lives. He is currently working on a book manuscript that examines how the ethicality and sociality of gift-giving are grafted onto neoliberal market rationality in the social economy sector in South Korea.

    Yewon Andrea Lee is a Korean Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Study of Korea at University of Toronto. She is an ethnographer and urban and labor sociologist and received her Ph.D. from the Department of Sociology at UCLA. She is interested in speculative urbanism and how it generates new politics of dissent. In particular, her dissertation focuses on tenant shopkeepers whose livelihoods are disrupted by speculation on the urban spaces on which their shops stand and how these subjects organize via transforming everyday mundane spaces of work into symbolic spaces of dissent.

    Yoonkyung Lee is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and the director of the Center for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto. She is a political sociologist specializing in labor politics, social movements, political representation, and the political economy of neoliberalism with a regional focus on East Asia. She is the author of Militants or Partisans: Labor Unions and Democratic Politics in Korea and Taiwan (Stanford University Press 2011) and numerous journal articles that appeared in Globalizations, Studies in Comparative International Development, Asian Survey, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Critical Asian Studies.

    Hyun Ok Park teaches sociology and the director of the Korean Office for Research and Education (KORE) at York University. With archival and ethnographic research, her research investigates global capitalism in colonial, industrial, and financial forms, democracy, socialism, and post-socialist transition. She is the author of Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution in Manchuria (Duke University Press, 2005). Her latest book is The Capitalist Unconscious: From Korean Unification to Transnational Korea (Columbia University Press, 2015). She is completing a book manuscript, “A Sublime Disaster: The Sewŏl Ferry Incident and the Politics of the Living Dead.”

    Jesook Song is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on contemporary urban transformation and welfare issues, including homelessness, youth unemployment, single women’s housing, mental health in South Korea. She is author of South Koreans in the Debt Crisis: The Creation of a Neoliberal Welfare Society (Duke University Press, 2009) and Living on Your Own: Single Women, Rental Housing, and Post-Revolutionary Affect in Contemporary South Korea (SUNY Press, 2014), On the Margins of Urban South Korea: Core Location as Method and Praxis (University of Toronto Press 2019, co-edited with Laam Hae).


    Speakers

    Laam Hae
    Keynote
    Associate Professor, Department of Politics, York University

    Yoonkyung Lee
    Chair
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Seung-Cheol Lee
    Discussant
    Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Mississippi

    Hyun-Chul Kim
    Speaker
    Ph.D Candidate, Department of Geography, University of Toronto

    Hae Yeon Choo
    Speaker
    Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    Jesook Song
    Discussant
    Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Yewon Andrea Lee
    Chair
    Post-doctoral Fellow, Centre for the Study of Korea at the University of Toronto


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of Korea

    Co-Sponsors

    School of Cities, University of Toronto


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 13th Technology in the Global Sphere: Challenges and Opportunities

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 13, 20209:30AM - 6:00PMThe Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    Please join us for our annual Munk School Graduate Student Conference where we explore the theme of Technology in the Global Sphere: Challenges and Opportunities. Through a series of professional and student panels, the conference aims to interact with and educate attendees on the impact of technology on the fields of security and development, while also giving Munk students an opportunity to share their own research at the intersection of technology and global affairs. We invite you to stay for our closing reception, offering a closing speaker and an opportunity to network with our specialists and your fellow attendees.

    $15 admission provides you access to the day’s events, with lunch and light refreshments offered.

    Student tickets purchased with any valid student card will be FREE with registration.

    9:30 – 10:00 Breakfast and Registration

    10:00 – 11:30 Security Panel

    11:30 – 12:30 Lunch

    12:30 – 2:00 Development Panel

    2:00 – 2:15 Coffee Break

    2:15 – 3:45 Student Research Panel

    3:45 – 4:30 Closing Speaker

    4:30 – 6:00 Closing Reception/Networking


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 17th Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA): Updates on the Debate

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 17, 20205:00PM - 8:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    In light of the recent migrant crisis in Central America and along the southern US border, it is valuable to re-examine the obstacles which the Canada-US Safe Third Country Agreement (STCA) has created with respect to those seeking refuge from violence and horror in Central America. Pulling together experts from the legal, policy, and governmental fields, the Global Migration Lab Student Initiative will explore the ongoing questions surrounding the STCA. What is the current legal situation? What is the current political situation? What does the future hold and what are the consequences?

    Dr. Craig Damian Smith, the former Associate Director of the Munk School’s Global Migration Lab, will be facilitating this panel discussion. Craig Damian Smith earned his Ph.D. from the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on migration, displacement, European foreign policy, and refugee integration.

    The panel discussion will take place on March 17th, 2020 from 5pm to 7pm at the Boardroom located on 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto Ontario, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. There will also be a reception after the panel discussion from 7pm to 8pm.

    Notice to all attendees, this event may be filmed and broadcast on the Global Migration Lab Student Research Initiative’s social media channels.

    The speakers for this panel discussion are:

    John McCallum is the former Minister of Immigration, Refugee, and Citizenship under the Justin Trudeau government from 2015 to 2017. John McCallum also previously served as Canada’s Minister of Defense from 2003 to 2004 under the Jean Chretien government as well as having most recently served as Canada’s Ambassador to China from 2017 to 2019 under the Justin Trudeau government.

    Jenny Kwan is the NDP Member of Parliament for Vancouver East and the current Critic for Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship, as well as the Critic for Multiculturalism. She serves as the Vice-Chair of the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration.

    Robert Falconer is a Research Associate with the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary. His work focuses on immigration and refugee policy, with a particular focus on reforming policies related to the Canadian asylum system. His other research interests include the retention of newcomers in rural Canada and the influence of domestic and foreign policy on immigrant interest in moving to Canada.

    Prasanna Balasundaram is a staff lawyer for Downtown Legal Services and supervises the Refugee and Immigration division and academic appeals cases in the University Affairs division. He has a special interest in judicial reviews of decisions by the Immigration and Refugee Board and administrative issues that engage constitutional rights. Prasanna is counsel for two of the individual applicants in the judicial review of the STCA, which was heard in November 2019.


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 20th De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic **BILINGUAL EVENT**

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 20, 20203:00PM - 5:00PM208N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    This event will be conducted partially in English and partially in French.

    De l’Histoire naturelle de Buffon au Regnum Animale d’Arnout Vosmaer: Scientific Rivalry between France and the Dutch Republic at the End of the Old Regime

    Après un doctorat en médecine vétérinaire (DMV) obtenu en 1992 à l’Université de Montréal,Swann Paradis a exercé la médecine vétérinaire (animaux de compagnie) au Québec pendant plusde 15 ans, parallèlement à ses études littéraires. Ses champs d’intérêt incluent l’histoire naturelleau XVIIIe siècle (littérature, philosophie et sciences), de même que le « roman terrifiant » et le« Romantisme noir », la poésie québécoise et franco-ontarienne contemporaine et l’écriturepoétique. Il prépare actuellement une monographie qui devrait paraître quelque part au XXIe sièclechez Hermann, dont le titre provisoire est : Le sixième sens de la taupe. Buffon dans la fabriquedes quadrupèdes. Il travaille actuellement sur un projet de recherche ayant reçu l’appui d’une« Subvention Savoir » du CRSH (2016-2020), pour le projet intitulé : « De la ménagerie du Princed’Orange au Jardin du Roi : Arnout Vosmaer (1720-1799) dans l’ombre de Buffon (1707-1788) ».

    At the beginning of his article on the Bengal Loris published in the 7th and last volume of the Supplément à l’Histoire naturelle in 1789, Buffon (1707-1788) offers a detailed description of an exotic species, based on a monograph written approximately twenty years earlier in 1770 by Aernout Vosmaer (1720-1799), who was the director of stathouder William V of Holland’s Cabinet of Natural History since 1756. Buffon, lacking access to a live or even stuffed specimen, had to rely on the description proposed by Vosmaer, who observed the live exotic animal in the Prince of Orange’s menagerie between 1770 and 1774 ; moreover, to support his harsh critic of how Vosmaer named this strange quadruped — The ‘‘Bengal Five-Toed Sloth’’, Buffon added a black & white copperplate — drawing from Jacques de Sève, engraving by Madeleine Rousselet (ou Veuve Tardieu) — a mirror copy of the coloured plate made from a pen and watercolour drawing by Aert Schouman, published alongside Vosmaer’s original monograph. As natural history was a hotbed of political rivalry, this anecdotic controversy is typical of many others between these two important centres of exotic animal specimens: the French and Dutch national menageries, based respectively in Versailles and Voorburg (a suburb of The Hague). À partir de cet exemple emblématique, nous voudrions exposer, au cours de cette présentation bilingue, comment la rivalité entre ces deux puissances coloniales en déclin a des résonances en amont et en aval dans la joute polémique qui se développe entre deux figures incontournables de la scène naturaliste périrévolutionnaire. Pour ce faire, à partir de certaines descriptions textuelles et iconographiques d’animaux exotiques, qui ont donné lieu à des échanges « musclés » entre le célèbre intendant du Jardin du Roi et son homologue néerlandais, beaucoup moins connu, il s’agira de déterminer si, par-delà les motivations nationalistes des protagonistes, ne se dégagerait pas aussi un certain « cosmopolitisme scientifique » propre à la République des Lettres, qui viendrait en quelque sorte réhabiliter la contribution néerlandaise, jusqu’ici plutôt occultée, dans l’histoire de l’histoire naturelle.


    Speakers

    Swann Paradis
    Collège Glendon


    Main Sponsor

    Centre for the Study of France and the Francophone World (CEFMF)

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies

    Glendon College, York University


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 24th Banks on the Brink: Global Capital, Securities Markets, and the Political Roots of Financial Crises

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 24, 202012:00PM - 2:00PMSidney Smith 3130
    100 St. George Street
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    Description

    Banks on the Brink explains why some countries are more vulnerable to banking crises than others. Copelovitch and Singer highlight the effects of two variables in combination: foreign capital inflows and the relative prominence of securities markets in the domestic financial system. Foreign capital is the fuel for banks’ potentially dangerous behavior, and banks are more likely to take on excessive risks when operating in a financial system with large securities markets. The book analyzes over thirty years of data and provides historical case studies of two key countries, Canada and Germany, each of which explores how political decisions in the 19th and early-20th centuries continue to affect financial stability today. The analyses in this book have crucial policy implications, identifying potential regulations and policies that can work to protect banking systems against future crises.

    Mark Copelovitch is professor in the Department of Political Science and the Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He works on the political economy of international trade, money, and finance, with a particular interest in the domestic and international politics of financial crises and the role of the International Monetary Fund in global financial governance, and European integration and the European Union.

    This event is sponsored in part by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) with funds from the German Federal Foreign Office (AA).


    Speakers

    Mark Copelovitch
    University of Wisconsin - Madison


    Sponsors

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Department of Political Science

    Global Economic Policy Lab


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Wednesday, March 25th The End of Certainties: Current Developments in German Foreign Policy

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Wednesday, March 25, 20202:00PM - 4:00PM108N, North House, Munk School of Global Affairs
    1 Devonshire Place
    M5S 3K7
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    Description

    German foreign policy at the end of the Merkel era is heading for the end of certainties. For the pillars that have supported this policy since 1949 – the European integration process, transatlantic security relations, the rule-based international order – are in crisis in one form or another. The next Federal Government will have to address these shifts in foreign policy more actively and develop new initiatives.

    Dr. Markus Kaim is currently Helmut Schmidt Fellow of the Zeit-Stiftung and the German Marshall Fund. In Berlin he works as Senior Fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs of the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP). He has taught and held fellowships at universities on both sides of the Atlantic: As Visiting Scholar at the Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa (2018), as Adjunct Professor at the Department for Political Science, University of Zurich (since 2012), as Guest Instructor at the Hertie School of Governance, Berlin (since 2012), as DAAD Professor for German and European Studies at the University of Toronto (2007-2008), as Acting Professor for Foreign Policy and International Relations at the University of Constance (2007), and as Visiting Fellow at the American Institute for Contemporary German Studies/ Johns Hopkins University (2005).

    This event is sponsored in part by the DAAD with funds from the German Foreign Office (AA).

    Main Sponsor

    Joint Initiative in German and European Studies

    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    German Academic Exchange Service


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Friday, March 27th Harney Lecture Series: "Origins and Destinations: The Making of the Second Generation"

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Friday, March 27, 20202:00PM - 4:00PMBloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON, M5S 0A7
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    Description

    Abstract:
    Immigrants’ greatest legacy involves their children. Born or raised in the United States, this second generation now stands over 20 million strong. In this book, immigration scholars Renee Luthra, Thomas Soehl, and Roger Waldinger provide a new way of understanding the second generation, bringing origins and destinations into view.

    Using surveys of second generation immigrant adults in New York and Los Angeles, this book explains why second generation experiences differ across national origin groups and why immigrant offspring with same national background follow different trajectories. Inter-group disparities stem from contexts of both emigration and immigration.

    Diversity also appears among immigrant offspring whose parents stem from the same place. Immigrant children grow up with homeland connections, which can both hurt and help. Though all immigrants enter the U.S. as non-citizens, some instantly enjoy legal presence, others spend years in the shadows; those at-entry differences yield long-term effects. Disentangling the sources of diversity among today’s population of immigrant offspring Origins and Destinations provides a new framework for understanding the second generation that is transforming America.

    Speaker bio:
    Roger Waldinger is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UCLA and Director of the UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration.
    He has worked on international migration throughout his career, writing on a broad set of topics, including transnationalism and homeland ties, labor markets, assimilation, the second generation, high-skilled immigration, immigration policy, and public opinion.
    Waldinger has published nine books, most recently The Cross-Border Connection: Immigrants, Emigrants, and their Homelands (Cambridge, MA:
    Harvard University Press, 2015); A Century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and their Homeland Connections (co-edited with Nancy Green; University of Illinois Press, 2016); and Origins and Destinations: The Making of the Second Generation, co-authored with Renee Luthra and
    Thomas Soehl (Russell Sage Foundation Press: 2018). His current research concerns the acquisition of citizenship and the development of national identity among immigrants and their descendants.

    Event hosted by Prof. Tahseen Shams, Department of Sociology.


    Speakers

    Roger Waldinger
    Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UCLA and Director of the UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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  • Tuesday, March 31st The Tribalization of Europe: A defense of our liberal values

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Tuesday, March 31, 202012:00PM - 2:00PM208N, North House, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, ON, M5S 3K7
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    Description

    University of Copenhagen’s Professor and Director of the Centre for European Politics Marlene Wind will present her new book “The Tribalization of Europe. A defense of our liberal values” , which is forthcoming in Polity Press in April 2020. Here is a summary and praise for the book:

    Tribalization is a global megatrend in today’s world. The election of Donald Trump, the Brexit vote, populist movements like Catalan separatism – together with democratic backsliding in Central and Eastern Europe – are all examples of tribalization. Fueled by anti-globalism and identity politics, tribalization is pulling up the drawbridge to the world. It is putting cultural differences before dialogue, collaboration, and universal liberal values.

    But tribalism is a dangerous road to go down. With it, argues Marlene Wind, we have put democracy itself in danger. Tribalism is not just about being pro-nation, anti-EU, and anti-global. It is in many instances a bigger and more fundamental movement that casts aside the liberal democratic principles we once held in common.

    At a time when former defenders of liberal values are increasingly silent or even have joined the growing chorus of tribalists, this book is a wake-up call. Drawing on a wide range of examples from the UK and the US to Spain, Hungary, and Poland, Wind highlights the dangers of identity politics and calls on people to stand up for democracy and the rule of law.”

    “The Tribalization of Europe is a hard-headed analysis of the turn toward narrow populist nationalism, as well as an impassioned defense of the liberal values needed to sustain a democratic political future.” — Francis Fukuyama, Stanford University

    “Marlene Wind has written an eloquent, magisterial and compelling warning: the degradation of democracy to extreme majoritarianism and adherence to the tribe (even if a tribe of citizens) fundamentally questions our common democratic values.” — Carlos Closa, European University Institute

    Contact

    Larysa Iarovenko
    416-946-8962


    Speakers

    Marlene Wind
    Speaker
    Professor, Department of Political Science, and Director of the Centre for European Politics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

    Francisco Beltran
    Moderator
    Lecturer, CERES, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, moderator.



    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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April 2020

  • Thursday, April 2nd Ottomans, Bosnians, and Noblemen: Elite Identity in an Early Modern Ottoman Province

    This event has been cancelled

    DateTimeLocation
    Thursday, April 2, 20204:00PM - 6:00PM2098 Sidney Smith Hall
    100 St. George Street
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    Series

    Seminar in Ottoman & Turkish Studies

    Description

    Throughout most of its existence, the Ottoman Empire was a multi-ethnic, multi-religious, multi-lingual diverse entity, and the people living in it were similarly diverse and maintained multi-faceted identities. Bosnia—a crucial province on the Habsburg border—provides us with an example of the practical effects that this reality had on career trajectories of individual Ottomans as well as on the formation of Ottoman policies in the province and beyond. This presentation examines how different aspects of identity affected the self-understanding and self-representation of members of the Ottoman-Bosnian elite, and how, during the sixteenth century, the complex identities of early modern Ottomans came to serve the interests of the Ottoman state.


    Speakers

    Dr. Ayelet Zoran-Rosen
    University of Auckland


    Sponsors

    Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

    Department of Near & Middle Eastern Civilizations

    Department of History


    If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.

    Disclaimer: Please note that events posted on this website are considered to be public events – unless otherwise stated – and you are choosing to enter a space where your image and/or voice may be captured as part of event proceedings that may be made public as part of a broadcast, webcast, or publication (online and in print). We make every effort to ensure your personal information is kept and used in compliance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). If you have any questions please get in touch with our office at munkschool@utoronto.ca or 416-946-8900.



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